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Andorra

General
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This small country is situated between France and Spain. Because of its elevation and proximity to the Pyrenees the climate is generally pleasant throughout the year.
Climate
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During the summer months the temperatures can rise to 30c but there is usually a cooling breeze. Lightening storms can occur during the summer months associated with torrential rain.
Sun Exposure and Dehydration
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Those from Northern Europe can develop significant sun exposure and so remember to use a wide brimmed hat when necessary. The altitude can also lead to significant tiredness and dehydration so take sufficient initial rest and drink plenty of fluids.
Safety & Security
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The level of crime throughout the country directed at tourists is very low. Nevertheless take care of your personal belongings at all times and use hotel safety boxes where possible.
Local Customs
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There are strict laws regarding the use of illegal drugs. Make sure you have sufficient supplies of any medication you required for your trip and that it is clearly marked. The European E111 form is not accepted in Andorra and so it is essential that you have sufficient travel insurance for your trip.
Winter Sports
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Andorra is one of the regions where many travel to partake of their winter sport facilities. Generally this is well controlled and one of the safer regions. Nevertheless, make certain your travel insurance is adequate for the activities you are planning to undertake.
Vaccination
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The only standard vaccine to consider for Andorra would be tetanus in line with many other developed countries of the world.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 15:24:06 +0200

Andorra la Vella, Andorra, July 12, 2018 (AFP) - The tax haven of Andorra has long been a favourite destination for smokers looking to stock up on cheap cigarettes, but the enclave said Thursday that it would soon stop advertising the fact.   The government said it had signed up to the World Health Organization's (WHO) anti-tobacco convention, which aims to encourage people to quit smoking and combat contraband sales.   "The goal is to contribute to public health and pursue the fight against trafficking," government spokesman Jordi Cinca said at a press conference.

The tiny principality of Andorra, perched in the Pyrenees on the border between France and Spain, attracts millions of shoppers each year to duty-free stores, where prices of alcohol, cigarettes, electronics and clothes can be up to 20 percent cheaper than elsewhere in the EU.   High taxes on tobacco imposed by many countries to help people kick smoking make Andorra's cigarettes a particularly good deal.   The average pack costs just three euros ($3.50) compared with eight euros in France, which has said it will gradually raise the price to 10 euros a pack by November 2020.

Tobacco sales bring in some 110 million euros a year for Andorra, whose economy is otherwise based almost entirely on tourism.   It is also an enticing destination for smugglers, with French and Spanish border agents regularly seizing cartons from people trying to sneak them out, either by car or by hiking down the mountain trails which criss-cross the Pyrenees.   No date has been set for the advertising ban, which will come into effect three months after the ratification of the WHO accord is voted by parliament.
Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2018 02:41:51 +0100

Andorra la Vella, Andorra, March 16, 2018 (AFP) - The tiny principality of Andorra is witnessing a once in a generation phenomenon -- a widespread strike.   Around a third of civil servants across the mountainous micro-state have walked out to protest proposed reforms to their sector in what has been described as Andorra's first large-scale strike since 1933.

With no negotiation breakthrough in sight, picket lines are expected to be manned again on Friday with customs officers, police, teachers and prison staff among those taking part.   The first major strike in 85 years was sparked by plans from the government of Antoni Marti to reform civil servant contracts.   He has assured officials "will not do an hour more" work under the reforms and that 49 million euros would be allocated for the next 25 years to supplement civil servant salaries.   But government workers are unconvinced with unions warning the reforms could risk their 35 hour working week and pay.

Customs officers involved in the strike interrupted traffic on the Andorran-Spanish border this week, according to unions, while some 80 percent of teachers have walked out of classes.   Strikers have occupied the government's main administrative building and held noisy protests outside parliament calling for Marti's resignation.    "We have started collecting signatures to demand the resignation of the head of government and now nobody will stop us," Gabriel Ubach, spokesman for the public service union, told reporters.
Date: Mon 27 Sep 2017
Source: Contagion Live [edited]

A recent Dispatch article published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Emerging Infectious Diseases journal, offers insight into a large norovirus outbreak that sprung up in Spain in 2016 that had been linked with bottled spring water. The Public Health Agency of Catalonia (ASPCAT) reported a staggering 4136 cases of gastroenteritis from 11-25 Apr 2016. Of the 4136 cases, 6 individuals required hospitalization. The CDC defines a "case-patient" as an "exposed person who had vomiting or diarrhoea (3 or more loose stools within 24 hours)," as well as 2 or more of the following symptoms: nausea, stomach pain, or fever.

ASPCAT investigators traced back the outbreak to contaminated bottled spring water in office water coolers. The water came from a source in Andorra, a small independent principality located between Spain and France. Norovirus is a "very contagious virus," according to the CDC, and it is common for individuals to become infected by eating contaminated food. Although it is possible to be infected by consuming contaminated drinking water, this mode of transmission is "rare in developed countries," according to the article.

The investigators collected water samples from a total of 4 19-L water coolers in 2 different offices located in Barcelona, "from which affected persons had drunk; samples 1 and 2 came from 2 water coolers in one office, while samples 3 and 4 came from 2 water coolers in another office. Using "positively charged glass wool and polyethylene glycol precipitation for virus concentration," the investigators tested the samples.

"We detected high RNA levels for norovirus genotype I and II, around 103 and 104 genome copies/L, in 2 of the 4 water cooler samples concentrated by glass wool filtration and polyethylene glycol precipitation," according to the article. The investigators noted that a drawback of using molecular methods is that they are not able to differentiate between particles that are infectious and those that are not. Therefore, they "predicted the infectivity of norovirus in the concentrated samples by treating the samples with the nucleic acid intercalating dye PMA propidium monoazide and Triton X surfactant before RT-qPCR," which allowed them to "distinguish between virions with intact and altered capsids."

In those 2 water samples, they found high genome copy values -- 49 and 327 genome copies/L for norovirus genotype I and 33 and 660 genomes copies/L for norovirus genotype II. This was not an unexpected finding, due to the large number of infected individuals associated with the outbreak. Through "PMA/Triton treatment before RT-qPCR assays," the investigators found that the proportion of infected virions accounted for 0.3% to 5.6% of the total number of physical particles in the water samples, "which was enough to cause gastrointestinal illness."

The investigators also analyzed faecal samples collected from infected individuals who worked at the office in which the 1st 2 water samples were collected. They detected the following genotypes in those faecal samples: GI.2 and GII.17. In the faecal samples collected from the other office, they isolated the following genotypes: GII.4/Sydney/2012, GI.2, GII.17, and GII.2.

"We hypothesize that the spring water was contaminated by all 4 strains (GI.2, GII.2, GII.4, and GII.17) but levels of viral contamination for each genotype were not homogeneous in all bottled coolers," the investigators wrote. "We may have detected only the GII.4 genotype in water samples 1 and 2 because of a higher concentration of this specific genotype or because of bias caused by the sampling, concentration, and molecular detection procedures."

The investigators admit one limitation to their study: the small number of water samples collected and analyzed. They attribute this to the fact that on 15 Apr 2016, 4 days after the onset of the outbreak, the company that produced the drinking water recalled over 6150 containers of water "of suspected quality" as a precautionary measure. The recall prevented the investigators from collecting more samples to assess, according to the article.

Although the exact cause of the contamination has not yet been identified, the investigators posit that "the high number of affected persons from 381 offices that received water coolers, and the many different genotypes found in some patients' faecal specimens" suggest that the spring aquifer had been contaminated by "sewage pollution," and the Andorra Ministry of Health and Welfare banned further use of the spring.

The investigators suggest that assessing commercially-produced mineral waters for different harmful pathogens, such as norovirus would be beneficial. They note, however, that creating, enhancing, and managing such "virus surveillance systems" would be costly. Thus, the investigators suggest taking a "balanced approach to keep both the cost and the time required for the analyses within feasibility limits."  [Byline: Kristi Rosa]
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[The interesting article published in the September 2017 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases is:
Blanco A, Guix S, Fuster N, et al: Norovirus in bottled water associated with gastroenteritis outbreak, Spain, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017; 23(9): 1531-34; https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/9/16-1489_article. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[Catalonia and Andorra can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1341. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
Date: Thu, 26 Dec 2013 22:25:05 +0100 (MET)

ANDORRA LA VELLA, Andorra, Dec 26, 2013 (AFP) - A Spanish skier and a French snowboarder have died in avalanches in different mountain ranges in Europe, officials said Thursday.

The 27-year-old skier, a woman from Barcelona, died Wednesday while going off-piste alone in the Soldeu resort in Andorra, in the Pyrenees mountains between France and Spain, a resort manager told AFP.   Although she was rescued within 10 minutes, after her glove was spotted on the surface, she was unable to be revived despite a helicopter dash to hospital.

In the Italian Alps, close to the border with France, a 24-year-old Frenchman who was snowboarding with three friends on a closed run died Thursday when an avalanche swept over him in the resort town of Les Arnauds.   Local officials said he succumbed to multiple injuries, asphyxia and hypothermia.

Avalanches are common in Europe's ski resorts at this time of year, when early snows are heavy with moisture, and several deaths occur each winter.   Last Sunday, a 35-year-old Frenchman died in an avalanche in the Alps near the Italian border while on a three-day trek with a friend.
Date: Fri 7 Feb 2003 From: Jaime R. Torres Source: EFE Salud, Thu 6 Feb 2003 (translated by Maria Jacobs) [edited] -------------------------------------------------- Close to 300 students in one school and 173 tourists staying in 7 hotels in the Principality of Andorra have been affected by outbreaks of gastroenteritis that, according to local authorities, are not related to each other. Monica Codina, Minister of Health, stated that the outbreak that has affected almost 300 children and 8 adults in the San Ermengol school was detected last Monday [3 Feb 2003] but that it may have started Wednesday or Thursday of the previous week. The epidemiological surveys of a group of pre-school and grammar school students that may also be affected have not been performed yet. Also pending are the results of the microbiological tests of the food and water served in the school dining room, but the minister has indicated that the probable cause of the outbreak is the fact that water pitchers were filled with hoses directly from the faucet. The Minister stated that this outbreak of gastroenteritis is not related to the one that affected 173 tourists, most of them young people on holiday, who where staying in 7 hotels of the Principality. The government is also investigating the cause of this outbreak and has indicated that an anomaly in the system that supplies water to the hotels was detected, requiring a process of chlorination, which has not been carried out due to the heavy snowfall of the past few days. * * * * * * * * * * [The suspicion that defective water supplies may be responsible for all of these independent outbreaks suggests that the etiologic agent may be an enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, or non-viral, rather than one of the noroviruses associated with sudden-onset viral gastroenteritis. Information on the outcome of diagnostic tests in progress would be welcomed. - ProMed Mod.CP]
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Zimbabwe

General
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This southern African country is a popular destination for travellers from Ireland. Victoria Falls must be one of the main tourist attractions but many other visitors will explore the rich s
fari parks and many other attractions, which Zimbabwe has to offer. Unfortunately the stability throughout the country has decreased considerably during the past two years and it will be essential that travellers stay within well defined itineraries agreed with recognised tour operators.
Safety & Security
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The level of petty crime is increasing throughout the country as stability decreases. Muggings and pickpocketing occur too often in the main urban areas and especially in the capital - Harare. Care should be taken when getting money from ATM’s or when leaving the banks. Try to have a companion with you and avoid busy market places and crowded local transport. Use hotel safe boxes and don’t leave personal belongings on view where possible. Avoid flaunting personal wealth, only use authorised taxis and take care if visiting late-night bars etc. Credit care fraud is becoming more common so ensure that your card never leaves your sight.
Travel in Zimbabwe
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Hiring cars or motorbikes is unwise as the number of serious accidents involving tourists is considerable. Many hazards occur along the roads including unlit abandoned trucks, stray livestock and pedestrians and poor fuel supplies. Many roads are in a poor state of repair and those requiring assistance may have to wait many hours in a deserted location. Car jacking and theft from cars is increasing. If driving long distances you should ensure that you have sufficient fuel and adequate supplies of food and water in case of emergency. A torch and sensible medical kit are also prerequisites.
Health Facilities
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Outside of the main urban centres of Harare and Bulawayo the level of healthcare for tourists may be very limited. Even in the cities shortages of some main medications may lead to inadequate treatment and evacuation to South Africa may become necessary. Any tourist on personal medication (asthma, diabetes, contraceptive pill etc) should make certain that they have sufficient supplies with them to complete their journey through Zimbabwe.
Rabies
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The risk of rabies occurs throughout the country for those exposed to infected warm-blooded animals. This will be mainly following a bite from an infected dog but cats and monkeys and many other animals also carry the disease. Returning to Harare and possibly to South Africa will be essential to ensure adequate early treatment.
Playing Golf in Zimbabwe
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Many tourists visiting Zimbabwe will play golf on some of their many courses. Golf tends to be played during the hours soon after dawn and towards dusk when mosquitoes may abound. They should be aware that there is an increased risk of malaria from mosquito bites (in infected regions) but also of wandering into the rough to retrieve a ball and being bitten by snakes or ticks or stung by scorpions. Avoiding the rough is a wise precaution!

White Water Rafting & Bungee Jumping
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Many tourists to the Zambezi region partake of adventure sports including white water rafting and bungee jumping. Check whether of not your travel insurance covers these activities and be aware that both activities can carry significant risks. The bungee jump at Victoria Falls is recognised as one of the highest in the world at 111 metres. Generally the safety and security is good but accidents do occur. The risks of serious injury from white water rafting are also present both from direct trauma (eg bruising, drowning, fractures etc) and also from exposure to Schistosomiasis in the calm fresh water regions along the Zambezi. This parasitic disease is more common in those who swim in Lake Malawi but does occur in Zimbabwe. Serious long-term effects are regularly reported in those returning after fresh water contact in Africa.
Food & Water Facilities
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Despite the diminishing security situation throughout the country and the food shortages which have been reported among the local population, the main tourist hotels are still receiving sufficient supplies. This situation may change and travellers should be aware that the level of service may be affected. Lettuce and cold foods may not be adequately treated and should be avoided. Unpeeled fruits should be fine but tap water should not be used for brushing your teeth unless you can easily smell chlorine.
Insect & Mosquito Bites
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The Zambezi valley region (including Victoria Falls) is probably the single highest risk region for tourists developing malaria throughout the world. It is essential that adequate malaria prophylaxis is used at all times of the year for those visiting this region. Those remaining in the central highlands (cities of Harare and Bulawayo) will not need prophylaxis as the risk of this mosquito borne disease is very small. Tsetse flies transmit sleeping sickness and this may be a risk for those visiting some of the safari parks. Good repellent and adequate light coloured clothing is essential.
Sun Exposure & Dehydration
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It is important to increase your intake of fluids and salt while perspiring significantly in a hot climate. Wearing a wide-brimmed hat is also important.
Vaccines for Zimbabwe
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There are no essential vaccines for entry into Zimbabwe from Ireland. However those crossing into Zambia at Victoria Falls (and having their passport stamped) may find that the authorities demand evidence of cover against Yellow Fever before re-entry. Otherwise most tourists are advised to consider adequate cover against:
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Poliomyelitis (childhood booster)
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Tetanus (childhood booster)
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Typhoid (food and water disease)
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Hepatitis A (food and water disease)
Those planning a longer or more rural trip will also need to consider cover against diseases like Hepatitis B and Rabies.
Summary
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The majority of tourists visiting Zimbabwe will remain very healthy and well providing they remain conscious of the prevailing local uncertainty and follow some simple precautions against food and water disease, mosquito bites, and accidents.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 12:17:21 +0100

Geneva, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - The number of people in Zimbabwe affected by a devastating cyclone and flooding has jumped to 200,000, with most of the damage occurring near the Mozambique border, the UN said Thursday.    The initial estimate of those hit in Zimbabwe was 15,000 but World Food Programme (WFP) spokesman Herve Verhoosel told reporters in Geneva that the numbers had surged following an overnight assessment.
Date: Thu 17 Jan 2019
Source: MMWR 2019;68(2):44-45 [edited]

Citation: N'cho HS, Masunda KP, Mukeredzi I, et al. Notes from the field: typhoid fever outbreak -- Harare, Zimbabwe, October 2017-February 2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:44-45. DOI: <http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6802a5>.
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On 16 Oct 2017, the Harare City Health Department (HCHD) in Zimbabwe identified a suspected typhoid fever (typhoid) case in a resident of Harare's Mbare suburb. Typhoid is a potentially fatal illness caused by _Salmonella enterica_ serovar Typhi (Typhi). HCHD initiated an investigation and identified a cluster of 17 suspected typhoid cases, defined as the occurrence of fever and at least one of the following symptoms: headache, malaise, abdominal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhoea, cough, or constipation. A confirmed case had Typhi isolated from blood, stool, or rectal swab culture [1].

As of 24 Feb 2018 (the most recent publicly available data), 3187 suspected and 191 confirmed cases were identified [see figure in source URL above. - Mod.LL], with no reported deaths among confirmed cases. Among suspected cases, 1696 (53%) patients were male, and the median age was 17 years (range, 1 month to 90 years). In addition to clusters in Mbare, clusters were detected in Harare's western suburbs, including Kuwadzana, where high rates of ciprofloxacin-resistant Typhi were identified.

Previous typhoid outbreaks in Harare have been associated with municipal water shortages and increased use of contaminated boreholes and shallow wells [2-5]. In January 2018, the CDC collaborated with HCHD to standardize the collection, analysis, and interpretation of water quality data from wells, boreholes, and municipal taps. HCHD and partners paired this approach with efforts to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) through assessing and repairing boreholes (particularly those with in-line chlorinators in affected areas); attending to burst sewers; conducting water sampling of municipal and borehole water; and educating local residents about typhoid. At the request of HCHD, a CDC team also conducted a review of case management and clinical outcomes among suspected typhoid patients admitted to Harare's designated typhoid treatment center from 1 Oct 2017 through 31 Dec 2017. Among 583 patients admitted with a diagnosis of suspected typhoid, complications occurred in 79 (14%), the most common being acute kidney injury (26), anemia (10), peritonitis (9), and electrolyte abnormalities (9). One patient experienced intestinal perforation, and 5 patients with suspected typhoid died; however, because these cases were not culture-confirmed, they were not reported as typhoid-related deaths. Cultures were processed for 286 (49%) inpatients; 74 (26%) yielded Typhi. In addition, 15 (33%) of 46 isolates from hospitalized patients were ciprofloxacin-resistant. Complication rates were higher (19%) and median illness duration was longer (9 days) among patients with ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates than among those with nonresistant isolates (9%; 7 days), but the differences were not statistically significant.

CDC laboratorians collaborated with Zimbabwe laboratory staff members to design a reporting protocol for laboratory results and ensure that accurate results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing were included in all reports. The standardized collection and analysis of clinical and laboratory information during an outbreak in which an unusual regional antibiotic resistance pattern featured prominently prompted public health officials to recommend 3rd-generation cephalosporins as 1st-line treatment for patients residing in areas with high rates of ciprofloxacin resistance [1].

The combination of poor water quality and sanitation and urban overcrowding continues to be a persistent driver of seasonal outbreaks of waterborne diseases in Harare. Although localized WASH interventions, such as those described here, serve to disrupt local transmission, comprehensive measures will be needed to improve the water treatment and delivery system in Harare. One such measure that was informed by the epidemiologic data is a Gavi-funded vaccination campaign using typhoid conjugate vaccine scheduled for January-February 2019, targeting 350 000 persons; this is the 1st use of typhoid conjugate vaccine and the 1st outbreak response vaccination campaign in Africa. The goal of this effort will be to disrupt transmission, thereby providing time for implementation of sustainable and widespread WASH interventions.

References
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1. World Health Organization. Guidelines for the management of typhoid fever. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2011. <http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/documents/s20994en/s20994en.pdf>
2. Davis WW, Chonzi P, Masunda KPE, et al. Notes from the field: typhoid fever outbreak -- Harare, Zimbabwe, October 2016-March 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:342-343.
3. CDC. Notes from the field: _Salmonella_ Typhi infections associated with contaminated water -- Zimbabwe, October 2011-May 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2012;61:435.
4. Polonsky JA, Martinez-Pino I, Nackers F, et al. Descriptive epidemiology of typhoid fever during an epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2012. PLoS One 2014;9.
5. Muti M, Gombe N, Tshimanga M, et al. Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2011. Pan Afr Med J 2014;18:309.
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[Vaccine intervention is an important step, as increasing antimicrobial resistance in the typhoid bacillus has made treatment more difficult.

Typhoid fever, so-called enteric fever caused by _Salmonella enterica_ serotype Typhi, has a totally different presentation from that of the more common kinds of salmonellosis. Epidemiologically, usually spread by contaminated food or water, typhoid is not a zoonosis like the more commonly seen types of salmonellosis. Clinically, vomiting and diarrhea are typically absent; indeed, constipation is frequently reported. As it is a systemic illness, blood cultures are at least as likely to be positive as stool in enteric fever, particularly early in the course of the infection, and bone marrow cultures may be the most sensitive.

The symptoms of classical typhoid fever typically include fever, anorexia, lethargy, malaise, dull continuous headache, non-productive cough, vague abdominal pain, and constipation. Despite the (often high) fever, the pulse is often only slightly elevated. During the 2nd week of the illness, there is protracted fever and mental dullness, classically called coma vigil. Diarrhea may develop but usually does not. Many patients develop hepatosplenomegaly (both liver and spleen enlarged). After the 1st week or so, many cases develop a maculopapular rash on the upper abdomen. These lesions ("rose spots") are about 2 cm (0.78 inch) in diameter and blanch on pressure. They persist for 2 to 4 days and may come and go. Mild and atypical infections are common.

The word typhoid (as in typhus-like) reflects the similarity of the louse-borne rickettsial disease epidemic typhus and that of typhoid fever; in fact, in some areas, typhoid fever is still referred to as abdominal typhus. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2019 18:24:24 +0100
By Fanuel JONGWE

Harare, Jan 15, 2019 (AFP) - Three people have been shot dead and many injured, Zimbabwe's main opposition party said Tuesday, as security forces crack down on protests triggered by a sharp, sudden rise in fuel prices.   The streets of the capital Harare were deserted a day after widespread demonstrations when public anger erupted over the country's worsening economic crisis.   Zimbabwe's mobile phone networks and internet were partially shut down, with one industry source saying the systems had been jammed and many users were complaining of severely limited access.

The government more than doubled petrol prices at the weekend after months of shortages that saw drivers queueing for hours to fill up. Essentials such as bread and medicine have also been scarce.   "The information we have received is that two people were shot dead in Chitungwiza (on the outskirts of Harare) and one person in Kadoma (town)," MDC opposition party spokesman Jacob Mafume told AFP.   "This is needless loss of lives. Many have been injured, some of them seriously." He gave no further details.

Amnesty reported that eight people had died, without giving a source, and criticised "repressive measures" taken by the government to quash the protests.   On Tuesday morning, police fired tear gas in Zimbabwe's second city Bulawayo after protesters chanted for the removal of President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who was on an official visit to Moscow.   An AFP reporter witnessed looting in the city, a stronghold of opposition to the ruling ZANU-PF party.

- 'Police beat me' -
Most shops remained closed in Harare, and minibus taxis that usually transport workers from the suburbs to the city centre were not running.   In the suburb of Kuwadzana, police were on patrol and forcing people off the streets.   One resident, Tawanda Mataya, said police had beaten him and slapped his 17-year-old son.   "It's so painful," Mataya told AFP showing swellings on his back.   "I was standing at my gate to assess whether I could go to work then this group of police who were passing by started beating me.   "My son who heard me screaming and opened the window to see what was happening was slapped several times."

Mnangagwa announced the fuel price hike in a televised address late Saturday, saying it was needed to tackle severe shortages and illegal trading.   He replaced longtime ruler and autocrat Robert Mugabe following a military takeover in 2017, before winning a disputed election in July.   Speaking during his visit to Russia, Mnangagwa said the fuel price increase "was necessary and still is".   On Monday, police dispersed hundreds of protesters who burnt tyres, erected barricades and looted businesses on the first day of a three-day general strike.   Security Minister Owen Ncube said the security action caused "loss of life" without giving figures on the number of dead and wounded.

- Economy in ruins -
The Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said 13 people had sustained gunshot wounds in and around Harare on Monday. At least 200 people were arrested.   Zimbabwe's economy has been in dire straits since hyperinflation wiped out savings between 2007 and 2009, when the Zimbabwean dollar was abandoned in favour of the US currency.   Zimbabweans mainly rely on electronic payments as US dollar notes are in short supply. The local "bond note" currency, introduced in 2016, is little trusted and falling in value.

Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa blamed the protests on "terrorism".   "Threats to overthrow a constitutionally elected government by force and install an unelected person as president of Zimbabwe will be thwarted," she vowed.   The Zimbabwe Trade Union Confederation (ZCTU) reiterated its call to continue the strike.   "Today it's day two of the Shutdown. We urge workers and citizens everywhere to stay at home," ZCTU tweeted. "There must be economic reforms for the poor to survive."   Mnangagwa -- Mugabe's former deputy -- has claimed that he represents a fresh start for the country and has vowed to revive the economy by attracting foreign investment.   Two days after July's election in July, soldiers opened fire using live bullets on protesters in Harare, leaving six dead.
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2019 11:17:26 +0100

Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Jan 15, 2019 (AFP) - Zimbabwe police fired tear gas to disperse protesters in the second city of Bulawayo on Tuesday, a day after the countr was rocked by violent demonstrations against a sharp hike in fuel prices.   Police moved in after protesters chanted for the removal of President Emmerson Mnangagwa and as looting broke out in Bulawayo, a stronghold of opposition to the ruling ZANU-PF party, an AFP reporter witnessed.   The streets of the capital, Harare, were deserted after Monday's demonstrations when public anger over Zimbabwe's worsening economic crisis erupted.

The government more than doubled petrol prices at the weekend after months of shortages when drivers have been forced to queue for hours to fill up, while essentials such as bread and medicines have also been scarce.   In the capital Harare, most shops remained closed after Monday's protests and minibus taxis that usually transport workers from the suburbs to the city centre were not running.   In Kuwadzana suburb, police were on patrol and forcing people off the streets.   One resident, Tawanda Mataya, said he and his 17-year-old son had been beaten up by police.   "It's so painful," Mataya told AFP showing swellings on his back.   "I was standing at my gate to assess whether I could go to work then this group of police who were passing by started beating me.   "My son who heard me screaming and opened the window to see what was happening was slapped several times."

- Pressure on president -
In a televised address late Saturday, President Emmerson Mnangagwa announced the fuel price hike, saying it was needed to tackle severe shortages and "rampant" illegal trading.   Mnangagwa took over from long-time ruler and autocrat Robert Mugabe following a military takeover in 2017, before winning a disputed election in July.

Currently on a tour of European countries, Mnangagwa will attend the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland, next week.   Speaking in Russia on Monday, Mnangagwa said the fuel price increase "was necessary and still is".   On Monday, the police had dispersed hundreds of protesters who burnt tyres, erected barricades and looted businesses on the first day of a three-day general strike.   Security Minister Owen Ncube said the security action caused "loss of life" without giving figures on the number of dead and wounded.

The Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said 13 people had sustained gunshot wounds in and around Harare on Monday. At least 200 people were arrested during the disturbances.   Zimbabwe's mobile phone networks and internet were partially shut down, with one industry source saying the systems had been jammed and many users complaining of limited access.   On Tuesday morning the Twitter account of the Ministry of Information said that "public order has been restored".   The Zimbabwe Trade Union Confederation (ZCTU), for its part, reiterated its call to strike.   "Today it's day two of the Shutdown. We urge workers and citizens everywhere to stay at home," ZCTU tweeted.   "Our struggle is genuine and there must be economic reforms for the poor to survive."

- An economy in ruins -
Zimbabwe's economy has been in dire straits since hyperinflation wiped out savings between 2007 and 2009, when the Zimbabwean dollar was abandoned in favour the US dollar.   Zimbabweans rely on electronic payments as US dollar notes are in short supply. The local "bond note" currency, introduced in 2016, is little trusted and falling in value.   Mnangagwa -- Mugabe's former deputy -- has claimed that he represented a fresh start for the country and vowed to revive the economy by attracting foreign investment.   In Bulawayo, one night guard on duty outside a closed shop told AFP that his colleagues had not turned up to work on Tuesday.   "Things are hard, and the protest and the protests should continue as long as they are peaceful," said Nicholas Banda.
Date: Wed 9 Jan 2019
Source: Pindula News [edited]

Mberengwa district in the Midlands province is currently experiencing a cholera outbreak which has proven difficult to contain. The outbreak started over the festive period. Reports indicate that the outbreak has been compounded by an acute shortage of health workers in the district. One village worker is serving a population of about 10,000 people.

While speaking to The Southern Eye, Midlands provincial medical director Simon Nyadundu said: "Firstly, we need to acknowledge that countrywide, there is a low village health worker ratio in rural areas. So Mberengwa, and in particular Chomubobo community, where the current cholera outbreak is existent, happens to be one of those areas where we have inadequate village health workers. We only have one for that area, but we are pushing to beef up the numbers. The latest figures I have indicate that we now have 26 cumulative cases of cholera in Mberengwa. Only 2 people have died, and that figure has not risen since the onset of the outbreak. The patients that tested positive to cholera were treated and discharged."
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[ProMED HealthMap: Zimbabwe: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/171>]
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World Travel News Headlines

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 16:10:28 +0100

Kinshasa, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - A six-month-old baby in the eastern DR Congo city of Bunia has died of Ebola, becoming the first fatality of the disease in a provincial capital, the heath ministry said Thursday.   Bunia, which has a population of 300,000, is the capital of Ituri province, which along with neighbouring North Kivu province has been battling an epidemic of Ebola since last August.

The baby is among 610 fatalities out of 980 recorded cases, the ministry said in a statement.   "The parents are apparently in good health," it said.   "Extensive investigations are underway and will include, among other things, analysis of the maternal milk to identify the source of contamination."   The ministry added that it had also registered 97 new cases in the previous three weeks.   This increase "was expected" given the impact of an attack on two Ebola treatment centres by armed groups in the troubled region, it said.
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 22:32:17 +0100

Blantyre, Malawi, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - Heavy rains could cause a dam in southern Malawi to give way if there is no let-up, authorities said Thursday, urging local residents to take shelter.   The warning came after cyclone Idai battered neighbouring Mozambique last Friday killing 242 people    Hurricane-force winds and rains have also ravaged hit eastern Zimbabwe where over 100 have died.

In Malawi, the storm has affected nearly a million people with over 80,000 displaced, according to the WHO.   The Chagwa dam "has had one of its major embankments eroded due to heavy rains," the interior security ministry said in a statement. "(It) is likely to burst in the event of heavy and incessant rains."   The statement advised local residents in the southern African country to evacuate "in case of an emergency".
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 12:27:11 +0100
By Abhaya SRIVASTAVA

New Delhi, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - Walls draped in lush vertical gardens and air filtered through purifiers insulate diners at a swanky New Delhi food court from the choking haze outside in one of the most polluted places on earth.   But these eco-eateries, offering cleaner air as well as modern menus to the well heeled are beyond reach for the poor, who have little means of escaping the deadly smog which coats the city for much of the year.   Air pollution kills more than one million Indians every year, according to a study by Lancet Planetary Health, and Delhi is ranked one of the most toxic urban centres to live, regularly exceeding World Health Organisation (WHO) limits.

But for Ramavtar Singh there is no escape: like many of the city's poorest, he eats, sleeps, and works outside.   "I work for six to eight hours every day and my children eat and sleep outside most times of the year," the father of five tells AFP at a roadside food stall, gulping down a 50-cent dish of rice and lentils.   Singh earns a living by cycling passengers and cargo around Delhi on his rickshaw, a strenuous activity that means he's inhaling dangerous concentrations of tiny pollutants deep into his lungs.    At best, he can wrap a rag over his mouth on smoggy days, a low-cost approach taken by labourers and rickshaw drivers that does little to prevent the most dangerous particles entering the bloodstream.   Delhi's smog peaks from October to February, routinely exceeding WHO recommendations for PM2.5 -- tiny and harmful airborne particles -- and some days registers levels more than 20 times safe limits.   Experts warn the long term health consequences of living enveloped in pollution are disastrous, often causing chronic sickness and in some cases early death.

- ' A quick oxygen shot' -
Across town, Abhimanyu Mawatwal is settling down for lunch at a food court in Worldmark Aerocity, a grand commercial centre boasting purified air.   A meal here could cost twice Singh's monthly salary, but it is a price Mawatwal is willing to pay because outside the smog is at hazardous levels.   "I love to come here for my meals. It is like getting a quick oxygen shot," the office worker says, surrounded by creeper vines and a faux stream as he breathed lungfuls of filtered air circulating through expensive filters.   "We need to bring greenery to concrete jungles and create places where everybody can come for a breath of fresh air," insists S. K. Sayal, CEO of Bharti Realty which owns Worldmark Aerocity.   Delhi's affluent, who are often better informed about the dangers of pollution, increasingly expect the same safety measures they have in place at home, to be available when they are out.

High-end eateries, bars and cinemas are tapping into that demand -- installing electronic air purifiers and creating dedicated areas of rich vegetation to help filter airborne toxins.   But for Singh, and the one in five Indians living on less than $2 a day, visiting such places is nothing more than a fantasy.   "What will I do if I spend all the money on one meal? How will I feed my family?" said the rickshaw cyclist, who earns about 1,200 rupees ($17) a month.   He cannot dream of buying the foreign-made air purifiers to protect his family at home -- machines favoured by Delhi's elite, expat communities and office workers -- that easily cost Singh's annual wage.    "The rich and the poor have to breathe the same poisonous air. But the poor are more exposed to pollution," explains Sunil Dahiya, a campaigner for Greenpeace India.    He adds: "Most of the time, they don't even know the effects the toxic air is having on their health. Poor communities are definitely at the losing end."
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 12:17:21 +0100

Geneva, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - The number of people in Zimbabwe affected by a devastating cyclone and flooding has jumped to 200,000, with most of the damage occurring near the Mozambique border, the UN said Thursday.    The initial estimate of those hit in Zimbabwe was 15,000 but World Food Programme (WFP) spokesman Herve Verhoosel told reporters in Geneva that the numbers had surged following an overnight assessment.
Date: Wed, 20 Mar 2019 09:25:29 +0100
By Vishal MANVE

Mumbai, March 20, 2019 (AFP) - India's Jet Airways was fighting multiple crises Wednesday after grounding six planes, leaving it with only a third of its fleet flying, while pilots have threatened to walk out and a major shareholder is reportedly looking to offload its huge stake.   The problems at India's number-two carrier come as other airlines struggle to turn a profit despite the sector rapidly expanding in the country over recent years.   Jet, which employs more than 20,000 people, is gasping under debts of more than $1 billion and has now been forced to ground a total of 78 of its 119 aircraft after failing to pay lenders and aircraft lessors.   In a statement late Tuesday announcing its latest grounding, the firm it said it was "actively engaging" with lenders to secure fresh liquidity and wanted to "minimise disruption".

But with hundreds of customers left stranded, Jet's social media accounts have been flooded with often suddenly stranded passengers demanding information, new flight tickets and refunds.   "@jetairways We book our flights in advance so that we save on travel cost and you are sending cancellation (message) now?", read one irate tweet on Wednesday.   "I have sent a DM (direct message) regarding my ticket details. Please respond!", said Sachin Deshpande, according to his Twitter profile a design engineer.   Another, Ankit Maloo, wrote: "Received an email for all together cancellation of flight days before departure without any prior intimation or communication over phone!"   The firm is also facing pressure from its many pilots who have not been paid on time, with unions threatening they will walk off the job if salaries do not arrive soon.

- Alarm bells -
"Pilots will stop flying jet planes from 1st April 2019 if the company does not disburse due salaries and take concrete decisions," a spokesperson for the National Aviator's Guild, a pilots union, told AFP.   India's aviation regulator on Tuesday warned Jet Airways to ensure that staffers facing stress are not forced to operate flights.   Meanwhile, Bloomberg reported that Etihad Airways of the United Arab Emirates has offered to sell its 24 percent stake in Jet to State Bank of India (SBI).   A collapse would deal a blow to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's pragmatic pro-business reputation ahead of elections starting on April 11.   India's passenger numbers have rocketed six-fold over the past decade with its middle-class taking advantage of better connectivity and cheaper flights.    The country's aviation sector is projected to become the world's third-largest by 2025.

But like other carries, Mumbai-based Jet has been badly hit by fluctuating global crude prices, a weak rupee and fierce competition from budget rivals.   Alarm bells for Jet first rang in August when it failed to report its quarterly earnings or pay its staff, including pilots, on time. It then later reported a loss of $85 million.   In February, it secured a $1.19 billion bailout from lenders including SBI to bridge a funding gap, but the crisis has since deepened.   "Jet Airways is rapidly reaching a point of no return and running out of assets to keep itself afloat," Devesh Agarwal, editor of the Bangalore Aviation website, told AFP.   "The only solution is equity expansion by diluting its stakes but Jet is just trying to cut losses and running out of options," Agarwal said.    Shares in Jet Airways were down more than five percent on Wednesday.
Date: Tue 19 Mar 2019
Source: Pragativadi [edited]

Three members of a family, including 2 minor girls, fell sick after consuming toxic wild mushrooms in Mirigikhoji village under Patana block in Keonjhar district.

According to sources, some members of the family complained of vomiting and nausea after consuming the wild mushroom. They were rushed to the Keonjhar district headquarters hospital where their health condition is stated to be critical.

Although the actual reason behind the illness has not been ascertained, the doctor suspected it to be a case of food poisoning, sources said.
=====================
[In India, mushrooms have been a source of diet and article of commerce for a long time and across many cultures. Poisoning results from unintentional consumption of wild poisonous mushrooms. The cases however remain undiagnosed, underreported and unpublished. A large number of suspected cases are reported in lay press. There have been small epidemics of mushroom poisoning culminating in mortality especially during monsoon. The published literature from India is sparse and mostly in the form of case reports  (<https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4298634/#bib2>).

There is no way to tell which mushrooms were consumed, and no clinical signs are reported. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[A map showing the location of the Keonjhar can be found at

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Keonjhar, Orissa, India: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/13795>]
Date: Thu 14 Mar 2019, 12:50 PM
Source: The Indian Awaaz [edited]

Over 100 schools have been closed after the dumping of toxic waste into a river caused hundreds of people to fall ill, including many children, authorities said in Malaysia. Over 500 people, many of them school pupils, have received medical treatment after inhaling the fumes.

A lorry [truck] is believed to have dumped the waste in southern Johor state last week, sending hazardous fumes across a wide area.

Education Minister Maszlee Malik said his Ministry has decided to close all 111 schools in the Pasir Gudang area immediately.
=========================
[It is very difficult to comment on what the toxin might have been. We know it produced fumes which were inhaled and resulted some individuals being treated, possibly for respiratory issues.

It is sad, and since it was dumped in a water way, we may see other individuals, and/or animals affected by the toxin. - ProMED Mod.TG

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Mon 18 Mar 2019
Source: Abidjan.net [in French, trans. ProMED Corr.SB, edited]

Two people, including a 70-year-old woman, died on [Sun 17 Mar 2019] in the village of Yrouzon and 4 other people were admitted to the general hospital of Duekoue (West, region of Guemon), after having consumed a decoction of herbal tea, supposed to cure malaria.

According to information collected from the victims, a decoction of herbal tea was prepared the day before by the wife of the young -30 years old- BN, that passed away instantly. [BN may have been trying to relieve the pain of what he believed to be chronic malaria]. BN, affected with chromatic [chronic?] malaria took a sip of the product with the hope of relieving his pain.

Also, his family members of who came to visit him, each took a sip, which was supposed to mitigate their "palu" [pain]. But unfortunately, the following events were; BN, having consumed the first liquid, lost consciousness and died during his evacuation. The old woman, aged about 70, fell on her way home and died on the spot. The other 4 affected people were fortunate enough to be admitted to the general hospital.  An investigation is opened to determine the causes of the tragedy.
======================
[Herbs can be healing, or dangerous. They become dangerous when the plant is misidentified, or mistaken. When a toxic plant is incorrectly identified as non-toxic beneficial herb, then disastrous consequences can follow. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Fri 15 Mar 2018
Source: WJHG [edited]

A rabies alert has been expanded to all of Bay County. The Florida Department of Health in Bay County is expanding a rabies alert issued in March [2019]. Health officials say there were 4 confirmed rabies cases in the span of a month.

Health officials say the most recent case involved a rabid raccoon killed by dogs off Oakenshaw Drive between Highway 2301 and Camp Flowers Road in Youngstown. Florida law requires pets 4 months or older to be vaccinated. If an animal is not vaccinated, keep the pet inside. Health officials say cats are the most likely to be infected with rabies.

Rabies is a fatal viral infection of the nervous system transmitted from animal to animal or animal to human by bite, scratch, or mucous membrane exposure. If your pet fights a wild animal, contact the Florida Department of Health in Bay County. The wild animal will need to be tested for rabies. Health official ask you do not shoot the wild animal in the head.  The alert will last 60 days.
==========================
[In the eastern USA, the main terrestrial reservoir of rabies is raccoons (see map of distribution of major rabies virus variants among carnivores at

A strategy that has been developed to control and contain the spread of rabies in raccoons is the use of oral rabies vaccination [ORV], which can be implemented by distributing bait. Florida has not been included in recent ORV actions, but the northwestern part of the state has been established as a zone needing enhanced rabies surveillance (see <https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed2030034>). - ProMED Mod.PMB]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Florida, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/212>]
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
From: Lucille Blumberg, John Frean, Evan Shoul <lucilleb@nicd.ac.za>,
<johnf@nicd.ac.za>, <evan.shoul@gmail.com> [edited]

A game hunter working in an area close to the South Luangwa National Park, Zambia has been admitted to a Johannesburg hospital with laboratory confirmed East African trypanosomiasis (EAT) [_Trypanosoma rhodesiense_] following an acute febrile illness.

He has a typical trypanosomal chancre on the dorsum of his hand, and a scanty parasitaemia was noted on a Giemsa- stained blood smear in Lusaka and Johannesburg laboratories.

On admission, he was moderately hypotensive with a tachycardia, had a mild acidosis, but no definite myocarditis, no ARDS, or clinical CNS pathology. He had a profound leucopaenia (WBC: 1.5) and thrombocytopenia (but no bleeding), moderately deranged hepatic transaminases (chronic hepatitis B infection) but normal renal function.

Suramin treatment was commenced promptly after admission. A CSF examination will be carried out later this week once the peripheral parasitaemia has cleared and the thrombocytopaenia has improved.

This is the 3rd case of EAT admitted to the unit in the past 4 months, one person working in game park, Malawi reserve (fatal case) and one person working in a game management area close to the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia.
-----------------------------------------------
Prof Lucille Blumberg
John Frean
Centre for Emerging Zoonotic and Parasitic Diseases
GeoSentinal Site
National Institute for Communicable Diseases
Johannesburg, South Africa
<lucilleb@nicd.ac.za>
<johnf@nicd.ac.za>
and
Dr Evan Shoul
Infectious Diseases Specialist
Johannesburg, South Africa
===========================
[ProMED thanks Lucille Blumberg, John Frean, and Evan Shoul for this report.

The South Luangwa National Park is in eastern Zambia, the southernmost of 3 national parks in the valley of the Luangwa River (see map at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Luangwa_National_Park>).  African trypanosomiasis is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in wild game animals and is a risk throughout game parks in Africa including Zambia. More information can be found on the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) website on African trypanosomiasis: <http://www.fao.org/paat/en/>.
The case story presented here shows that trypanosomiasis is a differential diagnosis to malaria and indeed haemorrhagic fever in endemic areas. Thus, such patients with a negative malaria blood film should be suspected and investigated for trypanosomiasis, also called African sleeping sickness. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at: