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Andorra

General
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This small country is situated between France and Spain. Because of its elevation and proximity to the Pyrenees the climate is generally pleasant throughout the year.
Climate
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During the summer months the temperatures can rise to 30c but there is usually a cooling breeze. Lightening storms can occur during the summer months associated with torrential rain.
Sun Exposure and Dehydration
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Those from Northern Europe can develop significant sun exposure and so remember to use a wide brimmed hat when necessary. The altitude can also lead to significant tiredness and dehydration so take sufficient initial rest and drink plenty of fluids.
Safety & Security
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The level of crime throughout the country directed at tourists is very low. Nevertheless take care of your personal belongings at all times and use hotel safety boxes where possible.
Local Customs
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There are strict laws regarding the use of illegal drugs. Make sure you have sufficient supplies of any medication you required for your trip and that it is clearly marked. The European E111 form is not accepted in Andorra and so it is essential that you have sufficient travel insurance for your trip.
Winter Sports
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Andorra is one of the regions where many travel to partake of their winter sport facilities. Generally this is well controlled and one of the safer regions. Nevertheless, make certain your travel insurance is adequate for the activities you are planning to undertake.
Vaccination
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The only standard vaccine to consider for Andorra would be tetanus in line with many other developed countries of the world.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 15:24:06 +0200

Andorra la Vella, Andorra, July 12, 2018 (AFP) - The tax haven of Andorra has long been a favourite destination for smokers looking to stock up on cheap cigarettes, but the enclave said Thursday that it would soon stop advertising the fact.   The government said it had signed up to the World Health Organization's (WHO) anti-tobacco convention, which aims to encourage people to quit smoking and combat contraband sales.   "The goal is to contribute to public health and pursue the fight against trafficking," government spokesman Jordi Cinca said at a press conference.

The tiny principality of Andorra, perched in the Pyrenees on the border between France and Spain, attracts millions of shoppers each year to duty-free stores, where prices of alcohol, cigarettes, electronics and clothes can be up to 20 percent cheaper than elsewhere in the EU.   High taxes on tobacco imposed by many countries to help people kick smoking make Andorra's cigarettes a particularly good deal.   The average pack costs just three euros ($3.50) compared with eight euros in France, which has said it will gradually raise the price to 10 euros a pack by November 2020.

Tobacco sales bring in some 110 million euros a year for Andorra, whose economy is otherwise based almost entirely on tourism.   It is also an enticing destination for smugglers, with French and Spanish border agents regularly seizing cartons from people trying to sneak them out, either by car or by hiking down the mountain trails which criss-cross the Pyrenees.   No date has been set for the advertising ban, which will come into effect three months after the ratification of the WHO accord is voted by parliament.
Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2018 02:41:51 +0100

Andorra la Vella, Andorra, March 16, 2018 (AFP) - The tiny principality of Andorra is witnessing a once in a generation phenomenon -- a widespread strike.   Around a third of civil servants across the mountainous micro-state have walked out to protest proposed reforms to their sector in what has been described as Andorra's first large-scale strike since 1933.

With no negotiation breakthrough in sight, picket lines are expected to be manned again on Friday with customs officers, police, teachers and prison staff among those taking part.   The first major strike in 85 years was sparked by plans from the government of Antoni Marti to reform civil servant contracts.   He has assured officials "will not do an hour more" work under the reforms and that 49 million euros would be allocated for the next 25 years to supplement civil servant salaries.   But government workers are unconvinced with unions warning the reforms could risk their 35 hour working week and pay.

Customs officers involved in the strike interrupted traffic on the Andorran-Spanish border this week, according to unions, while some 80 percent of teachers have walked out of classes.   Strikers have occupied the government's main administrative building and held noisy protests outside parliament calling for Marti's resignation.    "We have started collecting signatures to demand the resignation of the head of government and now nobody will stop us," Gabriel Ubach, spokesman for the public service union, told reporters.
Date: Mon 27 Sep 2017
Source: Contagion Live [edited]

A recent Dispatch article published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Emerging Infectious Diseases journal, offers insight into a large norovirus outbreak that sprung up in Spain in 2016 that had been linked with bottled spring water. The Public Health Agency of Catalonia (ASPCAT) reported a staggering 4136 cases of gastroenteritis from 11-25 Apr 2016. Of the 4136 cases, 6 individuals required hospitalization. The CDC defines a "case-patient" as an "exposed person who had vomiting or diarrhoea (3 or more loose stools within 24 hours)," as well as 2 or more of the following symptoms: nausea, stomach pain, or fever.

ASPCAT investigators traced back the outbreak to contaminated bottled spring water in office water coolers. The water came from a source in Andorra, a small independent principality located between Spain and France. Norovirus is a "very contagious virus," according to the CDC, and it is common for individuals to become infected by eating contaminated food. Although it is possible to be infected by consuming contaminated drinking water, this mode of transmission is "rare in developed countries," according to the article.

The investigators collected water samples from a total of 4 19-L water coolers in 2 different offices located in Barcelona, "from which affected persons had drunk; samples 1 and 2 came from 2 water coolers in one office, while samples 3 and 4 came from 2 water coolers in another office. Using "positively charged glass wool and polyethylene glycol precipitation for virus concentration," the investigators tested the samples.

"We detected high RNA levels for norovirus genotype I and II, around 103 and 104 genome copies/L, in 2 of the 4 water cooler samples concentrated by glass wool filtration and polyethylene glycol precipitation," according to the article. The investigators noted that a drawback of using molecular methods is that they are not able to differentiate between particles that are infectious and those that are not. Therefore, they "predicted the infectivity of norovirus in the concentrated samples by treating the samples with the nucleic acid intercalating dye PMA propidium monoazide and Triton X surfactant before RT-qPCR," which allowed them to "distinguish between virions with intact and altered capsids."

In those 2 water samples, they found high genome copy values -- 49 and 327 genome copies/L for norovirus genotype I and 33 and 660 genomes copies/L for norovirus genotype II. This was not an unexpected finding, due to the large number of infected individuals associated with the outbreak. Through "PMA/Triton treatment before RT-qPCR assays," the investigators found that the proportion of infected virions accounted for 0.3% to 5.6% of the total number of physical particles in the water samples, "which was enough to cause gastrointestinal illness."

The investigators also analyzed faecal samples collected from infected individuals who worked at the office in which the 1st 2 water samples were collected. They detected the following genotypes in those faecal samples: GI.2 and GII.17. In the faecal samples collected from the other office, they isolated the following genotypes: GII.4/Sydney/2012, GI.2, GII.17, and GII.2.

"We hypothesize that the spring water was contaminated by all 4 strains (GI.2, GII.2, GII.4, and GII.17) but levels of viral contamination for each genotype were not homogeneous in all bottled coolers," the investigators wrote. "We may have detected only the GII.4 genotype in water samples 1 and 2 because of a higher concentration of this specific genotype or because of bias caused by the sampling, concentration, and molecular detection procedures."

The investigators admit one limitation to their study: the small number of water samples collected and analyzed. They attribute this to the fact that on 15 Apr 2016, 4 days after the onset of the outbreak, the company that produced the drinking water recalled over 6150 containers of water "of suspected quality" as a precautionary measure. The recall prevented the investigators from collecting more samples to assess, according to the article.

Although the exact cause of the contamination has not yet been identified, the investigators posit that "the high number of affected persons from 381 offices that received water coolers, and the many different genotypes found in some patients' faecal specimens" suggest that the spring aquifer had been contaminated by "sewage pollution," and the Andorra Ministry of Health and Welfare banned further use of the spring.

The investigators suggest that assessing commercially-produced mineral waters for different harmful pathogens, such as norovirus would be beneficial. They note, however, that creating, enhancing, and managing such "virus surveillance systems" would be costly. Thus, the investigators suggest taking a "balanced approach to keep both the cost and the time required for the analyses within feasibility limits."  [Byline: Kristi Rosa]
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[The interesting article published in the September 2017 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases is:
Blanco A, Guix S, Fuster N, et al: Norovirus in bottled water associated with gastroenteritis outbreak, Spain, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017; 23(9): 1531-34; https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/9/16-1489_article. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[Catalonia and Andorra can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1341. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
Date: Thu, 26 Dec 2013 22:25:05 +0100 (MET)

ANDORRA LA VELLA, Andorra, Dec 26, 2013 (AFP) - A Spanish skier and a French snowboarder have died in avalanches in different mountain ranges in Europe, officials said Thursday.

The 27-year-old skier, a woman from Barcelona, died Wednesday while going off-piste alone in the Soldeu resort in Andorra, in the Pyrenees mountains between France and Spain, a resort manager told AFP.   Although she was rescued within 10 minutes, after her glove was spotted on the surface, she was unable to be revived despite a helicopter dash to hospital.

In the Italian Alps, close to the border with France, a 24-year-old Frenchman who was snowboarding with three friends on a closed run died Thursday when an avalanche swept over him in the resort town of Les Arnauds.   Local officials said he succumbed to multiple injuries, asphyxia and hypothermia.

Avalanches are common in Europe's ski resorts at this time of year, when early snows are heavy with moisture, and several deaths occur each winter.   Last Sunday, a 35-year-old Frenchman died in an avalanche in the Alps near the Italian border while on a three-day trek with a friend.
Date: Fri 7 Feb 2003 From: Jaime R. Torres Source: EFE Salud, Thu 6 Feb 2003 (translated by Maria Jacobs) [edited] -------------------------------------------------- Close to 300 students in one school and 173 tourists staying in 7 hotels in the Principality of Andorra have been affected by outbreaks of gastroenteritis that, according to local authorities, are not related to each other. Monica Codina, Minister of Health, stated that the outbreak that has affected almost 300 children and 8 adults in the San Ermengol school was detected last Monday [3 Feb 2003] but that it may have started Wednesday or Thursday of the previous week. The epidemiological surveys of a group of pre-school and grammar school students that may also be affected have not been performed yet. Also pending are the results of the microbiological tests of the food and water served in the school dining room, but the minister has indicated that the probable cause of the outbreak is the fact that water pitchers were filled with hoses directly from the faucet. The Minister stated that this outbreak of gastroenteritis is not related to the one that affected 173 tourists, most of them young people on holiday, who where staying in 7 hotels of the Principality. The government is also investigating the cause of this outbreak and has indicated that an anomaly in the system that supplies water to the hotels was detected, requiring a process of chlorination, which has not been carried out due to the heavy snowfall of the past few days. * * * * * * * * * * [The suspicion that defective water supplies may be responsible for all of these independent outbreaks suggests that the etiologic agent may be an enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, or non-viral, rather than one of the noroviruses associated with sudden-onset viral gastroenteritis. Information on the outcome of diagnostic tests in progress would be welcomed. - ProMed Mod.CP]
More ...

Kenya

General Information:
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Kenya is situated on the east coast of Tropical Africa and is one of the most popular tourist resorts in the continent. The country is bounded by Ethiopia and Somalia in the north, Ugan
a on the west, Tanzania to the south and the Indian ocean to the east. The country has been regarded as one of the more stable in Africa but nevertheless recent events, as they head towards a multiparty democracy, have led to a spiralling devaluation in their currency and general unease and disturbances.
Climate:
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Nairobi is situated at approx. 6000' and has a mild climate throughout the year. Malaria prophylaxis is not usually recommended for those visiting Nairobi city alone. The main rains tend to fall in April and May or October and November. The annual rainfall tends to be about 39 inches but significant variations can occur. Mombasa, on the coast, has a much more tropical climate and travellers will need to take more care with regard to personal hygiene and also serious protection against mosquito bites.
Health Care Facilities:
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In general, travellers to Nairobi find that the level of health care facilities are good. All doctors in Kenya speak English and the level of care they provide is usually excellent for the holiday maker. As in many other countries in central Africa, the screening of blood against various viral agents cannot be assured and so travellers should avoid all but essential of blood transfusions. Sterile needles and syringes are in good supply in the major towns and so a syringe kit is not usually necessary. All of the larger hotels will have their own English speaking medical officer, though travellers are usually asked to pay cash. There are many hotels and restaurants providing excellent menu facilities and food borne disease can usually be traced to eating salads or undercooked bivalve shellfish.
Swimming in Kenya:
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In all the major tourist resorts throughout Kenya there are swimming pools and these are usually the best places to indulge. On the coast the sand is exceptionally fine and it feels as if you are walking on flour. Just be careful of local strong currents and don't swim out to the coral. Watch out for the sea urchins. Their spines are very uncomfortable and may need to be extracted by medical staff. Keep your children in view at all times and warn them to take care. If you are trekking around Kenya or on Safari don't go swimming in any fresh water rivers or lakes. There is a disease called Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia) which will penetrate through your skin and may cause serious problems in the future.
Rabies in Kenya:
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This viral disease occurs throughout Kenya and is a significant risk for travellers who are going away from the major tourist areas. Keep clear of all warm blooded animals and if you are bitten (even licked or scratched) wash out the area immediately, apply an antiseptic and get medical attention. Even though the risk of Rabies for the traveller is very small don't ever disregard a contact of this type. The beach hotels near Mombasa are favourite haunts for monkeys. Don’t feed them and stay clear. Report any bite (lick or scratch) immediately. Watch your children at all times.
Trekking through Kenya:
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Some travellers to Kenya will have no particular itinerary planned and so start their holiday from either Nairobi of Mombasa. Those planning to go off the beaten track should register with the Irish Counsel. Great care should always be exercised as each year too many tourists have significant problems while trekking off the usual routes. The major risks revolve around food and water borne disease, the risk of rabies, altitude sickness on Mount Kenya, being robbed or simply getting lost!

Tips for Trekkers
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Always plan your trip well in advance
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Make sure that you know about personal health and general food & water hygiene.
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Check in frequently
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Never travel alone
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Make sure you have plenty of clean water
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Stick to your itinerary
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If you are in trouble, admit it!
The Risk of Malaria:
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In Kenya, malaria poses a very real risk outside Nairobi. One of the highest risk areas is Mombasa which is where many travellers will find themselves at some time. Malaria is transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito and so the first line of defence is to protect yourself against mosquito bites. (see leaflet on Protection against Insect Bites - Tropical Medical Bureau). Also it is essential to take your prescribed malaria tablets on a regular basis. Only stop your tablets under exceptional circumstances. Nevertheless, the traveller must remember that there is no perfect protection against malaria and the disease can still occur even after all the precautions have been taken. So be aware that any peculiar symptoms (especially 'flu) for at least a year after your trip will need to be checked out.
After your Journey:
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Just remember that some tropical diseases may not become evident for weeks or even months after your trip. If you are ill within a year of your journey always seek medical help.
Further Information:
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General travel health information may be obtained from the Tropical Medical Bureau at any of our centres. Please remember, every traveller will require a specialised consultation and this leaflet only contains general guideline information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 15 May 2019
Source: The Conversation [abridged, edited]

There's been an anthrax outbreak in Kenya's Nakuru county. But it's not the 1st time. Nakuru seems to be a hotspot for these outbreaks. The Conversation Africa's Moina Spooner asked Bernard Bett and John Gachohi to shed light on the reasons for this.

Why does Nakuru county have recurring outbreaks?
Last month [April 2019] an anthrax outbreak killed more than 10 buffaloes in Lake Nakuru National Park, which is in Kenya's Rift Valley. This area is no stranger to outbreaks. In our research, we identify 3 outbreaks that occurred in 2014, 2015 and 2017 in the park and surrounding areas. In 2015, 766 wild animals -- 745 of them buffaloes -- died from the disease. Preliminary results from the same project show a high-risk belt that experiences repeated outbreaks, especially in the dry season. This stretches from Narok in southwestern Kenya, through Nakuru, to Muranga and Meru in central Kenya. Outbreaks often affect the same areas because, once released, the bacteria continue to live as spores in the soil. Environmental factors that support these spores include high humidity, pH and calcium levels. Endemic areas are also often located in low-lying areas or in dry river beds. It's believed that these areas concentrate spores, carried by water, during wet seasons. Lake Nakuru National Park and its surrounding areas fit the anthrax profile.

How are these outbreaks dealt with?
When there's an outbreak, the Kenya Wildlife Services usually works with the Department of Veterinary Services to vaccinate certain endangered animals -- like rhinos -- dispose of carcasses and disinfect the areas to limit the disease spread. But the immunity that vaccinations provide to wildlife doesn't last very long; maintaining it would require regular booster vaccines. Another issue with the vaccine for wildlife is that its effectiveness across different species isn't known because it was developed mainly for use in livestock. The Department of Veterinary Services has recommended that livestock in the area be routinely vaccinated and the community given information about how the disease is transmitted.

What else can be done to prevent these outbreaks?
Anthrax outbreaks could be minimised if susceptible areas were properly managed. For instance, there are concerns that the population of herbivores in Lake Nakuru National Park -- especially buffaloes -- is so high that it's causing overgrazing, especially during the dry season. Overgrazing increases the risk of exposure to anthrax spores in the soil. Communities should also be made aware of how to dispose of livestock carcasses. For example, carcasses should always be disinfected using the right disinfectants and either burnt to ash or buried in pits that are at least 6 feet deep. The increasing human and livestock population in the countryside has also exerted a lot of pressure on grasslands. This has led to certain ecosystems being overstretched and unable to contain disease outbreaks and other natural disasters. In Lake Nakuru National Park, endangered wildlife species, like rhinos and Rothschild giraffes, should be targeted in vaccination campaigns. At the same time, much more needs to be done to determine the efficacy and levels of coverage of anthrax vaccines in wildlife.
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[Valuable insights by informed folk on the ground. This predicts well for the future of possible control of anthrax in Kenya. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Nakuru County, Kenya: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/47100>]
Date: Sat 4 May 2019
Source: Daily Nation [edited]

Public health officials in Embu county are on high alert following the outbreak of a disease suspected to be cholera which has left 3 people hospitalized. The victims, 2 men and a 7-year-old girl, are undergoing treatment at Embu County Referral Hospital where they were rushed immediately they fell sick.

County Public Health Officer Rosaline Kaugi confirmed that the 3 have been admitted to the isolation ward. She added that the men are from Nairobi while the girl is from Embu Blue Valley Estate. The victims were taken to the hospital after they started vomiting and complaining of stomach pains.  [Byline: George Munene]
Date: Wed 8 May 2019
Source: Kenya Daily Nation [edited]

One person has died while at least 188 have been treated for cholera in Kotulo, Mandera South, in the past month, the county's public health chief officer has said. The chief officer, Ms Rahama Abdullahi, said the person died due to delayed treatment.  "Since 6 Apr 2019, we have had one death that occurred upon late arrival at the treatment centre. We currently have 9 patients at the facility, but they are all stable," Ms Abdullahi said, adding the situation was under control as various actions had been taken. "We set up a cholera treatment centre with 50 beds. The situation has improved tremendously," she said, adding water sources were treated, homes disinfected, and public sanitation services offered. "We have treated the 2 major water sources for the 10 villages at Kotulo and all our officers in other sub-counties are alert." Ms Abdullahi further said the public were being educated on the disease and that fast food kiosks in the area that borders Wajir county had been closed. "We have also taken steps to avert a possible crisis at 3 schools in the area," she said.

To prevent the spread of the disease to other areas, all vehicles passing through Kotulo to Elwak or Wajir were also disinfected. "We are not taking chances. We have positioned our teams and sent supplies across the county to avert a crisis," the officer said.  According to the chief officer, the index case was of a woman who had travelled from Nairobi, where an outbreak had been declared. "The situation in Mandera is under control at the moment," she said. "We are managing the situation with some assistance from Kenya Red Cross at the treatment centre." Mandera last experienced a cholera outbreak in 2016, when 1629 cases and 18 deaths were recorded.  [Byline: Manase Otsialo]
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[Maps of Kenya:
Date: Tue 16 Apr 2019
Source: The Nation [edited]
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A male worker died on Tuesday morning, 16 Apr 2019 after what his colleagues said was "a short illness."

Sources at the hospital told the Nation that at least 23 cases of the water-borne disease, 8 involving staff, had been treated at the facility in April 2019 alone. The hospital's cafeteria has been closed indefinitely as the management battles to contain the spread of the outbreak. A source privy to the information and who requested anonymity because he is not authorized to issue press statements said they have been treating cholera cases on a daily basis.

"The hospital has been handling cholera cases day in day out but now there is an outbreak and the staff are affected. We are treating it seriously. The investigation is on," said the source. But in a statement, the hospital's management on [Tue 16 Apr 2019] denied any internal outbreak, meaning the cases could have come for outside. "There is an upsurge of cholera cases in Nairobi. We have had several cases admitted in our hospital. Unfortunately, we had 8 of our staff affected," said the statement. It continued: "There is no outbreak of cholera in the hospital. No patient is at risk and we are continuously monitoring."
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Kenya:

Aggressive interventions to stem outbreaks of cholera include providing sources of clean water and a vaccination campaign. The following is extracted from Lutwick LI, Preis J, Choi P: Cholera. In: Chronic illness and disability: the pediatric gastrointestinal tract. Greydanus DE, Atay O, Merrick J (eds). NY: Nova Bioscience, 2017, pp 113-136:

"For a variety of logistic, financial, and historical reasons, vaccines have not been available for cholera control programs outside of Viet Nam. Given as 2 or 3 dose courses, efficacy can be as high as 60-80 percent for at least 2-3 years but much shorter protection lengths in children younger than 5 years of age. Cost-effectiveness, especially once an outbreak has occurred, had remained unproven until reports from Guinea (57) and Haiti (58) demonstrated utility.

"The current vaccines prequalified for use by WHO (59) are:
- Dukoral (produced in Sweden) that contains several biotypes of O1 with recombinant cholera toxin B subunit, which also offers some protection against enterotoxigenic _E. coli_;
- Shanchol (produced in India) that contains biotypes of both O1 and O139 without the recombinant B unit. In a large study in Kolkata, India, a cluster-randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study of this product (60), the cumulative efficacy of the vaccine at 5 years was 65% (95% CI 52-74, p less than 0.0001). A locally-produced vaccine similar to this vaccine (mORCVAX) is produced in Viet Nam;
- Euvichol (produced in South Korea) that, like Shanchol, contains both O1 and O139 without recombinant B subunit. This vaccine has been reported to be non-inferior to Shanchol in a Philippine study (61).

In June 2016, the US FDA for the 1st time approved a cholera vaccine for use locally in travelers to cholera-endemic areas. This vaccine, Vaxchora, is an oral live, attenuated biologic (62) that is a reformulation of a previous product. This product, a single dose immunization also referred to as CVD 102-HgR, must be stored in the frozen state and as a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine is not given until at least 14 days after antibacterials were used and should be given at least 10 days before oral chloroquine antimalarial prophylaxis. Single dose use is an advantage over the older inactivated products which are given in 2 doses. Studies, however, have suggested that one dose of these inactivated oral vaccines can be effective when the vaccines are in short supply in both endemic and outbreak situations (63, 64).

References
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57. Luquero FJ, Grout L, Ciglenecki I, et al. Use of _Vibrio cholerae_ vaccine in an outbreak in Guinea. N Engl J Med. 2014; 370(22): 2111-20; available at
58. Severe K, Rouzier V, Anglade SB, et al. Effectiveness of oral cholera vaccine in Haiti: 37-month follow-up. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016; 94(5): 1136-42; available at
59. Bhattacharya SK, Sur D, Ali M, et al. 5 year efficacy of a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in Kolkata, India: a cluster-randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Infect Dis. 2013; 13(12): 1050-6; abstract available at
60. WHO. WHO prequalified vaccines.
61. Balk YO, Choi SK, Olveda RM, et al. A randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing two bivalent killed, whole cell, oral cholera vaccines (Euvichol vs Shanchol) in the Philippines. Vaccine 2015; 33(46): 6350-65; abstract available at
62. Freedman DO. Re-born in the USA: another cholera vaccine for travellers. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2016; 14(4): 295-6; available at
63. Qadri F, Wierzba TF, Ali M, et al. Efficacy of a single dose, inactivated oral cholera vaccine in Bangladesh. N Engl J Med. 2016; 374(18): 1723-32; available at:
64. Azman AS, Parker LA, Rumunu J, et al. Effectiveness of one dose of oral cholera vaccine in response to an outbreak: a case-cohort study. Lancet Global Health 2016; 4(11): e856-e863; available at
Date: Sat 13 Apr 2019
Source: Standard Media [edited]

The State may have ignored recommendations on anthrax outbreaks at Lake Nakuru National Park, exposing animals and humans to grave danger. The disease has killed 14 buffaloes with unconfirmed reports indicating one human infection in Elburgon, Nakuru County.

In August [2018], the Kenya Zoonotic Disease Unit of the ministries of agriculture and health had declared the park an anthrax hotspot and directed routine vaccination of all animals at all times. In a study to establish the cause of repeated anthrax outbreaks in the area, since 1973, the unit had blamed kneejerk reactions by government agencies for unnecessary loss of human and animal lives. "Typically, the government responds to these anthrax outbreaks by immediately deep-burying dead livestock and wildlife, ring vaccinating livestock, and treating affected humans," said the report. Anthrax vaccination programmes in the area, the report [says], have been irregular and mostly planned as a response to outbreaks; "there is no routine vaccination practised."

True to the report, on Tuesday [9 Apr 2019], Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) head of corporate communications Paul Gathitu said they had burned carcasses of the dead buffaloes, disinfected the sites and started vaccinating rhinos. "We will vaccinate 15 white rhinos and 67 black rhinos in a window of 10 days. So far, we have vaccinated 19 rhinos and 63 remaining while vegetation will be disinfected," said Susan Koech, the Principal Secretary for Wildlife, on Monday [8 Apr 2019]. The outbreak of anthrax was 1st identified on 29 Mar [2019] at the park, which has more than 4000 buffaloes.

On Sunday [7 Apr 2019], Nakuru County Minister for Agriculture Dr. Immaculate Njuthe said one case of suspected human anthrax had been reported in Elburgon. "If not managed well, the outbreak can spiral out of control and find its way into neighbouring communities," said Principal Secretary Koech.

The August [2018] study by local and international experts suggested inept handling of anthrax outbreaks in the past has not helped reduce recurrences. The experts had recommended the government develop an anthrax risk map for the country and maintain regular surveillance and vaccination of animals in and around the park. They had also recommended public education and awareness on the risk of anthrax outbreaks. The study traced 10 outbreaks around Lake Nakuru since 1973 including that of 2015, which killed 766 wild animals, including 745 buffaloes.  [Byline: Gatonye Gathura]
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Date: Tue 16 Apr 2019
Source: Standard Mail [edited]

The Nakuru County government has intensified inspection of meat products following reports of an anthrax outbreak in the county. Public health officials have been dispatched to all sub-counties to inspect meat supplied to butcheries and hotels to ensure it is safe for consumption. The officers are working together with those from the veterinary department to inspect at least 1000 licensed butcheries in the county. "Locals should not fear buying meat in any licensed butchery because we have intensified inspection and the supply channel for safety," Samuel King'ori, chief officer in charge of the Public Health department, said.

Two weeks ago, at least 14 people suspected to have contracted anthrax were treated at Elburgon Hospital. Samples were taken to Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri) in Nairobi for testing, but the results are yet to be released.

"Nobody should consume meat that has not been inspected because evil-minded people can sell infected livestock meat that can lead to deaths," said King'ori. In 2016, at least 70 people at Lengenet village contracted anthrax after they consumed the carcass of a cow.

Besides inspecting meat, the health workers are also inspecting food joints, shops and supermarkets to ensure food safety.

Dr. Enos Amuyunzu, County Chief Officer for Livestock, said at least 15 000 cattle have been vaccinated in Nakuru Town East Sub-County. Other areas where vaccination is ongoing include parts of Njoro and Elburgon in Molo Sub-County. Amuyunzu has asked farmers to monitor livestock and report any signs of anthrax, including high temperature, shivering or twitching, harsh dry coat, blood in dung or in nostrils, decrease or complete loss of milk, and also dejection and loss of appetite.  [Byline: Mercy Kahenda]
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[The 2018 expert advice was sound and experienced. It is hoped the present troubles will initiate the establishment of the necessary, and overdue, national programme of anthrax control and surveillance. Note that there has been another probable human case reported. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Nakuru County, Kenya: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/47100>]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 16:52:39 +0200
By Nazeer al-Khatib with Hashem Osseiran in Beirut

Maaret al-Numan, Syria, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - Syrian government air strikes killed 18 civilians, including a dozen people at a busy market, as fierce fighting raged for the jihadist-held northwest, a war monitor said on Wednesday.   Regime forces battled to repel a jihadist counteroffensive around the town of Kafr Nabuda that has left 70 combatants dead in 24 hours, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.   The Hayat Tahrir al-Sham alliance, led by Syria's former Al-Qaeda affiliate, controls a large part of Idlib province as well as adjacent slivers of Aleppo, Hama and Latakia provinces.   The jihadist-dominated region is nominally protected by a buffer zone deal, but the government and its ally Russia have escalated their bombardment in recent weeks, seizing several towns on its southern flank.   At least 12 people were killed and another 18 wounded when regime warplanes hit the jihadist-held Idlib province town of Maarat al-Numan around midnight (2100 GMT) on Tuesday, the Observatory said.

The market was crowded with people out and about after breaking the daytime fast observed by Muslims during the holy month of Ramadan.   The bombardment blew in the facades of surrounding buildings, and ripped through the flimsy frames and canvas of stalls in the market square, an AFP photographer reported.    The bodies of market-goers were torn apart.   "Residents are still scared," stallholder Khaled Ahmad told AFP.   Three more civilians were killed on Wednesday by air strikes in the nearby town of Saraqib, the Observatory said.    Two others were killed in strikes on the town of Maaret Hermeh, it added.    Another civilian was killed in air raids on the town of Jisr al-Shughur, the monitor said.   The Britain-based Observatory relies on a network of sources inside Syria and says it determines whose planes carried out strikes according to type, location, flight patterns and munitions.

- 'Worst fears'-
The strikes came as heavy clashes raged in neighbouring Hama province after the jihadists launched a counterattack on Tuesday.   Fresh fighting on Wednesday took the death toll to 70 -- 36 regime forces and militia and 34 jihadists, the Observatory said.   It said the jihadists had recaptured most of Kafr Nabuda from government forces, who had taken control of the town on May 8.   State news agency SANA on Wednesday however said the army repelled a jihadist attack in the area, killing dozens of insurgents.

Russia and rebel ally Turkey inked the buffer zone deal in September to avert a government offensive on the region and protect its three million residents.   But President Bashar al-Assad's government upped its bombardment of the region after HTS took control in January.   Russia too has stepped up its air strikes in recent weeks.   The Observatory says nearly 200 civilians have been killed in the flare-up since April 30.   The United Nations said Wednesday that Idlib's civilian population once again faced the threat of an all-out offensive.   "A full military incursion threatens to trigger a humanitarian catastrophe for over 3 million civilians caught in the crossfire, as well as overwhelm our ability to respond," said David Swanson, a spokesman for the UN humanitarian office.   Swanson said more than 200,000 people have been displaced by the upsurge of violence since April 28.   A total of 20 health facilities have been hit by the escalation -- 19 of which remain out of service, Swanson said.   Collectively they served at least 200,000 people, he added.

- 'Break the status quo' -
The September deal was never fully implemented as jihadists refused to withdraw from a planned buffer zone around the Idlib region.   But it ushered in a relative drop in violence until earlier this year, with Turkish troops deploying to observation points around the region.   The Syrian government has accused Turkey of failing to secure implementation of the truce deal by the jihadists.   But Turkish Defence Minister Hulusi Akar accused the Syrian regime late Tuesday of threatening the ceasefire deal.   "The regime is doing all that it can to break the status quo including using barrel bombs, land and air offensives," Akar told reporters.   "Turkish armed forces will not take a step back from wherever they may be", he however added.   Earlier, the US State Department said it was assessing indications that the government had used chemical weapons on Sunday during its offensive in Idlib.   HTS accused government forces of launching a chlorine gas attack on its fighters in the northern mountains of Latakia.   But the Observatory said Wednesday it had "no proof at all of the attack".
Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 02:06:35 +0200
By Amelie BARON

Port-au-Prince, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - With no oxygen in intensive care or gloves in the emergency room, residents at Haiti's largest hospital have gone on strike to protest the filthy environment and demand six months of back pay.   "We have almost nothing when we talk about emergency services," said Emmanuel Desrosiers, 24, one of the doctors-in-training at the State University of Haiti Hospital (HUEH) that began the work stoppage Monday.    "When a patient arrives, when we should immediately take charge, we start by listing the things they or their family need to go buy."   The HUEH, known as the "general hospital," is where the most disadvantaged families in this impoverished Caribbean country crowd. Buying the medical supplies themselves is a financial headache, but private clinics are far too expensive.   In crumbling buildings in the center of Port-au-Prince, male and female patients are crowded together in tiny rooms, while trash cans overflow.   "We feel ridiculous when we give hygienic advice to patients," one resident said of the situation.

The residents' selflessness as they work in an unsanitary environment is compounded by the fact that they have not been paid since the start of their residency, nearly six months ago.   After five years of medical studies, the state is required to pay them 9,000 Haitian gourdes (HTG) per month -- only about $100, due to the devaluation of the national currency.   Nothing is being done about the hospital's disrepair, with those in charge waiting for a new building to be completed, according to resident Yveline Michel.   The new HUEH will have two floors and more than 530 beds once it's finished -- but it's unclear when that will be.   The project began after the January 2010 earthquake, which destroyed more than half the hospital. The United States, France and Haiti invested $83 million in a new hospital, which should have been completed by 2016.   Instead, there is little visible activity on the construction site, which can be seen through the windows of the current building.

Due to the heat, the windows are always open, letting in noise and dust from the street. There are only a few fans in the hospital rooms, which do little to combat the humidity or the flies.   "At any moment we could lose patients, but the state isn't doing anything to save their lives," said Michel, 25.   "We're striking for the population, since it should make these demands."   But some locals question the residents' position because the strike prevents the already struggling hospital from functioning.   Since the strike began, the poorest families in the area no longer know where to go for medical emergencies, as the residents are in charge of admitting patients.   "Due to the lack of resources and the unsanitary environment, there are always people dying in the hospital, so it's not the strike causing that," said Michel in response.
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: Le Dauphin [in French, trans., edited]

Lovers of sushi, maki, sashimi, and other raw fish, beware of your stomach! 7 cases of fish tapeworm, better known as tapeworm [ProMED presumes it is Diphyllobothrium latum], have been reported in 2 years by the Rennes hospital in Ille-et-Vilaine [Brittany].

An exceptional number of cases was counted between July 2016 and September 2018, especially since no case had been detected for at least 20 years.

The infection is acquired by "eating raw or marinated fish which contains larvae of this parasite. The larvae will undergo several moults and develop in our digestive tract," explained Professor Florence Robert-Gangneux to our colleagues in France Bleu Armorique.

The parasite can measure up to 20 meters [66 ft] long and live 10 years in the body. The fish tapeworm can cause digestive disorders, deficiencies, although some patients do not notice.

The only solution to eliminate these parasites of the fish is freezing. This is what a 2004 European regulation imposes on restaurant owners serving raw fish. Freezing should be from -20 deg C [-4 deg F] during 24 hours or -35 deg C [-31 deg F] during 15 hours. And to get rid of the worm once ingested, it is necessary to undergo an unpleasant antiparasitic treatment, often on several occasions.
=====================
[We presume it is the fish tapeworm _Diphyllobothrium latum_, which is a tapeworm found in freshwater fish (<https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/diphyllobothrium/index.html>). In saltwater fish the most common parasite is _Anisakis_, but this is not a tapeworm. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of France:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019
Source: El Pais [in Spanish, trans. Mod.TY, edited]

Tarija Departmental Health Services (SEDES) reported a new case of hantavirus [infection] in Padcaya municipality. The number of patients with this illness is within what is expected, because this season is when more people acquire the disease. Epidemiological surveillance is continuing in Arce province. The person who acquired this illness is male and is under medical care until his recuperation.

The head of the Epidemiological Unit of SEDES, Claudia Montenegro, stated that the patient is hospitalized in the San Juan de Dios Regional Hospital in Tarija awaiting his recuperation. The physician said that in Bermejo and Padcaya municipalities, the harvest of citrus fruit and sugar cane for production of sugar has begun, so there is a trend for the cases of this illness to increase. This is due to the large number of families that move to the countryside where the rodent (long tail) is present that transmits this disease [virus].

"In contrast to previous seasons, this year [2019], there were positives for this disease in Gran Chaco province, including fatalities," Montenegro commented. "Epidemiological surveillance there is being implemented, as well as in areas such as Padcaya and Bermejo."

The official explained that in these localities, the rodent that transmits the disease [virus] to families is present, and with agricultural activities, [people] move into places where this animal lives, and so new cases of patients with hantavirus [infections] are registered every year.

In order to prevent this illness, it is recommended that rodent control campaigns be done to reduce their populations, openings in houses be sealed, and that residents reduce the possibility for rodents to make nests within a radius of 30 meters [100 ft] around the house, and eliminate items that could attract these animals near the house (food, grain, garbage). Workers should employ protective measures during agricultural tasks and cleaning work.

Initial symptoms include fatigue, fever and muscle pain, especially in the thighs, hips and back. Also, patients may present with headache, dizziness, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. [These symptoms may progress rapidly to respiratory difficulty requiring mechanical ventilation (hantavirus cardio pulmonary syndrome). Death can occur. - ProMED Mod.TY]
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[The hantavirus involved in the above cases is not mentioned. Cases of hantavirus infections in Tarija department are not new. Tarija department is endemic for hantaviruses, and cases occur there sporadically. Last year (2018), there were 11 cases. The previouslyreported 2015 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) that occurred in Tarija department were confirmed. As noted in the previous comments, earlier cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported from tropical, lowland areas of Bolivia, including 7 cases in Tarija during 2014. The specific hantaviruses involved in these or previous cases in Bolivia were not given.

In the lowland Amazon Basin of Bolivia, the rodent hosts of the hantavirus that might be involved in these hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases, with their images, include the following: - Laguna Negra virus (_Calomys laucha_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/images/Calomys%20laucha%20enciso%2031aug2011.jpg> and _C. callosus_ <https://eee.uci.edu/clients/bjbecker/PlaguesandPeople/Calomyscallosusb.jpg>); - Bermejo (Chaco rice rat _Oligoryzomys chacoensis_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/oligorizomyschacoensis.html>); and - Oran (_O. longicaudatus_ <http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/imgs/512x768/0000_0000/0711/1203.jpeg>).

Since previous cases in Tarija department have occurred in Bermejo, perhaps Bermejo hantavirus was involved.

Dr. Jan Clement commented that there is a need to be able to differentiate Seoul (SEOV) as a causative agent, but that is hampered by the fact that most current commercial ELISA or WB formats do not contain (anymore) a SEOV antigen, so that a preliminary presumption of a hantavirus infection can even be missed in non-research laboratories (ibidem, and: Reynes J-M, Carli D, Bour J-B, Boudjeltia S, Dewilde A, Gerbier G, et al. Seoul virus infection in humans, France, 2014-2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23:973-7;  <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/6/16-0927_article>.

SEOV is widely distributed around the world in the brown rat and is likely found in Tarija department. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Tarija, Tarija, Bolivia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/12643>]
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: ZBC (Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation) [edited]

The Zambezi Parks & Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) says it has managed to contain the anthrax outbreak in the Zambezi Valley which claimed 6 elephants, 3 buffalo, a lion and an impala. Zimparks, which has been working together with other stakeholders following the outbreak of anthrax in Zambezi Valley, confirmed that the infectious disease has now been brought under control.

Zimparks Public Relations Manager, Mr. Tinashe Farawo said the authority is pleased to have contained the disease, adding that measures are being put in place to strengthen surveillance mechanisms. "We can confirm that we have managed to contain the anthrax diseases in the Zambezi Valley thanks to efforts by our officers and support from private stakeholders," said Mr. Tinashe Farawo.

The disease killed a number of hippos in Binga last year [2018]. Anthrax is usually transmitted by feed and water contaminated with spores, which can lie dormant in the soil for many years. The primary sign of anthrax in grazing animals is sudden death, often with bloody discharges.
=======================
[So far so good, but I must point out that nature is illiterate and does not read the announcements of senior bureaucrats. She does what she does. Hopefully Mr. Farawo is correct but we should wait a couple of weeks at full alert.

Maps of Zimbabwe can be seen at

For a description of Hwange national park, go to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park>.

Hwange is in the western part of the country bordering Botswana and Zambia
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange>). - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Matabeleland North Province, Zimbabwe:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019, 2:49 PM
Source: KDKA [edited]

Pennsylvania's Secretary of Health, Dr. Rachel Levine has announced that the state has declared a hepatitis A outbreak with 171 cases in 36 counties. According to the map provided by the Department of Health, Allegheny and Philadelphia counties are hit the hardest with anywhere between 31-50 cases.

The counties hit hardest by this outbreak are Philadelphia and Allegheny, but we have seen an increase of cases throughout much of the state," Dr. Levine said. "We are taking this action now to be proactive in our response to treating Pennsylvanians suffering from this illnesses and prevent it from spreading. The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination."
=======================
[Pennsylvania is the latest (now almost half of the states in the USA) to declare a hepatitis A outbreak. As the numbers of cases continue to rise in a number of states, and news of smaller (so far) outbreaks occur in others, the question at the end of ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20190104.6241686 by a Kentucky official, "This is a disease of developing countries.

One has to ask: Why are we seeing it in the USA?" is more and more relevant. We are seeing these outbreaks because of the inability to deal with marginalized populations among their midst. The dramatic cutbacks in public health infrastructure in some of these states clearly feed the fire of these outbreaks. They must be addressed by bolstering public health resources and education and directly addressing the needs of these marginalized populations. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Pennsylvania, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/240>]
Date: Thu 16 May 2019
Source: AllAfrica, The Guardian report edited

A serving medical doctor has been infected with Lassa fever while 2 persons were confirmed dead in Kebbi state. Another medical doctor disclosed this yesterday [15 May 2019] when The Guardian visited the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Birnin Kebbi. He said that 2 children died last week [week of 6 May 2019] as a result of the Lassa fever while a medical doctor, who was doing his primary assignment treating the patients, was also infected.

"You see, the management of the FMC has opened a special unit called isolated unit for the Lassa fever patients. We still have some patients inside. Also, a medical doctor, who was managing some patients last month [April 2019], has also been infected and he is presently on admission," he said.

Meanwhile, the state's Commissioner for Health, Alhaji Umar Kambaza, who confirmed the incident, said they were aware of the cases in the state but the government is working towards them.  [Byline: Michael Egbejule, Ahmadu Baba Idris]
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[The dates of occurrence of these cases is not given. Presumably, they were hospitalized after 12 May 2019 when the Nigeria CDC update was issued. It is indeed unfortunate that an attending physician became infected in the hospital. Nosocomial infections are not unusual when personal protective equipment and barrier nursing measures are not employed. - ProMED Mod.TY]
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Vax Before Travel [abridged, edited]

The eastern African country of Ethiopia has been reporting measles outbreaks for many years, however, in 2019, new information indicates children are the ones most vulnerable for this infectious disease.

According to reporting by the European Commission, approximately 54% of the 4000 measles cases in Ethiopia reported during 2019 affected children under 5 years of age.

Moreover, over 60% of the children had never received their 1st measles vaccine dose.

This new data estimates that by the end of 2019, about 3.5 million children will be susceptible to the measles virus, mainly because of the failure to achieve the 'herd-immunity' necessary to interrupt transmission.

Moreover, these Ethiopian children are not the only under-vaccinated population.

An estimated 169 million children missed out on the 1st dose of the measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017, or 21.1 million children a year on average, said UNICEF on 25 Apr 2019.

And, the measles virus is one of the leading causes of death among children, particularly in developing countries. An estimated 100,000 measles deaths occurred globally in 2017.

Ethiopia announced it would aggressively confront this under-vaccination issue by integrating the measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization program in the 2nd year of life.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health said about 3 348 363 children will receive measles vaccine 2nd doses.

Dr Chatora Rufaro, World Health Organization (WHO) Ethiopia representative said in a press release, "The introduction of the 2nd dose of measles vaccination in Ethiopia will significantly contribute to a reduction of measles morbidity and mortality as well as the overall child mortality by preventing measles outbreaks."

To notify visitors about Ethiopia's ongoing measles risks, the CDC issued an initial Level 1 Travel Alert in 2015. Since then, the CDC advises all visitors to Ethiopia to ensure they are immunized against the measles virus.  [Byline: Don Ward Hackett]
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019 08:47 IST
Source: The Hindu [abridged, edited]

The current global resurgence in measles is having its resonance in Kerala too, which has been witnessing a serious surge in the disease since January [2019].

Across the globe, huge local outbreaks have been caused by travel as well as the increase in unvaccinated populations.

In Kerala, however, the majority of the cases are reported from Thiruvananthapuram, which has good vaccination coverage and amongst people who are well-nourished and have received at least one dose of vaccine in their lifetime.

Kerala reports around 600 plus cases of measles every year. This year [2019], as many cases have been reported in the first 4 months itself, with over 50% cases in the 19-40 year age group. There are also cases in the less than 9 months age group, but fewer cases than before in the 1-5 years group.

Immunisation
------------
"When universal routine immunisation in childhood improves and the virus is still in circulation, the disease will naturally move to the older age group who may be unimmunised or whose vaccine-derived immunity has begun to wane. At a time when the state is moving towards measles elimination, adult measles is a major concern," a senior health official said.

Historically, measles has been a childhood disease. The epidemiological shift to older population presents new public health challenges because of the increased severity of the disease, especially in vulnerable populations like pregnant women and immunocompromised patients (HIV, organ transplant recipients on immunosuppressants, cancer patients), who cannot be vaccinated with the live attenuated measles vaccine.

"Earlier, nearly 90% of measles cases could be managed on out-patient basis. This year [2019], most cases are in the 19-35 age group and over 60% of the cases had to be admitted as in-patients, with a good percentage requiring ICU management," said R Aravind, head of infectious diseases at Thiruvananthapuram Medical College.

The changing epidemiology of measles has not just brought forth the several unknowns but also raised important questions on whether adult immunisation should be a policy, on vaccine potency and the adequacy of vaccine immune response.

Though measles vaccine is highly immunogenic, as part of the national measles elimination strategy, a mandatory 2nd dose at 15-18 months was introduced in 2010, so that there is better immune protection. It is fairly certain that those currently in the 18-40 years age group have not had the protection of the 2nd dose and may be one reason for the increase in cases in this age group.

The 1st vaccination age for measles has been fixed at 9 months because till then, the maternal antibodies transferred in utero are supposed to afford protection to the child. If vaccinated earlier, the maternal antibodies might interfere with the immune response to vaccine.

Susceptible
-----------
However, at Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, the director, M Radhakrishna Pillai and team, who are currently studying the efficacy of measles vaccination in South India, have reported that children under the recommended vaccination age of 9 months are highly susceptible to measles.

SAT Hospital too has recently reported the death of an infant younger than 9 months due to measles.

"If the young mothers of the day do not have sufficient antibody protection, how do we protect infants younger than 9 months against measles? Given measles' age shift to older age group, should we move the vaccination age to 12 months for better vaccine response?

"Is a 3rd dose of MMR (mumps-measles-rubella) necessary? And should we recommend that all adults be given a dose of MMR as the virus is still in circulation? These questions need to be looked at from a research perspective by the State/National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation," a public health expert said.  [Byline: C Maya]
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Kerala State, India:
Date: Fri 17 May 2019
Source: The Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, press release [abridged, edited]

The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) said today (17 May 20-19) that no additional case of measles infection had been recorded as at 4pm today and announced that the outbreak of measles infection at Hong Kong International Airport earlier has concluded.

A spokesman for the CHP said, "A total of 73 cases of measles infection were recorded so far this year [2019], among them 29 cases were associated with the outbreak among airport workers.

Regarding measles control measures implemented at the airport, a total of 23 persons had received measles vaccination at the airport vaccination station as at 6pm today [17 May 2019], bringing the cumulative number of vaccinations given to 8501 since 22 Mar 2019. The airport vaccination station will cease operation from [18 May 2019].

As for the blood test service, the DH earlier provided the measles serology test service to airport staff. A cumulative total of 777 blood samples have been collected. For the pilot service to provide measles serology testing for Filipino foreign domestic helpers working in Hong Kong, a total of 146 blood samples have been collected to date. Participants are notified individually of the serology results.
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Hong Kong: