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Anguilla

Anguilla US Consular Information Sheet
March 03, 2009
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Anguilla is a British overseas territory in the Caribbean, part of the British West Indies. It is a small but rapidly developing island with particularly well-developed
ourist facilities.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 requires all travelers to and from the Caribbean, Bermuda, Panama, Mexico and Canada to have a valid passport to enter or re-enter the United States. U.S. citizens must have a valid U.S. passport if traveling by air, including to and from Mexico.
If traveling by sea, U.S. citizens can use a passport or passport card. We strongly encourage all American citizen travelers to apply for a U.S. passport or passport card well in advance of anticipated travel.
American citizens can visit travel.state.gov or call 1-877-4USA-PPT (1-877-487-2778) for information on how to apply for their passports.

In addition to a valid passport, U.S. citizens need onward or return tickets, and sufficient funds for their stay.
A departure tax is charged at the airport or ferry dock when leaving. For further information, travelers may contact the British Embassy, 19 Observatory Circle NW, Washington, DC
20008; telephone (202) 588-7800; or the nearest consulate of the United Kingdom in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, Denver, Houston, Miami, Orlando, Seattle, or San Francisco. Visit the British Embassy web site for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
While Anguilla's crime rate is relatively low, both petty and violent crimes
do occur. Travelers should take common-sense precautions to ensure their personal security, such as avoiding carrying large amounts of cash or displaying expensive jewelry. Travelers should not leave valuables unattended in hotel rooms or on the beach. They should use hotel safety deposit facilities to safeguard valuables and travel documents. Similarly, they should keep their lodgings locked at all times, whether they are present or away, and should not leave valuables in their vehicles, even when locked.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

The local emergency line in Anguilla is 911.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
There is only one hospital, Princess Alexandra Hospital (telephone: 264-497-2551), and a handful of clinics on Anguilla, so medical facilities are limited.
Serious problems requiring extensive care or major surgery may require evacuation to the United States, often at considerable expense.

There are no formal, documented HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to and foreign residents of Anguilla, but there have been anecdotal reports of exclusion.
Please verify this information with the British Embassy before you travel.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site.
Further health information for travelers
is available from the WHO.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Anguilla is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Unlike the U.S., traffic in Anguilla moves on the left. The few roads on the island are generally poorly paved and narrow. While traffic generally moves at a slow pace, with the increasing number of young drivers in Anguilla, there are occasional severe accidents caused by excessive speed. Although emergency services, including tow truck service, are limited and inconsistent, local residents are often willing to provide roadside assistance. For police, fire, or ambulance service dial 911.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
Visit the Government of Anguilla web site for further road safety information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
Civil aviation operations in Anguilla fall under the jurisdiction of British authorities. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of the United Kingdom’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Anguilla’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA web site.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Anguilla laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Anguilla are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Anguilla are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department's travel registration web site and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Anguilla. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy with consular responsibility over Anguilla is located in Bridgetown, Barbados in the Wildey Business Park in suburban Wildey, southeast of downtown Bridgetown.
The main number for the Consular Section is (246) 431-0225; after hours, the Embassy duty officer can be reached by calling (246) 436-4950.
Visit the U.S. Embassy Bridgetown online for more information.
Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, except Barbadian and U.S. holidays.
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Anguilla dated April 2, 2008, to update sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Information for Victims of Crime, and Medical Facilities and Health Information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2017 19:31:32 +0200

Paris, Sept 9, 2017 (AFP) - France's meteorological agency on Saturday issued its highest warning for the Caribbean islands of St Martin and St Barts as Hurricane Jose bore down, three days after they were hit by Hurricane Irma.   The alert warned of a "dangerous event of exceptional intensity," with winds that could reach 120 kilometres (75 miles) per hour, and strong rains and high waves.

St Barts is a French overseas territory, as is the French part of St Martin, which is divided between France and the Netherlands.   Twelve people were killed on the two islands by Hurricane Irma, thousands of buildings were flattened and the authorities are struggling to control looting.   The French state-owned reinsurer CCR on Saturday estimated the damage at 1.2 billion euros ($1.4 billion).   Irma is now heading for Florida, where a total of 6.3 million people have been ordered to evacuate, according to state authorities.
Date: Tue 29 Apr 2014
Source: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment [edited]

1 Oct 2013-29 Apr 2014 (week 18) St Maarten - Since the last report (week 15 [17?]) 52 new cases have been confirmed among St Maarten residents. Up to 29 Apr 2014, now a total of 343 confirmed cases have been reported. One of these confirmed cases was hospitalized.

The median age of the confirmed patients was 44 years, range 4-92 years. Of those cases for which gender was available, 201 were female and 130 were male.

- On 6 Dec 2013, the 1st indigenous chikungunya [virus infection] case of St Maarten was reported. Retrospectively, the 1st patient with suspected complaints was reported in mid-October 2013 in St Martin.
------------------------------------
Communicated by:
Roland Hubner
Superior Health Council
Brussels
Belgium
=====================
[The report also has graphs showing case numbers over time.

Maps of St Martin/St Maarten can be accessed at
Date: 5-11 May 2014
Source: Institut de Veille Sanitaire (French Institute for Public Health Surveillance, InVS) [edited]

Cases since the beginning of the outbreak in December 2013:
- St Martin: (susp) 3240 cases; deaths 3; stable.
- St Barthelemy: (susp) 500 cases; stable.
- Martinique: (susp) 24 180; deaths 3; increasing.
- Guadeloupe: (susp) 13 600 cases; deaths 1; increasing.
- French Guiana: (susp) not available; (probable or confirmed) 122 cases with 83 locally acquired; increasing, with a new cluster in Kourou and 2 near Cayenne.
======================
[The 16 May 2014 report from Guyaweb (<http://www.guyaweb.com/actualites/news/sciences-et-environnement/le-chik-revient-kourou-setend-cayenne-desormais-saint-laurent/>) states that there are 2 new cases in Saint-Laurent-du-Maroni, overlooking the Suriname River, of which one is certainly autochthonous, and a new focal point occurred in Kourou with 4 cases.

Maps of the area can be seen at
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/35574>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
Date: 7-13 Apr 2014
Source: INVS Point Sanitaire No. 14 [in French, trans. ProMed Mod.TY, edited]

Cases since the beginning of the outbreak in December, 2013:
- St. Martin: (susp.) 2980 cases, (probable and conf.) 793 cases; Deaths 3; Decreasing.
- Saint Barthelemy: (susp.) 460 cases, (probable or confirmed) 135 cases; Decreasing.
- Martinique: (susp.) 16 000, (probable or confirmed) 1473 cases; Deaths 2; Increasing.
- Guadeloupe: (susp.) 4710 cases, (probable or confirmed) 1261 cases; Deaths 1; In epidemic status.
- French Guiana: (susp.) 7 cases with 4 locally acquired, (probable or confirmed) 39 cases with 26 locally acquired) 30 cases; (imported) 16 cases; Moderate to increasing; Half of probable and confirmed cases are located in Kourou; however indigenous cases have also been recorded from the Cayenne Matoury, Remire and Macouria communities.
=================
[Maps showing case distributions on each island can be accessed at the above URL. - ProMed Mod.TY]
Date: Thu 27 Mar 2014
Source: The Daily Herald [edited]

As St. Maarten continues to take measures to combat the spread of the chikungunya virus, the number of cases continues to climb.

Health Minister Cornelius de Weever announced on Wednesday [26 Mar 2014], that the total number of confirmed chikungunya cases thus far stood at 224.

De Weever also announced that government will be signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with French St. Martin as a means of collectively responding to the mosquito threat that puts the population at risk. He said both sides have been working closely together to address the dengue and chikungunya threats.

The MOU will cover, amongst other things, a regular exchange of epidemiological information on vector-borne diseases and collectively publishing and representing data collected under the agreement.

The need for collective information campaigns and enhancement of the mosquito vector-control programme will also be included in the MOU. The MOU also describes the need for planning execution and evaluation of collective responses to the chikungunya threat.
=========================
[The increase in the number of chikungunya virus infections over the past week in St. Maarten is of concern, rising from 123 cases to 224 cases. This number is confirmed in another report that also indicates that there are an additional 325 suspected cases (<http://www.rivm.nl/dsresource?type=pdf&disposition=inline&objectid=rivmp:239786>).  - ProMed Mod.TY]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/35574>.]
More ...

South Africa

General Introduction: The Republic of South Africa lies at the Southern tip of the African continent, flanked between the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Although it lies close to the tropic of Capricorn, the inland areas are tempered by the relatively high a
titudes. Summers and winters are opposite to that found in Ireland. In South Africa the summer extents from October to March. Although South Africa is basically a developed country, much of its population, particularly in rural parts, live in poverty. However facilities for tourists in urban areas and game parks are generally excellent. Despite all the well documented reports overall violence against tourists is usually low but obviously care should always be taken. Travelling late at night is usually unwise and take particular care if visiting nightclubs etc.
Climate: There is generally a moderate climate with sunny days and cool nights. The Cape Town region has a mean yearly temperature of 170C while Johannesburg has an annual mean temperature of 160C. This is mainly because Johannesburg is at 5,700 feet altitude. Throughout South Africa, summer extends between October and March and winter is between June and September. In Johannesburg the winter months tend to be dry and cool while the rainy season tends to occur during the warmer summer months.
Health Facilities: In the larger cities of Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban & Pretoria and many others there will be no difficulty in receiving excellent medical attention. However when travelling throughout the more isolated rural regions the same situation does not occur. Travellers should always ensure that they are up-to-date in their routine travel vaccinations. World Travel Medicine Consultants (WTMC) in South Africa offer excellent medical facilities in many of the main centres. Contact by email their head office at for further information.
Jet Lag: Even though the hour changes from Ireland are not great after flying for approximately 13 hours you will arrive tired. On the plane journey take some exercise by walking around and occasionally stretching your calf muscles to lessen any risk of blood clots. If you are on the contraceptive pill (women only!) this will increase your risk on a long haul flight and you should talk this through with the doctor looking after your health care advice and vaccines. On arrival, try and rest for the first 24 hours to allow your body to catch up with itself. If lying by the pool remember not to fall asleep and wake some hours later with significant sunburn!
Mosquito-Borne Disease: Mosquitoes are most often associated with Malaria, however it is not the only disease which the insect may carry. Insect repellents which contain more than 30% DEET are effective for keeping mosquitoes away but remember to cover your arms and legs when they are biting. This is mainly in the hours between dusk and dawn. The risk of malaria can be reduced by taking malarial prophylaxis on a regular basis if you are planning to visit the risk areas. Anti malaria tablets are advised for those visiting low altitude areas especially areas around the Kruger National Park, north, east and western Transvaal, and the costal lowlands of Natal. Large towns and cities and high altitudes are more likely to be free of mosquitoes.
Effects of Heat: Extreme climate conditions can also lead to gastrointestinal difficulties but don't forget that when you perspire you will loose both water and salt. Replacing the lost water is easy but many travellers forget to replace the salt in their diet. This can lead to muscular cramps, tiredness and lethargy, a dull headache and generally feeling cross and out of sorts. Replacing depleted salt is most easily achieved by sprinkling it on your meals. Salt tablets can be dangerous and are best avoided except in expert hands. If you have any blood pressure difficulties then it will be important to talk this whole issue through with your doctor before leaving Ireland.
Waterborne diseases: Water sources in well developed urban areas of South Africa are generally safe. Outside the main cities caution must always be exercised with regard to drinking water. Safe water should be well chlorinated and so will have a distinct chlorine odour. Sealed bottled water is more preferable especially in less developed areas. Avoid ice in your drinks as its source may be unknown and don't brush your teeth in water you wouldn't want to drink. If unsure be careful and use sealed bottled water from one of the hotels.
Food-Borne Disease: Again, in the larger cities and tourist resorts, the food and its preparation is generally of an excellent standard and you should experience no problems. It is advised however to avoid eating shellfish and cold/rare meats. In particular, Capetown is famous for its various shellfish meals. Personally I would strongly encourage travellers to avoid them even in the best hotels and restaurants. It is just not worth the risk. As in any hot climate it is also wise to choose only the type of fruit you can peel yourself. Above all avoid buying or consuming food from roadside stalls or street vendors.
Rabies in South Africa: Travellers need to be aware that this potentially fatal viral condition occurs throughout Africa. The risk to any tourist or business traveller is very small but common sense needs to be maintained at all times. The disease is mainly transmitted through the bite of an infected warm blooded animal. Usually dogs and cats are involved but also be very careful of monkeys. If bitten by any potentially at risk animal wash out the wound immediately, apply a strong antiseptic and seek medical attention urgently
Yellow Fever: A yellow fever vaccination certificate is only required for travellers coming from endemic zones in Africa and the Americas. Travellers on scheduled airlines whose flights have originated outside the areas regarded as infected (or who are only in transit through these areas) are NOT required to possess a certificate.
If the flight originated from within a Yellow fever endemic area a certificate is then required.

Vaccination Schedule: Apart from Yellow Fever vaccine in certain circumstances, as mentioned above, there are no other vaccinations required for entry into South Africa from Ireland. Nevertheless there are a number of recommended vaccines for most travellers which need to be discussed. For trekking holidays or extended visits Rabies and Hepatitis B may need to be considered. Most travellers should start their vaccines at least 4 to 6 weeks before departure.
Further Information: South Africa is a beautiful destination with much to offer. Further general health information on staying healthy while travelling abroad may be obtained from the Tropical Medical Bureau. www.tmb.ie

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 8 May 2019
Source: African News Agency (ANA) [edited]

A case of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) has been confirmed in a 54-year-old man in North West, the provincial health department said. It said [CP] was in a stable condition, conscious, communicating and responding well to treatment at the Klerksdorp Tshepong hospital complex. "[CP] from a farm between Ventersdorp and Coligny in the North West province was admitted in the Klerksorp Hospital HID (highly infectious disease) unit with the history of Crimean-Congo fever at 16:45," hospital CEO Polaki Mokatsane said.

The statement said [CP] had visited a neighbouring farm on [26 Apr 2019] and later found a tick on his head, which he crushed with his fingers. Two days later, he experienced headache that recurred continuously despite taking painkillers.

He saw some redness on his skin on [30 Apr 2019] and consulted a private hospital in Potchefstroom, where he was admitted and discharged on [1 May 2019] after blood tests were done.

Later the same day [CP] was recalled to the hospital, as his blood levels were said to be low. He was admitted and transferred to the ICU isolation unit in the same facility on [3 May 2019].

The National Institute for Communicable Diseases confirmed he had CCHF, a viral disease with symptoms that may include fever, muscle pains, headache, vomiting, diarrhoea and bleeding into the skin.

[CP] was transferred to the North West provincial HID unit at Klerksdorp Hospital.
======================
[Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) cases occur sporadically in South Africa, with a yearly average of 5. CCHF virus is typically transmitted by the so-called "bontpoot" ticks, 3 species of _Hyalomma_ ticks (_Hyalomma rufipes_, _ Hyalomma glabrum_, and _ Hyalomma truncatum_). There are 3 species of _Hyalomma_ in South Africa, and although they are widely distributed, the ticks tend to be most numerous in the drier northwestern parts of the country -- the Karoo, western Free State, Northern Cape and North West Province (<http://www.nicd.ac.za/assets/files/CCHF_FAQ-General_Public.pdf>).

Human CCHF cases have been reported annually from South Africa since 1981, when it was 1st recognized in the country; between 0 and 20 cases of CCHF are diagnosed each year. Through nearly 30 years of passive surveillance, a total of 187 cases has been laboratory-confirmed. Although cases have been reported from all of the 9 provinces in the past 30 years, more than half of the cases originate from the semi-arid areas of Northern Cape Province (31.5% of cases) and Free State Province (23% of cases)  (<http://www.nicd.ac.za/assets/files/CCHF_FAQ-General_Public.pdf>).

Occupational groups such as herders, farmers, abattoir workers, veterinarians/animal health workers, hunters and persons informally slaughtering domestic/wild animals are at higher risk of infection. These persons often have exposure to ticks on the animals and in the animal environment, and also often have exposure to animal blood/tissues (e.g., during  castration of calves, vaccination, notching/tagging of ears, slaughtering).

Humans can become infected in the following ways:
- Being bitten by infected ticks.
- Squashing infected ticks (if fluid from the ticks enters into cuts/grazes on the skin, or splashes onto mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth).
- If blood/tissue from infected animals (during the short period that the animals have virus in circulation) comes into contact with cuts/grazes on the skin, or splashes onto mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth.
- Needle-stick/sharps injuries in healthcare workers from infected patients.

People are not always aware of being bitten by ticks, and in patients with CCHF, ticks have been found attached in concealed sites, such as on the scalp and between the toes.

The patient in the above report had possible exposure to an infected tick that he crushed, followed by development of symptoms. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
North West Province, South Africa:
Date: Wed, 24 Apr 2019 15:43:37 +0200

Johannesburg, April 24, 2019 (AFP) - Devastating floods in South Africa have left 51 dead and forced more than a thousand people from their homes, according to an updated toll issued Wednesday as President Cyril Ramaphosa flew to the deluged region.   Heavy rains have lashed the southeast of the country, tearing down homes and ravaging infrastructure in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape provinces.

Speaking to the affected Amanzimtoti community in Durban, after returning from emergency African Union talks in Egypt on the crises in Libya and Sudan, Ramaphosa said "there are more than 1,000 people who are now displaced."   He raised concerns about Free State province north of KwaZulu-Natal, saying that continuing downpours there were causing "risky situations."   The government will set aside emergency funding to help survivors rebuild their lives, Ramaphosa vowed.

Fifty-one people have been confirmed dead so far, although local media have given a toll as high as 54, rising from 33 on Tuesday.   Rescuers on Wednesday continued to comb debris, desperately looking for people feared trapped by landslides.   Emergency responders reported collapsed buildings and flooded roads, blocked sewer lines and toppled electricity pylons.

For safety reasons, schools and some businesses were shut in the affected areas.   South African military personnel have been dispatched to help rescue and evacuation efforts.   The South African Weather Services warned that more heavy rain and gale force winds were expected, which could threaten low-lying bridges and roads.
Date: Tue, 23 Apr 2019 10:08:27 +0200

Johannesburg, April 23, 2019 (AFP) - At least five people died early Tuesday in South Africa's coastal city of Durban after torrential rains triggered mudslides that crushed homes, emergency services said.   Among those killed were a six-month-old baby, a child of about 10 and two adults.   "Torrential rains damaged peoples houses (and) there were mudslides," Garrith Jamieson, spokesman for Rescue Care, told AFP.

"I can confirm five (deaths) but there are many more casualties," he said, adding there were unconfirmed reports of "multiple" deaths in other parts of the KwaZulu-Natal province.   Victims were either crushed to death by the mudslides or drowned in flood waters.   It was not immediately clear how many people were missing, but search and rescue operations continued on Tuesday.

Downpours have caused flooding in the southern and eastern parts of the country.   The military has been dispatched to help in rescue and evacuation efforts in some of the affected areas.   The South African Weather Services warned that more heavy rain was expected until Wednesday which could lead to more flooding and pose a threat to low-lying bridges and roads.
Date: Thu 28 Mar 2019
Source: IOL [edited]

A well-known Kimberley man [ME] is being treated for Congo fever in the isolation unit at the Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital. He is the 2nd patient to be diagnosed with Congo fever in South Africa this year [2019]. The other case is in the Free State.

According to [ME]'s wife, [SE], the 58-year-old started feeling ill on Sunday [24 Mar 2019]. "We went away for the weekend and when we came home my husband, who enjoys generally good health, began to complain of joint pain, a headache and feeling nauseous."

[SE] said her husband went to work at the Kareevlei Mine in the Koopmansfontein area on Monday [25 Mar 2019], still feeling unwell. "He had to attend a meeting but felt too ill and he knew he had to see a doctor. He then drove through to Kimberley and saw a doctor at the Mediclinic Gariep hospital.

"He was referred to a specialist as it was suspected that he could have contracted Congo fever as he had been bitten the week before by ticks." The specialist transferred him to the isolation unit at Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe (RMS) Hospital. This is also where [ME] had blood tests done to confirm that he had Congo fever, as these tests cannot be done in the private sector.

The diagnosis of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever was confirmed yesterday morning [27 Mar 2019]. [SE] said her husband had a bite mark on his shoulder and he found a tick in his groin area last week. "It is suspected that the ticks came from the veld as there is a lot of veld around the mine where he works."

[SE] added that her husband was receiving the normal treatment for Congo fever. "We are very fortunate that there are no signs of haemorrhaging at this stage and we are hopeful that he recovers without any complications. He is fine at this stage, although he is being kept in isolation. I can wave at him through the glass window and we keep in contact on the phone."

As Congo fever is contagious and is transmitted from one infected human to another by contact with infected blood or body fluids, [SE] will have to monitor herself for the next few days. "I was instructed by the doctor to take my temperature twice a day for 2 weeks as well as to watch out for any bleeding, flu-like symptoms and joint pain. I have also just been told to leave work."

There is no danger, however, of other contacts at this stage. Mediclinic Gariep spokesperson Denise Coetzee confirmed yesterday [27 Mar 2019] that a 58-year-old male patient, with possible Congo fever, was referred to the RMS hospital on the evening of 25 Mar 2019. "The patient had a history of being bitten by a tick and presented with fever and swollen glands."

The Northern Cape Department of Health also confirmed yesterday [27 Mar 2019] that a 58-year-old male was admitted to the isolation unit at RMS Hospital. Department spokesperson Lulu Mxekezo said that the man works near Koopmansfontein and was bitten by a tick sometime last week.  "A laboratory test result on Tuesday [26 Mar 2019] confirmed he is suffering from Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF). He is currently in a stable condition, still in the isolation unit," Mxekezo said.

The length of the incubation period for Congo fever depends on the mode of acquisition of the virus. According to the World Health Organisation, following infection by a tick bite the incubation period is usually 1 to 3 days, with a maximum of 9 days. The incubation period following contact with infected blood or tissues is usually 5 to 6 days, with a documented maximum of 13 days.

Onset of symptoms is sudden, with fever, myalgia (muscle ache), dizziness, neck pain and stiffness, backache, headache, sore eyes and photophobia (sensitivity to light). There may be nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and a sore throat early on, followed by sharp mood swings and confusion. After 2 to 4 days, the agitation may be replaced by sleepiness, depression and lassitude, and the abdominal pain may localise to the upper right quadrant, with detectable hepatomegaly (liver enlargement).

Other clinical signs include tachycardia (fast heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes) and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the skin) on internal mucosal surfaces, such as in the mouth and throat and on the skin. The petechiae may give way to larger rashes called ecchymoses, and other haemorrhagic phenomena. There is usually evidence of hepatitis, and severely ill patients may experience rapid kidney deterioration, sudden liver failure or pulmonary failure after the 5th day of illness.

The mortality rate from CCHF is approximately 30%, with death occurring in the 2nd week of illness. In patients who recover, improvement generally begins on the 9th or 10th day after the onset of illness.  [Byline: Michelle Cahill]
========================
[CCHF was 1st reported in South Africa in 1981 [1]. CCHF is being reported with increasing frequency from South Africa. In 1985, an outbreak was reported from a Cape Town hospital due to nosocomial spread of virus [2]. Nosocomial infections with CCHF have occurred in other countries, including Iraq, the former Soviet Union, and Pakistan [3,4]. Contact with bloody secretions appeared to be the means of transmission in those outbreaks, although airborne transmission has been neither proven nor disproven [4].

CCHF is caused by a bunyavirus of the arbovirus group. Widespread occurrence of the antibodies in wild and domestic animals in South Africa has been documented [5]. Transmission to humans is thought to be primarily via the _Hyalomma_ genus of tick or contact with the blood of infected animals [5].

CCHF, as well as other viral hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola virus disease, Marburg virus disease, and Lassa fever, have the potential to spread in a hospital setting. Patients are often hospitalized with a severe illness, but the nonspecific nature of their signs and symptoms may not suggest a viral hemorrhagic fever.

Even simple isolation procedures, such as barrier nursing on open wards, can effectively halt transmission of these viruses. Therefore, it is imperative that a diagnosis of a viral hemorrhagic fever be considered in any patient with an unknown febrile disease who either resides in or traveled to an endemic area within 3 weeks of the onset of symptoms. If other more common causes of the fever, such as malaria or sepsis, can be reasonably excluded, measures for isolation of the patient should be taken immediately. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[References
1. Gear JHS, Thomson PD, Hopp M, et al. Congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever in South Africa. Report of a fatal case in the Travsvaal. S Afr Med J 1982;62:576-80.
2. CDC. International Notes Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever -- Republic of South Africa. MMWR Weekly 1985;34:94,99-101 <https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000489.htm>.
3. Burney MI, Ghafoor A, Saleen M, et al. Nosocomial outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by a Crimean hemorrhagic fever-Congo virus in Pakistan, January 1976. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1980;29:941-7.
4. Hoogstraal H. The epidemiology of tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Asia, Europe, and Africa. J Med Entomol 1979;15:307-417.
5. Swanepoel R, Struthers JK, Shepherd AJ, et al. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in South Africa. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1983;32:1407-15.

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Northern Cape Region, South Africa:
Date: Tue 22 Jan 2019
Source: Review Online [abridged, edited]

The Limpopo Department of Health is alerting people, particularly those who regularly work or handle livestock and animals, to be cautious following confirmation of a case of brucellosis in the Giyani area, where a livestock farmer died after having been diagnosed with the disease.

Brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by a type of bacteria called _Brucella_. The bacterium can spread from animals to humans. The infection is acquired through ingestion or direct contact such as touching, splashes onto mucous membranes, and inhalation (breathing in) of contaminated animal products. The infection with _Brucella_ species is not spread from person to person.

Spokesperson for the department, Neil Shikwambana, says the farmer contracted the disease after he was reported to have drank unpasteurized (unboiled) milk from his cattle.

Brucellosis can be contracted through eating undercooked/uncooked meat or consuming unpasteurized/raw dairy products (milk, cheese, ice cream), or coming into contact with an infected animal. Bacteria can also enter wounds in the skin/mucous membranes through contact with infected animals. This includes people who have close contact with animals or animal excretions (new-born animals, foetuses, and excretions that may result from birth) such as slaughterhouse workers, meat-packing plant employees, veterinarians, farmers and hunters (inhaling the bacteria while dressing their game).

People most at risk include infants and young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as people with cancer, an organ transplant, or HIV.
=======================
[The species generally associated with cattle is _Brucella abortus_. Brucellosis is one of the classical zoonoses linked to ingestion of unpasteurized milk and dairy products. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Limpopo Province, South Africa: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/2947>]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 16:52:39 +0200
By Nazeer al-Khatib with Hashem Osseiran in Beirut

Maaret al-Numan, Syria, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - Syrian government air strikes killed 18 civilians, including a dozen people at a busy market, as fierce fighting raged for the jihadist-held northwest, a war monitor said on Wednesday.   Regime forces battled to repel a jihadist counteroffensive around the town of Kafr Nabuda that has left 70 combatants dead in 24 hours, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.   The Hayat Tahrir al-Sham alliance, led by Syria's former Al-Qaeda affiliate, controls a large part of Idlib province as well as adjacent slivers of Aleppo, Hama and Latakia provinces.   The jihadist-dominated region is nominally protected by a buffer zone deal, but the government and its ally Russia have escalated their bombardment in recent weeks, seizing several towns on its southern flank.   At least 12 people were killed and another 18 wounded when regime warplanes hit the jihadist-held Idlib province town of Maarat al-Numan around midnight (2100 GMT) on Tuesday, the Observatory said.

The market was crowded with people out and about after breaking the daytime fast observed by Muslims during the holy month of Ramadan.   The bombardment blew in the facades of surrounding buildings, and ripped through the flimsy frames and canvas of stalls in the market square, an AFP photographer reported.    The bodies of market-goers were torn apart.   "Residents are still scared," stallholder Khaled Ahmad told AFP.   Three more civilians were killed on Wednesday by air strikes in the nearby town of Saraqib, the Observatory said.    Two others were killed in strikes on the town of Maaret Hermeh, it added.    Another civilian was killed in air raids on the town of Jisr al-Shughur, the monitor said.   The Britain-based Observatory relies on a network of sources inside Syria and says it determines whose planes carried out strikes according to type, location, flight patterns and munitions.

- 'Worst fears'-
The strikes came as heavy clashes raged in neighbouring Hama province after the jihadists launched a counterattack on Tuesday.   Fresh fighting on Wednesday took the death toll to 70 -- 36 regime forces and militia and 34 jihadists, the Observatory said.   It said the jihadists had recaptured most of Kafr Nabuda from government forces, who had taken control of the town on May 8.   State news agency SANA on Wednesday however said the army repelled a jihadist attack in the area, killing dozens of insurgents.

Russia and rebel ally Turkey inked the buffer zone deal in September to avert a government offensive on the region and protect its three million residents.   But President Bashar al-Assad's government upped its bombardment of the region after HTS took control in January.   Russia too has stepped up its air strikes in recent weeks.   The Observatory says nearly 200 civilians have been killed in the flare-up since April 30.   The United Nations said Wednesday that Idlib's civilian population once again faced the threat of an all-out offensive.   "A full military incursion threatens to trigger a humanitarian catastrophe for over 3 million civilians caught in the crossfire, as well as overwhelm our ability to respond," said David Swanson, a spokesman for the UN humanitarian office.   Swanson said more than 200,000 people have been displaced by the upsurge of violence since April 28.   A total of 20 health facilities have been hit by the escalation -- 19 of which remain out of service, Swanson said.   Collectively they served at least 200,000 people, he added.

- 'Break the status quo' -
The September deal was never fully implemented as jihadists refused to withdraw from a planned buffer zone around the Idlib region.   But it ushered in a relative drop in violence until earlier this year, with Turkish troops deploying to observation points around the region.   The Syrian government has accused Turkey of failing to secure implementation of the truce deal by the jihadists.   But Turkish Defence Minister Hulusi Akar accused the Syrian regime late Tuesday of threatening the ceasefire deal.   "The regime is doing all that it can to break the status quo including using barrel bombs, land and air offensives," Akar told reporters.   "Turkish armed forces will not take a step back from wherever they may be", he however added.   Earlier, the US State Department said it was assessing indications that the government had used chemical weapons on Sunday during its offensive in Idlib.   HTS accused government forces of launching a chlorine gas attack on its fighters in the northern mountains of Latakia.   But the Observatory said Wednesday it had "no proof at all of the attack".
Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 02:06:35 +0200
By Amelie BARON

Port-au-Prince, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - With no oxygen in intensive care or gloves in the emergency room, residents at Haiti's largest hospital have gone on strike to protest the filthy environment and demand six months of back pay.   "We have almost nothing when we talk about emergency services," said Emmanuel Desrosiers, 24, one of the doctors-in-training at the State University of Haiti Hospital (HUEH) that began the work stoppage Monday.    "When a patient arrives, when we should immediately take charge, we start by listing the things they or their family need to go buy."   The HUEH, known as the "general hospital," is where the most disadvantaged families in this impoverished Caribbean country crowd. Buying the medical supplies themselves is a financial headache, but private clinics are far too expensive.   In crumbling buildings in the center of Port-au-Prince, male and female patients are crowded together in tiny rooms, while trash cans overflow.   "We feel ridiculous when we give hygienic advice to patients," one resident said of the situation.

The residents' selflessness as they work in an unsanitary environment is compounded by the fact that they have not been paid since the start of their residency, nearly six months ago.   After five years of medical studies, the state is required to pay them 9,000 Haitian gourdes (HTG) per month -- only about $100, due to the devaluation of the national currency.   Nothing is being done about the hospital's disrepair, with those in charge waiting for a new building to be completed, according to resident Yveline Michel.   The new HUEH will have two floors and more than 530 beds once it's finished -- but it's unclear when that will be.   The project began after the January 2010 earthquake, which destroyed more than half the hospital. The United States, France and Haiti invested $83 million in a new hospital, which should have been completed by 2016.   Instead, there is little visible activity on the construction site, which can be seen through the windows of the current building.

Due to the heat, the windows are always open, letting in noise and dust from the street. There are only a few fans in the hospital rooms, which do little to combat the humidity or the flies.   "At any moment we could lose patients, but the state isn't doing anything to save their lives," said Michel, 25.   "We're striking for the population, since it should make these demands."   But some locals question the residents' position because the strike prevents the already struggling hospital from functioning.   Since the strike began, the poorest families in the area no longer know where to go for medical emergencies, as the residents are in charge of admitting patients.   "Due to the lack of resources and the unsanitary environment, there are always people dying in the hospital, so it's not the strike causing that," said Michel in response.
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: Le Dauphin [in French, trans., edited]

Lovers of sushi, maki, sashimi, and other raw fish, beware of your stomach! 7 cases of fish tapeworm, better known as tapeworm [ProMED presumes it is Diphyllobothrium latum], have been reported in 2 years by the Rennes hospital in Ille-et-Vilaine [Brittany].

An exceptional number of cases was counted between July 2016 and September 2018, especially since no case had been detected for at least 20 years.

The infection is acquired by "eating raw or marinated fish which contains larvae of this parasite. The larvae will undergo several moults and develop in our digestive tract," explained Professor Florence Robert-Gangneux to our colleagues in France Bleu Armorique.

The parasite can measure up to 20 meters [66 ft] long and live 10 years in the body. The fish tapeworm can cause digestive disorders, deficiencies, although some patients do not notice.

The only solution to eliminate these parasites of the fish is freezing. This is what a 2004 European regulation imposes on restaurant owners serving raw fish. Freezing should be from -20 deg C [-4 deg F] during 24 hours or -35 deg C [-31 deg F] during 15 hours. And to get rid of the worm once ingested, it is necessary to undergo an unpleasant antiparasitic treatment, often on several occasions.
=====================
[We presume it is the fish tapeworm _Diphyllobothrium latum_, which is a tapeworm found in freshwater fish (<https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/diphyllobothrium/index.html>). In saltwater fish the most common parasite is _Anisakis_, but this is not a tapeworm. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of France:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019
Source: El Pais [in Spanish, trans. Mod.TY, edited]

Tarija Departmental Health Services (SEDES) reported a new case of hantavirus [infection] in Padcaya municipality. The number of patients with this illness is within what is expected, because this season is when more people acquire the disease. Epidemiological surveillance is continuing in Arce province. The person who acquired this illness is male and is under medical care until his recuperation.

The head of the Epidemiological Unit of SEDES, Claudia Montenegro, stated that the patient is hospitalized in the San Juan de Dios Regional Hospital in Tarija awaiting his recuperation. The physician said that in Bermejo and Padcaya municipalities, the harvest of citrus fruit and sugar cane for production of sugar has begun, so there is a trend for the cases of this illness to increase. This is due to the large number of families that move to the countryside where the rodent (long tail) is present that transmits this disease [virus].

"In contrast to previous seasons, this year [2019], there were positives for this disease in Gran Chaco province, including fatalities," Montenegro commented. "Epidemiological surveillance there is being implemented, as well as in areas such as Padcaya and Bermejo."

The official explained that in these localities, the rodent that transmits the disease [virus] to families is present, and with agricultural activities, [people] move into places where this animal lives, and so new cases of patients with hantavirus [infections] are registered every year.

In order to prevent this illness, it is recommended that rodent control campaigns be done to reduce their populations, openings in houses be sealed, and that residents reduce the possibility for rodents to make nests within a radius of 30 meters [100 ft] around the house, and eliminate items that could attract these animals near the house (food, grain, garbage). Workers should employ protective measures during agricultural tasks and cleaning work.

Initial symptoms include fatigue, fever and muscle pain, especially in the thighs, hips and back. Also, patients may present with headache, dizziness, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. [These symptoms may progress rapidly to respiratory difficulty requiring mechanical ventilation (hantavirus cardio pulmonary syndrome). Death can occur. - ProMED Mod.TY]
=====================
[The hantavirus involved in the above cases is not mentioned. Cases of hantavirus infections in Tarija department are not new. Tarija department is endemic for hantaviruses, and cases occur there sporadically. Last year (2018), there were 11 cases. The previouslyreported 2015 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) that occurred in Tarija department were confirmed. As noted in the previous comments, earlier cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported from tropical, lowland areas of Bolivia, including 7 cases in Tarija during 2014. The specific hantaviruses involved in these or previous cases in Bolivia were not given.

In the lowland Amazon Basin of Bolivia, the rodent hosts of the hantavirus that might be involved in these hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases, with their images, include the following: - Laguna Negra virus (_Calomys laucha_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/images/Calomys%20laucha%20enciso%2031aug2011.jpg> and _C. callosus_ <https://eee.uci.edu/clients/bjbecker/PlaguesandPeople/Calomyscallosusb.jpg>); - Bermejo (Chaco rice rat _Oligoryzomys chacoensis_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/oligorizomyschacoensis.html>); and - Oran (_O. longicaudatus_ <http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/imgs/512x768/0000_0000/0711/1203.jpeg>).

Since previous cases in Tarija department have occurred in Bermejo, perhaps Bermejo hantavirus was involved.

Dr. Jan Clement commented that there is a need to be able to differentiate Seoul (SEOV) as a causative agent, but that is hampered by the fact that most current commercial ELISA or WB formats do not contain (anymore) a SEOV antigen, so that a preliminary presumption of a hantavirus infection can even be missed in non-research laboratories (ibidem, and: Reynes J-M, Carli D, Bour J-B, Boudjeltia S, Dewilde A, Gerbier G, et al. Seoul virus infection in humans, France, 2014-2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23:973-7;  <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/6/16-0927_article>.

SEOV is widely distributed around the world in the brown rat and is likely found in Tarija department. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Tarija, Tarija, Bolivia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/12643>]
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: ZBC (Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation) [edited]

The Zambezi Parks & Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) says it has managed to contain the anthrax outbreak in the Zambezi Valley which claimed 6 elephants, 3 buffalo, a lion and an impala. Zimparks, which has been working together with other stakeholders following the outbreak of anthrax in Zambezi Valley, confirmed that the infectious disease has now been brought under control.

Zimparks Public Relations Manager, Mr. Tinashe Farawo said the authority is pleased to have contained the disease, adding that measures are being put in place to strengthen surveillance mechanisms. "We can confirm that we have managed to contain the anthrax diseases in the Zambezi Valley thanks to efforts by our officers and support from private stakeholders," said Mr. Tinashe Farawo.

The disease killed a number of hippos in Binga last year [2018]. Anthrax is usually transmitted by feed and water contaminated with spores, which can lie dormant in the soil for many years. The primary sign of anthrax in grazing animals is sudden death, often with bloody discharges.
=======================
[So far so good, but I must point out that nature is illiterate and does not read the announcements of senior bureaucrats. She does what she does. Hopefully Mr. Farawo is correct but we should wait a couple of weeks at full alert.

Maps of Zimbabwe can be seen at

For a description of Hwange national park, go to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park>.

Hwange is in the western part of the country bordering Botswana and Zambia
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange>). - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Matabeleland North Province, Zimbabwe:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019, 2:49 PM
Source: KDKA [edited]

Pennsylvania's Secretary of Health, Dr. Rachel Levine has announced that the state has declared a hepatitis A outbreak with 171 cases in 36 counties. According to the map provided by the Department of Health, Allegheny and Philadelphia counties are hit the hardest with anywhere between 31-50 cases.

The counties hit hardest by this outbreak are Philadelphia and Allegheny, but we have seen an increase of cases throughout much of the state," Dr. Levine said. "We are taking this action now to be proactive in our response to treating Pennsylvanians suffering from this illnesses and prevent it from spreading. The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination."
=======================
[Pennsylvania is the latest (now almost half of the states in the USA) to declare a hepatitis A outbreak. As the numbers of cases continue to rise in a number of states, and news of smaller (so far) outbreaks occur in others, the question at the end of ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20190104.6241686 by a Kentucky official, "This is a disease of developing countries.

One has to ask: Why are we seeing it in the USA?" is more and more relevant. We are seeing these outbreaks because of the inability to deal with marginalized populations among their midst. The dramatic cutbacks in public health infrastructure in some of these states clearly feed the fire of these outbreaks. They must be addressed by bolstering public health resources and education and directly addressing the needs of these marginalized populations. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Pennsylvania, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/240>]
Date: Thu 16 May 2019
Source: AllAfrica, The Guardian report edited

A serving medical doctor has been infected with Lassa fever while 2 persons were confirmed dead in Kebbi state. Another medical doctor disclosed this yesterday [15 May 2019] when The Guardian visited the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Birnin Kebbi. He said that 2 children died last week [week of 6 May 2019] as a result of the Lassa fever while a medical doctor, who was doing his primary assignment treating the patients, was also infected.

"You see, the management of the FMC has opened a special unit called isolated unit for the Lassa fever patients. We still have some patients inside. Also, a medical doctor, who was managing some patients last month [April 2019], has also been infected and he is presently on admission," he said.

Meanwhile, the state's Commissioner for Health, Alhaji Umar Kambaza, who confirmed the incident, said they were aware of the cases in the state but the government is working towards them.  [Byline: Michael Egbejule, Ahmadu Baba Idris]
========================
[The dates of occurrence of these cases is not given. Presumably, they were hospitalized after 12 May 2019 when the Nigeria CDC update was issued. It is indeed unfortunate that an attending physician became infected in the hospital. Nosocomial infections are not unusual when personal protective equipment and barrier nursing measures are not employed. - ProMED Mod.TY]
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Vax Before Travel [abridged, edited]

The eastern African country of Ethiopia has been reporting measles outbreaks for many years, however, in 2019, new information indicates children are the ones most vulnerable for this infectious disease.

According to reporting by the European Commission, approximately 54% of the 4000 measles cases in Ethiopia reported during 2019 affected children under 5 years of age.

Moreover, over 60% of the children had never received their 1st measles vaccine dose.

This new data estimates that by the end of 2019, about 3.5 million children will be susceptible to the measles virus, mainly because of the failure to achieve the 'herd-immunity' necessary to interrupt transmission.

Moreover, these Ethiopian children are not the only under-vaccinated population.

An estimated 169 million children missed out on the 1st dose of the measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017, or 21.1 million children a year on average, said UNICEF on 25 Apr 2019.

And, the measles virus is one of the leading causes of death among children, particularly in developing countries. An estimated 100,000 measles deaths occurred globally in 2017.

Ethiopia announced it would aggressively confront this under-vaccination issue by integrating the measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization program in the 2nd year of life.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health said about 3 348 363 children will receive measles vaccine 2nd doses.

Dr Chatora Rufaro, World Health Organization (WHO) Ethiopia representative said in a press release, "The introduction of the 2nd dose of measles vaccination in Ethiopia will significantly contribute to a reduction of measles morbidity and mortality as well as the overall child mortality by preventing measles outbreaks."

To notify visitors about Ethiopia's ongoing measles risks, the CDC issued an initial Level 1 Travel Alert in 2015. Since then, the CDC advises all visitors to Ethiopia to ensure they are immunized against the measles virus.  [Byline: Don Ward Hackett]
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019 08:47 IST
Source: The Hindu [abridged, edited]

The current global resurgence in measles is having its resonance in Kerala too, which has been witnessing a serious surge in the disease since January [2019].

Across the globe, huge local outbreaks have been caused by travel as well as the increase in unvaccinated populations.

In Kerala, however, the majority of the cases are reported from Thiruvananthapuram, which has good vaccination coverage and amongst people who are well-nourished and have received at least one dose of vaccine in their lifetime.

Kerala reports around 600 plus cases of measles every year. This year [2019], as many cases have been reported in the first 4 months itself, with over 50% cases in the 19-40 year age group. There are also cases in the less than 9 months age group, but fewer cases than before in the 1-5 years group.

Immunisation
------------
"When universal routine immunisation in childhood improves and the virus is still in circulation, the disease will naturally move to the older age group who may be unimmunised or whose vaccine-derived immunity has begun to wane. At a time when the state is moving towards measles elimination, adult measles is a major concern," a senior health official said.

Historically, measles has been a childhood disease. The epidemiological shift to older population presents new public health challenges because of the increased severity of the disease, especially in vulnerable populations like pregnant women and immunocompromised patients (HIV, organ transplant recipients on immunosuppressants, cancer patients), who cannot be vaccinated with the live attenuated measles vaccine.

"Earlier, nearly 90% of measles cases could be managed on out-patient basis. This year [2019], most cases are in the 19-35 age group and over 60% of the cases had to be admitted as in-patients, with a good percentage requiring ICU management," said R Aravind, head of infectious diseases at Thiruvananthapuram Medical College.

The changing epidemiology of measles has not just brought forth the several unknowns but also raised important questions on whether adult immunisation should be a policy, on vaccine potency and the adequacy of vaccine immune response.

Though measles vaccine is highly immunogenic, as part of the national measles elimination strategy, a mandatory 2nd dose at 15-18 months was introduced in 2010, so that there is better immune protection. It is fairly certain that those currently in the 18-40 years age group have not had the protection of the 2nd dose and may be one reason for the increase in cases in this age group.

The 1st vaccination age for measles has been fixed at 9 months because till then, the maternal antibodies transferred in utero are supposed to afford protection to the child. If vaccinated earlier, the maternal antibodies might interfere with the immune response to vaccine.

Susceptible
-----------
However, at Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, the director, M Radhakrishna Pillai and team, who are currently studying the efficacy of measles vaccination in South India, have reported that children under the recommended vaccination age of 9 months are highly susceptible to measles.

SAT Hospital too has recently reported the death of an infant younger than 9 months due to measles.

"If the young mothers of the day do not have sufficient antibody protection, how do we protect infants younger than 9 months against measles? Given measles' age shift to older age group, should we move the vaccination age to 12 months for better vaccine response?

"Is a 3rd dose of MMR (mumps-measles-rubella) necessary? And should we recommend that all adults be given a dose of MMR as the virus is still in circulation? These questions need to be looked at from a research perspective by the State/National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation," a public health expert said.  [Byline: C Maya]
========================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Kerala State, India:
Date: Fri 17 May 2019
Source: The Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, press release [abridged, edited]

The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) said today (17 May 20-19) that no additional case of measles infection had been recorded as at 4pm today and announced that the outbreak of measles infection at Hong Kong International Airport earlier has concluded.

A spokesman for the CHP said, "A total of 73 cases of measles infection were recorded so far this year [2019], among them 29 cases were associated with the outbreak among airport workers.

Regarding measles control measures implemented at the airport, a total of 23 persons had received measles vaccination at the airport vaccination station as at 6pm today [17 May 2019], bringing the cumulative number of vaccinations given to 8501 since 22 Mar 2019. The airport vaccination station will cease operation from [18 May 2019].

As for the blood test service, the DH earlier provided the measles serology test service to airport staff. A cumulative total of 777 blood samples have been collected. For the pilot service to provide measles serology testing for Filipino foreign domestic helpers working in Hong Kong, a total of 146 blood samples have been collected to date. Participants are notified individually of the serology results.
===================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Hong Kong: