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Angola

Angola - US Consular Information Sheet
June 20, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Angola is a large, developing country in south-west central Africa.
The capital city is Luanda.
Portuguese, the official language, is widely spoken through
ut the country.
Despite its extensive oil and mineral reserves and arable land suitable for large-scale production of numerous crops, Angola has some of the world's lowest social development indicators.
Development was severely restricted by a 27-year long civil war that broke out upon independence in 1975, which destroyed the majority of the country's infrastructure.
Since the conflict's conclusion in 2002, the government has initiated extensive infrastructure reconstruction and development projects, and there are growing signs of economic recovery.
However, Angola still faces challenges with its infrastructure and with providing government services, especially in basic social services, aviation and travel safety, accommodation availability and quality and communications. Facilities for tourism, particularly outside the capital of Luanda, are often rudimentary. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Angola for additional information.
ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport and visa are required and must be obtained in advance.
An International Certificate of Vaccination is required.
Visitors should allow several weeks for the processing of their visa application.
Angola does not issue airport visas.
Persons arriving without visas are subject to arrest or exclusion.
Travelers may also encounter delays if they do not have at least one completely blank visa page in their passports for entry stamps.
As of November 1, 2007, Angola no longer requires travelers to have an exit visa.
Travelers whose international immunization cards do not show inoculations against yellow fever within the past ten years may be subject to exclusion, on-the-spot vaccination, and/or heavy fines.
Visitors remaining in Angola beyond their authorized visa duration are subject to fines and arrest.
It is illegal to attempt to carry local currency out of Angola and persons found attempting to carry local currency out of Angola are subject to having this currency confiscated by customs officers.
Current information on entry requirements may be obtained from the Embassy of Angola at 2100-2108 16th Street NW, Washington, DC, tel. (202) 785-1156, fax (202) 785-1258. See our information on dual nationality, the prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
The overall security situation in Angola has improved markedly since the end of the civil war; however, Americans should still exercise caution when traveling in Angola.
Although the war has ended, ground travel throughout Angola can be problematic due to land mines, which were used extensively during the war.
Travelers should not touch anything that resembles a mine or unexploded ordinance.
Frequent checkpoints and poor infrastructure contribute to unsafe travel on roads outside of the city of Luanda.
Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined, but their authority should not be challenged.
Travel in many parts of Luanda is relatively safe by day, but car doors should be locked, windows rolled up, and packages stored out of sight.
Visitors should avoid travel after dark, and no travel should be undertaken on roads outside of cities after nightfall.

Americans located in, or planning to visit, the northern province of Cabinda should be aware of threats to their safety outside of Cabinda city.
In 2007 and 2008 armed groups specifically targeted and attacked expatriates in Cabinda; these armed attacks resulted in the rape, robbery and murder of a small number of expatriates working in Cabinda.
Those responsible have declared their intention to continue attacks against expatriates.
Occasional attacks against police and Angolan Armed Forces (FAA) convoys and outposts also continue to be reported.
These incidents, while small in overall numbers, have occurred with little or no warning.
American citizens are, therefore, urged to exercise extreme caution when traveling outside of Cabinda city and limit travel to essential only.

Americans are advised to undertake only essential travel to Lunda North and South provinces.
As the government of Angola is sensitive to the travel of foreigners in the diamond producing areas of the provinces, proper permission and documentation is required to frequent these areas.
One can be subject to restriction or detention.
There have been reports of crime or banditry in these areas, especially on roads leading into these areas.

Visitors to Angola are advised not to take photographs of sites and installations of military or security interest, including government buildings, as this can result in fines and possibly arrest.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Public Announcements, including the Worldwide Caution, can be found.
Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except on U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Crime is a serious problem throughout Angola.
While most violent crime occurs between Angolans, foreigners have occasionally been attacked as well.
Street crime is a regular occurrence in Luanda.
The most common crimes are pick-pocketing, purse-snatching, vehicle theft, and vehicle break-ins.
Armed muggings, robberies, and carjacking involving foreigners are not frequent but do occur.
Americans are advised to avoid Roque Santeiro and Rocha Pinto, and to only travel the “Serpentine Road” in front of the U.S. Embassy by car.
In general, movement around Luanda is safer by day than by night.
Touring after dark should be avoided.
Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined, but their authority should not be challenged.
Air travelers arriving in Luanda are strongly advised to arrange reliable and secure ground transportation in advance; there is no regular taxi service.
American citizens are advised to avoid the use of the public transportation known as “candongueiros” or “taxistas”; these multi-passenger vans are largely unregulated and often dangerous.

Motorists should stop at all police checkpoints if so directed.
Police officers may solicit bribes or request immediate payment of "fines" for alleged minor infractions.
American citizens asked for bribes by the police should politely ask the traffic police to write them a ticket if the police allege a moving violation.
If the police officer writes the ticket, then the motorist would pay the fine at the place indicated on the ticket.
If no moving violation is alleged and the officer is asking for a bribe, the motorist should, without actually challenging the officer's authority, politely ask the officer for his/her name and badge number.
Officers thus engaged will frequently let motorists go with no bribe paid if motorists follow this advice.
Motorists are reminded to have all proper documents in the vehicle at all times (i.e. vehicle registration, proof of insurance, and driver's license), as the lack of documentation is a violation and can also be a reason an officer would solicit a bribe.
Local law requires that every driver in Angola have the proper permission to drive.
Further information on driving in Angola can be obtained from the Embassy of Angola.
Police are not always responsive to reports of crime or requests for assistance.
Most police are on foot and are assigned to designated stationary posts.
The Rapid Intervention Police (PIR) unit is frequently seen patrolling various areas of the city.
This unit, which is well trained and organized, will respond to major criminal incidents.

There have been police operations against illegal aliens and private companies resulting in deportation of illegal resident foreign nationals and loss of personal and company property.
Independent entrepreneurs in Angola should carry relevant immigration and business documents at all times.

Travelers should be alert to fraud occasionally perpetrated by Luanda airport personnel.
Immigration and customs officials sometimes detain foreigners without cause, demanding gratuities before allowing them to enter or depart Angola.
Airport health officials sometimes demand that passengers arriving without proof of current yellow fever vaccination accept and pay for a vaccination at the airport.
Travelers are advised to carry their yellow fever vaccination card and ensure their yellow fever vaccine is up-to-date.
If travelers forget to bring their yellow fever vaccination card and do not wish to receive the vaccine offered at the airport, they should be prepared to depart the country on the next available flight.
Searches of travelers' checked baggage is common; travelers are advised to take precautions against this possibility.
Travelers should also be aware that criminals sometimes attempt to insert items into baggage at the airport, particularly for flights from Luanda to South Africa.
It is important that travelers maintain control of their carry-on baggage at all times, and if they believe something has been inserted into their baggage, they should report the incident immediately to airport authorities.
INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends, and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of crimes are solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

In addition to reporting crime to local police and the U.S. Embassy in Angola, victims of crime who are residing in Angola are also encouraged to report the crime to the security department of their employer.
Short-term visitors are encouraged to report the crime to the management of the hotel where they are staying if the crime occurred in or near the hotel.
The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Angola for police is 113; for fire fighters: 115, and for ambulance services: 112.
Please be advised that the emergency numbers listed may or may not have an English speaking operator available.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical facilities and services are available in Angola, but are limited and often do not meet U.S. standards.
Adequate care for medical emergencies is limited to Luanda, where there are some good private clinics that usually have a 24-hour service provided by a general practice physician and with specialists on call.
A list of such facilities can be found at http://angola.usembassy.gov/medical_information.html.
Routine operations such as appendectomies can be performed.
Local pharmacies provide a limited supply of prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines/drugs.
Travelers are, therefore, urged to carry with them an adequate supply of properly-labeled medications they routinely require for the duration of their projected stay in Angola.
Malaria is endemic in most areas of Angola.

An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever, a severe and often fatal disease, occurred in Uige province in the spring of 2005; however, on November 7, 2005, the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Angola and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the Marburg outbreak in Angola had ended.
This announcement came after 45 consecutive days without a new case of the illness.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Angola is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
Since the end of the civil war in 2002, overland access to the interior has increased.
However, fighting in most of the country damaged or destroyed many roads and bridges, and services for motorists outside urban areas cannot be counted on.

Road travel can be dangerous, especially during the rainy season (October - March), which can cause large potholes and erosion and due to the presence of landmines.
Road conditions vary widely outside the capital from acceptable paved surfaces to virtually impassable dirt roads, particularly secondary routes.
Many secondary roads, including secondary roads in urban areas, are impassable during the rainy season.
Overloaded, poorly marked, and disabled vehicles, as well as pedestrians and livestock, pose hazards for motorists.
Ground travel in rural areas should be undertaken during daylight hours only.
Landmines also pose a continuing hazard to travelers.
Many areas were heavily mined during the war, including roads, bridges, and railroad tracks.
Areas with suspected landmines are generally clearly marked and travelers should heed these warnings.
Primary roads are considered to be landmine free in most provinces, but travelers should not venture far from the margins of the road.
Extensive government, commercial, and NGO demining projects continue throughout the country.

Traffic in Luanda is heavy and often chaotic, and roads are often in poor condition.
Few intersections have traffic lights or police to direct vehicles.
Drivers often fail to obey traffic signals and signs, and there are frequent vehicle breakdowns.
Itinerant vendors, scooters and pedestrians often weave in and out of traffic, posing a danger to themselves and to drivers.
Most public transportation, including buses and van taxis, should be avoided as the vehicles are generally crowded and may be unreliable.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Angola, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Angola’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa/. The U.S. Embassy in Luanda prohibits its employees from using TAAG, Angola’s national airline, for domestic or international flights due to concerns regarding safety and maintenance.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Customs Regulations:
Angolan customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Angola of sensitive items including firearms, antiquities, and currency.
It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Angola in Washington, DC or one of Angola's consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Financial Transactions:
Angola is generally a cash-only economy; neither traveler’s checks nor credit cards are used outside the capital of Luanda.
In Luanda, credit cards are accepted in extremely limited circumstances, namely large hotels.
Although, in April 2007 a major campaign was launched to expand credit card acceptance this effort has yet to expand beyond the capital city.
In general, Automated Teller Machine’s (ATM’s) are only accessible to those individuals who hold accounts with local banks.
Dollars are generally accepted in all provincial capitals; travelers should carry a sufficient supply of U.S. dollars with them.
Only the newer series U.S. dollar bills (with large faces) are accepted.
U.S. dollars can be converted to local currency at exchange businesses authorized by the Angolan government.
Angolan currency (the Kwanza) may not be taken out of the country and travelers, who attempt to carry currency out of Angola, are subject to having the currency confiscated.

Personal Identification: U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passports with them at all times so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and U.S. citizenship is readily available.
The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Luanda can prepare copies of American passports at no charge for individuals who register with the Embassy.
To avoid the risk of theft of or confiscation of original documentation, the U.S. Embassy recommends that Americans keep their passport in a secure place and carry a copy to avoid the possibility of authorities confiscating identity and travel documents.

Labor Disputes: American performers traveling to Angola to perform in concerts and/or other events should be aware that there have been several serious allegations made against talent agencies making arrangements for foreign performers.
These allegations include, among other things, several charges of breach of contract and the forcible retention of passports and persons.
Performers should assure themselves of the reputation of any agency they may contract with before traveling.
Many find it useful to contact performers who have previously worked in Angola and are familiar with agencies in Angola.
Persons experiencing any incidents of this nature in Angola should report these to the local Angolan police and the U.S. Embassy.

Long Delays in Renewal of Visas: U.S. citizens who opt to renew their work or other visa while in Angola should expect delays of 2-10 weeks or more, during which time the Angolan immigration authorities will retain one's passport and one will not be able to travel.
U.S. citizens are advised to plan accordingly, and if travel during this time cannot be avoided, one should apply for a second U.S. passport PRIOR to turning over the primary passport to Angolan authorities for visa renewal.
To apply for a second U.S. passport, you must write a letter explaining the need for the second passport, as well as meet all the requirements for a normal application for passport renewal, including being able to show a current valid passport.
Receiving a second passport will take 7-10 business days.
Expatriates who stay beyond their visa expiration date are subject to steep fines.

Hotel Availability:
Hotels are limited in Angola, and demand for the limited number of rooms is high.
Hotels are often booked months in advance, especially in the capital city of Luanda.
Only a few large hotels in Luanda accept credit cards; hotels in the provinces generally do not accept credit cards.
Adequate hotels are found in most provincial capitals, but some provide limited amenities.
Please see our information on Customs Regulations.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Angolan laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession or use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Angola are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sex with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Angola are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Angola.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The Consular Section is located at the American Embassy Complex, Rua Houari Boumedienne #32, in the Miramar area of Luanda, P.O. Box 6468, tel. (244) 222-641-000,
(244) 222-447-028, (244) 222-445-481, (244) 222-446-224; 24-hour duty officer (244) 923-404-209; fax (244) 222-641-259.
The Consular Section may be contacted by e-mail at consularluanda@state.gov.
Further information on travel to Angola is also available at the Embassy web site at http://angola.usembassy.gov/.
*

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This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated April 29, 2008, to update the Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Traffic Safety and Road Conditions, Aviation Safety Oversight, and Special Circumstances.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu 9 May 2019 19:02 WAT
Source: Diario de Noticias [in Portuguese, machine trans., abridged, edited]

The measles outbreak in the Angolan province of Lunda Sul has caused 47 deaths since the start of the year [2019], among almost 1300 registered cases, Angola's national director of Public Health told Lusa today [9 May 2019].

Isilda Neves [Director, Program in Technical Assistance to the MOH] told Lusa that a vaccination campaign to identify children who are not yet immunized against the disease, will start at the weekend [11 May 2019], lasting for 10 days.

Along with this campaign, the vaccination intensification in the districts of Saurimo, capital of Lunda Sul, and in the other municipalities of the province, has been underway since the 2nd week of April [2019].

"At the end of the week we are going to make a big intervention: We are training the teams to go all out. We have at least 100 teams, each with 4 elements -- 2 coaches, one support team for the mobilization, and another to register the vaccinated children," she said.

The campaign, according to the national public health official, takes place first in Saurimo, followed by the remaining 3 municipalities in the province.

"Since the beginning of the year [2019], there were 1297 cases and 47 deaths, mostly in Saurimo," added Isilda Neves.

Health authorities are trying to control the situation, in which more than 90% of cases are being registered in children who have not been vaccinated, she said.

"One of the problems we identified is that many children who have passed the age of measles vaccination have not been vaccinated. Since there are a large number of children in the same household, we are also finding cases in children under 9 months and this is our concern too," she said.
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Lunda Sul province, Angola:
26th December 2018

Angola (Cunene province). 29 Nov 2018. (reported) 25 cases of microcephaly. Samples sent to the central laboratory in Luanda to determine if they are Zika virus related. There were no cases of microcephaly during the same period in 2017.

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map Angola:
Date: Sat 11 Aug 2018
Source: World Health Organization [edited]
<http://www.who.int/neglected_diseases/news/Surveillance-presence-of-dracunculiasis-in-Angola/en/>

Disease surveillance confirms the presence of dracunculiasis in Angola. The World Health Organization (WHO) has received confirmation of a human case (29 Jun 2018) of dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) in Angola -- a country not known to have had any cases in the past. "The patient is an 8 year old girl from Cunene Province.

Signs of worm emergence in April this year [2018] were characteristic of guinea worm disease and the worm appeared identical to _Dracunculus medinensis_," said Dr Maria Cecília de Almeida of the Angolan Guinea Worm Eradication Programme and who is also director of Control Programmes for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Health. "The case-management protocol was observed, including the preservation of the worm specimen, and we are investigating further to determine the extent of transmission and burden of the disease." The case was detected through a nationwide guinea worm case search during the national immunization campaign against measles and rubella.

The specimen was sent to the WHO Collaborating Center for Dracunculiasis Eradication at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [1] test confirmed the worm as _Dracunculus medinensis_ [2]. "This is the first confirmed case of human infection in Angola. The discovery is part of measures taken by the Ministry of Health, following a WHO evaluation mission to Angola in 2016 to assess the country's level of readiness to finalize its dossier requesting a WHO certification," said Dr Dieudonné Sankara, team leader of WHO's guinea worm eradication programme.

After the evaluation mission of 2016, the International Commission for the Certification of Dracunculiasis Eradication recommended that Angola should use all available opportunities to gather robust evidence of absence of guinea worm disease in the country before submitting its certification request. WHO is supporting Angola through all 3 of its operating levels -- Country Office, Regional Office and Headquarters -- to implement its roadmap for certification of dracunculiasis-free status. "With the discovery of this new case, measures are being put up to strengthen surveillance, reporting and investigation of all suspicious cases through the country's Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response," said Dr Nzuzi Katondi, field officer, WHO Country Office, Angola. "Intelligence and alerts are being reported and rumours are being followed up and investigated."

Efforts are also being made through the country's broader mapping exercise of other neglected tropical diseases. To achieve global certification of dracunculiasis eradication, WHO must formally certify every individual country even if no transmission has ever taken place in that particular country. Confirmation of the 1st case in Angola comes as the global guinea worm eradication programme is tackling _Dracunculus medinensis_ infection in both humans and dogs, mainly in Chad. From 1 Jan to 31 May 2018, Chad reported 3 human cases and 534 infected dogs. Ethiopia and Mali, 2 other countries with recent cases, reported zero human cases.

South Sudan, which reported its last human case in November 2016, declared interruption of dracunculiasis transmission in March 2018. The latest confirmation from Angola brings the global total, so far this year [2018], to 4 human cases. Dracunculiasis is a crippling parasitic disease caused by a long threadlike worm. The infection is transmitted mostly when people drink water contaminated with parasite-infected water fleas. When the eradication campaign began in 1986, there were an estimated 3.5 million cases.  PCR is a technique used in medical and biological research laboratories. It is used in the early stages of processing DNA for sequencing, for detecting the presence or absence of a gene to help identify pathogens during infection, and when generating forensic DNA profiles from tiny samples of DNA.  _Dracunculus medinensis_, a nematode (worm), is the causative agent of guinea worm disease.
============================
[According to the latest guinea worm update from WHO (Weekly Epidemiology Report 2018;32:409-16. 10 Aug 2018; <http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/273782/WER9332.pdf>) the reported numbers for other countries in 2018 are Chad, 5544; Ethiopia, 5044; Mali, 91; Sudan, 0. South Sudan did not file a report. Even though this is just a single case, the finding indicates that there is a focus. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[Cunene province is in the south of Angola bordering Namibia (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunene_Province>).

HealthMap/ProMED map available at: Angola: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/165>.]
Date: Tue 8 May 2018
Source: AllAfrica.com [edited]

A total of 21 positive cases of sleeping sickness were diagnosed in the last 2 weeks in the municipality of Banga, Kwanza Norte province, during the prospecting campaign held by the Provincial Department of the Institute of Combat and Control of Trypanosomiasis (Icct).

Angelino Francisco Correia, the supervisor of the campaign, said that 2800 had been examined, and 21 cases were diagnosed, of which 5 were confirmed as sleeping sickness patients.

The official called the active participation of the population in the campaigns of prospection of the disease.
=====================
[A review of human trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Africa (Fevre EM, Wissmann Bv, Welburn SC, Lutumba P (2008) The Burden of Human African Trypanosomiasis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2(12): e333. <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000333>) found that Angola is a highly endemic country with more than a 1000 cases annually. For background information on human trypanosomiasis in Africa see the ProMED posting "Trypanosomiasis - Angola http://promedmail.org/post/20110709.2081".

A map of Kwanza Norte Province, Angola:
Monday 16th April 2018

- Ndalatando. 11 Apr 2018. At least 78 suspected cases recorded in the period 4-9 Apr 2018 in northern Cuanza Norte Province.
More ...

Afghanistan

Afghanistal US Consular Information Sheet March 03, 2009


COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:


Afghanistan has made significant progress since the Taliban were deposed in 2001, but still faces daunting challenges, including de

eating terrorists and insurgents, recovering from over three decades of civil strife, dealing with years of severe drought and rebuilding a shattered physical, economic and political infrastructure. Coalition and NATO forces under ISAF work in partnership with Afghan security forces to combat Taliban and al-Qa’ida elements who seek to terrorize the population and challenge the government. Violence in 2008 reached unprecedented levels, as both ISAF/Afghan forces and the Taliban initiated more battles than ever before. President Hamid Karzai was sworn in as President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan on December 7, 2004 and the Afghan Parliament was subsequently convened in late 2005. The government is working to develop a more effective police force, a more robust legal system, and sub-national institutions that work in partnership with traditional and local leaders to meet the needs of the population. The U.S. works closely with the international community to provide coordinated support for these efforts. An Afghanistan-hosted Peace Jirga with Pakistan resulted in a commitment to cooperate in combating terrorism, facilitate the return of Afghan refugees, and support regional economic activity. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Afghanistan for additional information.


ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:


 A passport and valid visa are required to enter and exit Afghanistan. Afghan entry visas are not available at Kabul International Airport or any other ports of entry in Afghanistan. American citizens who arrive without a visa are subject to confiscation of their passport and face heavy fines and difficulties in retrieving their passport and obtaining a visa, as well as possible deportation from the country. Americans arriving in the country via military air usually have considerable difficulties if they choose to depart Afghanistan on commercial air, because their passports are not stamped to show that they entered the country legally. Those coming on military air should move quickly after arrival to legalize their status if there is any chance they will depart the country on anything other than military air. Visit the Embassy of Afghanistan web site at http://www.embassyofafghanistan.org for the most current visa information. The Consular office of the Embassy of Afghanistan is located at 2233 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 216, Washington, DC 20007, phone number 202-298-9125. Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.


SAFETY AND SECURITY:


The latest Travel Warning for Afghanistan emphasizes that the security situation remains critical for American citizens. The Taliban and associated insurgent groups, al-Qaida network terrorist organizations, and narco-traffickers oppose the strengthening of a democratic government. These groups aim to weaken or bring down the Government of Afghanistan and to drive Westerners out of the country. They do not hesitate to use violence, including targeting civilians. Terrorist activities may include, but are not limited to bombings -- including improvised explosive devices and car bombs -- assassinations, carjackings, rocket attacks, assaults and kidnappings. There were over 120 suicide attacks in 2008. There is an ongoing threat to attack and kidnap U.S. citizens and Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) workers throughout the country. In 2008,, more than 30 NGO workers were killed (six foreigners) and at least 78 NGO staff members (seven foreigners) were abducted. Over 25 other foreign civilians, including journalists, were kidnapped. Kabul continues to experience suicide bombings against Afghan government personnel and installations, Afghan and coalition military assets, and international civilians. Riots -- sometimes violent -- have occurred in response to various political or other issues. Crime, including violent crime, remains a significant problem. Official Americans' use of the Kabul-Jalalabad, Kabul-Kandahar highways and other roads throughout the country is often restricted or completely curtailed because of security concerns. Insurgents continue to use roadside and car bombs to conduct attacks and abductions along major highways. Millions of unexploded land mines and other ordinance present a constant danger. The country faces a difficult period in the near term, and American citizens could be targeted or placed at risk by unpredictable local events. Americans should not come to Afghanistan unless they have made arrangements in advance to address security concerns. The absence of records for ownership of property, differing laws from various regimes and the chaos that comes from decades of civil strife have left property issues in great disorder. Afghan-Americans returning to Afghanistan to recover property, or Americans coming to the country to engage in business, have become involved in complicated real estate disputes and have faced threats of retaliatory action, including kidnapping for ransom and death. Large parts of Afghanistan are extremely isolated, with few roads, mostly in poor condition, irregular cell phone signals, and none of the basic physical infrastructure found in Kabul or the larger cities. Americans traveling in these areas who find themselves in trouble may not even have a way to communicate their difficulties to the outside world. For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found. Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.


CRIME:


 A large portion of the Afghan population is unemployed, and many among the unemployed have moved to urban areas. Basic services are rudimentary or non-existent. These factors may directly contribute to crime and lawlessness. Diplomats and international relief workers have reported incidents of robberies and household burglaries as well as kidnappings and assault. Any American citizen who enters Afghanistan should remain vigilant for possible banditry, including violent attacks.


INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:


The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and to the U.S. Embassy in Kabul. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the U.S. Embassy in Kabul for assistance. The Embassy staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to provide a list of attorneys if needed. The local equivalent to the "911" emergency line in Afghanistan is: 119 Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.


CRIMINAL PENALTIES:


While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Afghanistan’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. During the last several years, there have been incidents involving the arrest and/or detention of U.S. citizens. Arrested Americans have faced periods of detention—sometimes in difficult conditions—while awaiting trial. Penalties for possession or use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Afghanistan are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Another sensitive activity is proselytizing. Although the Afghan Constitution allows the free exercise of religion, proselytizing is often viewed as contrary to the beliefs of Islam and considered harmful to society. Proselytizing may lead to arrest and/or deportation. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.


SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:


Because of the poor infrastructure in Afghanistan, access to banking facilities is limited and unreliable. Afghanistan's economy operates on a "cash-only" basis for most transactions. Credit card transactions are not available. International bank transfers are limited. Some ATM machines exist at Standard Charter Bank and Afghan International Bank (AIB) in the Wazir Akbar Khan neighborhood of Kabul, but some travelers have complained of difficulties using them. International communications are difficult. Local telephone networks do not operate reliably. Most people rely on satellite or cellular telephone communications even to make local calls. Cellular phone service is available locally in Kabul and some other cities, but can be unreliable. Injured or distressed foreigners could face long delays before being able to communicate their needs to family or colleagues outside of Afghanistan. Internet access through local service providers is limited. In addition to being subject to all Afghan laws, U.S. citizens who are also citizens of Afghanistan may also be subject to other laws that impose special obligations on Afghan citizens. U.S. citizens who are also Afghan nationals do not require visas for entry into Afghanistan. The Embassy of Afghanistan issues a letter confirming your nationality for entry into Afghanistan. However, you may wish to obtain a visa as some Afghan-Americans have experienced difficulties at land border crossings because they do not have a visa in their passport. For additional information on dual nationality in general, see the Consular Affairs home page for our dual nationality flyer. U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passport with them at all times, so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and U.S. citizenship is readily available. As stated in the Travel Warning, consular assistance for American citizens in Afghanistan is limited. Islam provides the foundation of Afghanistan's customs, laws and practices. Foreign visitors -- men and women -- are expected to remain sensitive to the Islamic culture and not dress in a revealing or provocative manner, including the wearing of sleeveless shirts and blouses, halter-tops and shorts. Women in particular, especially when traveling outside of Kabul, may want to ensure that their tops have long sleeves and cover their collarbone and waistband, and that their pants/skirts cover their ankles. Almost all women in Afghanistan cover their hair in public; American women visitors should carry scarves for this purpose. Afghan customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Afghanistan of items such as firearms, alcoholic beverages, religious materials, antiquities, medications, and printed materials. American travelers have faced fines and/or confiscation of items considered antiquities upon exiting Afghanistan. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Afghanistan in Washington for specific information regarding customs requirements. Travelers en route to Afghanistan may transit countries that have restrictions on firearms, including antique or display models. If you plan to take firearms or ammunition to another country, you should contact officials at that country's embassy and those that you will be transiting to learn about their regulations and fully comply with those regulations before traveling. Please consult http://www.customs.gov for information on importing firearms into the United States. Please see our Customs Information sheet.


MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:


Well-equipped medical facilities are few and far between throughout Afghanistan. European and American medicines are available in limited quantities and may be expensive or difficult to locate. There is a shortage of basic medical supplies. Basic medicines manufactured in Iran, Pakistan, and India are available, but their reliability can be questionable. Several western-style private clinics have opened in Kabul: the DK-German Medical Diagnostic Center (www.medical-kabul.com), Acomet Family Hospital (www.afghancomet.com), and CURE International Hospital (ph. 079-883-830) offer a variety of basic and routine-type care; Americans seeking treatment should request American or Western health practitioners. Afghan public hospitals should be avoided. Individuals without government licenses or even medical degrees often operate private clinics; there is no public agency that monitors their operations. Travelers will not be able to find Western-trained medical personnel in most parts of the country outside of Kabul, although there are some international aid groups temporarily providing basic medical assistance in various cities and villages. For any medical treatment, payment is required in advance. Commercial medical evacuation capability from Afghanistan is limited and could take days to arrange. Even medevac companies that claim to service the world may not agree to come to Afghanistan. Those with medevac insurance should confirm with the insurance provider that it will be able to provide medevac assistance to this country. There have been outbreaks of Avian Influenza in poultry in Afghanistan, to include the areas of Nangahar, Laghman, and Wardak provinces, and in the city of Kabul, however, there have been no reported cases of the H5N1 virus in humans. Updates on the Avian Influenza situation in Afghanistan are published on the Embassy’s web site at http://kabul.usembassy.gov/information_for_travelers.html. For additional information on Avian Influenza, please refer to the Department of State's Avian Influenza Fact Sheet available at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/health/health_1181.html Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Afghanistan. For further information, please consult the CDC's Travel Notice on TB. http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/yellowBookCh4-TB.aspx| The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Afghanistan. However, if one has questions, please inquire directly with the Embassy of Afghanistan at http://www.embassyofafghanistan.org before you travel. Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site. Further health information for travelers is available from the WHO.


MEDICAL INSURANCE:


The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas. TRAFFIC


SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:


 While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Afghanistan is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance. All drivers face the potential danger of encountering improvised-explosive devices and land mines that may have been planted on or near roadways. An estimated 5-7 million landmines and large quantities of unexploded ordinance exist throughout the countryside and alongside roads, posing a danger to travelers. Robbery and kidnappings are also prevalent on highways outside of Kabul. The transportation system in Afghanistan is marginal, although the international community is constructing modern highways and provincial roads. Vehicles are poorly maintained, often overloaded, and traffic laws are not enforced. Vehicular traffic is chaotic and must contend with numerous pedestrians, bicyclists and animals. Many urban streets have large potholes and are not well lit. Rural roads are not paved. Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.


AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:


As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Afghanistan, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Afghanistan’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s internet website at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa. U.S. Government personnel are not authorized to travel on Ariana Afghan Airlines or any other airline falling under the oversight of the Government of Afghanistan’s Civil Aviation Authority, owing to safety concerns; however, U.S. Government personnel are permitted to travel on international flights operated by airlines from countries whose civil aviation authorities meet international aviation safety standards for the oversight of their air carrier operations under the FAA’s International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) program.


CHILDREN'S ISSUES:


 For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction. R


EGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:


Americans living or traveling in Afghanistan are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration web site and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Afghanistan. Americans without internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located in Kabul on Great Massoud (Airport) Road, local phone number 0700-108-001 or 0700-108-002, and for emergencies after hours 0700-201-908. The web site is http://kabul.usembassy.gov/ * * * * * This replaces the Country Specific Information dated June 16, 2008 to update sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Information for Victims of Crime, Criminal Penalties, Special Circumstances, and Medical Facilities and Health Information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2019 13:26:06 +0200 (METDST)

Jalalabad, Afghanistan, Aug 19, 2019 (AFP) - Scores of people including children were wounded Monday after a series of explosions shook the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad, as the country's independence day was marred by bloodshed.

As many as 10 blasts were reported in and around the city in Nangarhar province, authorities said, and casualty numbers rose as the day wore on.   "The explosions were caused by IEDs in different parts of the city and as groups of people were celebrating independence day," the Nangarhar governor's spokesman Attaullah Khogyani said, referring to improvised explosive devices.   Jalalabad is the scene of frequent bomb attacks, and the surrounding terrain is home to both Taliban fighters and the Islamic State group's local affiliate.

At least 52 people were wounded, Khogyani said. Zaher Adel, a spokesman for a local hospital, said 66 wounded people had been brought in. An AFP correspondent saw children among the victims.   This year's August 19 celebrations mark 100 years of Afghan independence from British influence.   The day was supposed to be one of national pride and unity, but was overshadowed by an IS suicide attack Saturday on a crowded Kabul wedding hall that killed at least 63 people.

In Kabul, locals took to the streets to wave the black-red-and-green Afghan flag, but several public events to commemorate the date were scrapped as Kabul mourns and due to fears of a fresh attack.    "We postponed the celebrations to honour the victims, but we will definitely take revenge for our people," Afghan President Ahraf Ghani said.   "We will avenge the blood of our people, every drop of it."

Mayhem from Afghanistan's war continues to wreak havoc on Afghans every day, even though the US and the Taliban are in final negotiations for a deal that would see US troops begin to quit Afghanistan and could potentially lead to a reduction in violence.
Date: Sun, 18 Aug 2019 11:47:26 +0200 (METDST)
By By Emal Haidary and Mushtaq Mojaddidi

Kabul, Aug 18, 2019 (AFP) - Joy and celebration turned into horror and carnage when a suicide bomber targeted a packed Afghan wedding hall, killing at least 63 people in the deadliest attack to rock Kabul in months, officials and witnesses said Sunday.   The massive blast, which took place late Saturday in west Kabul, came as Washington and the Taliban finalise a deal to reduce the US military presence in Afghanistan and hopefully build a roadmap to a ceasefire.   The groom recalled greeting smiling guests in the afternoon, before seeing their bodies being carried out hours later.

The attack "changed my happiness to sorrow", the young man, who gave his name as Mirwais, told local TV station Tolo News.   "My family, my bride are in shock, they cannot even speak. My bride keeps fainting," he said.   "I lost my brother, I lost my friends, I lost my relatives. I will never see happiness in my life again."   Interior ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said at least 63 people had been killed and 182 injured.   "Among the wounded are women and children," Rahimi said. Earlier he stated a suicide bomber carried out the attack.

Afghan weddings are epic and vibrant affairs, with hundreds or often thousands of guests celebrating for hours inside industrial-scale wedding halls where the men are usually segregated from the women and children.   "The wedding guests were dancing and celebrating the party when the blast happened," recounted Munir Ahmad, 23, who was seriously injured and whose cousin was among the dead.   "Following the explosion, there was total chaos. Everyone was screaming and crying for their loved ones," he told AFP from his bed in a local hospital, where he is being treated for shrapnel wounds.

Images from inside the hall showed blood-stained bodies on the ground along with pieces of flesh and torn clothes, hats, sandals and bottles of mineral water. The huge blast ripped parts of the ceiling off.   The wedding was believed to be a Shia gathering. Shia Muslims are frequently targeted in Sunni-majority Afghanistan, particularly by the so-called Islamic State group, which is also active in Kabul but did not immediately issue any claim of responsibility.

Wedding guest Hameed Quresh told AFP the young couple were saying their vows when the bomb went off.    "We fainted following the blast, and we don't know who brought us to the hospital," sobbed Quresh, who lost one brother and was himself wounded.   Another guest told Tolo that some 1,200 people had been invited. With low security, weddings are seen as easy targets.   The attack sent a wave of grief through a city grimly accustomed to atrocities. President Ashraf Ghani called it "barbaric", while Afghanistan's chief executive Abdullah Abdullah described it as a "crime against humanity".

- Withdrawal deal expected -
The attack underscores both the inadequacy of Afghanistan's security forces and the scale of the problem they face. While the police and army claim they prevent most bombings from ever happening, the fact remains that insurgents pull off horrific attacks with chilling regularity.   On July 28, at least 20 people were killed when attackers targeted Ghani's running mate Amrullah Saleh as he campaigned in presidential elections.    The incident showed how even amid tight security and known threats, insurgents can conduct brazen attacks.   The issue also goes to the heart of a prospective deal between the US and the Taliban that would see Washington begin to withdraw its approximately 14,000 soldiers from Afghanistan.

The deal relies on the Taliban providing guarantees they will stop jihadist groups such as Al-Qaeda and IS from using Afghanistan as a safe haven. Saturday's attack suggests any such promise would be tough to keep.   The "Taliban cannot absolve themselves of blame, for they provide platform for terrorists," Ghani said.   Few believe such a deal will bring quick peace.

Many Afghans fear the Taliban could return, eroding hard-won rights for women in particular and leading to a spiralling civil war.   Meanwhile, in the northern province of Balkh, 11 members of the same family were killed when their car hit a roadside bomb, officials said. The provincial governor blamed the Taliban for planting the device.
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2019 11:19:17 +0200

Kabul, July 1, 2019 (AFP) - At least one person was killed and dozens wounded in a Taliban-claimed attack which saw a powerful car bomb rock Kabul early Monday, followed by gunmen who battled special forces in an area housing military and government buildings.   Many children were among the wounded, according to a hospital statement, after the rush-hour explosion sent a plume of smoke into the air above the Puli Mahmood Khan neighbourhood of the Afghan capital and shook buildings up to two kilometres (1.2 miles) away.

AFP reporters could hear gunshots and multiple smaller explosions as fighting between the gunmen and special forces continued more than four hours after the attack began.   "At first, a car bomb took place and then several attackers took over a building. The area is cordoned off by the police special forces and (they) are bringing down the attackers," interior ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said.    He later said that at least one attacker had been killed.   Health ministry spokesman Wahidullah Mayar said that at least one person had been killed and 65 wounded -- including nine children -- and warned that casualties could rise.   "Among the wounded, many children who were going to school," said the Twitter account of the Emergency Hospital in Kabul, where many victims were taken.   Some social media images purportedly taken at the hospital showed wounded, stunned children in school uniforms, still clutching books as they arrived for treatment.

The Taliban claimed the attack, which came just two days after the insurgents began a seventh round of talks with the US in Qatar as Washington eyes a breakthrough before Afghanistan's September presidential election.   Militant spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid released a statement saying the insurgents had targeted a defence ministry building in the area, which was quickly blocked off by Afghan forces and ambulances, with helicopter gunships seen overhead as firing continued.   Authorities have not confirmed the target.    "We were sitting inside the office when the world turned upside down on us," Zaher Usman, an employee at a branch of the culture ministry, which he said stands just 150 metres (yards) from the blast.

- Brief lockdown -
"When I opened my eyes, the office was filled with smoke and dust and everything was broken, my colleagues were screaming," Usman told AFP by telephone.   Shams Amini, a spokesman for the Afghan Football Federation, told AFP that the blast occurred near their HQ gates, and said some colleagues had been injured.   Nearby Shamshad TV station, which was attacked in 2017, aired images of broken glass and damage to its offices. "I was terrified," Shamshad anchor Hashmat Stanikzai told AFP.

The explosion came as the US was set to begin a third day of negotiations with the militants in Doha. There was no immediate confirmation if they would go ahead after the blast.   With the attack still ongoing, the Taliban spokesman in Doha again insisted that the insurgents will not negotiate with Kabul.   "Once the timeline for the withdrawal of foreign forces is set in the presence of international observers, then we will begin the talks to the Afghan sides, but we will not talk to the Kabul administration as a government," Suhail Shaheen tweeted. 

The insurgents have long refused to negotiate with the Western-backed government, whom they deem puppets.   The talks have so far centred on four issues -- counter-terrorism, the foreign troop presence, an intra-Afghan dialogue and a permanent ceasefire.   A potential deal would see the US agree to withdraw its troops after more than 17 years in Afghanistan, igniting deep concerns among Afghans who fear Washington will rush for the exits and allow the militants to return to some semblance of power.   In return, the Taliban would guarantee the country would never again become a safe haven for violent extremism, as happened with Al-Qaeda before the September 11, 2001 attacks.   However, US officials have insisted that "nothing is agreed until everything is agreed", including intra-Afghan talks.
Date 24 Jun 2019
Source: Mena FN [edited]

The number of polio positive cases in Afghanistan has reached 10 so far in 2019, with 4 cases reported from Uruzgan [Oruzgan] province and 1 new case detected in the Mehr Abad area of Tirinkot, the provincial capital.

According to Ministry of Public Health, a 21-month-old girl is permanently paralyzed in Tirinkot, making 10 cases of polio in Afghanistan so far [in 2019].

The Health ministry in a statement said that last week, another polio case was reported from Trinkot, which paralyzed a 30-month-old boy [see Poliomyelitis update (50): Afghanistan (OZ) http://promedmail.org/post/20190619.6528976].

House-to-house polio campaigns have been banned in this area since May 2018. This means children under [5 years of age] living in the area have not been vaccinated and protected from the virus since then, the ministry added.

Only one out of 10 polio cases were reported from Eastern Kunar province, while the rest have been reported from the southern region: 4 cases in Urozgan [Oruzgan], 3 in Helmand and 2 cases in Kandahar.

"Access to health services is the right of every citizen of the country," said Dr. Ferozuddin Feroz, the Minister of Public Health of Afghanistan. "We are deeply concerned about the increasing polio cases and the number of children who still don't have consistent access to vaccination. The virus could spread, and more children will be affected and paralyzed by polio virus in Afghanistan. I ask everyone to work together and protect innocent children against polio, to provide a safe and secure environment for our frontline workers to vaccinate children in every corner of the country."

The polio vaccine is safe, even for sick and new-born children. It is very important that new-borns and sick children get the vaccine, because they may have lower immunity, which makes them more susceptible to the virus.

Polio vaccination has also been strongly endorsed by national and global Islamic scholars, the statement added.
======================
[In last week's report on the 30-month-old male child from Oruzgan, there was mention that the vaccination teams were unable to enter the zone where the child lived due to security concerns. The media report above mentions there haven't been vaccinations provided through household visits in this zone since May 2018.

Oruzgan is located in the central part of Afghanistan, sharing southern and southwestern borders with Kandahar and Helmand provinces where other polio cases have been reported this year (2019) as well (<https://www.afghana.com/GetLocal/Afghanistan/Provinces.htm>).

With the addition of this newly confirmed case, there have now been 10 cases of confirmed poliomyelitis reported from Afghanistan since the beginning of 2019. Add these to the 27 cases confirmed in Pakistan, and there are now 37 cases reported this year (2019), 4 more than the total number of cases reported during 2018.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Oruzgan Province, Afghanistan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1257>  - ProMED Mod.MPP]
Date: Tue 18 Jun 2019
Source: MENAFN [edited]

A new polio case has been reported by local officials in southern Uruzgan province. Dr. Saifudin, head of the polio campaign for Uruzgan, said on Tuesday [18 Jun 2019] that a 2-year-old child was affected by polio in Meher Abad village of Terinkot city, the provincial capital. "[The family] of the polio-affected kid lives on the outskirts of Terinkot city and they (family) did not have access to health facilities," he said.

Meanwhile, provincial healthcare officials said the anti-polio vaccine was not launched in Mehrab Abad village due to security conditions; thus, a number of children have not received the polio immunization. Also, the head of the immunization department for the southern provinces has expressed concerns over reports of polio cases in the southern parts of Afghanistan: "7 cases of polio have been registered before; this (polio) is a great threat to the Afghan children," he said.

In the past 3 months, 9 cases of polio have been registered so far: 3 polio cases in Uruzgan, 2 in Kandahar, 3 Helmand and 1 in Kunar.
=======================
[The statement "[The family] of the polio-affected kid lives on the outskirts of Terinkot city and they (family) did not have access to health facilities" should be coupled with the following sentence "Meanwhile, provincial healthcare officials said the anti-polio vaccine was not launched in Mehrab Abad village due to security conditions; thus, a number of children have not received the polio immunization," which strongly suggests that this child lives in an area with significant civil unrest where access to healthcare, both curative and preventive, is significantly limited. What needs to be emphasized is that while there isn't access to normal healthcare services and vaccinators are often unable to access these areas, the poliovirus is able to access these areas and circulate in the pockets of susceptible individuals living there. Until something can be done to convince the warring parties that children's health should not be held hostage for political gain, the goal of polio eradication will also remain hostage to the politics.

A Xinhua.net article on this case mentions that the age of the child is 2.5 years

Oruzgan is located in the central part of Afghanistan, sharing southern and southwestern borders with Kandahar and Helmand provinces where other polio cases have been reported this year (2019) as well (<https://www.afghana.com/GetLocal/Afghanistan/Provinces.htm>).

With the addition of this newly confirmed case, there have now been 9 cases of confirmed poliomyelitis reported from Afghanistan since the beginning of 2019. Add these to the 24 cases confirmed in Pakistan, and there are now 33 cases reported this year (2019) -- the same number as reported for the entire year of 2018. - ProMED Mod.MPP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Oruzgan Province, Afghanistan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1257>]
More ...

Bolivia

Bolivia US Consular Information Sheet
July 19, 2006

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Bolivia is a constitutional democracy and one of the least-developed countries in South America. Tourist facilities are generally adequate, but vary greatly in qualit
. The capital is La Paz, accessible by Bolivia's international airport in El Alto. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Bolivia for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: A U.S. passport valid for at least six months from the date of proposed entry into Bolivia is required to enter and depart Bolivia. U.S. citizen tourists do not need a visa for a stay of one month or less (that period can be extended up to 90 days upon application to the Bolivian immigration authorities). Visitors for other purposes must obtain a visa in advance. U.S. citizens whose passports are lost or stolen in Bolivia must obtain a replacement passport and present it, together with a police report of the loss or theft, to a Bolivian government immigration office in order to obtain permission to depart. For more information on replacement passport procedures, please consult the U.S. Embassy's Web site at . An exit tax is charged when departing Bolivia by air. Travelers with Bolivian citizenship or residency pay an additional fee upon departure. While the Bolivian Government does not require travelers to purchase round-trip air tickets in order to enter the country, some airlines have required travelers to purchase round-trip tickets prior to boarding aircraft bound for Bolivia. Some tourists arriving by land report that immigration officials did not place entry stamps in their passports, causing problems at checkpoints and upon departure. See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on Bolivia and other countries. Visit the Embassy of Bolivia web site at for the most current visa information (please note that the web site is primarily in Spanish).

Bolivian consulates are located in Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Oklahoma City, New York, San Francisco, and Seattle. For information on in-country visa procedures and requirements, please consult the Bolivian Immigration Service at (please note that the web site is in Spanish), fax/telephone (591-2) 211-0960, street address Avenida Camacho entre Loayza y Bueno, La Paz, Bolivia. See Entry and Exit Requirements for more information pertaining to dual nationality and the international child abduction . Please refer to our Customs Information to learn more about customs regulations.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: In an effort to prevent international child abduction, the Bolivian Government has initiated procedures at entry/exit points. Minors (under 18) who are citizens or residents of Bolivia and who are traveling alone, with one parent or with a third party, must present a copy of their birth certificate and written authorization from the absent parent(s) or legal guardian, specifically granting permission to travel alone, with one parent or with a third party. When a parent is deceased, a notarized copy of the death certificate is required in lieu of the written authorization. If documents are prepared in the United States, the authorization and the birth certificate must be translated into Spanish, notarized, and authenticated by the Bolivian Embassy or a Bolivian consulate within the United States. If documents are prepared in Bolivia, only notarization by a Bolivian notary is required. Using these documents, a t ravel permit may be obtained from the Juzgado del Menor. This requirement does not apply to children who enter the country with a U.S. passport as tourists, unless they hold dual U.S./Bolivian citizenship or have been in Bolivia for more than 90 consecutive days.

SAFETY AND SECURITY: The countrywide emergency number for the police, including highway patrol, is 110. The corresponding number for the fire department is 119. The National Tourism Police has an office in La Paz, with plans to expand to Cochabamba and Santa Cruz, providing free assistance to tourists 24 hours a day. These services include English-speaking officials who may assist tourists in filing police reports of lost/stolen documents or other valuables. The La Paz office is located at Plaza del Stadium, Edificio Olympia, planta baja, Miraflores, telephone number 222-0516.

Protests, strikes, and other civic actions can occur at any time and disrupt transportation on a local and national level. This is particularly true before, during and after elections or other changes in government. While protest actions generally begin peacefully, they have the potential to become violent. The police have used tear gas to break up protests. In addition to rallies and street demonstrations, protesters sometimes block roads; they sometimes react with force when travelers attempt to pass through or go around roadblocks and occasionally have used the threat of explosives to press their point.

U.S. citizens should avoid roadblocks and demonstrations. Demonstrations protesting government or private company policies occur frequently, even in otherwise peaceful times. Roadblocks and demonstrations in June 2005 led to the closure of the El Alto airport in La Paz, resulting in cancellation and diversion of flights and other inconveniences to travelers. U.S. citizens planning travel to or from Bolivia should take into consideration the possibility of disruptions to air service in and out of La Paz and other airports. Americans should monitor Bolivian media reports for updates. The Embassy strongly recommends that U.S. citizens avoid areas where roadblocks or public demonstrations are occurring or planned. Political rallies should similarly be avoided in light of press reports of violence at some rallies in various parts of Bolivia.

U.S. citizens who find themselves in a roadblock should not attempt to "run" a roadblock, as this may aggravate the situation and lead to physical harm. Taking alternative, safe routes, or returning to where the travel started may be the safest courses of action under these circumstances. U.S. citizens embarking on road trips should monitor news reports and may contact the American Citizen Services Unit of the U.S. Embassy in La Paz at (591)(2)(216-8297 or the U.S. consular agencies in Cochabamba at (591)(4)425-6714 and/or Santa Cruz at (591) (3) 351-3477 for updates. Given that roadblocks may occur without warning and have stranded travelers for several days, travelers should take extra food and water. The U.S. Embassy also advises its employees to maintain at least one week's supply of drinking water and canned food in case roadblocks affect supplies, as occurred in June 2005. For more information on emergency preparedness, please consult the Federal Emergency Management Authority (FEMA) Web site at . That Web site includes a Spanish language version.

Americans living or traveling in Bolivia are encouraged to register and update their contact information at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz and/or the U.S. consular agencies in Cochabamba and Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Registration may be done online and in advance of travel. Information on registering may be found at the Department of State's Consular Affairs website .

In February and October 2003, approximately one hundred people died during violent demonstrations and protests in downtown La Paz and the nearby city of El Alto. These demonstrations also affected Cochabamba and other towns and villages in the Altiplano. While the protests and demonstrations subsided, many of the underlying social, political, and economic causes remain, and in March 2005, several intercity roads, including Bolivia's major east-west highway, were closed by blockades for several weeks.

Since 2000 the resort town of Sorata, located seventy miles north of La Paz, has been cut off by blockades on three occasions, ranging from one week to one month. Visitors contemplating travel to Sorata should contact the Consular Section in La Paz prior to travel.

In the Chapare region between Santa Cruz and Cochabamba and the Yungas region northeast of La Paz violence and civil unrest, primarily associated with anti-narcotics activities, periodically create a risk for travelers to those regions.

Confrontations between area residents and government authorities over coca eradication have resulted in the use of tear gas and stronger force by government authorities to quell disturbances. Pro-coca groups have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and may attempt to target U.S. Government or private interests. U.S. citizen visitors to the Chapare or Yungas regions are encouraged to check with the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy prior to travel. Violence has also erupted recently between squatters unlawfully invading private land and security forces attempting to remove them.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site , where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement , Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State's pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad .

CRIME: The U.S. Department of State currently classifies Bolivia as a medium to high crime threat country. Street crime, such as pick pocketing and theft from parked vehicles, occurs with some frequency in Bolivia. Theft of cars and car parts, particularly late-model four-wheel-drive vehicles, is common. Hijacking of vehicles has occurred, and travelers should take appropriate precautions to avoid being victimized. In November 2003, an American citizen was murdered during an attempted carjacking in Santa Cruz.

Bolivian police state that there are currently eight organized criminal groups operating in the La Paz area. The techniques employed by these groups vary, but there are a few major patterns that can be identified.

There have been reports of "false police" -- persons using police uniforms, identification, and even buildings modified to resemble police stations -- intercepting and robbing foreign tourists. Under Bolivian law, police need a warrant from the "fiscal" or prosecutor to detain a suspect. Any searches or seizures must occur at a bona fide police station in the presence of the fiscal. The warrant requirement also applies to suspected drug trafficking cases, although such searches and seizures may occur without a fiscal present. If detained, U.S. citizens should request to see the warrant and demand immediate contact with the nearest U.S. Consular Office (in La Paz, Cochabamba or Santa Cruz).

According to press reports, criminals using the "false police" method focus on foreigners in areas frequented by tourists including bus terminals and tourist markets such as Sagarnaga Street in La Paz. The perpetrators will identify a potential victim and have an accomplice typically driving a white taxi offer taxi services to the potential victim. They focus on European/American tourists who are not wearing a traditional "trekker" backpack and are traveling without a large number of bags. A few blocks after the potential victim boards the taxi another accomplice, pretending to be a recently arrived tourist, boards the taxi with the potential victim. With all the accomplices then in place, the "false police" stop the taxi, "search" the passengers, and rob the victim. As part of this scam, the false police may take the victim to a "false police" station.

A similar variation also introduces a "tourist" to the victims. This introduction can take place on a bus, taxi, train, or just walking down the street. The "tourist" will befriend the victims and might seek assistance in some manner. After a period of time, the "police" intercept the victims and the "tourist." At this point, the "police" discover some sort of contraband (usually drugs) on the "tourist." The entire group is then taken to the "police station." At this point, the "police" seize the documents, credit cards, and ATM cards of the victims. The perpetrators obtain pin numbers, sometimes by threat of violence, and the scam is complete.

Another technique again introduces a "tourist" to the victims. This "tourist" can be any race or gender and will probably be able to speak the language of the victims. This meeting can happen anywhere and the goal of the "tourist" is to build the trust of the victims. Once a certain level of trust is obtained, the "tourist" suggests a particular mode of transportation to a location (usually a taxi). The "taxi" picks up the victims and the "tourist" and delivers the group to a safe house in the area. At this point the victims are informed that they are now kidnapped and are forced to give up their credit cards and ATM cards with pin numbers.

Bolivian police sources state that two Austrian citizens fell victim to this scam and had their bank accounts emptied through use of their ATM card. The perpetrators then suffocated the victims and buried them in clandestine graves, where police found their bodies on April 3, 2006. During that timeframe, a Spanish citizen also purportedly fell prey to this scam, and his body was found nearby.

In most instances, the victims are released, but the murder of the victims is still a possibility. The techniques and the perpetrators are convincing. Authentic uniforms, badges, and props help persuade the victims that the situation is real and valid. All tourists visiting Bolivia should exercise extreme caution. Visitors should be suspicious of all "coincidences" that can happen on a trip. If the tourist has doubts about a situation, the tourist should immediately remove him/herself from the scene.

Thefts of bags, wallets, and backpacks are a problem throughout Bolivia, but especially in the tourist areas of downtown La Paz and the Altiplano. Most thefts involve two or three people who spot a potential victim and wait until the bag or backpack is placed on the ground, often at a restaurant, bus terminal, Internet café, etc. In other cases, the thief places a disagreeable substance on the clothes or backpack of the intended victim, and then offers to assist the victim with the removal of the substance. While the person is distracted, the thief or an accomplice grabs the bag or backpack and flees. In such a situation, the visitor should decline assistance, secure the bag/backpack, and walk briskly from the area. To steal wallets and bags, thieves may spray water on the victim's neck, and while the person is distracted, an accomplice takes the wallet or bag. At times the thief poses as a policeman, and requests that the person accompany him to the police station, using a nearby taxi. The visitor should indicate a desire to contact the U.S. Embassy and not enter the taxi. Under no circumstances should you surrender ATM or credit cards, or release a PIN number. While most thefts do not involve violence, in some instances the victim has been physically harmed and forcibly searched for hidden valuables. Visitors should avoid being alone on the streets, especially at night and in isolated areas.

Five years ago female tourists reported being drugged and raped by a tourist guide in the city of Rurrenabaque in the Beni region. Visitors should be careful when choosing a tour operator and should not accept any type of medication or drugs from unreliable sources. The Embassy has received reports of sexual assaults against female hikers in the Yungas Valley, near the town of Coroico. Visitors to Coroico are advised to avoid hiking alone or in small groups.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends, and explain how funds may be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime .
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Medical care in large cities is adequate for most purposes but of varying quality. Ambulance services are limited-to-non-existent. Medical facilities are generally not adequate to handle serious medical conditions. Pharmacies are located throughout Bolivia, and prescription and over the counter medications are widely available. Western Bolivia, dominated by the Andes and high plains (Altiplano), is largely insect-free. However, altitude sickness (see below) is a major problem. Eastern Bolivia is tropical, and visitors to that area are subject to related illnesses. In March 2005, several cases of yellow fever were reported in the Chapare region. News media periodically report outbreaks of rabies, particularly in the larger cities.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC's Internet site at . For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization's (WHO) website at . Further health information for travelers is available at .

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Most medical evacuation flights cannot land at the airport serving La Paz due to the altitude; instead flights may need to use the international airport in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas .

HIGH-ALTITUDE HEALTH RISKS: Official U.S. Government travelers to La Paz are provided with the following information: The altitude of La Paz ranges from 10,600 feet to over 13,000 feet (3,400 to 4,000 meters) above sea level. Much of Western Bolivia is at the same altitude or higher, including Lake Titicaca, the Salar de Uyuni, and the cities of Oruro and Potosi. The altitude alone poses a serious risk of illness, hospitalization, and even death, if you have a medical condition that affects blood circulation or breathing.

Prior to departing the U.S. for high-altitude locations (over 10,000 feet above sea level), travelers should discuss the trip with their personal physician and request information on specific recommendations concerning medication and lifestyle tips at high altitudes. Coca-leaf tea is a popular beverage and folk remedy for altitude sickness in Bolivia. Possession of this tea, which is sold in bags in most Bolivian grocery stores, is illegal in the United States.

The State Department's Office of Medical Services does not allow official U.S. Government travelers to visit La Paz if they have any of the following:

Sickle cell anemia or sickle cell trait: 30 percent of persons with sickle cell trait are likely to have a crisis at elevations of more than 8,000 feet.
Heart disease: A man 45 years or older, or a woman 55 years or older, who has two of the following risk factors (hypertension, angina, diabetes, cigarette smoking, or elevated cholesterol) should have a stress EKG and a cardiological evaluation before the trip.
Lung disease: Anyone with asthma and on maximum dosage of medication for daily maintenance, or anyone who has been hospitalized for asthma within the last year should not come to La Paz and surrounding areas.
Given potential complications from altitude sickness, pregnant women should consult their doctor before travel to La Paz and other high-altitude areas of Bolivia.
All people, even healthy and fit persons, will feel symptoms of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) upon arrival at high altitude. Most people will have increased respiration and increased heart rate. Many people will have headaches, difficulty sleeping, lack of appetite, minor gastric and intestinal upsets, and mood changes. Many travelers limit physical activity for the first 36 to 48 hours after arrival and avoid alcohol and smoking for at least one week after arrival.

For additional information, travelers should visit the World Health Organization's website at as well as the CDC's travel warning on high altitude sickness at .

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Bolivia is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance. U.S. citizens planning on driving in Bolivia, despite the hazards described below, should obtain an international driver's license through their local automobile club before coming to Bolivia.

Road conditions in Bolivia are hazardous. Although La Paz, Santa Cruz, and Cochabamba are connected by improved highways, the vast majority of roads in Bolivia are unpaved. Few highways have shoulders, fencing or barriers, and highway markings are minimal. Yielding for pedestrians in the cities is not the norm. For trips outside the major cities, especially in mountainous areas, a four-wheel-drive vehicle is highly recommended. Travel during the rainy season (November through March) is difficult, as most routes are potholed, and some roads and bridges are washed out. Added dangers are the absence of formal training for most drivers, poor maintenance and overloaded vehicles, lack of lights on some vehicles at night, and intoxicated or overly tired drivers, including commercial bus and truck drivers.

The majority of intercity travel in Bolivia is by bus, with varying levels of safety and service. In recent years there have been major bus crashes on the highway between La Paz and Oruro, and on the Yungas road. The old Yungas road is considered one of the most dangerous routes in the world. Taxis, vans, and buses dominate intracity transportation. From a crime perspective, public transportation is relatively safe and violent assaults are rare. However, petty theft of unattended backpacks and other personal items does occur. For reasons of safety, visitors are advised to use radio taxis whenever possible.

Drivers of vehicles involved in traffic accidents are expected to remain at the scene until the arrival of local police authorities. Any attempt to leave the scene is in violation of Bolivian law. The Embassy believes any attempt to flee the scene of an accident would place the driver and passengers at greater risk of harm than remaining at the scene until the arrival of local police. Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Bolivia as being in compliance with ICAO international aviation safety standards for oversight of Bolivia's air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA's Internet web site at www.faa.gov/avr/iasa/index.cfm . There are limited flights within Bolivia and to neighboring countries. Flight delays and cancellations are common. In February and March 2006, strikes at national carrier Lloyd Aereo Boliviano led to the cancellation of both national and international flights with resultant delays and other inconveniences for travelers.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: In the run-up to the July 2006 Constituent Assembly elections, President Morales accused the United States military of infiltrating Bolivia with operatives disguised as "students and tourists." As an apparent result of these comments, some U.S. citizens have reported harassment by Bolivian officials and been subjected to unwanted media attention. In one case, a local Bolivian newspaper wrongly identified an American citizen as an operative for the Central Intelligence Agency. Americans planning on traveling to Bolivia should be aware of the political atmosphere and the possibility of unwanted attention from pro-governmental groups and other Bolivian officials.

For information on in-country visa procedures and requirements, please consult the Bolivian Immigration Service at (please note that the Web site is in Spanish), fax/telephone (591-2) 211-0960, street address Avenida Camacho entre Loayza y Bueno, La Paz, Bolivia. In emergency cases, the Immigration Service may permit temporary residency applicants to retrieve their passports from those applications. However, under current regulations in such cases the applicant would need to commence the application anew, including paying the corresponding fees. Any U.S. documents, such as birth, marriage, divorce or death certificates, to be presented in Bolivia must first be authenticated in the U.S. at the nearest Bolivian Embassy or consulate. For information on those procedures, please consult the Department of State Office of Authentications web site, www.state.gov/m/a/auth , and the nearest Bolivian Embassy or consulate.

Please see our information on customs regulations .
MARRIAGE: Please see our information on marriage in Bolivia , available on the Embassy's Web site at
MOUNTAIN TREKKING AND CLIMBING SAFETY: U.S. citizens are advised to exercise extreme care when trekking or climbing in Bolivia. Since June 2002, four American citizens have died in falls while mountain climbing in Bolivia. Three of the deaths occurred on Illimani, a 6,402-meter peak located southeast of La Paz. Many popular trekking routes in the Bolivian Andes cross passes as high as 16,000 feet. Trekkers must have adequate clothing and equipment, not always available locally, and should be experienced mountain travelers. It is not prudent to trek alone. Solo trekking is the most significant factor contributing to injuries and robberies. The safest option is to join an organized group and/or use a reputable firm to provide an experienced guide and porter who can communicate in both Spanish and English. If you develop any of the following symptoms while climbing at altitude - severe headache, weakness, vomiting, shortness of breath at rest, cough, chest tightness, unsteadiness - descend to a lower altitude immediately. Trekkers and climbers are strongly encouraged to purchase adequate insurance to cover expenses in case of injury or death.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Bolivian laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Bolivia are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties .

It often takes years to reach a decision in Bolivian legal cases, whether involving property disputes, civil, or criminal matters. Depending on the circumstances of the case, the court can order a defendant held in jail for the duration of the case. Prison conditions are primitive, and prisoners are expected to pay for food and lodging. For further information, please see the Annual Human Rights Report for Bolivia at . Lists of local Bolivian attorneys and their specialties are available from the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in La Paz and the Consular Agencies in Santa Cruz and Cochabamba, and may also be found on our Web site at .

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children's Issues website . Pending U.S. implementation of the Hague Convention on International Adoptions, under Bolivian law U.S. citizens who are not resident in Bolivia are not permitted to adopt Bolivian children./p>

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Bolivia are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consular Agency through the State Department's travel registration website, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Bolivia. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consular Agencies in Cochabamba and Santa Cruz. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consular Agency to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy is located at 2780 Avenida Arce in La Paz, between calles Cordero and Campos; telephone (591-2) 216-8297 during business hours 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., or (591-2) 216-8000 for after-hours emergencies; fax (591-2) 216-8808; Internet . The U.S. Embassy in La Paz is open for American Citizen Services Monday through Thursday from 1:30PM to 5:00PM and Fridays from 08:30 to12:30 and from 2:00PM to 4:00PM, except U.S. and Bolivian holidays. Questions should be directed to the email address USCit.Services.Bolivia@gmail.com or consularlapaz@state.gov .

There are two consular agencies in Bolivia, which provide limited services to American citizens, but are not authorized to issue passports. Anyone requesting service at one of the consular agencies should call ahead to verify that the service requested would be available on the day you expect to visit the agency.

Santa Cruz: The Consular Agency in Santa Cruz is located at 146 Avenida Roque Aguilera (Tercer Anillo); telephone (591-3) 351-3477, 351-3479, or 351-3480; fax (591-3) 351-3478. The U.S. Consular Agency in Santa Cruz is open to the public Mondays from 09:00 to 12:30 and from 2:00PM to 5:00PM and on Tuesday through Friday from 09:00 to 12:30, except U.S. and Bolivian holidays.

Cochabamba: The Consular Agency in Cochabamba is located at Avenida Oquendo 654, Torres Sofer, room 601; telephone (591-4) 411-6313; fax (591-4) 425 -6714. The U.S. Consular Agency in Cochabamba is open Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon, excluding U.S. and Bolivian holidays.
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated April 4, 2006 to update Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Marriage, Special Circumstances and web links.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 7 Aug 2019
Source: El Deber [in Spanish trans. ProMED Mod.TY, edited]

Soldier LC, who completed his military service in the Bolivian Condors School (ESCONBOL) in Sanadita, died of [a] hantavirus [infection], according to laboratory results issued this [Wed 31 Jul 2019] by the National Center for Tropical Diseases (CENETROP) of the Tarija Department of Health Service (SEDES).

The Chief of Epidemiology, Claudia Montenegro, confirmed that the conscript died from this disease that is transmitted by the long-tailed rat and that he had been infected in a forest locality near to the Campo Largo community, where he was from.

According to Montenegro, this is the 15th hantavirus [infection] case reported in Tarija department in 2019; 5 of them died.

The hantavirus cases correspond to patients from Bermejo and the Chaco region where the rat that carries [the] hantavirus lurks.  [Byline: David Maygua]
=========================
[The case count is now up to 15 in Tarija department; 5 of them, including the case above, died. As noted in earlier posts, cases of hantavirus infections in Tarija department are not new. The department is endemic for hantaviruses, and cases occur there sporadically. Last year (2018), there were 11 cases. The previously reported 2015 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) that occurred in Tarija department were confirmed. As noted in the previous comments, earlier cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been reported from tropical, lowland areas of Bolivia, including 7 cases in Tarija during 2014. The specific hantaviruses involved in these or previous cases in Bolivia were not given.

In the lowland Amazon Basin of Bolivia, the rodent hosts of the hantavirus that might be involved in these hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases, with their images, include the following:
- Laguna Negra virus (small vesper mouse, _Calomys laucha_ <http://www.faunaparaguay.com/calomyslaucha.html> and large vesper mouse, _C. callosus_
- Bermejo (Chaco rice rat, _Oligoryzomys chacoensis_
- Oran (long- tailed pygmy rice rat, _O. longicaudatus_

Since previous cases in Tarija department have occurred in Bermejo, perhaps Bermejo hantavirus was involved.

Dr Jan Clement commented earlier that there is a need to be able to differentiate Seoul orthohantavirus (SEOV) as a causative agent, but that is hampered by the fact that most current commercial ELISA or WB (Western Blot) formats no longer contain a SEOV antigen, so that a preliminary presumption of a hantavirus infection can even be missed in non-research laboratories (Clement J, LeDuc JW, Lloyd G, et al. Wild rats, laboratory rats, pet rats: global Seoul hantavirus disease revisited. Viruses. 2019; 11(7): 652; pii: E652; <https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/11/7/652/htm>; and Reynes JM, Carli D, Bour JB et al. Seoul virus infection in humans, France, 2014-2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017; 23(6): 973-7; <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/6/16-0927_article>.

SEOV is widely distributed around the world in the brown rat and is likely found in Tarija department. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Maps of Bolivia:
Date: Wed 17 Jul 2019
Source: El Deber [in Spanish trans. ProMED Mod.TY, edited]

The 1st 3 cases of Chapare arenavirus haemorrhagic fever were detected between December 2003 and January 2004, but the vector [reservoir] was not identified. The affected individuals had febrile and cardiac symptoms.

The New World Chapare arenavirus haemorrhagic fever, which has recently affected 5 people in La Paz [department], 3 of whom died, had its 1st outbreak in 16 years in a rural locality in the Cochabamba tropics; however, since then, until now, the vector [reservoir] has not been identified.

It is known that arenaviruses are transmitted by rodents, and because of this the latest investigations in northern La Paz, where the 1st case was reported (that now is known as the Chapare genotype), was focused on searching for _Calomys callous_ [the large vesper mouse. - ProMED Mod.SH], which transmits Machupo virus, but it may also be transmitted by other rodent families, say knowledgeable people.

The chief of epidemiology of the Departmental Health Services (SEDES), Roberto Torrez, recalled that Chapare virus was identified more than a decade ago, after 3 people presented with haemorrhagic fever symptoms in the rural community of Samusaveti (Cochabamba tropics) between December 2002 and January 2004. The ill individuals presented with febrile and haemorrhagic symptoms and, mainly, cardiac problems. The investigation results indicated that they were dealing with a virus that was "very related" to Machupo, but was genetically distinct. In 2006, it was given the name Chapare, for the locality of its origin.

Torrez explained that the focus [of infection] was controlled, but the vector [reservoir] was not identified. Until now, it is still unknown how the virus has reappeared in northern La Paz, although the possibilities are that the vector [reservoir] has migrated from the Cochabamba tropics or has been inhabiting northern La Paz and that recently infected people have presented [with the disease]. "We know that it is transmitted by rodents, but we do not know the vector [reservoir] of the original Chapare virus, neither of the Cochabamba one, nor of the La Paz one," he said.

The chief of epidemiology discarded the idea that Santa Cruz department is at risk of an outbreak, since that "cases of the disease have never been registered nor have rodents of the _Calomys callous_ family [sic; genus and species] infected with Machupo virus been encountered." Torrez said that many years ago, in San Ignacio de Velasco, in the [municipal] limits of Piso Firme, _Calomys callous_ rodents were taken with Latino virus, which is not a human pathogen.

Technicians of the Ministry of Health have captured rodents in the areas of Caranavi and Guanay, where the 1st fatal case (a farmer) lived and worked. Since calomys rodents were not encountered, the investigation was expanded to other types of rodents.

[A hospitalized medical student who died 4 Jun 2019 was first diagnosed with dengue and later with a fatal arenavirus infection. The legal dispute between the patient's family and the hospital physicians is not translated here, since it adds nothing to the understanding of treatment or of epidemiology of the infection. - ProMED Mod.TY]  [byline: Deisy Ortiz, Miguel A Melendres]
====================
[New World arenavirus haemorrhagic fever virus Chapare, that has recently infected 5 patients in La Paz [department], 3 of whom died, brought to mind the 1st outbreak 16 years ago in a rural area of Cochabamba; however, since then it has not been possible to identify the animal reservoir. At that time, 3 people presented with symptoms of haemorrhagic fever in the rural community of Samusaveti (Cochabamba tropics) between December 2003 and January 2004. - ProMED Mod.JT]

This report definitely identifies the virus involved in these cases as Chapare arenavirus. Symptoms of Chapare and Machupo virus infections include: early clinical manifestations consist of nonspecific signs and symptoms, including fever, headache, fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia. Within 7 days, patients may develop haemorrhagic signs, including bleeding from the oral and nasal mucosa and from the bronchopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts. Case fatality rates range from 5% to 30% (see ProMED-mail post Bolivian haemorrhagic fever - Bolivia: background http://promedmail.org/post/20190705.6553672).

The original cases were investigated by a team of Bolivian health authorities, US Navy health experts based in Lima, Peru, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus was characterized as Chapare arenavirus, a previously unrecognized arenavirus, discovered in serum samples from a patient in rural Bolivia who eventually died of the infection. A full report of the study was published 18 Apr 2008 in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens cited below.

Reference
---------
Delgado S, Erickson BR, Agudo R, et al. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia. PLoS Pathog. 2008; 4(4): e1000047; <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2277458/>

It is unfortunate that the rodent reservoir of Chapare virus is still unknown. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Bolivia:
Date: Thu 18 Jul 2019
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Haemorrhagic Fever in Bolivia [edited]

Watch-level 1. Practice usual precautions
-----------------------------------------
Key Points:
- An outbreak of haemorrhagic fever was recently reported in Bolivia.
- The outbreak is caused by an arenavirus that appears similar to Chapare virus, which causes Chapare haemorrhagic fever.
- Travellers to Bolivia should avoid contact with rodents, with rodent urine or faeces (droppings), and with people who are sick.

What is the current situation?
Health officials in Bolivia have reported an outbreak of haemorrhagic fever associated with an arenavirus similar to Chapare arenavirus. The 1st case was in a man from Caranavi Province. A health care provider who treated him became ill and was transferred to La Paz. Currently, several additional cases have been reported; all have been in health care providers or family members of the 1st patient.

Testing suggests that the virus is genetically similar to Chapare virus, a New World arenavirus that was 1st documented in Bolivia in 2003. During that outbreak, a small number of people became ill, and one died. Since then, no additional cases have been reported. Additional testing is ongoing to determine the exact cause of this outbreak.

What can travelers do to protect themselves?
- Although the animal source for this virus has not been confirmed, travellers should avoid contact with rodents and rodent urine or faeces.
- Avoid contact with people who are sick.
- Travellers going to Bolivia to provide health care to local populations may be at risk and should wear full personal protective equipment when treating suspect hemorrhagic fever cases.
===========================
[The above CDC precaution is in response the recent occurrence of Chapare arenavirus hemorrhagic fever in the La Paz department of Bolivia (see Chapare virus - Bolivia: (LP) http://promedmail.org/post/20190719.6573996). The initial 3 cases of Chapare arenavirus hemorrhagic fever were detected between December 2003 and January 2004, but the vector [reservoir] was not identified. The virus recently affected 5 people in La Paz [department], 3 of whom died, had its 1st outbreak in 16 years in a rural locality in the Cochabamba tropics; however, since then, until now, the vector [reservoir] has not been identified.

As noted earlier, the original cases were investigated by a team of Bolivian health authorities, US Navy health experts based in Lima, Peru, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus was characterized as Chapare arenavirus, a previously unrecognized arenavirus, discovered in serum samples from a patient in rural Bolivia who eventually died of the infection. A full report of the study was published 18 Apr 2008 in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens cited below.

Citation
--------
Delgado S, Erickson BR, Agudo R, et al. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia. PLoS Pathog. 2008; 4(4): e1000047;

The rodent reservoir of Chapare virus is still unknown. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Fri 5 Jul 2019
Source: GIDEON (Global Infectious Disease Epidemiology Network) [edited]

Re: ProMED-mail Undiagnosed illness - Bolivia (02): (LP) Bolivian haemorrhagic fever conf. http://promedmail.org/post/20190704.6551379

In 2019, a small outbreak of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever was reported at a hospital in La Paz [department], Bolivia. The following background data on Bolivian haemorrhagic fever are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series.[1,2] Primary references are available from the author.

Bolivian haemorrhagic fever (BHF) is caused by Machupo virus (Arenaviridae, Tacaribe complex, _Mammarenavirus_). The disease was initially described in 1959 as a sporadic hemorrhagic illness in rural areas of Beni department, eastern Bolivia, and the virus itself was 1st identified in 1963. BHF is most common during April to July in the upper savanna region of Beni. Principal exposure occurs through rodents ([the large vesper mouse] _Calomys callosus_), which enter homes in endemic areas.

BHF is one of several human _Arenavirus_ diseases reported in the Americas: Argentine haemorrhagic fever (Junin virus), Brazilian haemorrhagic fever (Sabia virus), lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever (Guanarito virus) and Whitewater Arroyo virus infection. (At least 2 related diseases are reported in Africa: Lassa fever and Lujo virus infection.)

Infection of _C. callosus_ results in asymptomatic viral shedding in saliva, urine, and feces; 50% of experimentally infected _C. callosus_ are chronically viremic and shed virus in their bodily excretions or secretions. _C. callosus_ acquires the virus after birth, and start shedding it through their urine and saliva while suckling. When mice acquire the virus as adults, they may develop immunity and no longer shed the virus.

Although the infectious dose of Machupo virus in humans is unknown, exposed persons may become infected by inhaling virus in aerosolized secretions or excretions of infected rodents, ingestion of food contaminated with rodent excreta, or by direct contact of excreta with abraded skin or oropharyngeal mucous membranes. Nosocomial and human-to-human spread have been documented. Hospital contact with a patient has resulted in person-to-person spread of Machupo virus to nursing and pathology laboratory staff.

In 1994, fatal secondary infection of 6 family members in Magdalena, Bolivia from a single naturally acquired infection further suggested the potential for person-to-person transmission.

During December 2003 to January 2004, a small focus of haemorrhagic fever was reported in the area of Cochabamba. A 2nd _Arenavirus_, Chapare virus, was recovered from one patient with fatal infection.

Early clinical manifestations consist of nonspecific signs and symptoms, including fever, headache, fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia. Within 7 days, patients may develop hemorrhagic signs, including bleeding from the oral and nasal mucosa and from the bronchopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts. Case fatality rates range from 5% to 30%.

Ribavirin has been used successfully in several cases of BHF. The recommended adult regimen is 2.0 g intravenously (IV), followed by 1.0 g IV every 6 hours for 4 days, and then 0.5 g every 8 hours for 6 days.

Note that the etiologic agent and clinical features of BHF are similar to those of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). Neurological signs are more common in AHF, while hemorrhagic diatheses are more common in BHF. A vaccine available for AHF could theoretically be effective against BHF as well.

References
1. Berger S. American hemorrhagic fevers: global status, 2019. Gideon e-books.
2. Berger S. Infectious diseases of Bolivia, 2019. 342 pages, 87 graphs, 495 references.
Communicated by:
Steve Berger
Geographic Medicine
Tel Aviv Medical Center, Israel
=======================
[ProMED-mail thanks Dr. Berger for the overview of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever presented above. As noted in the previous comment, and above, Bolivian haemorrhagic fever, caused by Machupo virus, occurs sporadically in lowland Bolivia, especially in Beni department. There was a case there in 2013, and in 2012 ProMED-mail reported that 13 people had been infected with Machupo virus and 7 had died as a consequence of the disease. In Beni department at that time, 5 municipalities, including Magdalena, were reported to have had large populations of _Calomys callosus_ mice, the reservoir host of Machupo virus, which can persistently infect the mice. It is not surprising to find cases in lowland areas of La Paz department again, where the current cases are occurring. The drylands vesper mouse, _C. musculinus_ mentioned in the previous post, although present in southern Bolivia, is unlikely to be the reservoir rodent involved in the current cases. _C. callosus_ mice are the recognized reservoir hosts of Machupo virus. Health officials can provide information about rodent control and assist in implementing it to reduce the risk of exposure to Machupo virus, but effective long-term implementation of rodent control ultimately rests with local residents.

An image of _C. callosus_, the large vesper mouse and reservoir host of Machupo virus, can be seen at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Wed 3 Jul 2019 11:53 BOT
Source: La Razon [in Spanish trans. ProMED Mod.TY, edited]

[The Ministry of] Health confirmed that a virus that killed a hospitalized patient and 2 physicians from La Paz is an arenavirus transmitted by rodents. The disease, after 7 days, causes haemorrhagic fever, a symptom presented by the patients hospitalized in intensive care in 2 health centers in La Paz.

One of the viruses in this family is Machupo that causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, a disease that, according to hypotheses, is affecting the patients that are under observation, La Razon reported this [Wed 3 Jul 2019] in its printed edition.

"In laboratory terms, from national laboratories such as INLASA [Instituto Nacional de Laboratorios de Salud; National Institute of Health Laboratories] and CENTROP, [Centro de Enfermedades Tropicales; Tropical Diseases Center] they have identified an arenavirus," said Gabriela Montano in a press conference.

The report is also backed by a report from the [US] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta [CDC], Georgia, USA.

"We have a preliminary result from the CDC in Atlanta that also mentions an arenavirus. All of these elements together allow us to provide this information to the public today," the official added.

This virus is transmitted by rodents, specifically called the corn rat or _Calomys musculinus_, and it may also be transmitted person-to-person.  [Byline: Ruben Arinez]
=========================
[Bolivian haemorrhagic fever, caused by Machupo virus, an arenavirus, occurs sporadically in lowland Bolivia, especially in Beni department. There was a case there in 2013 and in 2012, ProMED-mail reported that 13 people had been infected with Machupo virus and 7 had died as a consequence of the disease. In Beni department at that time, 5 municipalities, including Magdalena, were reported to have had large populations of _Calomys callosus_ mice, the reservoir host of Machupo virus, which can cause persistent infections in the mice. It would not be surprising to find cases in lowland areas of La Paz department as well, where the current cases are occurring. The drylands vesper mouse, _C. musculinus_ mentioned above, although present in southern Bolivia, is unlikely to be the reservoir rodent involved in these cases. _C. callosus_ mice are the recognized reservoir hosts of Machupo virus. Health officials can provide information about rodent control and assist in implementing it, but effective long-term implementation ultimately rests with local residents.

An image of _C. callosus_, the large vesper mouse and reservoir host of Machupo virus can be seen at
<http://www.faunaparaguay.com/calomyscallosus.html>.

An image of _C. musculinus_, the drylands vesper mouse, can be seen at
<http://www.faunaparaguay.com/calomysmusculinus.html>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Bolivia:
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 18:13:17 +0200 (METDST)

London, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - British Airways pilots on Friday said they will strike for three days in September in a dispute over pay, in a move that could affect tens of thousands of travellers.   The strikes on September 9, 10 and 27 were announced by the British Airline Pilots Association (Balpa), which said there had been a 93-percent vote in favour of industrial action.   "It is completely unacceptable that Balpa is destroying the travel plans of tens of thousands of our customers with this unjustifiable strike action," said the airline.   "We are extremely sorry that after many months of negotiations, based on a very fair offer, Balpa has decided on this reckless course of action," it said.

British Airways said it would change schedules to try and ensure as many people as possible can take their flights but warned that "many" customers will not be able to travel.   "We will be offering refunds and re-bookings for passengers booked on cancelled flights," it said.   Balpa said the strikes were "a last resort" but added that pilots had made "sacrifice after sacrifice" in recent years.   Balpa estimated each day of strike action would cost the company around £40 million (44 million euros, $49 million).
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 15:08:04 +0200 (METDST)
By Obert SIMWANZA

Lusaka, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - Children living in a central Zambian mining town are still exposed to high levels of toxic lead 25 years after the mine closed, Human Rights Watch said Friday, as lawyers announced plans to take legal action.   Decades of lead mining have left Kabwe, around 150 kilometres (95 miles) north of Lusaka, severely polluted, with serious health implications for residents.   The mine, which operated from the early 1900s until its closure in 1994, was at one time the world's largest lead mine. It was run by the Zambian government from the early 1970s when the mining industry was nationalised.     In a report published Friday, HRW said the town in the Copperbelt area still has extreme levels of contamination and children continue to be exposed to high levels of toxic lead in soil and dust around their homes, schools and play areas.

HRW's children's rights fellow and report author Joanna Naples-Mitchell described the situation in Kabwe as "a public health emergency" and said the government was "not responding with the sense of urgency that is warranted".    "The Zambian government is aware that Kabwe has been severely contaminated... since the 1990s and efforts to clean up have been inadequate," she told AFP.   A class action suit is being prepared to demand compensation for poisoning from Anglo American South Africa, a former investor in the mine, London-based law firm Leigh Day announced Friday. The law firm deals in human rights issues.   The case will be brought in courts in South Africa, where the mining firm is based, said the lawyers, who are acting on behalf of some 200 children who have been treated for lead poisoning.   Anglo American on Friday said in a statement it did not believe it was "in any way responsible for the current situation" in Kabwe.    "We were concerned to learn of the situation at Kabwe as reported by the press," it said, adding "the nationalisation more than 40 years ago effectively placed these issues under the control of the Zambian Government".

- 'Severely contaminated' -
The HRW report said that although lead and zinc mining have stopped in the town, various medical studies conducted over the past seven years show children there still had elevated levels of lead in their blood.   Between 2003 and 2011, the World Bank funded a government project to decontaminate Kabwe's affected townships, and to test and treat children. But some 76,000 people, or a third of the town's population, still live in contaminated areas.   One recent study published last year and cited by HRW estimated that more than 95 percent of children in the townships surrounding the lead mine have elevated blood lead levels and that about half of them require medical intervention.   "This is the worst environmental disaster I have seen in 30 years of practice," said lawyer Richard Meeran of Leigh Day.    Johannesburg-based collaborating lawyer Zanele Mbuyisa said they will argue that "the environmental damage created has potentially contaminated almost three generations of men, women and children".

- Insufficient resources -
Three years ago, the government launched another five-year World Bank-funded project to get rid of the lead and carry out new rounds of testing and treatment.   The project targets around 10,000 people including children, pregnant women and mothers.   "We think this a very important opportunity for the Zambian government to find a lasting solution to this problem," said Naples-Mitchell.   She urged Zambia to find new and effective methods to clean up the lead, adding that their 2018 study indicated that pollution levels were "as high they had been in the 1970s".    In a letter last month, the government indicated to HRW that it does not have enough resources to address the full scale of the contamination.   The government did not immediately comment on the report.   Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning since they absorb four to five times as much as an adult and this can retard their growth and IQ, while in worst cases it can result in brain damage or even death.
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 14:02:01 +0200 (METDST)

Khartoum, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - Rain and flash floods have killed 54 people in Sudan since the start of July and affected nearly 200,000, the United Nations said Friday.   The worst affected area is While Nile state in the south but Khartoum and other regions have also been affected.   "More than 37,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged," the UN said, quoting figures from the government body it partners with in the crisis response.   "Humanitarians are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods," it said, adding that most of the 54 recorded deaths were due to collapsed roofs and electrocution.

The floods are having a lasting humanitarian impact on communities, with cut roads, damaged water points, lost livestock and the spread of water-borne diseases by insects.   The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said an extra $150 million were needed from donors to respond to the floods, in addition to the $1.1 billion required for the overall humanitarian situation in Sudan.
Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2019 21:40:50 +0200 (METDST)

Warsaw, Aug 22, 2019 (AFP) - At least five people, including two children, were killed and more than 100 others were injured Thursday during a sudden thunderstorm in Poland and Slovakia's Tatra mountains, according to rescuers and officials.   Most of the victims were on the Polish side, where lightning struck a large metal cross on top of Mount Giewont and a metal chain near the summit, rescuers said. One person died in Slovakia.   "There were a lot of incidents involving lightning strikes today in the Tatras," Polish mountain rescue service chief Jan Krzysztof told Poland's PAP news agency.    "More than 100 people are injured," Poland's Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said after arriving in the nearby mountain resort town of Zakopane.

Rescuers believe many hikers were nearby when lightning struck the cross on Giewont's summit.   They had set out to climb Poland's highest mountains when the skies were clear earlier in the day.    "We heard that after (the) lightning struck, people fell... the current then continued along the chains securing the ascent, striking everyone along the way. It looked bad," Krzysztof said.    Lightning also struck on the nearby Czerwone Wierchy mountain massif, injuring a Portuguese citizen.
Date: Wed 21 Aug 2019
Source: Forbes [edited]

A Missouri county has imposed mandatory hepatitis A vaccinations for food handlers. Franklin County, Missouri, joins a handful of jurisdictions across the country with mandatory hepatitis A vaccine programs aimed at preventing further cases. This development is part of a larger trend aimed at expanding vaccinations for hepatitis A and addressing future outbreaks of the disease.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that can cause symptoms ranging from fever to jaundice and, in extreme cases, liver failure and death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the virus is most commonly spread in the USA via the fecal-oral route, meaning that a person unknowingly ingests something contaminated with the faeces of an infected person.

Hepatitis A is a particularly insidious virus, as an infected person is most contagious 2 weeks before symptoms develop, and those symptoms can take as long as 50 days after exposure to develop. Fortunately, hepatitis A is preventable by vaccine.

CDC is investigating outbreaks of hepatitis A across 29 states. According to CDC, 233 individuals have died from hepatitis A between 2016 and 2019 out of over 24 000 reported cases. Several states, including Kentucky, Florida, Ohio, and West Virginia, have seen thousands of cases.

In an effort to curb the increase in reported cases of hepatitis A, many local jurisdictions are considering mandatory hepatitis A vaccines for food service workers. For example, Missouri has reported 387 cases of hepatitis A in the past 2 years. Over 50 of these cases are from Franklin County, which has a population of about 100,000 residents. Franklin County officials have imposed mandatory vaccinations for individuals who handle food. Food establishments, including restaurants, have 90 days to ensure their employees are vaccinated. Nearby St Louis County, Missouri enacted a mandatory vaccine requirement nearly 20 years ago. Similar ordinances requiring vaccines for food service workers were enacted in Kentucky's Ashland and Boyd Counties in 2018.  [byline: Tommy Tobin]
=====================
[A campaign to protect the patrons of restaurants from acquiring hepatitis A from the food as being done now in this county in Missouri is more than reasonable, as has been stated here previously. In addition to the recent outbreak of 23 cases of HAV linked to a New Jersey golf club (see alsos below), the following is an only partial list of recent reports of restaurant employees acquiring HAV:

Washington 16 Aug 2019
Hepatitis A forces Lynnwood restaurant to temporarily close

New York 16 August 2019
Confirmed case of hepatitis A in Platinum Pizza employee, vaccines to be made available to patrons

Florida 6 Aug 2019
Ocala restaurant employee infected with hepatitis A, officials say

Tennessee, Ohio 1 Aug 2019
National epidemic of hepatitis A outbreaks puts restaurant customers at risk

Mississippi 24 Jul 2019
Health officials investigating possible hepatitis A exposure at Mississippi restaurant

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Missouri, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/227>]
Date: Sun 18 Aug 2019
Source: Associated Press [edited]

Health officials in Las Vegas are using the word "outbreak" to describe a sharp spike in hepatitis A cases reported mostly among homeless people and drug users. The Southern Nevada Health District reported on Wednesday [14 Aug 2019] that from November [2018] to June [2019] it tallied 83 cases of the virus that causes liver damage and can lead to death.

That's far more than the 58 cases reported in 2016, 2017, and 2018, combined. The district says more than 80% of reported patients were people without a permanent place to live, and 92% use drugs, whether intravenous or not.

Clinical services chief Dr Fermin Leguen told the Las Vegas Review-Journal recently that the numbers are alarming. He noted that cases are being reported nationwide. Public health emergencies have been declared in cities including Miami and Philadelphia, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking outbreaks in 27 states. An outbreak of hepatitis A among homeless people in San Diego killed 20 in 2017.

Clark County officials announced in July 2019 that during a 2-day count in January 2019, almost 5300 people were tallied living on sidewalks, vacant lots, parks, and drainage tunnels in and around Las Vegas. That was down from about 6100 in 2017. The Southern Nevada Health District said the trend in hepatitis A cases has been upward: 6 reported cases in 2016; 13 cases in 2017; and 39 in 2018.

The Review-Journal accompanied a crisis intervention team visiting hepatitis A "hot spots" in Las Vegas to offer vaccine shots. The vaccine for the hepatitis A virus is effective soon after inoculation, although a 2nd dose is required after 6 months for full coverage.

Fuilala Riley, president of Help of Southern Nevada, told the newspaper that access to running water for people to wash their hands is important in preventing spread of the virus. Hepatitis A is most often transmitted through consumption of water or food contaminated with faeces.
=======================
[Nevada has yet to be listed in the CDC site following this unnecessary outbreak.  As the number of cases continues to rise in a number of states, and news of smaller (so far) outbreaks occur in others, the question at the end of ProMED-mail post http://promedmail.org/post/20190104.6241686 by a Kentucky official -- "This is a disease of developing countries. One has to ask: Why are we seeing it in the USA?" -- is more and more relevant. We are seeing these outbreaks because of the inability to deal with marginalized populations in our midst. The dramatic cutbacks in public health infrastructure in some of these states clearly feed the fire of these outbreaks. They must be addressed by bolstering public health resources and education and directly addressing the needs of these marginalized populations. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Las Vegas, Nevada, United States:
Date: Wed 21 Aug 2019
Source: Bring Me the News [edited]

There have now been 69 people to have fallen sick from the _Escherichia coli_ outbreak at Lake Nokomis. Health officials put out an alert earlier this month [August 2019] after 3 children became sick with the bug after swimming at the lake, prompting the closure of both its beaches.

The Minnesota Department of Health said on Friday [16 Aug 2019] it had received 49 confirmed cases of _E. coli_-related illness since the outbreak, and on Tuesday [20 Aug 2019] revealed that this number had grown to 69. Those affected went swimming at the south Minneapolis lake between 16 Jul and 11 Aug 2019, with the Shiga-toxin producing _E. coli_ taking up to 16 days to show symptoms. [We generally consider 10 days to be the long end of the incubation period. - ProMED Mod.LL]

Both beaches at the lake have been closed and will remain that way for the rest of the season, as part of MDH's response to contain the outbreak. Of the total cases, 20% affected children aged 10 and younger. Fortunately, nobody has required hospitalization.

The Star Tribune reports that with other beach closures at Bde Maka Ska and Lake Hiawatha, among others, this summer, it is the most beach closures seen in the city since it started testing for bacteria in 2003. The MDH advises anyone showing symptoms of a Shiga-toxin _E. coli_ infection -- diarrhea (often bloody), stomach cramps, no or low-grade fever -- should see a healthcare provider.  [byline: Adam Uren]
========================
[This has become a substantial outbreak.  It is important to understand that there are many different kinds of _E. coli_. The organism is an important component of the human intestinal tract and can perform important functions helpful to its host. These strains can cause human infections if they "escape" from the usual location into the urinary tract, gall bladder, or abdominal cavity. They are also what are mentioned when a beach is closed for _E. coli_ contamination. In this circumstance, officials are measuring the organism or "coliforms" in the water to reflect human sewage contamination.

In addition, some strains of _E. coli_ can produce toxins that can induce diarrhea, and much of so-called travelers' diarrhea is caused by these strains. All of these strains are human bacteria, not zoonotic organisms, that is, not spread from animal hosts. One _E. coli_ group called Shiga toxin producing or enterohemorrhagic _E. coli_ (EHEC), the organism likely to be involved here, is zoonotic. Spread in a number of ways, including via undercooked ground beef, contaminated vegetables, and direct or direct contact with farm animals including contaminated water, EHEC can cause significant disease and even death.

In the spring of 2000, in Walkerton, a town of 5000 in southern Ontario, an outbreak of _E. coli_ O157:H7 infection claimed 7 lives -- 6 adults and a child -- and over 200 were seen at local area hospitals.

Swimming-associated transmission is illustrated in the following references:

1. Keene WE, McAnulty JM, Hoesly FC, et al. A swimming-associated outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis caused by _Escherichia coli_ O157:H7 and _Shigella sonnei_. N Engl J Med. 1994; 331(9): 579-84; available
2. CDC. Lake-associated outbreak of _E. coli_ O157:H7 - Illinois. MMWR 1996; 45(21): 437-9; available at
3. Ackman D, Marks S, Mack P, et al. Swimming-associated hemorrhagic colitis due to _Escherichia coli_ O157:H7 infection: evidence of prolonged contamination of a fresh water lake. Epidemiol Infect. 1997; 119:1-8; available at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Lake Nokomis, Minnesota, United States:
28 Jul 2019

As many as 13 have died while 6677 have been infected across Tanzania. In Dar es Salaam region alone, 6631 cases and 11 deaths have occurred.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Tanzania:
8 Aug 2019

Dengue-type1 outbreak was declared on the 27 Feb 2019 following a laboratory (NZLabPlus) confirmation of 7 dengue type 1 cases. From 28 Jan-4 Aug 2019, a cumulative number of 78 dengue cases have been reported (22 confirmed, and 56 probable-NS1Ag positives). Rarotonga and Aitutaki are the only islands affected and most of the cases have been from the main island of Rarotonga. Aitutaki has managed to contain its number of cases to 3. The last case was reported on 18 Apr 2019. A total of 42 cases have been hospitalised and given free mosquito nets to take and use at home. Apart from some severe cases, the hospitalisation was also an effort to contain and minimise the spread of the infection into the community. Unfortunately, some cases refused to be admitted but were given some health advice and mosquito precautionary measures. No deaths reported.

- Cook Islands. 17 Aug 2019. 78 dengue cases have been reported in Cook Islands since the outbreak began early in the year [2019]. The Cook Islands News reports the Ministry of Health saying 22 were confirmed cases while 56 have been deemed probable positives.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Cook Islands:
19 Aug 2019

358 indigenous cases and 2 imported cases of dengue 2 have been confirmed since the beginning of 2019, according to the latest Health Watch bulletin. Tahiti is still in an epidemic phase: all communes are affected except Mahaena, Pueu, and Teahupoo. In the islands, Bora-Bora is in epidemic phase (at least 3 cases without epidemiological link): Vaitape and Faanui are affected. Moorea is in an epidemic phase: The communes of Afareaitu, Haapiti, and Paopao are affected. Six islands are in the alert phase: Nuku-Hiva (Taiohae), Fakarava, Raiatea, Rangiroa, Huahine, and Hiva Oa (Atuona). Since dengue type 2 has not circulated in the country since the year 2000, the population is poorly immunized, and the epidemic may be large. People under 20 or arriving in French Polynesia after 2000 are most at risk of becoming infected.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of French Polynesia: