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Albania

Albania US Consular Information Sheet November 04, 2008

 COUNTRY DESCRIPTION

Albania is a parliamentary democracy that is transforming its economy into a market-oriented system. Albania's per capita income is among the lowest in Eu

ope, but economic conditions in the country are steadily improving. Tourist facilities are not highly developed in much of the country, and though Albania's economic integration into European Union markets is slowly underway, many of the goods and services taken for granted in other European countries are not yet available. Hotel accommodations are limited outside of major cities. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Albania for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS

 A passport is required. All travelers entering or exiting Albania must have six months or more validity on their passport. Customs officers strictly enforce this law. U.S. citizens do not require a visa prior to entering Albania, but those traveling without a visa will be charged a fee for an entry stamp at the point of entry, which is valid for a stay of up to 90 days. This fee is currently 10 Euros, or the equivalent in any easily convertible currency, including U.S. dollars. Travelers without a visa who intend to stay in Albania for more than 90 days should be aware that Albanian law allows a traveler without a visa to remain in Albania for 90 days only within a specific 180-day period. That 180-day period is defined from the first day of entry. For example, a traveler entering without a visa on January 1 may remain in Albania for 90 days total during the period of time between January 1 and June 28. Departing Albania during this time period does not "restart the clock." Travelers attempting to reenter Albania without a visa and within 180 days of a previous entry and after an aggregate stay of 90 days may be denied entry. For stays exceeding 90 days within a 180-day period, those interested must apply for a Residency Permit at the police station with jurisdiction over the city of residence. Information on how to apply for a residency permit is available on the Embassy of Albania web site at http://www.embassyofalbania.org/. There is also a departure fee of ten Euros, or the equivalent in any easily convertible currency, including U.S. dollars. Visit the Embassy of Albania web site at http://www.embassyofalbania.org/consular.html#visa for the most current visa information. Dual Nationality: The Albanian government considers any person in Albania of Albanian parents to be an Albanian citizen. In addition to being subject to all Albanian laws affecting U.S. citizens, dual nationals may be subject to Albanian laws that impose special obligations. Male Albanian citizens are subject to compulsory military service regulations. If such persons are found guilty of draft evasion in Albania, they are subject to prosecution by the Albanian court. Those who might be affected should inquire at an Albanian Embassy or Consulate outside Albania regarding their status before traveling. In some instances, dual nationality may hamper U.S. Government efforts to provide protection abroad. Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY

Although the overall security situation in Albania has improved in recent years, organized criminal activity continues to operate in all regions, and corruption is pervasive. US Government employees need permission to travel to the northern administrative districts of Shkoder, Malesi E Madhe and Tropoje (with the exception of the route along the national road to Montenegro and the city of Shkoder) and to the southern town of Lazarat, with such travel restricted to secure vehicles with escort. Travel restrictions for U.S. Government employees have been lifted for overnight stays in the city of Shkoder. In most cases, police assistance and protection is limited. A high level of security awareness should be maintained at all times. Photographing anything that authorities regard as being of military or security interest may cause travelers problems. All gatherings of large crowds should be avoided, particularly those involving political causes or striking workers. For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found. Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME

In the latest State Department assessment, Albania’s crime rating is “medium.” Crime against foreigners is rare in Albania, as targeting foreigners is often viewed as too risky. Visitors should maintain the same personal security awareness that they would in any metropolitan U.S. city. Caution should be exercised in bars in Tirana where violent incidents, some involving the use of firearms, have occurred in the past, particularly in the early morning hours. Within the last years there have been fewer cases of carjacking compared with previous years. Anyone who is carjacked should surrender the vehicle without resistance. Armed crime continues to be more common in northern and northwestern Albania than in the rest of the country. Street crime is fairly common in Albania, particularly at night. Criminals do not seem to deliberately target U.S. citizens or other foreigners, but do seek targets of opportunity, and select those who appear to have anything of value. Vehicle theft is still one of the biggest problems in Albania. Pick-pocketing is widespread; U.S. citizens have reported the theft of their passports by pick-pockets. INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line is 129, though coverage is inconsistent at best. See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION

Medical facilities and capabilities in Albania are limited beyond rudimentary first aid treatment. Emergency and major medical care requiring surgery and hospital care is inadequate due to lack of specialists, diagnostic aids, medical supplies, and prescription drugs. Travelers with previously diagnosed medical conditions may wish to consult their physicians before travel. As prescription drugs may be unavailable locally, travelers may also wish to bring extra supplies of required medications. Recent electricity shortages have resulted in sporadic blackouts throughout the country, which can affect food storage capabilities of restaurants and shops. While some restaurants and food stores have generators to properly store food, travelers should take care that food is cooked thoroughly to reduce the risk of food-borne illness. Water in Albania is not potable. Visitors should plan to purchase bottled water or drinks while in country. The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Albania. Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en

MEDICAL INSURANCE

The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Albania is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance. Major roads in Albania are often in very poor condition. Traveling by road throughout Albania is the most dangerous activity for locals and tourists. Vehicle accidents are the major cause of death, according to police statistics. Electricity shortages have resulted in sporadic blackouts throughout the country that can happen any hour of the day or night. Such outages affect traffic signals and street lights, making driving increasingly treacherous at any time of day. Travel at night outside the main urban areas is dangerous and should be avoided due to deplorable road conditions. During the winter months, travelers may encounter dangerous snow and icy conditions on the roads throughout mountainous regions in northern Albania. Buses travel between most major cities almost exclusively during the day, but they are often unreliable and uncomfortable. Many travelers looking for public transport prefer to use privately owned vans, which function as an alternate system of bus routes and operate almost entirely without schedules or set fares. Please note that many of these privately owned vans may not have official permission to operate a bus service and may not adhere to accepted safety and maintenance standards. Persons wishing to use privately owned vans should exercise caution. There are no commercial domestic flights and few rail connections. Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of the country’s national tourist office at www.albaniantourism.com.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Albania, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Albania's Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. For further information, travelers may visit the FAA's web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Albania's customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Albania of some items. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Albania in Washington, D.C. or one of Albania's Consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements. As noted previously, the Albanian government considers any person in Albania of Albanian parents to be an Albanian citizen. In addition to being subject to all Albanian laws affecting U.S. citizens, dual nationals may be subject to Albanian laws that impose special obligations. Male Albanian citizens are subject to compulsory military service regulations. See our information pertaining to dual nationality. Albania is a cash economy. Credit cards and travelers checks are not generally accepted, except at the major new hotels in Tirana and some international airline offices. Travelers' checks can be changed at banks in larger towns. Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) are available in most cities. Please see our Customs Information CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Albania’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Albania are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties. Under Albanian law, police can detain any individual for up to 10 hours without filing formal charges. U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passports with them at all times to show proof of identity and U.S. citizenship if questioned by local officials.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES

For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION

 Americans living or traveling in Albania are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Albania. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located at Rruga Elbasanit 103, tel. (355)(4) 2247285; fax (355)(4) 2232222. The U.S. Embassy web site is http://tirana.usembassy.gov/ * * * This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated June 10, 2008, to update sections on Entry and Exit Requirements, Medical Facilities and Health Information, and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Fri, 9 Mar 2018 16:28:50 +0100

Tirana, March 9, 2018 (AFP) - The military has been deployed in northern Albania to help hundreds of people trapped by floods following heavy rainfall, authorities said on Friday.   More than 9,230 hectares (22,800 acres) of agricultural land is underwater in the Shkodra region, including villages where the only means of transport is by boat, the defence ministry said.

Army personnel are evacuating residents and securing food supplies in the affected areas, 100 kilometres (60 miles) north of the capital, Tirana.   The torrential rain in recent days has caused landslides damaging dozens of homes and flooding roads, said the transport ministry.   The rain has also forced the Albanian authorities to release excess water from a hydroelectric plant, which has added to the flooding in northern areas of the country.   Weather forecasters say the rain is likely to ease from Saturday.
Date: Sun, 3 Dec 2017 12:29:40 +0100

Tirana, Dec 3, 2017 (AFP) - Thousands of police and soldiers have been deployed in Albania to rescue stranded residents after heavy rainfall triggered major flooding, and caused the death of a utility worker, officials and the power company said Sunday.   The victim, Sabri Vlinga, died while he was working on a electricity pole at Roskovec in the flooded south of the country, the power company said in statement.   Two other people were injured in similar accidents. it added.   Some 6,400 police and soldiers have been sent to help rescue people stranded by the floods, Prime MInister Edi Rama said Saturday, calling the situation "very critical".

Around 1,500 people in the affected areas have been rescued, while several thousand homes were without electricity as many utility poles have been swept away by mudslides, said Shemsi Prenci, head of civil protection.   More than 7,874 hectares (19,450 acres) of farm land as well as 3,193 homes are under water and several roads in the south remained impassable.

Army forces have built a temporary bridge at Darezeze, about 70 kilometres (44 miles) from the capital Tirana, to come to the aid of 2,000 residents stranded by the floods, the defence ministry said.    In neighbouring Macedonia, the heavy rains have also caused flooding as several rivers include the main Vardar river have burst their banks, the MIA news agency reported.
Date: Sat 5 Aug 2017
From: Edmond Puca <edmond_puca@yahoo.com> [edited]

Here in Albania, we have 2 imported cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), one imported from the north of Greece and another from Macedonia in a village near the border with Albania.

The patient from Macedonia is 25 years old. He presented in the emergency room on 31 Jul [2017]. Right now, he is in good condition and will survive. He presented with fever, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and lower back pain.

The other patient from Greece had been in our service for the previous 2 weeks and now is at home in good condition.

The disease is caused by Dobrava-Belgrade virus infection.
---------------------------------
Dr Edmond Puca
Infectologue
Department of Infectious Disease
UHC "Mother Teresa"
Tirana, Albania
===================
[ProMED-mail thanks Dr Edmond Puca for sending in this report.  This and the previous report are the 1st reports of hantavirus infections in Macedonia that ProMED-mail has posted. There is also evidence of HFRS in Greece, although ProMED-mail has not posted reports previously. Sero-epidemiological investigations conducted in several Balkan countries revealed an overall seroprevalence of 4 per cent in Greece (<http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168170213004887#>). There doubtless have been Dobrava-Belgrade virus infections in Greece and the Balkans over the years, given that this virus is known to circulate widely in the Balkans.

The yellow-necked field mouse (_Apodemus flavicollis_) is the principle vertebrate host for Dobrava-Belgrade virus. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2017 04:30:32 +0100
By Briseida MEMA

Tirana, Feb 6, 2017 (AFP) - Emira Sela covers her face with her hand to hide a disfiguring abscess, the traumatic result of unregulated cosmetic treatments now rampant across Albania.   The 31-year-old began to worry when wrinkles appeared on her face. Sela's hairdresser told her that a simple injection, costing around 60 euros ($65), would banish the signs of ageing.   "She assured me that I would not risk anything. She even listed well-known names" of women who had undergone such treatment, said Sela.   "I did not think twice, I trusted her without asking questions," said the blonde woman with green eyes, her voice trembling.

Albanian hair and beauty salons lacking expertise and medical supervision are offering such cosmetic treatments, unregulated in a legal vacuum, much to the alarm of qualified doctors.   A single injection of a product whose content and dosage Sela knew nothing about was enough to ruin her life in late August.    Despite antibiotics she has permanent pain, fever and nausea, while the abscess on her right cheek forces her eye to half-close and her face is nearly paralysed.   "I am so disfigured that I tried to commit suicide," said Sela, who lost her job in a bank. Her only hope now is corrective surgery at an Italian hospital, scheduled for this month.

- Desiring Kardashian look -
"There are more and more impostors with syringes," said Panajot Papa, a plastic surgeon at a private clinic in Tirana.   "The problem is also the products... Forbidden in Europe, they enter illegally from Turkey or China."    Eriona Shehu, a dermatologist at Tirana's university hospital, said these unregulated synthetic products, such as injected liquid silicone and acrylamide, were being offered at temptingly low prices.

"Cosmetic interventions have become a lucrative industry. The patient is only a customer, exposed to a number of risks."   Shehu said the desire to look like voluptuous US reality television star Kim Kardashian was "destroying the lives of young Albanian girls looking for beauty".   Albanian doctors say the typical age of clients for such procedures is between 16 and 28.    In the country of about three million people, the demand for cosmetic interventions rose more than 50 percent in 2015, according to a study published by Albania's economic magazine Monitor.

Promotional offers can be seen everywhere, such as a beauty salon advertising 20 percent reductions for three people coming together for treatment during the holiday season.   Papa says he has treated a dozen young women aged between 20 and 27 who suffered complications after having their lips and cheekbones swollen with injected liquid silicone for 40 to 50 euros.    The product has been banned for cosmetic use in countries such as Italy and France for more than 15 years.   Papa said such botched interventions left these women prone to particularly bad swellings during their menstrual period, requiring further treatment -- and he warned they may suffer such symptoms for life.

- Closing legal gap -
Albanian doctors are worried about foreign practitioners who come from Italy, Turkey and Greece to work just for a weekend.   "They may not have a diploma, qualification or licence for these kind of interventions or for assuming the responsibility of a patient's medical follow-up," said Besim Boci, head of the otolaryngology department at Tirana's university hospital.   Due to legal loopholes, the judiciary cannot step in.    A spokesman at Tirana's tribunal, Alba Nikolla, admits that it is currently impossible to "open investigations and prosecute based only on complaints" against practitioners.

But authorities are set to tackle this with a draft law to control cosmetic products and beauty salons, which is due to be introduced in parliament in the next few months.   The law complies with the requirements of the European Union, which Albania aspires to join, and will enable authorities to shut down rogue establishments using synthetic products.    When health is adversely affected, practitioners could be imprisoned for three to 10 years.    Such regulations could go some way to easing the trauma of women like Elisa Lura, a 22-year-old economics student.   She underwent a laser treatment to restore her natural look after paying 50 euros to a neighbourhood salon for permanent eyebrow tattoos, which went wrong. But the laser made things much worse.   "Everything is spoiled!" she said of her face now covered with painful scars.
Date: Wed, 13 Jan 2016 04:21:54 +0100
By Briseida MEMA

Tirana, Albania, Jan 13, 2016 (AFP) - With her sick daughter in the arms, Mira Lela pushes her way through the hallway of the doctor's clinic, crowded with patients ailing from heavy pollution in Albania's capital.   "This is an emergency, she has difficulty breathing," said the tearful woman, forcing open the door to the office of Bardhyl Vaqari, who has worked in the specialist Tirana clinic for more than 20 years.   "An acute asthma attack," said the doctor on seeing the child.   "The number of people with respiratory allergies and cardiovascular problems has greatly increased," he told AFP, adding that the number of patients on the clinic's books has more than doubled to 8,000 in the last four years.

On the noisy and congested streets outside, clapped-out bangers and Hummer trucks cross paths with Mercedes, BMWs and overloaded buses that leave a trail of black smoke and heavy odour.    Having been cut off from the world under a strict communist regime until 1991, the Western Balkan city had just a few hundred cars on its roads in the 1990s.

But today, through a mixture of pride, luxury-seeking and necessity, given the lack of public transport, there are more than 190,000 cars circulating in a city of about one million people.   "Albanians take the car even when going to buy bread in a nearby store. That's why the traffic is overloaded all day and this increases pollution levels," said Altin Duka, a despairing 65-year-old shopkeeper.

The average age of vehicles on Tirana's roads is around 16 years, twice the European average, according to Gani Cupi, deputy manager of Albania's Road Transport Services.    Many of the vehicles do not meet the standards of the European Union, which Albania hopes to join.   "The traffic load, the age of vehicles, their technical condition but also the poor quality of fuel are all factors contributing to the capital's pollution," said Cupi.

- Taxing dilemmas -
In a bid to clean up the air, Albanian authorities considered doubling taxes on ageing vehicles but then dropped such plans. Analysts suggested the cost would weigh too heavily on citizens in one of the poorest countries in Europe.   New cars are already exempt from paying annual tax for the first three years, but authorities in 2012 lifted a levy on the import of old vehicles as the EU considered it a "fiscal discrimination".

Tirana's Mayor Erion Veliaj has pledged to battle against the fumes by increasing the number of green spaces, introducing hybrid buses and improving infrastructure in the city, which is crammed with mostly illegal constructions.   "The number of vehicles does not stop growing," he told AFP, pointing out that about 500 people die in the city each year "because of respiratory or cardiovascular problems related to pollution".

A report this year from the European Environment Agency noted a 20 to 30 percent decrease in Tirana's concentration levels of PM10 and PM2.5 -- damaging particulate matter -- according to data assessment from 2011 to 2013.   But Laureta Dibra, head of the air and climate change department at Albania's Environment Ministry, told AFP that PM10 levels had actually been rising in areas of heavy traffic in recent years.   Tirana remains "among the most polluted cities in Europe", added the director of the National Environment Agency, Julian Beqiri.   "The level of the population's exposure to pollutants is still a problem," he said.

- On your bikes -
In an effort to improve air quality in the capital and educate residents, Tirana organised two car-free days in 2015, when the air was said to be at least four times less polluted than usual.   Worried activists are campaigning to promote the bicycle as a means of transport and a way of life.   Ecovolis, a bike sharing system, rents out at least 200 bicycles from different tations around Tirana, at 60 leke (44 euro cents, $0.47) per bike per hour -- but many people still prefer getting behind the wheel.

Although Albania's energy minister claims that 95 percent of fuel meets the required standards, even Prime Minister Edi Rama attacked its quality in May last year.   "It is so bad that even a strong car like a Mercedes ends up being bad for Albanians' lungs," he said, calling for urgent measures to improve fuel controls.   The government says restrictions have since been tightened, but those at the frontline of the fumes remain unhappy.   "I come home in the evening with a completely dry throat and a bitter taste my mouth," said Bequir Veseli, 37, a traffic policeman who spends eight hours a day at the centre of a chaotic roundabout.   "I have trouble breathing but what can I do? The next day I have to go back to my post".
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Brazil

General

 Brazil is the largest country in South America and extends from the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean to the depths of the Amazon basin. The climate varies throughout the country but generally it experiences a humid

tropical climate.

Safety & Security

The level of crime in many of the main urban centres is certainly rising and tourists need to be aware of the risks involved in travelling particularly in the evening hours. It is wise to use an official taxi for any journeys after dark. It is sensible not to flaunt any personal wealth and to use the hotel safety boxes for any valuables and your travel documents. The amount of crime against tourists tends to be greater in areas surrounding hotels, discotheques, bars, nightclubs and other similar establishments that cater to visitors, especially at dusk and during the evening hours. There are frequent reports of theft on city buses and such transportation should be avoided. A number of the main cities have established specialised tourist police units to patrol areas frequented by tourists. Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Brasilia all continue to experience a high incidence of crime.

Road Safety

Throughout this huge country the state of the roads varies greatly. In many regions the roads are dirt tracks and assistance would be hard to obtain for those travelling off from the main tourists routes. Bag snatching from traffic lights occurs in the main cities. If considering hiring a car make certain that your travel insurance is sufficient.

Jet Lag

After your flight you will experience a degree of jet lag. Travelling from Europe this will be less than when you travel home but nevertheless it will still cause your body to complain for 24 to 48 hours. Try to have a more relaxing time for the first few days (and also after returning home if possible!). Be careful not to fall asleep by the pool and then awaken with sunburn which could ruin your time abroad.

Medical Facilities

In any country of this size the level of medical care will vary greatly. This is particular true out side the main tourist resorts. English speaking doctors should be available but the level of hospital care can be worrisome. Make certain you carry sufficient supplies of any medication you may require for your entire holiday. Essential drugs (asthma, diabetes, epilepsy etc) should be divided for security.

Sun Exposure and Dehydration

The hot humid tropical climate often leads to quite significant problems for the Irish traveller. Make sure you cover your head when out in the sunlight and drink plenty of fluids to replenish that lost through perspiration. Replace the salt you loose by eating crisps etc orby putting salt on your meal (providing there is no contraindication).

Visiting the Iguassu Falls

These huge waterfalls border Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. There is only minimal risk of malaria and so malaria prophylaxis is not generally recommended. Also, Yellow fever is not transmitted in this area but mosquitoes can abound. Sensible insect bite precautions should be followed at all times.

Food & Water

Many tourists who visit Brazil stay in the main resorts along the southern coast. The food and water preparation in the hotels is normally excellent but eating food from street vendors is generally unwise. Shell fish (bivalve oysters, mussels, clams etc) are unwise even in a five star hotel. Check the water from the cold water tap in your room. If you can’t easily smell chlorine (swimming pool style) don’t use it even for brushing your teeth. If travelling around the country (Caribbean coast or into the Amazon regions) take significantly more care.

Rabies 

This viral disease occurs throughout Brazil and it is usually transmitted through the bite from an infected warm-blooded animal (eg dogs, cats & monkeys). Any contact should be avoided but if it occurs treat it very seriously and seek competent medical attention immediately after you wash out the area and apply an antiseptic.

Malaria

The risk of malaria is significant all year throughout the Amazon regions. There is insignificant risk for those staying along the coast up as far as Fortaleza and for those remaining in this region prophylaxis is not usually recommended. The risk in the region of Brasilia is also thought to be minimal though this is an area which has unusually experience an outbreak of Yellow Fever recently, and so the situation will require review.

Mosquito Borne Diseases  Apart from malaria the other two main diseases transmitted by mosquitoes which cause problems in Brazil are Dengue Fever (mainly along Caribbean Coast but has been reported much further south) and Yellow Fever (mainly in the Amazon Basin but thought to be spreading to other regions). Avoidance techniques are important at all times throughout the day. Swimming **************************************** Most of the main tourist swimming pools will be well maintained and the smell of chlorine will be evident. If sea swimming is on your agenda make sure you go where there are plenty of others and never swim alone. Look for warning signs and pay attention to local advice. Be very careful of local currents which can be dangerous. Vaccinations **************************************** The Brazilian Embassy is advising all travellers to Brazil to have vaccination cover against Yellow Fever. Also for your personal protection it is wise to consider some further vaccines. Generally we would recommend the following vaccination cover; * Yellow Fever (mosquito borne) * Tetanus (childhood booster) * Typhoid (food & water borne) * Hepatitis A (food & water borne) For those travelling more extensively or staying in the country for longer periods we would usually suggest that further vaccines are considered including Hepatitis B, Meningitis and Rabies. Summary **************************************** Many travellers to Brazil will remain perfectly healthy and well providing they follow some sensible precautions. Further information is available from either of our centres regarding any recent disease outbreaks.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Fri 17 May 2019
Source: The Rio Times [edited]

A new threat to public health haunts the state of Rio de Janeiro: Scientists at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) have discovered that a virus with symptoms similar to those of the chikungunya virus [infection] may precipitate an epidemic in the Southeast.

Both have similar characteristics, such as disabling intense joint pains that last for months. There is no vaccine or any specific treatment.

Laboratory tests have shown that the Mayaro virus can be transmitted by both the _Aedes_ mosquito and the common mosquito (_Culex_). According to Amilcar Tanuri, coordinator of the Laboratory of Molecular Virology at UFRJ, where the study was carried out, this increases the risk of an epidemic.

Mistaken for chikungunya [virus], Mayaro [virus] has been present in Rio since 2016. Additionally, the gravity of the discovery lies in the fact that the cases are autochthonous, meaning the victims were infected here, rather than in other locations. To date, 3 cases are known, all from Niteroi.
=======================
[Mayaro virus (MAYV) has been found to cause human disease in other areas in Brazil. This is the 1st report of Mayaro virus infection in Rio de Janeiro state that ProMED-mail has posted. The 1st report of Mayaro virus cases was in 1955, in an outbreak in Para state, Brazil. In 2011, thousands of cases of Mayaro fever were reported an outbreak occurred in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

As ProMED Mod.JT noted in an early ProMED-mail post, MAYV, of the _Alphavirus_ genus, Togaviridae family, is endemic in tropical areas of South America (Trinidad, Suriname, French Guyana, Brazil, Peru, Bolivia and Venezuela). The transmission cycle is very similar to yellow fever virus, utilizing primates as reservoirs and _Haemagogus_ mosquitoes as vectors.

MAYV has been associated with a variety of mosquitoes that are possible vectors that can transmit it humans. MAYV has been isolated from _Aedes aegypti_ and _Culex quinquefasciatus_ captured in the field in Brazil. _Anopheles_ mosquitoes have been implicated as important virus vectors (see references below).

References
Brustolin M, Pujhari S, Henderson CA, Rasgon JL. _Anopheles_ mosquitoes may drive invasion and transmission of Mayaro virus across geographically diverse regions. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018;12(11):e0006895. <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006895> Serra OP, Cardoso BF, Ribeiro AL, et al. Mayaro virus and dengue virus 1 and 4 natural infection in culicids from Cuiaba, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2016;111(1):20-9.  <http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0074-02760150270>

Several public health experts have expressed concern that MAYV could become a significant problem in the tropical Americas. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1650>]
Date: 6 May 2019
Source: Dive.sc.gov [in Portuguese, machine trans. edited]

Santa Catarina has recorded its 1st case of human rabies in 38 years.

The Office of Epidemiological Surveillance of Santa Catarina (DIVE/SC), linked to the Superintendence of Health Surveillance (SUV) of the State Health Department (SES/SC), reports that laboratory diagnosis was confirmed by the Laboratory Institute Pasteur as rabies for the death of a 58-year-old woman living in a rural area of the municipality of Gravatal, last Saturday (4 May 2019).

The samples were sent to Sao Paulo by the Central Laboratory of Public Health (LACEN/SC). Santa Catarina had not registered cases of rabies in humans since 1981, when a patient from Ponte Serrada was a victim of the disease. The last cases of rabies in dogs and cats were recorded in 2006, in the municipalities of Xanxere (1 dog and 1 cat), Itajai (1 dog), and in 2016, in Jabora (1 dog).

DIVE/SC technicians were present on Mon 6 May 2019 in the municipality of Tubarao meeting with the Regional Health Management, the Municipal Health Department of Gravatal and Capivari de Baixo, CIDASC (Integrated Company for Agricultural Development of Santa Catarina) and UNISUL for the development of actions, according to the protocol of the Ministry of Health, considering Santa Catarina is a controlled area for animal rabies in the urban cycle. The actions involve home-to-house vaccinations of dogs and cats within a 5-mile radius from the patient's home as well as active search for sick and dead animals and population orientation. "In addition, if a person is attacked by a dog or any other animal, it is very important to seek health services even if the injury is not serious, as there may be a need to take the vaccine against rabies," says John Fuck, manager of Zoonoses of Dive/SC.

Vaccination of all dogs and cats is the most effective form of protection against the disease. The vaccination is expected to begin on Thu 9 May 2019. The population of Gravatal and Capivari de Baixo can search for more detailed information about the action directly at the Municipal Health Department. DIVE/SC has already requested 10,000 doses of rabies vaccine for the vaccination scheme.

According to the veterinarian of DIVE/SC, Alexandra Schlickmann Pereira, the population should be attentive to the strange behavior of their pets. "Any change in behavior such as restlessness, increased aggression, limb paralysis and photophobia (sensitivity to light) should be observed and reported to the Municipal Health Department," he warns.

Rabies is a transmissible disease affecting mammals such as dogs, cats, oxen, horses, monkeys, bats and humans when the saliva of the infected animal comes into contact with the skin or mucosal membranes such as eyes, by biting, scratching or licking of the animal. The virus attacks the central nervous system, leading to death after a short time of incubation. Rabies has no established cure (there are only 3 known cases of cure in the world, one in Brazil), and the only way to prevent it is through the vaccine.  [Byline: Amanda Mariano, Bruna Matos, Patricia Pozzo]
=========================
[As the article points out, survival is extremely rare once a person shows symptoms after being bitten by a rabid animal, even with treatment.

Rabies post-exposure vaccinations
------------------------------
For people who have never been vaccinated against rabies previously, post-exposure anti-rabies vaccination should always include administration of both passive antibody and vaccine.

The combination of human rabies immune globulin (HRIG) and vaccine is recommended for both bite and non-bite exposures, regardless of the interval between exposure and initiation of treatment.

People who have been previously vaccinated or are receiving pre-exposure vaccination for rabies should receive only vaccine.

Adverse reactions to rabies vaccine and immune globulin are not common. Newer vaccines in use today cause fewer adverse reactions than previously available vaccines. Mild local reactions to the rabies vaccine, such as pain, redness, swelling, or itching at the injection site, have been reported. Rarely, symptoms such as headache, nausea, abdominal pain, muscle aches, and dizziness have been reported. Local pain and low-grade fever may follow injection of rabies immune globulin.

The vaccine should be given at recommended intervals for best results. Talk with your doctor or state or local public health officials if you will not be able to have shots at the recommended interval. Rabies prevention is a serious matter and changes should not be made in the schedule of doses.

People cannot transmit rabies to other people unless they themselves are sick with rabies. The prophylaxis you are receiving will protect you from developing rabies, and therefore you cannot expose other people to rabies. You should continue to participate in your normal activities.

There is no recognized value in administering rabies immune globulin greater than 7 days after initiating a vaccine course, since vaccine-induced antibodies begin to appear within one week.

Portions of this comment were extracted from

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Santa Catarina, Brazil: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/2975>]
Date: Tue 23 Apr 2019 20:07 BRT
Source: G1, RBS TV report [in Portuguese, machine trans., edited]

Ten cases of toxoplasmosis in children were confirmed in Lagoa Vermelha, in the Northern Region of Rio Grande do Sul. Health officials investigate the focus of the contamination.

Nine of the diagnosed children studied until last year [2018] were from the Duque de Caxias school. Analyses of the water and food from the school have not revealed any problems.

Last month [March 2019], the management removed a sandbox from the patio, where the children played. "They inspected all possible sectors, investigated all possibilities, and all was ok, everything is within the standard of normality," says the director of the school, Lucelia Sguarizi. "We are most interested in finding out where the focus is. We do not want any students being contaminated anymore."

One of the children diagnosed with toxoplasmosis is the 5-year-old son of a nursing technician. "For the past 2 months he reported that he had a headache, not every day, but often he was very tired," the mother describes. "It is a disease that can infect a large number of people, and this creates concern and leads us to take effective measures to avoid the favourable conditions for proliferation of the disease," she says.

Last year [2018], Santa Maria, in the Central Region [of Brazil], reported an outbreak of the disease, whose origins are still under investigation. More than 900 cases were registered.

The main suspect of contamination was the water. The then Minister of Health, Gilberto Occhi, said in June 2018 that this was the origin of the outbreak. The statement sparked controversy. The mayor of Santa Maria, Jorge Pozzobon, denied this could be the source.

As early as March 2019, the Health Secretary of Santa Maria, Francisco Harrisson, reported that water has spread toxoplasmosis. The following month, after the declaration, the state government issued a statement stating that the case is still being investigated, so far without conclusion.
----------------------------------------------------
Communicated by:
Felippe Danyel Cardoso Martins
Universidade Estadual de Londrina
==============================
[Several outbreaks of toxoplasmosis (infection with _Toxoplasma gondii_] have been reported from Brazil (see ProMED reports below). Felines excrete oocysts in faeces which can remain viable in the environment, including fresh water, for months. Isolation of oocysts from water samples require special concentration techniques. A food source is another possibility as raw or undercooked meat containing _T. gondii_ tissue cysts is infective. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil:
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2019 18:49:48 +0200

Rio de Janeiro, April 10, 2019 (AFP) - Residents of a hillside Rio de Janeiro favela risk finding hungry caimans at their front door after the city was hit hard by heavy flooding caused by torrential rain.   The cold-blooded creatures -- smaller relatives of alligators -- belong to
a resident of the Rolas favela in western Rio, and escaped on Tuesday when a wall holding them in burst when struck by a flash flood.

An animal control team has been mobilized to re-capture the reptiles, the Rio environmental services office told AFP.   How many were on the loose? Officials did not say.   The team faces a risky task: not only must they be wary of the aggressive animals, but they must navigate streets knee-deep in water or slick with mud, dodging uprooted trees and loose power lines like the one that electrocuted a man to death near where the caimans escaped from.   They also face more mundane dangers, such as being shot, knifed, mugged or kidnapped in the high-crime favela.

As of Wednesday the team had been unable to enter the favela "due to the strong presence of drug traffickers," city officials said.   "I saw the wall collapse and two people have already seen caimans at their front door," a local resident wrote on social media.   The unusually heavy rain, which began late Monday and continued into Tuesday, has killed at least 10 people, officials said.   The rain triggered flash flooding that turned some streets into raging rivers, uprooting trees and sweeping away vehicles.   Heavy runoff from neighbouring hills gushed through some apartment buildings and shops, leaving behind mud and debris.
Date: Sat 6 Apr 2019
Source: Globo.com [in Portuguese, machine trans. edited]

In the Northern Region of Rio Grande do Sul, the death of cattle has worried producers. At least 50 animals have died this year [2019] on 15 properties with signs of rabies. [This appears to be a large outbreak and needs some serious support from the local and state governments. - ProMED Mod.TG]

In the town of Soledade, Adriano Borges Knopf lost 4 animals in less than 15 days. "We started to suspect it was not a normal thing. We noticed the animals lost their legs [weakness in legs] and did not get up any more," said the farmer.

A sample [from the animal necropsy, and the laboratory] report found Adrian's cattle had herbivore rabies, a disease caused by a virus transmitted by bats. [Cattle are herbivores, and consequently in some areas it is called herbivore rabies, but this virus could equally affect people, or dogs or horses. - ProMED Mod.TG]

Four other cattle belonging to the producer Luiz Carlos dos Santos also died because of the problem. "It's their milk we live on. We were even planning to improve this year [2019]," he lamented about the losses in production.

The challenge now is to control the transmission of the disease affecting these cattle. Most of the animals that died were attended by the veterinarian Bolivar Camargo, who is part of a cooperative in the region. "There are people who had 10 lactating cows and ended up losing 7, so their profitability ends, right?" he pointed out.

Last week, a bat was found near one of the affected properties. Technicians from the State Department of Agriculture are doing a survey to try to identify the source of these infections.  In addition to injury, producers are also concerned about the transmission of rabies to humans. The disease, however, is not transmitted by the consumption of milk or meat.  "They [the people] should be vaccinated if they have a very high risk, if they have suffered a bite from an animal, or had very intimate contact with an animal showing clinical signs of rabies," explained veterinarian Isadora Correa.

She added: "[The vaccine] is not available to the entire population, nor would it be the case, because the risk of transmission of herbivore rabies from a bovine to a human being is fairly low."
======================
[Most likely, the bats responsible for transmitting the rabies virus are vampire bats. While these bats can and do move around, deforestation seems to upset them, causing them to move to areas where there previously has not been a problem.

Vampire bats are distributed in tropical areas of the western hemisphere from Argentina to Mexico and have been responsible for transmitting rabies virus, most frequently to cattle and equine animals, and, infrequently, to humans [by bite]. Of the 3 vampire bat species, _Desmodus rotundus_ is by far the most common rabies virus transmitter.

There are 2 options for rabies control in these situations:
vaccination of animals upon which the vampire bats feed, or reduction of the vampire bat populations, or perhaps a 3rd option would be a combination of the 2 approaches. Eliminating vampire bat hosts is the fastest and most effective approach when vampire bat-transmitted rabies appears in an area. In areas where repeated vampire bat-transmitted rabies occurs, control of these bats has been employed in some countries. Controlling vampire bats by eliminating their roosts is extremely difficult because these roosts can be hard to find. Effective vampire bat control has been accomplished by capturing bats in mist nets when they come to feed on livestock and applying anticoagulant jelly (warfarin and similar products), which they and their roost-mates ingest on grooming.

As animals can be vaccinated, it would prudent to do so immediately, as there is approximately 2 weeks from vaccination of the cattle until they are capable of mounting an immune response. In addition to vaccination, the suggestion of netting the bats and using anticoagulant jelly is perhaps equally as important. So, employing additional methods instead of only one method, would be the most prudent approach to a more rapid control of this disease from these bats.

The loss of these animals to these families is huge, and this is a large outbreak needing immediate containment. Perhaps the government could send out some vaccine and additional people to help vaccinate animals and to net and coat the bats with anticoagulant jelly. Coating the bats means handling the bats, minimally, and gloves should be worn. Likewise, any bite or scratch should receive immediate medical attention and post exposure prophylaxis rabies vaccine for the individual(s) affected.

References
----------
1. Brass DA. Rabies in bats: natural history and public health implications. Ridgefield CN: Livia Press, 1994. 335 pp.
2. Greenhall AM: Feeding behavior. In: AM Greenhall and U Schmidt, editors. Natural history of vampire bats. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1988. 111:31. - Mod.TG

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/3419>]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 16:52:39 +0200
By Nazeer al-Khatib with Hashem Osseiran in Beirut

Maaret al-Numan, Syria, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - Syrian government air strikes killed 18 civilians, including a dozen people at a busy market, as fierce fighting raged for the jihadist-held northwest, a war monitor said on Wednesday.   Regime forces battled to repel a jihadist counteroffensive around the town of Kafr Nabuda that has left 70 combatants dead in 24 hours, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.   The Hayat Tahrir al-Sham alliance, led by Syria's former Al-Qaeda affiliate, controls a large part of Idlib province as well as adjacent slivers of Aleppo, Hama and Latakia provinces.   The jihadist-dominated region is nominally protected by a buffer zone deal, but the government and its ally Russia have escalated their bombardment in recent weeks, seizing several towns on its southern flank.   At least 12 people were killed and another 18 wounded when regime warplanes hit the jihadist-held Idlib province town of Maarat al-Numan around midnight (2100 GMT) on Tuesday, the Observatory said.

The market was crowded with people out and about after breaking the daytime fast observed by Muslims during the holy month of Ramadan.   The bombardment blew in the facades of surrounding buildings, and ripped through the flimsy frames and canvas of stalls in the market square, an AFP photographer reported.    The bodies of market-goers were torn apart.   "Residents are still scared," stallholder Khaled Ahmad told AFP.   Three more civilians were killed on Wednesday by air strikes in the nearby town of Saraqib, the Observatory said.    Two others were killed in strikes on the town of Maaret Hermeh, it added.    Another civilian was killed in air raids on the town of Jisr al-Shughur, the monitor said.   The Britain-based Observatory relies on a network of sources inside Syria and says it determines whose planes carried out strikes according to type, location, flight patterns and munitions.

- 'Worst fears'-
The strikes came as heavy clashes raged in neighbouring Hama province after the jihadists launched a counterattack on Tuesday.   Fresh fighting on Wednesday took the death toll to 70 -- 36 regime forces and militia and 34 jihadists, the Observatory said.   It said the jihadists had recaptured most of Kafr Nabuda from government forces, who had taken control of the town on May 8.   State news agency SANA on Wednesday however said the army repelled a jihadist attack in the area, killing dozens of insurgents.

Russia and rebel ally Turkey inked the buffer zone deal in September to avert a government offensive on the region and protect its three million residents.   But President Bashar al-Assad's government upped its bombardment of the region after HTS took control in January.   Russia too has stepped up its air strikes in recent weeks.   The Observatory says nearly 200 civilians have been killed in the flare-up since April 30.   The United Nations said Wednesday that Idlib's civilian population once again faced the threat of an all-out offensive.   "A full military incursion threatens to trigger a humanitarian catastrophe for over 3 million civilians caught in the crossfire, as well as overwhelm our ability to respond," said David Swanson, a spokesman for the UN humanitarian office.   Swanson said more than 200,000 people have been displaced by the upsurge of violence since April 28.   A total of 20 health facilities have been hit by the escalation -- 19 of which remain out of service, Swanson said.   Collectively they served at least 200,000 people, he added.

- 'Break the status quo' -
The September deal was never fully implemented as jihadists refused to withdraw from a planned buffer zone around the Idlib region.   But it ushered in a relative drop in violence until earlier this year, with Turkish troops deploying to observation points around the region.   The Syrian government has accused Turkey of failing to secure implementation of the truce deal by the jihadists.   But Turkish Defence Minister Hulusi Akar accused the Syrian regime late Tuesday of threatening the ceasefire deal.   "The regime is doing all that it can to break the status quo including using barrel bombs, land and air offensives," Akar told reporters.   "Turkish armed forces will not take a step back from wherever they may be", he however added.   Earlier, the US State Department said it was assessing indications that the government had used chemical weapons on Sunday during its offensive in Idlib.   HTS accused government forces of launching a chlorine gas attack on its fighters in the northern mountains of Latakia.   But the Observatory said Wednesday it had "no proof at all of the attack".
Date: Wed, 22 May 2019 02:06:35 +0200
By Amelie BARON

Port-au-Prince, May 22, 2019 (AFP) - With no oxygen in intensive care or gloves in the emergency room, residents at Haiti's largest hospital have gone on strike to protest the filthy environment and demand six months of back pay.   "We have almost nothing when we talk about emergency services," said Emmanuel Desrosiers, 24, one of the doctors-in-training at the State University of Haiti Hospital (HUEH) that began the work stoppage Monday.    "When a patient arrives, when we should immediately take charge, we start by listing the things they or their family need to go buy."   The HUEH, known as the "general hospital," is where the most disadvantaged families in this impoverished Caribbean country crowd. Buying the medical supplies themselves is a financial headache, but private clinics are far too expensive.   In crumbling buildings in the center of Port-au-Prince, male and female patients are crowded together in tiny rooms, while trash cans overflow.   "We feel ridiculous when we give hygienic advice to patients," one resident said of the situation.

The residents' selflessness as they work in an unsanitary environment is compounded by the fact that they have not been paid since the start of their residency, nearly six months ago.   After five years of medical studies, the state is required to pay them 9,000 Haitian gourdes (HTG) per month -- only about $100, due to the devaluation of the national currency.   Nothing is being done about the hospital's disrepair, with those in charge waiting for a new building to be completed, according to resident Yveline Michel.   The new HUEH will have two floors and more than 530 beds once it's finished -- but it's unclear when that will be.   The project began after the January 2010 earthquake, which destroyed more than half the hospital. The United States, France and Haiti invested $83 million in a new hospital, which should have been completed by 2016.   Instead, there is little visible activity on the construction site, which can be seen through the windows of the current building.

Due to the heat, the windows are always open, letting in noise and dust from the street. There are only a few fans in the hospital rooms, which do little to combat the humidity or the flies.   "At any moment we could lose patients, but the state isn't doing anything to save their lives," said Michel, 25.   "We're striking for the population, since it should make these demands."   But some locals question the residents' position because the strike prevents the already struggling hospital from functioning.   Since the strike began, the poorest families in the area no longer know where to go for medical emergencies, as the residents are in charge of admitting patients.   "Due to the lack of resources and the unsanitary environment, there are always people dying in the hospital, so it's not the strike causing that," said Michel in response.
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: Le Dauphin [in French, trans., edited]

Lovers of sushi, maki, sashimi, and other raw fish, beware of your stomach! 7 cases of fish tapeworm, better known as tapeworm [ProMED presumes it is Diphyllobothrium latum], have been reported in 2 years by the Rennes hospital in Ille-et-Vilaine [Brittany].

An exceptional number of cases was counted between July 2016 and September 2018, especially since no case had been detected for at least 20 years.

The infection is acquired by "eating raw or marinated fish which contains larvae of this parasite. The larvae will undergo several moults and develop in our digestive tract," explained Professor Florence Robert-Gangneux to our colleagues in France Bleu Armorique.

The parasite can measure up to 20 meters [66 ft] long and live 10 years in the body. The fish tapeworm can cause digestive disorders, deficiencies, although some patients do not notice.

The only solution to eliminate these parasites of the fish is freezing. This is what a 2004 European regulation imposes on restaurant owners serving raw fish. Freezing should be from -20 deg C [-4 deg F] during 24 hours or -35 deg C [-31 deg F] during 15 hours. And to get rid of the worm once ingested, it is necessary to undergo an unpleasant antiparasitic treatment, often on several occasions.
=====================
[We presume it is the fish tapeworm _Diphyllobothrium latum_, which is a tapeworm found in freshwater fish (<https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/diphyllobothrium/index.html>). In saltwater fish the most common parasite is _Anisakis_, but this is not a tapeworm. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of France:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019
Source: El Pais [in Spanish, trans. Mod.TY, edited]

Tarija Departmental Health Services (SEDES) reported a new case of hantavirus [infection] in Padcaya municipality. The number of patients with this illness is within what is expected, because this season is when more people acquire the disease. Epidemiological surveillance is continuing in Arce province. The person who acquired this illness is male and is under medical care until his recuperation.

The head of the Epidemiological Unit of SEDES, Claudia Montenegro, stated that the patient is hospitalized in the San Juan de Dios Regional Hospital in Tarija awaiting his recuperation. The physician said that in Bermejo and Padcaya municipalities, the harvest of citrus fruit and sugar cane for production of sugar has begun, so there is a trend for the cases of this illness to increase. This is due to the large number of families that move to the countryside where the rodent (long tail) is present that transmits this disease [virus].

"In contrast to previous seasons, this year [2019], there were positives for this disease in Gran Chaco province, including fatalities," Montenegro commented. "Epidemiological surveillance there is being implemented, as well as in areas such as Padcaya and Bermejo."

The official explained that in these localities, the rodent that transmits the disease [virus] to families is present, and with agricultural activities, [people] move into places where this animal lives, and so new cases of patients with hantavirus [infections] are registered every year.

In order to prevent this illness, it is recommended that rodent control campaigns be done to reduce their populations, openings in houses be sealed, and that residents reduce the possibility for rodents to make nests within a radius of 30 meters [100 ft] around the house, and eliminate items that could attract these animals near the house (food, grain, garbage). Workers should employ protective measures during agricultural tasks and cleaning work.

Initial symptoms include fatigue, fever and muscle pain, especially in the thighs, hips and back. Also, patients may present with headache, dizziness, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. [These symptoms may progress rapidly to respiratory difficulty requiring mechanical ventilation (hantavirus cardio pulmonary syndrome). Death can occur. - ProMED Mod.TY]
=====================
[The hantavirus involved in the above cases is not mentioned. Cases of hantavirus infections in Tarija department are not new. Tarija department is endemic for hantaviruses, and cases occur there sporadically. Last year (2018), there were 11 cases. The previouslyreported 2015 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) that occurred in Tarija department were confirmed. As noted in the previous comments, earlier cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported from tropical, lowland areas of Bolivia, including 7 cases in Tarija during 2014. The specific hantaviruses involved in these or previous cases in Bolivia were not given.

In the lowland Amazon Basin of Bolivia, the rodent hosts of the hantavirus that might be involved in these hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases, with their images, include the following: - Laguna Negra virus (_Calomys laucha_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/images/Calomys%20laucha%20enciso%2031aug2011.jpg> and _C. callosus_ <https://eee.uci.edu/clients/bjbecker/PlaguesandPeople/Calomyscallosusb.jpg>); - Bermejo (Chaco rice rat _Oligoryzomys chacoensis_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/oligorizomyschacoensis.html>); and - Oran (_O. longicaudatus_ <http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/imgs/512x768/0000_0000/0711/1203.jpeg>).

Since previous cases in Tarija department have occurred in Bermejo, perhaps Bermejo hantavirus was involved.

Dr. Jan Clement commented that there is a need to be able to differentiate Seoul (SEOV) as a causative agent, but that is hampered by the fact that most current commercial ELISA or WB formats do not contain (anymore) a SEOV antigen, so that a preliminary presumption of a hantavirus infection can even be missed in non-research laboratories (ibidem, and: Reynes J-M, Carli D, Bour J-B, Boudjeltia S, Dewilde A, Gerbier G, et al. Seoul virus infection in humans, France, 2014-2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017;23:973-7;  <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/6/16-0927_article>.

SEOV is widely distributed around the world in the brown rat and is likely found in Tarija department. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Tarija, Tarija, Bolivia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/12643>]
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: ZBC (Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation) [edited]

The Zambezi Parks & Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) says it has managed to contain the anthrax outbreak in the Zambezi Valley which claimed 6 elephants, 3 buffalo, a lion and an impala. Zimparks, which has been working together with other stakeholders following the outbreak of anthrax in Zambezi Valley, confirmed that the infectious disease has now been brought under control.

Zimparks Public Relations Manager, Mr. Tinashe Farawo said the authority is pleased to have contained the disease, adding that measures are being put in place to strengthen surveillance mechanisms. "We can confirm that we have managed to contain the anthrax diseases in the Zambezi Valley thanks to efforts by our officers and support from private stakeholders," said Mr. Tinashe Farawo.

The disease killed a number of hippos in Binga last year [2018]. Anthrax is usually transmitted by feed and water contaminated with spores, which can lie dormant in the soil for many years. The primary sign of anthrax in grazing animals is sudden death, often with bloody discharges.
=======================
[So far so good, but I must point out that nature is illiterate and does not read the announcements of senior bureaucrats. She does what she does. Hopefully Mr. Farawo is correct but we should wait a couple of weeks at full alert.

Maps of Zimbabwe can be seen at

For a description of Hwange national park, go to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park>.

Hwange is in the western part of the country bordering Botswana and Zambia
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange>). - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Matabeleland North Province, Zimbabwe:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019, 2:49 PM
Source: KDKA [edited]

Pennsylvania's Secretary of Health, Dr. Rachel Levine has announced that the state has declared a hepatitis A outbreak with 171 cases in 36 counties. According to the map provided by the Department of Health, Allegheny and Philadelphia counties are hit the hardest with anywhere between 31-50 cases.

The counties hit hardest by this outbreak are Philadelphia and Allegheny, but we have seen an increase of cases throughout much of the state," Dr. Levine said. "We are taking this action now to be proactive in our response to treating Pennsylvanians suffering from this illnesses and prevent it from spreading. The best way to prevent hepatitis A is through vaccination."
=======================
[Pennsylvania is the latest (now almost half of the states in the USA) to declare a hepatitis A outbreak. As the numbers of cases continue to rise in a number of states, and news of smaller (so far) outbreaks occur in others, the question at the end of ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20190104.6241686 by a Kentucky official, "This is a disease of developing countries.

One has to ask: Why are we seeing it in the USA?" is more and more relevant. We are seeing these outbreaks because of the inability to deal with marginalized populations among their midst. The dramatic cutbacks in public health infrastructure in some of these states clearly feed the fire of these outbreaks. They must be addressed by bolstering public health resources and education and directly addressing the needs of these marginalized populations. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Pennsylvania, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/240>]
Date: Thu 16 May 2019
Source: AllAfrica, The Guardian report edited

A serving medical doctor has been infected with Lassa fever while 2 persons were confirmed dead in Kebbi state. Another medical doctor disclosed this yesterday [15 May 2019] when The Guardian visited the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Birnin Kebbi. He said that 2 children died last week [week of 6 May 2019] as a result of the Lassa fever while a medical doctor, who was doing his primary assignment treating the patients, was also infected.

"You see, the management of the FMC has opened a special unit called isolated unit for the Lassa fever patients. We still have some patients inside. Also, a medical doctor, who was managing some patients last month [April 2019], has also been infected and he is presently on admission," he said.

Meanwhile, the state's Commissioner for Health, Alhaji Umar Kambaza, who confirmed the incident, said they were aware of the cases in the state but the government is working towards them.  [Byline: Michael Egbejule, Ahmadu Baba Idris]
========================
[The dates of occurrence of these cases is not given. Presumably, they were hospitalized after 12 May 2019 when the Nigeria CDC update was issued. It is indeed unfortunate that an attending physician became infected in the hospital. Nosocomial infections are not unusual when personal protective equipment and barrier nursing measures are not employed. - ProMED Mod.TY]
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Vax Before Travel [abridged, edited]

The eastern African country of Ethiopia has been reporting measles outbreaks for many years, however, in 2019, new information indicates children are the ones most vulnerable for this infectious disease.

According to reporting by the European Commission, approximately 54% of the 4000 measles cases in Ethiopia reported during 2019 affected children under 5 years of age.

Moreover, over 60% of the children had never received their 1st measles vaccine dose.

This new data estimates that by the end of 2019, about 3.5 million children will be susceptible to the measles virus, mainly because of the failure to achieve the 'herd-immunity' necessary to interrupt transmission.

Moreover, these Ethiopian children are not the only under-vaccinated population.

An estimated 169 million children missed out on the 1st dose of the measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017, or 21.1 million children a year on average, said UNICEF on 25 Apr 2019.

And, the measles virus is one of the leading causes of death among children, particularly in developing countries. An estimated 100,000 measles deaths occurred globally in 2017.

Ethiopia announced it would aggressively confront this under-vaccination issue by integrating the measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization program in the 2nd year of life.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health said about 3 348 363 children will receive measles vaccine 2nd doses.

Dr Chatora Rufaro, World Health Organization (WHO) Ethiopia representative said in a press release, "The introduction of the 2nd dose of measles vaccination in Ethiopia will significantly contribute to a reduction of measles morbidity and mortality as well as the overall child mortality by preventing measles outbreaks."

To notify visitors about Ethiopia's ongoing measles risks, the CDC issued an initial Level 1 Travel Alert in 2015. Since then, the CDC advises all visitors to Ethiopia to ensure they are immunized against the measles virus.  [Byline: Don Ward Hackett]
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
Date: Mon 20 May 2019 08:47 IST
Source: The Hindu [abridged, edited]

The current global resurgence in measles is having its resonance in Kerala too, which has been witnessing a serious surge in the disease since January [2019].

Across the globe, huge local outbreaks have been caused by travel as well as the increase in unvaccinated populations.

In Kerala, however, the majority of the cases are reported from Thiruvananthapuram, which has good vaccination coverage and amongst people who are well-nourished and have received at least one dose of vaccine in their lifetime.

Kerala reports around 600 plus cases of measles every year. This year [2019], as many cases have been reported in the first 4 months itself, with over 50% cases in the 19-40 year age group. There are also cases in the less than 9 months age group, but fewer cases than before in the 1-5 years group.

Immunisation
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"When universal routine immunisation in childhood improves and the virus is still in circulation, the disease will naturally move to the older age group who may be unimmunised or whose vaccine-derived immunity has begun to wane. At a time when the state is moving towards measles elimination, adult measles is a major concern," a senior health official said.

Historically, measles has been a childhood disease. The epidemiological shift to older population presents new public health challenges because of the increased severity of the disease, especially in vulnerable populations like pregnant women and immunocompromised patients (HIV, organ transplant recipients on immunosuppressants, cancer patients), who cannot be vaccinated with the live attenuated measles vaccine.

"Earlier, nearly 90% of measles cases could be managed on out-patient basis. This year [2019], most cases are in the 19-35 age group and over 60% of the cases had to be admitted as in-patients, with a good percentage requiring ICU management," said R Aravind, head of infectious diseases at Thiruvananthapuram Medical College.

The changing epidemiology of measles has not just brought forth the several unknowns but also raised important questions on whether adult immunisation should be a policy, on vaccine potency and the adequacy of vaccine immune response.

Though measles vaccine is highly immunogenic, as part of the national measles elimination strategy, a mandatory 2nd dose at 15-18 months was introduced in 2010, so that there is better immune protection. It is fairly certain that those currently in the 18-40 years age group have not had the protection of the 2nd dose and may be one reason for the increase in cases in this age group.

The 1st vaccination age for measles has been fixed at 9 months because till then, the maternal antibodies transferred in utero are supposed to afford protection to the child. If vaccinated earlier, the maternal antibodies might interfere with the immune response to vaccine.

Susceptible
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However, at Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, the director, M Radhakrishna Pillai and team, who are currently studying the efficacy of measles vaccination in South India, have reported that children under the recommended vaccination age of 9 months are highly susceptible to measles.

SAT Hospital too has recently reported the death of an infant younger than 9 months due to measles.

"If the young mothers of the day do not have sufficient antibody protection, how do we protect infants younger than 9 months against measles? Given measles' age shift to older age group, should we move the vaccination age to 12 months for better vaccine response?

"Is a 3rd dose of MMR (mumps-measles-rubella) necessary? And should we recommend that all adults be given a dose of MMR as the virus is still in circulation? These questions need to be looked at from a research perspective by the State/National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation," a public health expert said.  [Byline: C Maya]
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Kerala State, India:
Date: Fri 17 May 2019
Source: The Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, press release [abridged, edited]

The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) of the Department of Health (DH) said today (17 May 20-19) that no additional case of measles infection had been recorded as at 4pm today and announced that the outbreak of measles infection at Hong Kong International Airport earlier has concluded.

A spokesman for the CHP said, "A total of 73 cases of measles infection were recorded so far this year [2019], among them 29 cases were associated with the outbreak among airport workers.

Regarding measles control measures implemented at the airport, a total of 23 persons had received measles vaccination at the airport vaccination station as at 6pm today [17 May 2019], bringing the cumulative number of vaccinations given to 8501 since 22 Mar 2019. The airport vaccination station will cease operation from [18 May 2019].

As for the blood test service, the DH earlier provided the measles serology test service to airport staff. A cumulative total of 777 blood samples have been collected. For the pilot service to provide measles serology testing for Filipino foreign domestic helpers working in Hong Kong, a total of 146 blood samples have been collected to date. Participants are notified individually of the serology results.
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Hong Kong: