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United Arab Emirates

United Arab Emirates US Consular Information Sheet
28th February 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven independent emirates, each with its own ruler.
The federal government is a constitutional re
ublic, headed by a president and council of ministers.
Islamic ideals and beliefs provide the conservative foundation of the country's customs, laws and practices. The UAE is a modern, developed country, and tourist facilities are widely available. Read the Department of State Background Notes on the United Arab Emirates for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: A passport is required. For stays of less than 60 days, U.S. citizens holding valid passports may obtain visitor visas at the port of entry for no fee. For a longer stay, a traveler must obtain a visa before arrival in the UAE. In addition, an AIDS test is required for work or residence permits; testing must be performed after arrival. A U.S. AIDS test is not accepted. For further information, travelers can contact the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates, 3522 International Court NW, Washington, DC 20037, telephone (202) 243-2400.
Visit the web site of the UAE's Ministry of Information regarding tourism, business, and residence in the UAE at http://www.uaeinteract.org.

Unlike other countries in the region that accept U.S. military ID cards as valid travel documents, the UAE requires U.S. military personnel to present a valid passport for entry/exit.

UAE authorities will confiscate any weapons, weapon parts, ammunition, body armor, handcuffs, and/or other military/police equipment transported to or through a civilian airport.
Americans have been arrested and jailed for transporting such weapons and equipment without the express written authorization of the UAE government, even though airline and U.S. authorities allowed shipment on a US-originating flight.

U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries that are not members of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), who depart the UAE via land are required to pay a departure fee. This fee is 20 UAE dirhams and is payable only in the local UAE dirham currency.

Visit the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates web site at http://uae-embassy.org for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY: Americans in the United Arab Emirates should exercise a high level of security awareness. The Department of State remains concerned about the possibility of terrorist attacks against U.S. citizens and interests throughout the world. Americans should maintain a low profile, vary routes and times for all required travel, and treat mail and packages from unfamiliar sources with caution. In addition, U.S. citizens are urged to avoid contact with any suspicious, unfamiliar objects, and to report the presence of the objects to local authorities.
U.S. Government personnel overseas have been advised to take the same precautions. In addition, U.S. Government facilities may temporarily close or suspend public services from time to time as necessary to review their security posture and ensure its adequacy.

Taking photographs of potentially-sensitive UAE military and civilian sites, or foreign diplomatic missions, including the U.S. Embassy, may result in arrest, detention and/or prosecution by local authorities.
In addition, engaging in mapping activities, especially mapping which includes the use of GPS equipment, without coordination with UAE authorities, may have the same consequences.

On several occasions in the past three years, small groups of expatriate recreational boaters were detained by the Iranian Coast Guard for alleged violation of Iranian territorial waters while fishing near the island of Abu Musa, approximately 20 miles from Dubai.
The UAE and Iran have had a long-standing dispute concerning jurisdiction of Abu Musa.
Fishing or sailing in these waters may result in seizure of vessels and detention of passengers and crew in Iran.
Obtaining consular assistance in Iran is difficult and can only be done through the Swiss Embassy in Tehran, which acts as a Protecting Power, providing limited U.S. consular services.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves overseas, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME: Crime generally is not a problem for travelers in the UAE. However, the U.S. Embassy advises U.S. citizens to take normal precautions against theft, such as not leaving a wallet, purse, or credit card unattended. Although vehicle break-ins in the UAE are rare, U.S. citizens are encouraged to ensure that unattended vehicles are locked and that valuables are not left out in plain sight.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Basic modern medical care and medicines are available in the principal cities of the UAE, but not necessarily in outlying areas.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747); fax 1-888-CDC-FAXX (1-888-232-3299), or via the CDC's web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization's (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.
TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning the United Arab Emirates is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

The police emergency number and ambulance number is 999. Mobile phones are widely used throughout the UAE, so passers-by usually request emergency police and medical services quickly. Response time by emergency services is adequate. However, medical personnel emphasize transport of the injured to the hospital rather than treatment on site. Traffic accidents are a leading cause of death in the UAE because drivers often drive at high speeds. Unsafe driving practices are common, especially on inter-city highways. On highways, unmarked speed bumps and drifting sand create additional hazards.

Country-wide traffic laws impose stringent penalties for certain violations, particularly driving under the influence of alcohol.
In the UAE, there is zero tolerance for driving after consumption of alcohol.
Penalties may include hefty jail sentences and fines over $6,000 and, for Muslims (even those holding U.S. citizenship), lashings. Persons involved in an accident in which another party is injured automatically go to jail, until the injured person is released from the hospital. Should a person die in a traffic accident, the driver of the other vehicle is liable for payment of compensation for the death (known as "dhiyya"), usually the equivalent of 55,000 U.S. dollars. Even relatively minor accidents may result in lengthy proceedings, during which both drivers may be prohibited from leaving the country.

In order to drive, UAE residents must obtain a UAE driver's license. Foreign driver's licenses are not recognized. However, a non-resident visitor to the UAE can drive if he/she obtains a valid international driver's license issued by the motor vehicle authority of the country whose passport the traveler holds. The UAE recognizes driver's licenses issued by other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states only if the bearer is driving a vehicle registered to the same GCC state. Under no circumstances should anyone drive without a valid license.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
You may also visit the web site of the UAE’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety at http://www.uaeinteract.org.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of the United Arab Emirates’ Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of the United Arab Emirates' air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA's web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: The UAE government does not recognize dual nationality.
Children of UAE fathers automatically acquire UAE citizenship at birth and must enter the UAE on UAE passports. UAE authorities have confiscated U.S. passports of UAE/U.S. dual nationals in the past. This act does not constitute loss of U.S. citizenship, but should be reported to the U.S. Embassy in Abu Dhabi or the U.S. Consulate General in Dubai. In addition to being subject to all UAE laws, U.S. citizens who also hold UAE citizenship may also be subject to other laws that impose special obligations on citizens of the UAE.
For additional information, please refer to our Dual Nationality flyer.

U.S. citizens have at times become involved in disputes of a commercial nature that have prompted local firms or courts to take possession of the U.S. citizen's passport. Travel bans may also be enforced against U.S. citizens involved in financial disputes with a local sponsor or firm. Such travel bans, which are rigidly enforced, effectively prevent the individual from leaving the UAE for any reason until the dispute is resolved. Although it is customary for a local sponsor to hold an employee's passport, it is illegal to do so under UAE law. Most contractual/labor disputes can be avoided by clearly establishing all terms and conditions of employment or sponsorship in the labor contract at the beginning of any employment. Should a dispute arise, the UAE Ministry of Labor has established a special department to review and arbitrate labor claims. A list of local attorneys capable of representing Americans in such matters is available from the Consular and Commercial sections of the U.S. Embassy in Abu Dhabi and the U.S. Consulate General in Dubai.

Codes of behavior and dress in the UAE reflect the country's Islamic traditions and are more conservative than those of the United States. Visitors to the UAE should be respectful of this conservative heritage, especially in the Emirate of Sharjah where rules of decency and public conduct are strictly enforced. Female travelers should keep in mind the cultural differences among the many people who coexist in the UAE and should be cognizant that unwitting actions may invite unwanted attention to them. Isolated incidents of verbal and physical harassment of Western women have occurred. Victims of harassment are encouraged to report such incidents to the U.S. Embassy in Abu Dhabi or the Consulate General in Dubai.

American citizens intending to reside and work in the UAE may have to present personal documents authenticated by the Department of State's Office of Authentications in Washington, D.C. before traveling to the UAE. This can be a complex process involving local, state and federal offices and requiring several weeks to complete.
For procedural information, the Office of Authentications may be contacted by telephone from within the United States at 800-688-9889 or 202-647-5002, by fax at 202-663-3636, or by e-mail at aoprgsmauth@state.gov.
In order to meet UAE government requirements for school registrations and residency sponsorship for family members, Americans intending to bring their families to reside with them in the UAE will need to have their marriage certificate and children's birth certificates, or custody/adoption decrees, if appropriate, authenticated by the Department of State in Washington, DC.
The U.S. Embassy and Consulate General cannot authenticate U.S. local- and state-issued personal, academic or professional documents; they will only be able to authenticate the final authentication document from the Department of State.
Additional information on authentication of documents can be found at http://www.state.gov/m/a/auth/.
In terms of employment, a recent change to UAE labor law requires local sponsors to have employees' diplomas, academic and/or occupational/professional certificates validated through a “Degree Verification” process established in the UAE.
Prospective employees will be required to submit photocopies of such documents for verification to a firm under contract to the Ministry of Labor.

In addition, persons in the education and health professions reportedly have to meet two requirements for validation of their educational credentials at this time – the formal “chain” authentication of academic/professional credentials in the U.S. and the “Degree Verification” process in the UAE.
Different UAE Ministries have different requirements in this regard.
Determining these requirements with one’s prospective employer is strongly recommended before arrival in the UAE.

Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating UAE laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in the UAE are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

Legislation enacted in January 1996 imposes the death sentence for convicted drug traffickers. Since January 2006, possession of even trace amounts of illegal drugs has resulted in sentences of four years imprisonment for foreign citizens transiting the UAE. American citizens transiting and entering the UAE’s airports and in possession of illegal drugs have been discovered, arrested and prosecuted by UAE authorities.
As mentioned, in such cases the minimum penalty is four years imprisonment.

Some drugs normally taken under a doctor's supervision in the United States, and even some over-the-counter U.S. drugs and medications, are classified as narcotics in the UAE and are illegal to possess.
A doctor's prescription should be carried along with any medication that is brought into the country.
A person may be subject to arrest and prosecution if possession of prescribed medicines (especially those containing codeine and similar narcotic-like ingredients) comes to the attention of local authorities.
The U.S. Embassy’s web site includes an unofficial list of such medicines, obtained from the UAE Ministry of Health.
Most medications available in the U.S. are also available by doctors’ prescription through hospitals and pharmacies in the UAE.

In addition, the UAE's tough anti-narcotics program also includes poppy seeds, widely used in other cultures, including the U.S., for culinary purposes, on its list of controlled substances. The importation and possession of poppy seeds in any and all forms is strictly prohibited. Persons found to possess even very small quantities of controlled substances listed by the UAE are subject to prosecution by the authorities and may be given lengthy prison terms of up to 15 years. Travelers with questions regarding the items on the list of controlled substances should contact the U.S. Embassy in Abu Dhabi or the U.S. Consulate General in Dubai. If suspected of being under the influence of drugs or alcohol, individuals may be required to submit to blood and/or urine tests and may be subject to prosecution.

Crimes of fraud, including passing bad checks and non-payment of bills (including hotel bills), are regarded seriously in the UAE and can result in imprisonment and/or fines. Bail generally is not available to non-residents of the UAE who are arrested for crimes involving fraud.

Drinking or possession of alcohol without a Ministry of Interior liquor permit is illegal and could result in arrest and/or fines and imprisonment. Alcohol is served at bars in most major hotels but is intended for guests of the hotel. Persons who are not guests of the hotel, and who consume alcohol in the restaurants and bars, technically are required to have their own personal liquor licenses. Liquor licenses are issued only to non-Muslim persons who possess UAE residency permits. Drinking and driving is considered a serious offense. Penalties generally are assessed according to religious law.

While individuals are free to worship as they choose, and facilities are available for that purpose, religious proselytizing is not permitted in the UAE.
Persons violating this law, even unknowingly, may be imprisoned or deported.

If arrested, U.S. citizens should contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General for assistance. The U.S. Consul will provide information on the local judicial system and a list of local attorneys. In Dubai, the U.S. Consul can also arrange for U.S. citizen detainees to meet with an ombudsman from the Human Rights Department of the Dubai police headquarters, if the detainee believes he or she is not being treated fairly.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION/EMBASSY AND CONSULATE LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in the United Arab Emirates are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site and to obtain updated information on travel and security within the United Arab Emirates. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy in Abu Dhabi is located at Embassies District, Plot 38, Sector W59-02, Street No. 4, P.O. Box 4009. The telephone number is (971) (2) 414-2200, and the Consular Section fax number is (971) (2) 414-2241. The email address for American Citizens Services inquiries, including passport questions, is abudhabiacs@state.gov. The after-hours telephone number is (971) (2) 414-2500. The Embassy Internet web site is http://uae.usembassy.gov.

The U.S. Consulate General in Dubai is located on the 21st floor of the Dubai World Trade Center, P.O. Box 9343. The telephone number is (971) (4) 311-6000 (for after-hours emergencies, contact the Embassy at (971)(2) 414-2200 for the Dubai Duty Officer, and the Consular Section fax number is (971) (4) 311-6213. The email address for American Citizens Services inquiries, including passport questions, is dubaiwarden@state.gov. The web site for the U.S. Consulate General in Dubai is http://dubai.usconsulate.gov.

The workweek for both the Embassy in Abu Dhabi and the Consulate General in Dubai is Sunday through Thursday.
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for the UAE dated July 06, 2007, to update the sections on Traffic Safety and Road Conditions and Criminal Penalties.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Fri, 8 Mar 2019 11:58:53 +0100
By Shatha Yaish

Hatta, United Arab Emirates, March 8, 2019 (AFP) - Just over 100 kilometres (62 miles) from Dubai's skyscrapers, Mohammed al-Kaabi strolls through the tranquil desert with his friends as the sun sets.   Kaabi, 27, hails from a long line of Emiratis, a people with a centuries-old bedouin history tied inextricably to the local desert.    Today, he is among a fast-growing group drawn to a new wave of a tradition of desert camping but with all the trappings of comfort, style and modernity.   With "glamping", short for "glamorous camping", Dubai aims to expand on its renown for luxurious city living and its tradition of camping.

Betting on tourism at a time of low oil prices, Dubai is now offering stays in chic desert trailers, in plush mountainside lodgings and beach camps, as it seeks to put its own mark on the glamping trend that has swept world tourism destinations.   "This place is far from the cities and the high-rises," said Kaabi, sporting the traditional full-length white Emirati robe worn by men.   "Camping is very popular in the UAE, but when you want to bring the family it becomes more complicated," he added, at a campsite in Hatta, near the Omani border.   "But here, safety and comfort are provided for."

- A room with... a bed -
Camping is still a beloved way of life for many Emiratis, who take their equipment and head for the desert from the fall months onwards, when the scorching summer heat has faded.    Tourists and expat residents also increasingly opt to escape the hustle and bustle of the city.

Dubai welcomed a record 15.9 million visitors in 2018, many of whom were drawn to its mega malls, luxurious hotels and pristine beaches.   It hopes to push the figure up to 20 million visitors annually by next year, when it hosts the six-month global trade fair, Expo 2020.    The mountainous eastern Hatta desert has lots to offer "glampers" with a taste for adventure but also for their home comforts.   Near the Hatta dam, campers have a choice between a trailer, caravan or five-star lodge fully equipped with TVs and power points for charging a smartphone.

Seated outside a trailer, Jamil Fahmy, a Dubai resident from Saudi Arabia, said glamping was the perfect way to escape the city without compromising on hygiene.    "It's fun, with the fire and hanging with friends and all that, but I personally prefer to sleep in a room with a bed and a private bathroom, and that's what we get here," he told AFP.    "It's great to be an adventurer and explore and cook fireside, and that's what we did.   "But when the time came, we retreated into the beautiful room and slept on a bed."

- 'Five-star camping' -
Rooms with modern amenities, including bathrooms and beds, start from 400 dirhams (about $110, 100 euros) per night at the Hatta site, which opened in October.    The Hatta camping project, part of Dubai's plan to use tourism to diversify revenues, is also home to a 350-metre zip wire.   Last year, Dubai faced a downturn in the real-estate market due to a supply glut, while oil prices also dropped, affecting the UAE as a whole.    Several glamping sites, some on the beach, have popped up across the UAE in recent years, with options to participate in yoga classes, star gazing or kayaking.

For Jay, a 37-year-old Briton, glamping offers a new experience after a decade in the UAE.    "We're fairly outdoorsy, we came here kayaking before, we did the big zip line," he told AFP, referring to the Hatta zip wire.    But, he added with a laugh that with the usual no-frills style of camping "you haven't got a shower or all the facilities" so glamping is a welcome step-up.   "You get the outdoors and all of that, and nature, and you can barbeque -- but you can also have a shower and get clean!   "It's not five-star hoteling, but five-star camping."
Date: 30 Jan 2019
From: Taiichiro Kobayashi <tkobayashi@cick.jp> [edited]

Two women who returned to Japan from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were diagnosed with dengue fever (DF). They could be the 1st reported cases of DF infected in the UAE. They live in Japan and travelled together to the UAE from 29 Dec 2018 to 4 Jan 2019. During their stay in the UAE, they mostly stayed in Dubai and were bitten by mosquitoes several times.

They came to Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital on 16 Jan 2019. A 32-year-old woman and a 29-year-old woman complained of high fever for 6 and 4 days, respectively. One revealed an erythematous rash on her trunk, face and extremities, and their tourniquet test results were positive. Their blood examinations revealed leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia and mild liver dysfunction.

Although the UAE is not known as an endemic country of DF, we suspected the women of having DF because of their history, physical examination and laboratory test results. We performed a rapid diagnostic test of DF (SD BIOLINE Dengue DUO), and their results of non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigen were positive. Furthermore, dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3) genotype III genome was detected from both of their sera with real-time RT-PCR and following viral genome sequence analysis at the Laboratory of Arboviruses, National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID), Japan.

These 2 cases may be a signal of the emergence of DF in the UAE, where urbanization progresses and many travellers and immigrants from DF-endemic countries are being accepted.
===============================
Taiichiro Kobayashi
Department of Infectious Diseases
Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome
Hospital
Tokyo, Japan
<tkobayashi@cick.jp>

Yuya Atsuta, Masaru Tanaka, Kazuaki Fukushima, Keishiro Yajima and Akifumi Imamura
Department of Infectious Diseases
Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital Tokyo, Japan

Takahiro Maeki, Shigeru Tajima, Satoshi Taniguchi, Masayuki Saijo and Chang-Kweng Lim
Department of Virology I, National Institute of Infectious Diseases Tokyo, Japan

[ProMED thanks the colleagues from Japan for sharing this important update on imported dengue fever cases, which were serotyped as DENV-3, from the UAE into Japan.

The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. _Aedes albopictus_ is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of the world. Travellers with viraemia arriving in any country from dengue-affected areas of the world can become proponents of local outbreaks. The above report also highlights the importance of considering dengue in differential diagnosis of fever with suggestive blood picture even in cases presenting in nonendemic areas. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
United Arab Emirates: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/132]
Date: Wed 5 Sep 2018
Source: BBC [edited]

A total of 19 people have been taken ill after an Emirates airline plane landed in New York, officials say. The plane was quarantined at JFK airport as those on board were checked by health officials. As many as 10 were taken to hospital but others refused treatment.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that initially about 100 people including some crew had complained of illness. Flight 203 from Dubai landed at 09:10 (13.10 GMT) with 521 passengers.

Emergency vehicles were seen on the runway as it landed. Soon afterwards, Emirates airline tweeted that the sick passengers were being attended to and those who were unaffected would be allowed to leave the plane.

The CDC said in a statement that is was "aware of an Emirates flight from Dubai that arrived this morning at JFK".

"Approximately 100 passengers, including some crew on the flight, complained of illness including cough and some with fever.

"CDC public health officers are working with... officials to evaluate passengers including taking temperatures and making arrangements for transport to local hospitals those that need care."

Later Eric Phillips, spokesman for New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, confirmed that all the passengers were off the plane and the sick people had been taken to hospital.

He said that some of the passengers had originally come from the Saudi Arabian city of Mecca, which was currently experiencing a flu outbreak, and that the passengers' symptoms were "pointing to the flu".
Date: Mon 28 May 2018
Source: EMPRES-I (Global Animal Disease Information System) [edited]

According to an EMPRESS report issued today [Mon 28 May 2018], there was a human case of MERS-CoV infection confirmed by PCR testing in Gayathi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This report was based on an OIE report.

No further information was provided.
=====================
[The most recent confirmed human MERS-CoV infection in the UAE was reported in December 2017 and involved an Omani camel herder who was identified as an asymptomatic infection. This was detected as part of border screening of camels on entry to the UAE following the detection of positive MERS-CoV infection in the camels (see MERS-CoV (01): Malaysia (ex KSA), Saudi Arabia, UAE (ex Oman) http://promedmail.org/post/20180102.5532148).

I was unable to find more information on the case mentioned in the EMPRES report above, from either the HAAD (Health Authority of Abu Dhabi) website, or the OIE or EMPRES websites. Questions that come to mind include: demographics (age, sex); clinical picture (was this based on clinical illness in the human or was this part of screening after identification of MERS-CoV infected camels entering the UAE (where screening is typically done); possible high risk exposures (either contact with camels, contact with other known cases, contact with the health sector before onset of illness, or history of travel to other geographic areas where MERS-CoV circulation is known).

More information from knowledgeable sources would be greatly appreciated.

The HealthMap/ProMED map of the UAE can be found at:
Date: Thu 21 Sep 2017
Source: Eurosurveillance Edition 2017, 22(38) [edited]

ref: Dabrera G, Brandsema P, Lofdahl M, et al. Increase in legionnaires' disease cases associated with travel to Dubai among travellers from the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Netherlands, October 2016 to end August 2017. Euro Surveill. 2017; 22(38): pii=30618.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Abstract
--------
Between 1 Oct 2016 and 31 Aug 2017, 51 legionnaires' disease (LD) cases from the United Kingdom (UK), Sweden, and the Netherlands were identified with associated travel to Dubai. Cases did not all stay in the same accommodation, indicating that no single accommodation could be the source for all these infections. While local investigations continue into other potential sources, clinicians should remain alert to the possibility of LD among travellers returning from Dubai with respiratory illness.

Introduction
------------
In December 2016, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported an increase in legionnaires' disease (LD) cases associated with travel to Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) [1] based on cases reported to ELDSNet (European legionnaires' disease surveillance network), an ECDC-operated surveillance system among European Union (EU) countries, Iceland, and Norway [2] for laboratory-confirmed, travel-associated LD (TALD) cases who stayed in commercial accommodation site(s) (such as hotels) during the 2-10-day incubation period.

As this increase in Dubai-associated TALD cases continues, we describe cases reported with symptom onset between 1 Oct 2016 and 31 Aug 2017 among residents from the UK, Sweden, and the Netherlands (the 3 countries that were initially reporting the largest numbers of cases). We describe the ongoing situation as at 18 Sep 2017 to provide further insight into the observed increase and create awareness among physicians and travellers returning with compatible symptoms to consider legionella as a differential diagnosis [1].

[The full Eurosurveillance article can be accessed at the source URL above. - ProMED Mod.ML]
====================
[Dubai is one of the 7 emirates and the most populous city of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubai>). Dubai has become a popular tourist destination. It is said to be the 4th most visited city in world, with over 15 million visitors in 2016, after London, Paris, and Bangkok (<https://www.khaleejtimes.com/listicles/dubai-worlds-fourth-most-popular-destination-in-2016>).

Overnight visitors in Dubai spent almost USD 11 billion in 2014

Dubai can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map at

In 2009, ProMED-mail first reported legionnaires' disease in 3 travellers to Dubai, one of whom from the UK died (Legionellosis, fatal, hotel - United Arab Emirates: (Dubai) http://promedmail.org/post/20090205.0509). In December 2016, ProMED-mail reported an increase in the number of cases of legionnaires' disease in 2016, compared with previous years, in European travelers returning from Dubai, with 26 cases having their onset of illness since 1 Oct 2016 (Legionellosis - EU: EU travellers, ex United Arab Emirates (Dubai) susp http://promedmail.org/post/20161230.4733569). In June 2017, ProMED-mail reported that an additional 34 cases among European travelers to Dubai, with the most recent case becoming ill in May 2017, suggesting an ongoing exposure risk (Legionellosis - Europe (03): ex United Arab Emirates (Dubai) http://promedmail.org/post/20170602.5079438).

According to the Eurosurveillance report above on 51 legionnaires' disease cases with symptom onset between 1 Oct 2016 and 31 Aug 2017, from the UK, Sweden, and the Netherlands associated with travel to Dubai, of 43 cases staying in commercial accommodation only 15 stayed in sites where there were 2 or more cases, whereas 27 stayed in sites where there were no other cases. In addition, 3 of the 51 cases were associated with a foreign-travel related cluster in other countries.

Of the 51 cases of legionnaires' disease, 50 were infected by organisms speciated as _Legionella pneumophila_. However, the serogroup was known for only 16 cases: 13 of the 16 were serogroup 1, 2 were serogroup 13 and 1 was serogroup 2-14. Sequence-based typing (ST) was available for only 9 cases: 6 cases were ST616, and 3 cases were ST1327. ST616 was only observed in cases associated with travel to Dubai and ST1327 was associated with travel to Dubai for all but one case. Furthermore, 11 cases spent their entire incubation period in Dubai. These findings supported the assertion that at least some of these infections occurred within Dubai. However, the cases for whom sequence-based typing was available were all linked to different accommodations sites.

No increase in pneumonia notifications occurred locally in Dubai between October and December 2016, which suggested an environmental _Legionella_ source in Dubai that might have been frequented more often by foreign travelers than by local residents. Another explanation was that the local Dubai population is predominantly young, with only 8.7 percent in the 50 years or older age group in 2016, and therefore potentially at lower risk for legionnaires' disease than foreign travelers. Also, the investigators noted that the increase in cases of legionnaires' disease among European travelers to Dubai could not be fully explained by an increase in the number of European travelers to Dubai, but so far no environmental sources have been identified in Dubai. - ProMED Mod.ML]
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Turkey

Geographical Information:
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Turkey is officially known as the Republic of Turkey and is bordered on the northwest by Bulgaria and Greece, on the north by the Black Sea and on the south by Syria, Iraq and t
e Mediterranean Sea. The capital is Ankara with a population of about 2.5 million though Istanbul is a much larger city (6.6 million). The population of the country is estimated at 62 million with the majority in the cities and along the costal regions.
Climate:
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The Mediterranean and Aegean shores of Turkey have long and hot summers with a milder winter. In Istanbul the average July temperature reaches 230C while in January it can drop to 00C. Throughout the country the annual rainfall is about 29". This is mainly during the months of December and January.

Health Care Facilities:
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The level of adequate health facilities vary considerably within the country. Most of the better hotels will have access to English speaking doctors but care may be required if hospital admission is required.
Disease Profile:
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Cholera and other water borne diseases are frequently reported from Istanbul. In the southeastern city of Diyarbakir there are regular reports of dysentery, typhoid, meningitis and other contagious diseases.

General Food & Water Hygiene:
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There can be little doubt that travellers to Turkey who disregard basic hygiene precautions will run a risk of developing significant illness and a ruined holiday. With simple general care most tourists will remain healthy.

Food Rules:
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Always eat in clean restaurants and hotels. Eat freshly cooked hot food. Stay away from cold salads, especially lettuce. Don’t eat any of the bivalve shellfish dishes such as oysters and mussels. Never eat food prepared by street vendors. Always peel your own fruit if at all possible.
Water Rules:
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Never use the hotel tap water for drinking or brushing your teeth unless you can easily smell chlorine. Don’t allow ice in your drinks and be wary of the hotel water jug which may be in your room each day. Any of the canned drinks or bottles are usually quite safe. Just check the seal first!
Rabies in Turkey:
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This disease is only a particularly risk for travellers who plan to have extended trekking holidays throughout Turkey. Most tourists travelling for a ‘sun’ holiday would be very unfortunate to be exposed but nevertheless care should be taken at all times to ensure that there is no contact with warm blooded animals. This is mainly true for dogs and cats but any infected
warm blooded animal can transmit the disease through its saliva. Any bite, lick or scratch should be treated seriously.
*
Wash out the area
*
Apply an antiseptic
*
Attend for urgent medical attention
Sun Stroke:
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The immense strength of the sun in the Middle East can often be underestimated by the Irish traveller. This is especially true for small children and the elderly. Try and stay out of the direct sunlight between 11am to 4pm. Use a wide brimmed hat if possible to protect yourself. Drink plenty of fluid (about 2 or 3 times as much as in Ireland) and remember to increase your salt intake unless this is contraindicated because of high blood pressure or heart disease etc. Any signs of dehydration should be recognised and treated early (dry lips, headache etc.).
Anthrax:
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This bacterial disease is sometimes contracted by travellers who purchase untreated leather goods while abroad.
Drug Trafficking:
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Remember that Turkey is regarded as a gateway to Europe. Never agree to carry belongings for others unless you are certain of the contents.
Malaria in Turkey:
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The risk of malaria in Turkey is very limited and transmission usually only occurs between the months of March to November in the Çukurova / Amikova areas and from mid-March to mid-October in southeast Anatolia. These are mainly away from the standard tourist routes and so prophylaxis will usually not be required. Nevertheless there may be an abundant supply of mosquitoes and other insects around. Travellers should carry insect repellents and wear longer sleeved clothing when at risk.
Vaccinations for Turkey:
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There are no compulsory vaccines for entry to Turkey from Ireland. However, travellers are advised to ensure that they are adequately covered against Poliomyelitis, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A. Those spending longer in the country or undertaking a trekking holiday may also need to consider vaccination cover against Rabies and Hepatitis B .
Further Information:
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Travellers can obtain further health information for overseas travel by contacting either of our offices. Useful web sites for information on Turkey include;

www.WHO.int
www.CDC.gov
www.FCO.gov.uk

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat 23 Feb 2019
Source: Xinhua [abridged, edited]

Turkey's experts recently warned that epidemic diseases such as measles that have been off the grid for years might come back amid decreasing vaccination rates in the country in the past few years under the influence of anti-vaccine discourse. The anti-vaccination trend started with 183 people in 2011, reaching 980 in 2013 and 5091 in 2015. In 2017, a total of 23 600 families declined compulsory vaccine, professor Mehmet Ceylan, head of paediatric infectious diseases at Ankara's Hacettepe Medical Faculty, said.

The expert warned of an epidemic outbreak if vaccination rates falls under 95 per cent, or some 50 000 people in Turkey. Ceylan said that diseases such as diphtheria and tetanus, which have been off the grid in Turkey for years, might show up again.
 
WHO also voiced concern about the increasing anti-vaccination movement in Turkey. An increasing number of groups were "misleading" the public about the effects of vaccines, harming their trust in getting vaccinated, WHO said.
Turkish health ministry has set up a special website to inform the public about vaccines and to fight false facts. But the anti-vaccination movement is increasingly active on social media, with slogans such as "I have no obligation to vaccinate". A great majority is concerned with the content of the vaccines such as use of mercury or aluminum.

It's obligatory in Turkey that a baby be given a total of 16 different types of vaccination in the 1st 24 months. Parents have to sign an official document holding them responsible, if they reject vaccination. Professor Ata Nevzat Yalcin from Akdeniz University's Faculty of Medicine, Infection Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, warned against the latest trend of increasing measles in Turkey. "The worldwide increase in the disease in 2017 was also observed in our country," he said. There were 572 measles cases in 2014, 342 in 2015, 9 cases in 2016, 69 cases in 2017. In the 1st 9 months of 2018, the number of the cases exceeded 500, he added. Measles arises especially in the spring and winter months, and can cause recurrent epidemics every 2 to 3 years, Yalcin said.

According to the Health Ministry's figures, the measles vaccination rate was 97 per cent in 2015, 98 per cent in 2016, and 96 per cent in 2017. Turkey faced a measles outbreak, which was off the grid for many years, compounded by the arrival of millions of refugees after civil war erupted in neighbouring Syria.

Some 7415 people were diagnosed with measles in Turkey in 2013, but the epidemic was prevented after an intense vaccination program. The number of people diagnosed with measles disease reached 510 in the 1st 9 months of 2018 in Turkey, a recent report of WHO said. According to WHO, the number of global measles cases doubled to 229 068 in 2018, and 82 596 of them were in Europe, mostly caused by stalled vaccination levels.
Date: Wed, 13 Feb 2019 13:01:04 +0100

Beijing, Feb 13, 2019 (AFP) - Beijing has warned its citizens in Turkey to "be more vigilant", as bilateral tensions rise after strong Turkish criticism of China's treatment of its minority Uighur community.   Nearly one million Uighurs and other Turkic-speaking minorities are being held in extrajudicial detention in camps in Xinjiang, according to a UN panel of experts, where most of China's more than 10 million Uighurs live.

Beijing has admitted to placing people in "vocational education centres" to prevent radical Islamism. Critics however allege Uighurs in the camps are being brainwashed in a massive campaign to enforce conformity with Chinese society and abandon Islam.   The northwestern Xinjiang region -- home to some 10 million Uighurs -- has long suffered from violent unrest, which China claims is orchestrated by an organised "terrorist" movement seeking the region's independence.

Turkey, which has its own significant Uighur population, said on Saturday China's treatment of the Uighurs was "a great embarrassment for humanity".   It also called on the international community and the UN "to take effective steps to end the human tragedy in Xinjiang region".   China's embassy to Turkey wrote on its website: "We call once more on Chinese citizens in Turkey and Chinese tourists going to Turkey to be more vigilant and pay attention to their personal security as well as the security of their belongings."

The warning was posted on Sunday, the day after the declarations by the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs.   Violent anti-China protests against the county's treatment of the Uighurs have previously broken out in Turkey. In 2015, militant Turkish nationalists burnt a Chinese flag in front of China's embassy in Ankara.   A popular Chinese restaurant in Istanbul also had its windows smashed and a group of South Korean tourists who were visiting the city was attacked because they were mistaken for Chinese.
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2019 15:25:41 +0100

Istanbul, Jan 31, 2019 (AFP) - Nearly 40 million foreign tourists visited Turkey in 2018, an increase of more than 21 percent, according to tourism ministry figures released on Thursday.    The Turkish tourism industry has been recovering over the last couple of years after a spate of terror attacks in 2015 and 2016 seriously dented the sector as well as a failed coup in July 2016.   "Tourism in Turkey continues to rise and break the records of recent years," the ministry said, adding that there was a rise of 21.84 percent in 2018 from 2017.

Turkey welcomed just over 46 million visitors in 2018, including 39.49 million foreigners and 6.62 million Turkish citizens from abroad.   The number exceeded that of 2015 when 42 million visitors came to Turkey, before a decline of 24.6 percent was recorded in 2016.   The last major terror attack to hit Turkey was during New Year celebrations in 2017 when a gunman killed 39 people at an elite Istanbul nightclub.

Tourism income increased by 12.3 percent to reach $29.5 billion in 2018 compared to the previous year, according to official statistics published by the Turkish statistics office (TUIK) on Thursday.    The 2018 figure was up from $26.3 billion in the previous year, TUIK said.   Official data revealed that 81.8 percent of the income came from foreign visitors and 18.2 percent from Turkish citizens living abroad.   Nearly six million foreigners coming to Turkey in 2018 were from Russia -- an increase of 26.49 percent compared with 2017 -- and 4.5 million visitors were from Germany, up by 25.88 percent from the previous year, according to the ministry's statement.

Around 1.5 million people visited Ephesus in western Turkey -- where the remains of one of the "Seven Wonders of the World", the famous Temple of Artemis lies -- in 2018.   But in 2017, the figure was lower at 996,800 visitors, the tourism ministry said.   During one weekend in January, several groups of tourists were enjoying the Ephesus ruins, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2015 and is the fifth most visited site in Turkey.   Some of my friends warned me: 'you know all the events that happened two, three years ago?' Shi, a Chinese tourist at Ephesus, said. "I think now it is OK. I don't worry about that."
Date: Sun, 27 Jan 2019 14:27:53 +0100

Ankara, Jan 27, 2019 (AFP) - A tornado hit the Turkish resort of Antalya, injuring a dozen people, overturning buses and damaging airplanes at the airport with officials warning on Sunday of the risk of more bad weather.   After the tornado battered the area in the south on Saturday, Antalya Governor Munir Karaloglu said 12 people were injured and two buses were blown over at the airport.   Two planes and a police helicopter were also partly damaged, Karaloglu said.   It was the fifth tornado in three days, the governor's office said.   The governorate on Sunday warned the public on Twitter that the risk of another tornado as well as strong winds, flooding and lightning remained in the province's east.   Former Antalya MP and current Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu on Sunday told reporters that two people were killed after storms and flooding in the east of the province.

Turkish state news agency Anadolu had reported on Thursday that two people had died after a tornado hit Kumluca and Finike districts, while at least 10 others were wounded.   Search and rescue teams on Sunday were looking for a 20-year-old university student who went missing after her car was hit by the tornado as she was on her way to visit her mother and father, Anadolu said.   Environment Minister Murat Kurum said 315 buildings had been damaged in the past two days in the province because of bad weather.   President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday said during a rally in Antalya that the material damage had reached nearly 100 million Turkish lira ($19 million; 16.6 million euros).
Date: 6 Sep 2018
Source: Ahval [edited]

Turkey has been hit by a new anthrax outbreak in the southeast, as a district in Turkey's southeastern province of Bitlis has been quarantined after 81 cows died over a week because of anthrax, Cumhuriyet newspaper said on Thursday [6 Sep 2018], citing a Milli Gazete [Turkish newspaper] report. All cattle in the Gunkiri district in Bitlis have been vaccinated, and local authorities have said the animals in surrounding areas will also be vaccinated as a precaution against an outbreak. Security forces have been checking cattle entering and leaving the district, and sales of meat and dairy products have been banned.

Dozens were taken to hospital on Saturday [1 Sep 2018] over suspicions of anthrax in Istanbul, after anthrax was detected in Turkey's capital of Ankara and eastern province of Sivas among cattle imported from Brazil. The Turkish Animal Rights Federation on Thursday [6 Sep 2018] claimed that a Panama-flagged ship allegedly carrying anthrax-infected animals has been waiting at the southern entrance of Istanbul's Bosphorus Strait. "We also received reports that animals dying of anthrax were thrown into Marmara Sea," the animal rights group said on Twitter.

Ali Seker, a deputy of the main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP), has filed a parliamentary question asking the Minister of Agriculture to inform the public about the ship, which he said had been waiting at Istanbul's Ahirkapi anchor point for 20 days and carried cattle bought from Brazil, Cumhuriyet reported on Thursday [6 Sep 2018].

Meanwhile, reports of anthrax outbreaks in different parts of Turkey have created panic and outcry on social media. "Help! Doesn't this country have willpower? We are being poisoned," Gokhan Ozoguz, the singer of the famous Turkish band Athena said on Twitter on Thursday [6 Sep 2018]. "Not just anyone would be able to add the fear of contracting anthrax when we eat meatballs for lunch to all our other day-to-day worries. I'd like to congratulate all those involved," another Twitter user said.

Binali Yildirim, Turkey's former Prime Minister and Parliamentary Spokesperson in office, asked the Minister of Health to taste the meat first during a reception in Turkish Parliament on Wednesday [5 Sep 2018], Diken news site reported. Yet pro-government newspaper Yeni Safak on Tuesday [4 Sep 2018] said that some domestic producers, which it labeled as "meat barons," were using the reports of anthrax outbreaks to manipulate the market and increase prices.
========================
[To find Bitlis province on the western side of Lake Van, go to

Anthrax is enzootic in eastern Turkey and a constant problem, so I am puzzled as to why this outbreak in Bitlis got away from them. Getting all the district cattle promptly vaccinated after the event will slow down new cases. It is hoped that authorities are getting on with vaccinating the cattle in the surrounding districts as well because with 81 sick and dead cows to feed on, the Gunkiri tabanid female flies will be ranging outward to snack with their mouthparts already contaminated on cattle and even the occasional human. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
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Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

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World Travel News Headlines

31st May 2019

A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali erupted Friday, spewing a plume of ash and smoke more than 2,000 metres (6,500 feet) into the sky. Mount Agung, about 70 kilometres from the tourist hub of Kuta, has been erupting periodically since it rumbled back to life in 2017, sometimes grounding flights and forcing residents to flee their homes.
Mount Agung is about 70 kilometres from the tourist hub of Kuta

The latest shortly before noon on Friday shot a cloud of volcanic ash high into the sky, but caused no disruption to flights, Indonesia's geological agency said.  Agung remained at the second highest danger warning level, and there is a four-kilometre no-go zone around the crater.

Last summer, dozens of flights were cancelled after Agung erupted, while tens of thousands of locals fled to evacuation centres after an eruption in 2017.

The last major eruption of Agung in 1963 killed around 1,600 people.

Indonesia is situated on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", a vast zone of geological instability where the collision of tectonic plates causes frequent quakes and major volcanic activity.

31st May 2019

Heatwaves across India have exacted heavy casualties this year, including dozens of deaths by sunstroke and other heat-related causes. The deaths have been mainly reported from states like Maharashtra (particularly Vidarbha), Andhra Pradesh (mainly Rayalseema) and Telangana, due to the temperature extremes in these regions. What's worrying is, a study suggests that the heatwave conditions are likely to increase from next year and continue till 2064 because of El Niño Modoki and depletion in soil moisture. Here's how the heatwave is taking a toll in the above states.

Maharashtra

Parts of Maharashtra have been reeling under high temperatures accompanied by severe heatwave condition during this summer. According to a report in The Times Of India, a 50-year old man in Beed succumbed to death because of heatstroke recently, taking the overall number to 8. Reports show a total of 456 cases of heat-related illnesses in Maharashtra this summer. Last year, the number of cases reported was 568. However, the death toll this year is more than last year's figure of 2 victims.

Regions like Nagpur and Akola show the most number of deaths and illnesses in the Vidarbha region. About 163 cases of heat-related illness were reported in Nagpur and 76 ailments were reported in Latur region. Recently, Chandrapur in Maharashtra (which lies 150km south of Nagpur) registered a day temperature of 48°C, the highest recorded in India this summer.

Andhra Pradesh

Parts of Andhra Pradesh have been experiencing temperatures of 45°C and more since the last few days. These conditions have persisted in the state after the heavy rains caused by Cyclone Fani.

Two women going on a two-wheeler and covered themselves with scarfs to protect themselves from the heat wave, in Vijayawada
(Mahesh G, TOI, BCCL, Vijayawada.)

Three people have died in Andhra Pradesh due to heat-related causes this year. Also, 433 people have been diagnosed with heatstroke. Earlier this month, electrical transformers had blown up in many parts of Krishna and Guntur districts, disrupting power supply for more than five hours and intensifying the effects of heatwave conditions and the severe temperatures.

In 2015, Andhra Pradesh experienced the most number of heat deaths in the country: 1,369 people died that year from heat-related illnesses.

Telangana

Seventeen people have succumbed in Telangana over the last 22 days. However, the number of unconfirmed deaths is expected to be higher. The region saw 541 heat-related deaths in 2015, and 27 in 2018. The farmers and those who work in the sun are usually the ones to be affected the most by high temperatures and heatwave conditions.

As heat blankets the country, make sure you stay protected. Follow official guidelines and do not step out in the Sun, especially in the afternoon hours, unless absolutely necessary.

(With inputs from The Times Of India.)

11th June 2019
https://afro.who.int/news/confirmation-case-ebola-virus-disease-uganda

Kampala, 11 June 2019 - The Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) have confirmed a case of Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda. Although there have been numerous previous alerts, this is the first confirmed case in Uganda during the Ebola outbreak on-going in neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The confirmed case is a 5-year-old child from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who travelled with his family on 9th June 2019. The child and his family entered the country through Bwera Border post and sought medical care at Kagando hospital where health workers identified Ebola as a possible cause of illness. The child was transferred to Bwera Ebola Treatment Unit for management. The confirmation was made today by the Uganda Virus Institute (UVRI). The child is under care and receiving supportive treatment at Bwera ETU, and contacts are being monitored.

The Ministry of Health and WHO have dispatched a Rapid Response Team to Kasese to identify other people who may be at risk, and ensure they are monitored and provided with care if they also become ill. Uganda has previous experience managing Ebola outbreaks. In preparation for a possible imported case during the current outbreak in DRC, Uganda has vaccinated nearly 4700 health workers in 165 health facilities (including in the facility where the child is being cared for); disease monitoring has been intensified; and health workers trained on recognizing symptoms of the disease. Ebola Treatment Units are in place.

In response to this case, the Ministry is intensifying community education, psychosocial support and will undertake vaccination for those who have come into contact with the patient and at-risk health workers who were not previously vaccinated.  

Ebola virus disease is a severe illness that is spread through contact with the body fluids of a person sick with the disease (fluids such as vomit, faeces or blood). First symptoms are similar to other diseases and thus require vigilant health and community workers, especially in areas where there is Ebola transmission, to help make diagnosis. Symptoms can be sudden and include:
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
People who have been in contact with someone with the disease are offered vaccine and asked to monitor their health for 21 days to ensure they do not become ill as well.

The investigational vaccine being used in DRC and by health and frontline workers in Uganda has so far been effective in protecting people from developing the disease, and has helped those who do develop the disease to have a better chance of survival. The Ministry strongly urges those who are identified as contacts to take this protective measure.

Investigational therapeutics and advanced supportive care, along with patients seeking care early once they have symptoms, increase chances of survival.

The Ministry of Health has taken the following actions to contain spread of the disease in the country:
  • The District administration and local councils in the affected area have been directed to ensure that any person with Ebola signs and symptoms in the community is reported to the health workers immediately and provided with advice and testing.
  • The Ministry of Health is setting up units in the affected district and at referral hospitals to handle cases if they occur.
  • •Social mobilization activities are being intensified and education materials are being disseminated.

There are no confirmed cases in any other parts of the country.

The Ministry is working with international partners coordinated by the World Health Organization.

The Ministry of Health appeals to the general public and health workers to work together closely, to be vigilant and support each other in helping anyone with symptoms to receive care quickly. The Ministry will continue to update the general public on progress and new developments.
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 14:24:43 +0200

Lima, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Peru has declared a health emergency in five regions, including Lima, after the deaths of at least four people linked to Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system.   Health Minister Zulema Tomas said Sunday that in addition to the deaths there were currently 206 cases of the disease.   "We have an outbreak, there has been a brusque increase" since June 5, Tomas said on state-run TV Peru, adding that health authorities were taking steps to control and contain the disease.

While the syndrome is not contagious, a 90-day health emergency was declared because the current cases "have unusual and atypical characteristics that require rapid or immediate initial treatment," Peru's Institute of Neurological Sciences said.   The precise cause of the disorder is unknown, but most cases develop after a person has been sick with diarrhoea or a respiratory infection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US says its research suggests that the syndrome is "strongly associated" with the Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness.   The regions affected by GBS include three on the country's northern coast -- Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad -- tourist destinations known for their archaeological sites and beaches.   Also included was the central region of Junin and Lima, which has nine million inhabitants.   Two deaths were reported in Piura, one in La Libertad and another in Junin.
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 16:39:03 +0200

Madrid, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Three tourists have fallen from their hotel balconies in Spain's Balearic Islands in recent days, one of them dying on impact, police said Monday as the summer season in the party archipelago begins.   The incidents came as Britain's foreign office warned holidaymakers heading to Spain against "balcony falls" and asked them not to "take unnecessary risks... particularly if you're under the influence of drink or drugs."   On Friday in Magaluf, a party resort notorious for its booze-fuelled tourism, a 19-year-old British man fell to his death from the second floor of his hotel, Spain's Civil Guard police force said.

A spokesman said police were looking at two theories -- either "he threw himself off voluntarily, or he fell by accident."   He did not know whether the victim had consumed drugs or alcohol.   On Thursday, a 35-year-old German man fell from the second floor of his hotel too, this time in Palma de Majorca, and was seriously injured, police said.   A source close to the probe, who declined to be named, said the man had drunk, dozed off, woken up and subsequently fallen from the balcony, possibly disorientated.   And on Monday, an Australian man in his early thirties fell from the second floor of his hotel in Ibiza and was seriously hurt, police said, without giving further details.

Balcony falls happen every year in the Balearic Islands and other party resorts in Spain, most of them due to excessive drinking or drug-taking/   Some are accidental slips, while others happen when tourists miss while trying to jump into pools or onto another balcony -- a practice known as "balconing."   The British foreign office's online travel advice for Spain has an entire section warning against "balcony falls".   "There have been a number of very serious accidents (some fatal) as a result of falls from balconies," says the website.    "Many of these incidents have involved British nationals and have had a devastating impact on those involved and their loved ones."
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 06:44:54 +0200

Sydney, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Australian police said Monday they were scouring bushland for a Belgian teenage tourist missing in a popular surf town for more than a week.   Theo Hayez, an 18-year-old backpacker, was last seen on May 31 at a hotel in the coastal tourist town of Byron Bay -- some 750 kilometres (470 miles) north of Sydney -- New South Wales state police said.   "We have a large amount of resources searching... in bushland that is towards the east and northeast of the town," police Chief Inspector Matthew Kehoe said in a statement.   "We are advised that this disappearance is completely out of character for him."   Police said they were alerted to his disappearance on Thursday after he failed to return to a hostel he was staying in.   Hayez's passport and personal belongings were all left at the hostel, and police believe he had not made any financial transactions since his disappearance or used his mobile phone.
Date: Sat 8 Jun 2019
Source: New Jersey 101.5 [edited]

The potentially deadly Powassan tick-borne virus has been confirmed in 2 Sussex county residents, one of whom died last month [May 2019], state health officials confirmed [Sat 8 Jun 2019].

The Powassan virus is spread by the deer tick [_Ixodes scapularis_]. The illness is rarer than Lyme disease, which is also spread by the tick, but 10% of people who contract the [Powassan virus] illness die from it.

A Department of Health official on [Sat 8 Jun 2019] said that the department had not determined the cause of death for the patient who died last month [May 2019] but said that lab results this week [week of 3 Jun 2019] confirmed that he had the virus.

A 2nd victim continues to recover at home.

Symptoms of the virus include brain swelling, meningitis, fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, loss of coordination, trouble speaking, and memory loss. Symptoms can appear a week to a month after a tick bite, although some people show no symptoms and do not require treatment.

There is no vaccine or cure for the disease. Treatment includes hospitalization, support for breathing, and intravenous fluids.

Prevention involves the same precautions that should be taken to avoid Lyme disease: avoid wooded areas with tall grasses, use insect repellent while outdoors, and check for ticks after being outdoors.

Powassan [virus] -- first discovered in Powassan, Ontario, in 1958 -- has been confirmed in recent years in New Jersey, with one case each in 2013, 2014, and 2015, and 4 cases in 2017, the most recent year for which data is available. The cases were reported in Sussex, Warren, Morris, and Essex counties.

Between 2008 and 2017, there were 125 confirmed cases in the entire country and 9 deaths.

A person who said they were close to the man who died last month [May 2019] posted on Facebook that the man was bitten in the arm by a tick while gardening and fell ill about 2 weeks later. The Facebook post said that there was no bull's-eye mark around the bite -- a known tell-tale sign for Lyme infection. About a day before he was hospitalized, the man reported feeling like he was coming down with a cold and had a high fever.

State health department's tip sheet for preventing Powassan [virus infection]:
- avoid contact with ticks by avoiding wooded areas with high grass;
- when hiking, stay on the center of the trail;
- picnic in areas away from wooded and bushy areas;
- keep children on playground equipment and away from tall grass and shrubs;
- when outdoors, apply insect repellents;
- wear light-colored clothes so it is easy to see and remove ticks;
- wear long-sleeve shirts and pants;
- tuck long pants into socks so ticks cannot crawl under pants;
- do tick checks every couple hours while outdoors and before coming indoors;
- if you see a tick during tick checks, remove it right away;
- keep grass mowed short;
- keep children's toys, playground equipment, pools, and lawn furniture at least 15 feet [4.6 m] from wooded areas;
- create a woodchip or mulch border between your yard and wooded areas;
- keep areas under bird feeders and pet dishes clean, so they do not attract animals that may carry ticks;
- keep trash in closed containers or areas so it does not attract animals that may carry ticks.  [Byline: Sergio Bichao]
=======================
[Powassan virus is endemic in New Jersey, and cases occur there sporadically. The tick vector is the deer tick, _Ixodes scapularis_. Humans become infected with POWV during spillover transmission from the natural transmission cycles. In humans, POWV can be a causative agent of a severe neuroinvasive illness, with 50% of survivors displaying long-term neurological sequelae. Individuals living or visiting areas where the deer tick occurs, should follow the above recommendations to avoid tick bites. If a tick is found feeding, it should be removed with forceps or tweezers grasping the tick at skin level and then gentle, constant force applied. The tick should never be removed by grasping it with thumb and forefinger, as squeezing the tick may cause inoculation of contents containing the pathogenic agent into the feeding site.

POWV was recognized as a human pathogen in 1958, when a young boy died of severe encephalitis in Powassan, Ontario, Canada. In that case, POWV was isolated from the brain autopsy. There are 2 distinct genetic lineages now recognized: POWV (lineage I) and deer tick virus (lineage II). Since the index case in 1958, over 100 human cases of POWV have been reported, with an apparent rise in disease incidence in the past 16 years. This recent increase in cases may represent a true emergence of POWV in regions where the tick vector species are prevalent, or it could represent an increase in POWV surveillance and diagnosis. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of New Jersey, United States:
New Jersey county map:
Date: 6 Jun 2019
Source: Washington Post [edited]

Dominican government officials released more-detailed autopsy results on Thursday [6 Jun 2019] for 3 American tourists who died at adjacent beach resorts owned by the same hotel company during the last week of May 2019.

All 3 victims experienced eerily similar symptoms and internal trauma before their deaths, according to a news release from Dominican authorities. Pathologists said autopsies showed the 3 had internal haemorrhaging, pulmonary oedema, and enlarged hearts.

Toxicology reports are pending [These are likely to be the most interesting. - ProMED Mod.TG].

A U.S. State Department official said authorities have not yet established a connection between the 30 May 2019 deaths of 49-year-old CAD, and 63-year-old NEH, both of Prince George's County, MD, and the death on 25 May 2019 of 41-year-old MSW of Pennsylvania.

The FBI is providing Dominican law enforcement with "technical assistance with the toxicology reports," the State Department official said.

MSW had just checked into the Luxury Bahia Principe Bouganville, in the town of San Pedro de Macoris, and was taking pictures from her room balcony when she started to feel ill.

Less than 2 hours later, she was dead, local authorities said.

The bodies of CAD and HEH were found inside their room at the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana after relatives grew concerned because they had not checked out of the resort.

The hotels are located next to each other on the island's southern coast, about 60 miles from the tourist-heavy Punta Cana area.

Dominican authorities initially did not run toxicology tests for MSW because there were no signs of violence, said Ramon Brito, a spokesman for the National Police's special tourism unit. After the Maryland couple was found, investigators ordered a set of tests to determine whether anything the 3 Americans consumed may have led to their deaths, Brito said.  [Byline: Arelis R. Hernandez]
Date: 31 May 2019
Source: 4 News [edited]

The Alachua County Health Department is warning residents that there are 12 confirmed cases of mumps, primarily from college students at the University of Florida.  "This is a little more than usual," says Steve Orlando, University of Florida spokesman.

Alachua County normally receives around 2 reported cases a year, and UF believes more students could be infected.  "So, it's curious because these are individuals who are vaccinated, and that's what we are seeing nationwide," says Paul Myers, Alachua County Health Department administrator.

Officials say it is still unclear why there has been an uptick with the virus. So far, the CDC shows 736 people have contracted mumps nationwide in 2019.

"The sharing of the utensils, sharing of the cups, sharing of the water bottles, you know it is a very common thing for students to share those things, and that's exactly the kind of thing that could lead to transmission," says Orlando.
Date: Sat 8 Jun 2019
Source: Business Standard [edited]

As many as 14 children have died due to acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in the district, while over a dozen are admitted in hospitals with high fever and other symptoms of the infection.

Sunil Shahi, Superintendent of Shri Krishna Medical College and Hospital (SKMCH), told ANI, "We have received 38 patients so far; most of them have a deficiency of glucose in their blood. Of these, 2 have also tested JE [Japanese encephalitis] positive; the overall casualty till now is 14."

Dr Gopal Sahni, head of Critical Care Unit, said, "When heat and humidity rise, the body's sweat cannot evaporate. The humidity level is over 50 per cent in the last few days. We have about 15 such children admitted in the hospital currently, and 89 such cases come regularly."

Encephalitis is a viral infection, which causes mild flu-like symptoms such as a fever or a headache.
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[Again, this year (2019), cases of AES and JE are appearing in north-western India. Of the 14 AES cases, 2 tested positive for JE. The aetiology of the remaining cases is not stated, but the majority are reported as hypoglycaemic. As noted previously, frequently, in reports of JE cases in India, acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) of undefined aetiology is often mentioned with JE cases that are a minority of those hospitalized.

The determination of the aetiology or aetiologies of AES has been confusing and elusive. Various etiological agents have been proposed in recent years as responsible for AES cases. AES has continued to be attributed to a variety of aetiologies, including Reye syndrome-like disease, possible enterovirus infection from polluted water, heatstroke, lychee fruit consumption, and scrub typhus (_Orientia tsutsugamushi_). Recently, scrub typhus has been implicated in many AES cases. A recent publication (reference below) states that dengue virus is one of the 3 most common agents identified in acute encephalitis syndrome (AES). Unfortunately, existing surveillance for AES does not include routine testing for dengue. Dengue accounts for 5% of AES cases in India, especially in the absence of laboratory evidence for other pathogens tested. Dengue should be added to the list of possible AES etiological agents.

Reference:
Vasanthapuram Ravi, Shafeeq Keeran Shahul Hameed, Anita Desai, Reeta Subramaniam Mani, Vijayalakshmi Reddy, et al.: Dengue virus is an under-recognised causative agent of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES): Results from a 4-year AES surveillance study of Japanese encephalitis in selected states of India. International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2019. doi: <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2019.01.008>.

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