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Angola

Angola - US Consular Information Sheet
June 20, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Angola is a large, developing country in south-west central Africa.
The capital city is Luanda.
Portuguese, the official language, is widely spoken through
ut the country.
Despite its extensive oil and mineral reserves and arable land suitable for large-scale production of numerous crops, Angola has some of the world's lowest social development indicators.
Development was severely restricted by a 27-year long civil war that broke out upon independence in 1975, which destroyed the majority of the country's infrastructure.
Since the conflict's conclusion in 2002, the government has initiated extensive infrastructure reconstruction and development projects, and there are growing signs of economic recovery.
However, Angola still faces challenges with its infrastructure and with providing government services, especially in basic social services, aviation and travel safety, accommodation availability and quality and communications. Facilities for tourism, particularly outside the capital of Luanda, are often rudimentary. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Angola for additional information.
ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport and visa are required and must be obtained in advance.
An International Certificate of Vaccination is required.
Visitors should allow several weeks for the processing of their visa application.
Angola does not issue airport visas.
Persons arriving without visas are subject to arrest or exclusion.
Travelers may also encounter delays if they do not have at least one completely blank visa page in their passports for entry stamps.
As of November 1, 2007, Angola no longer requires travelers to have an exit visa.
Travelers whose international immunization cards do not show inoculations against yellow fever within the past ten years may be subject to exclusion, on-the-spot vaccination, and/or heavy fines.
Visitors remaining in Angola beyond their authorized visa duration are subject to fines and arrest.
It is illegal to attempt to carry local currency out of Angola and persons found attempting to carry local currency out of Angola are subject to having this currency confiscated by customs officers.
Current information on entry requirements may be obtained from the Embassy of Angola at 2100-2108 16th Street NW, Washington, DC, tel. (202) 785-1156, fax (202) 785-1258. See our information on dual nationality, the prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
The overall security situation in Angola has improved markedly since the end of the civil war; however, Americans should still exercise caution when traveling in Angola.
Although the war has ended, ground travel throughout Angola can be problematic due to land mines, which were used extensively during the war.
Travelers should not touch anything that resembles a mine or unexploded ordinance.
Frequent checkpoints and poor infrastructure contribute to unsafe travel on roads outside of the city of Luanda.
Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined, but their authority should not be challenged.
Travel in many parts of Luanda is relatively safe by day, but car doors should be locked, windows rolled up, and packages stored out of sight.
Visitors should avoid travel after dark, and no travel should be undertaken on roads outside of cities after nightfall.

Americans located in, or planning to visit, the northern province of Cabinda should be aware of threats to their safety outside of Cabinda city.
In 2007 and 2008 armed groups specifically targeted and attacked expatriates in Cabinda; these armed attacks resulted in the rape, robbery and murder of a small number of expatriates working in Cabinda.
Those responsible have declared their intention to continue attacks against expatriates.
Occasional attacks against police and Angolan Armed Forces (FAA) convoys and outposts also continue to be reported.
These incidents, while small in overall numbers, have occurred with little or no warning.
American citizens are, therefore, urged to exercise extreme caution when traveling outside of Cabinda city and limit travel to essential only.

Americans are advised to undertake only essential travel to Lunda North and South provinces.
As the government of Angola is sensitive to the travel of foreigners in the diamond producing areas of the provinces, proper permission and documentation is required to frequent these areas.
One can be subject to restriction or detention.
There have been reports of crime or banditry in these areas, especially on roads leading into these areas.

Visitors to Angola are advised not to take photographs of sites and installations of military or security interest, including government buildings, as this can result in fines and possibly arrest.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Public Announcements, including the Worldwide Caution, can be found.
Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except on U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Crime is a serious problem throughout Angola.
While most violent crime occurs between Angolans, foreigners have occasionally been attacked as well.
Street crime is a regular occurrence in Luanda.
The most common crimes are pick-pocketing, purse-snatching, vehicle theft, and vehicle break-ins.
Armed muggings, robberies, and carjacking involving foreigners are not frequent but do occur.
Americans are advised to avoid Roque Santeiro and Rocha Pinto, and to only travel the “Serpentine Road” in front of the U.S. Embassy by car.
In general, movement around Luanda is safer by day than by night.
Touring after dark should be avoided.
Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined, but their authority should not be challenged.
Air travelers arriving in Luanda are strongly advised to arrange reliable and secure ground transportation in advance; there is no regular taxi service.
American citizens are advised to avoid the use of the public transportation known as “candongueiros” or “taxistas”; these multi-passenger vans are largely unregulated and often dangerous.

Motorists should stop at all police checkpoints if so directed.
Police officers may solicit bribes or request immediate payment of "fines" for alleged minor infractions.
American citizens asked for bribes by the police should politely ask the traffic police to write them a ticket if the police allege a moving violation.
If the police officer writes the ticket, then the motorist would pay the fine at the place indicated on the ticket.
If no moving violation is alleged and the officer is asking for a bribe, the motorist should, without actually challenging the officer's authority, politely ask the officer for his/her name and badge number.
Officers thus engaged will frequently let motorists go with no bribe paid if motorists follow this advice.
Motorists are reminded to have all proper documents in the vehicle at all times (i.e. vehicle registration, proof of insurance, and driver's license), as the lack of documentation is a violation and can also be a reason an officer would solicit a bribe.
Local law requires that every driver in Angola have the proper permission to drive.
Further information on driving in Angola can be obtained from the Embassy of Angola.
Police are not always responsive to reports of crime or requests for assistance.
Most police are on foot and are assigned to designated stationary posts.
The Rapid Intervention Police (PIR) unit is frequently seen patrolling various areas of the city.
This unit, which is well trained and organized, will respond to major criminal incidents.

There have been police operations against illegal aliens and private companies resulting in deportation of illegal resident foreign nationals and loss of personal and company property.
Independent entrepreneurs in Angola should carry relevant immigration and business documents at all times.

Travelers should be alert to fraud occasionally perpetrated by Luanda airport personnel.
Immigration and customs officials sometimes detain foreigners without cause, demanding gratuities before allowing them to enter or depart Angola.
Airport health officials sometimes demand that passengers arriving without proof of current yellow fever vaccination accept and pay for a vaccination at the airport.
Travelers are advised to carry their yellow fever vaccination card and ensure their yellow fever vaccine is up-to-date.
If travelers forget to bring their yellow fever vaccination card and do not wish to receive the vaccine offered at the airport, they should be prepared to depart the country on the next available flight.
Searches of travelers' checked baggage is common; travelers are advised to take precautions against this possibility.
Travelers should also be aware that criminals sometimes attempt to insert items into baggage at the airport, particularly for flights from Luanda to South Africa.
It is important that travelers maintain control of their carry-on baggage at all times, and if they believe something has been inserted into their baggage, they should report the incident immediately to airport authorities.
INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends, and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of crimes are solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

In addition to reporting crime to local police and the U.S. Embassy in Angola, victims of crime who are residing in Angola are also encouraged to report the crime to the security department of their employer.
Short-term visitors are encouraged to report the crime to the management of the hotel where they are staying if the crime occurred in or near the hotel.
The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Angola for police is 113; for fire fighters: 115, and for ambulance services: 112.
Please be advised that the emergency numbers listed may or may not have an English speaking operator available.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical facilities and services are available in Angola, but are limited and often do not meet U.S. standards.
Adequate care for medical emergencies is limited to Luanda, where there are some good private clinics that usually have a 24-hour service provided by a general practice physician and with specialists on call.
A list of such facilities can be found at http://angola.usembassy.gov/medical_information.html.
Routine operations such as appendectomies can be performed.
Local pharmacies provide a limited supply of prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines/drugs.
Travelers are, therefore, urged to carry with them an adequate supply of properly-labeled medications they routinely require for the duration of their projected stay in Angola.
Malaria is endemic in most areas of Angola.

An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever, a severe and often fatal disease, occurred in Uige province in the spring of 2005; however, on November 7, 2005, the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Angola and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the Marburg outbreak in Angola had ended.
This announcement came after 45 consecutive days without a new case of the illness.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Angola is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
Since the end of the civil war in 2002, overland access to the interior has increased.
However, fighting in most of the country damaged or destroyed many roads and bridges, and services for motorists outside urban areas cannot be counted on.

Road travel can be dangerous, especially during the rainy season (October - March), which can cause large potholes and erosion and due to the presence of landmines.
Road conditions vary widely outside the capital from acceptable paved surfaces to virtually impassable dirt roads, particularly secondary routes.
Many secondary roads, including secondary roads in urban areas, are impassable during the rainy season.
Overloaded, poorly marked, and disabled vehicles, as well as pedestrians and livestock, pose hazards for motorists.
Ground travel in rural areas should be undertaken during daylight hours only.
Landmines also pose a continuing hazard to travelers.
Many areas were heavily mined during the war, including roads, bridges, and railroad tracks.
Areas with suspected landmines are generally clearly marked and travelers should heed these warnings.
Primary roads are considered to be landmine free in most provinces, but travelers should not venture far from the margins of the road.
Extensive government, commercial, and NGO demining projects continue throughout the country.

Traffic in Luanda is heavy and often chaotic, and roads are often in poor condition.
Few intersections have traffic lights or police to direct vehicles.
Drivers often fail to obey traffic signals and signs, and there are frequent vehicle breakdowns.
Itinerant vendors, scooters and pedestrians often weave in and out of traffic, posing a danger to themselves and to drivers.
Most public transportation, including buses and van taxis, should be avoided as the vehicles are generally crowded and may be unreliable.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Angola, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Angola’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa/. The U.S. Embassy in Luanda prohibits its employees from using TAAG, Angola’s national airline, for domestic or international flights due to concerns regarding safety and maintenance.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Customs Regulations:
Angolan customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Angola of sensitive items including firearms, antiquities, and currency.
It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Angola in Washington, DC or one of Angola's consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Financial Transactions:
Angola is generally a cash-only economy; neither traveler’s checks nor credit cards are used outside the capital of Luanda.
In Luanda, credit cards are accepted in extremely limited circumstances, namely large hotels.
Although, in April 2007 a major campaign was launched to expand credit card acceptance this effort has yet to expand beyond the capital city.
In general, Automated Teller Machine’s (ATM’s) are only accessible to those individuals who hold accounts with local banks.
Dollars are generally accepted in all provincial capitals; travelers should carry a sufficient supply of U.S. dollars with them.
Only the newer series U.S. dollar bills (with large faces) are accepted.
U.S. dollars can be converted to local currency at exchange businesses authorized by the Angolan government.
Angolan currency (the Kwanza) may not be taken out of the country and travelers, who attempt to carry currency out of Angola, are subject to having the currency confiscated.

Personal Identification: U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passports with them at all times so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and U.S. citizenship is readily available.
The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Luanda can prepare copies of American passports at no charge for individuals who register with the Embassy.
To avoid the risk of theft of or confiscation of original documentation, the U.S. Embassy recommends that Americans keep their passport in a secure place and carry a copy to avoid the possibility of authorities confiscating identity and travel documents.

Labor Disputes: American performers traveling to Angola to perform in concerts and/or other events should be aware that there have been several serious allegations made against talent agencies making arrangements for foreign performers.
These allegations include, among other things, several charges of breach of contract and the forcible retention of passports and persons.
Performers should assure themselves of the reputation of any agency they may contract with before traveling.
Many find it useful to contact performers who have previously worked in Angola and are familiar with agencies in Angola.
Persons experiencing any incidents of this nature in Angola should report these to the local Angolan police and the U.S. Embassy.

Long Delays in Renewal of Visas: U.S. citizens who opt to renew their work or other visa while in Angola should expect delays of 2-10 weeks or more, during which time the Angolan immigration authorities will retain one's passport and one will not be able to travel.
U.S. citizens are advised to plan accordingly, and if travel during this time cannot be avoided, one should apply for a second U.S. passport PRIOR to turning over the primary passport to Angolan authorities for visa renewal.
To apply for a second U.S. passport, you must write a letter explaining the need for the second passport, as well as meet all the requirements for a normal application for passport renewal, including being able to show a current valid passport.
Receiving a second passport will take 7-10 business days.
Expatriates who stay beyond their visa expiration date are subject to steep fines.

Hotel Availability:
Hotels are limited in Angola, and demand for the limited number of rooms is high.
Hotels are often booked months in advance, especially in the capital city of Luanda.
Only a few large hotels in Luanda accept credit cards; hotels in the provinces generally do not accept credit cards.
Adequate hotels are found in most provincial capitals, but some provide limited amenities.
Please see our information on Customs Regulations.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Angolan laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession or use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Angola are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sex with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Angola are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Angola.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The Consular Section is located at the American Embassy Complex, Rua Houari Boumedienne #32, in the Miramar area of Luanda, P.O. Box 6468, tel. (244) 222-641-000,
(244) 222-447-028, (244) 222-445-481, (244) 222-446-224; 24-hour duty officer (244) 923-404-209; fax (244) 222-641-259.
The Consular Section may be contacted by e-mail at consularluanda@state.gov.
Further information on travel to Angola is also available at the Embassy web site at http://angola.usembassy.gov/.
*

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This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated April 29, 2008, to update the Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Traffic Safety and Road Conditions, Aviation Safety Oversight, and Special Circumstances.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu 9 May 2019 19:02 WAT
Source: Diario de Noticias [in Portuguese, machine trans., abridged, edited]

The measles outbreak in the Angolan province of Lunda Sul has caused 47 deaths since the start of the year [2019], among almost 1300 registered cases, Angola's national director of Public Health told Lusa today [9 May 2019].

Isilda Neves [Director, Program in Technical Assistance to the MOH] told Lusa that a vaccination campaign to identify children who are not yet immunized against the disease, will start at the weekend [11 May 2019], lasting for 10 days.

Along with this campaign, the vaccination intensification in the districts of Saurimo, capital of Lunda Sul, and in the other municipalities of the province, has been underway since the 2nd week of April [2019].

"At the end of the week we are going to make a big intervention: We are training the teams to go all out. We have at least 100 teams, each with 4 elements -- 2 coaches, one support team for the mobilization, and another to register the vaccinated children," she said.

The campaign, according to the national public health official, takes place first in Saurimo, followed by the remaining 3 municipalities in the province.

"Since the beginning of the year [2019], there were 1297 cases and 47 deaths, mostly in Saurimo," added Isilda Neves.

Health authorities are trying to control the situation, in which more than 90% of cases are being registered in children who have not been vaccinated, she said.

"One of the problems we identified is that many children who have passed the age of measles vaccination have not been vaccinated. Since there are a large number of children in the same household, we are also finding cases in children under 9 months and this is our concern too," she said.
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Lunda Sul province, Angola:
26th December 2018

Angola (Cunene province). 29 Nov 2018. (reported) 25 cases of microcephaly. Samples sent to the central laboratory in Luanda to determine if they are Zika virus related. There were no cases of microcephaly during the same period in 2017.

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map Angola:
Date: Sat 11 Aug 2018
Source: World Health Organization [edited]
<http://www.who.int/neglected_diseases/news/Surveillance-presence-of-dracunculiasis-in-Angola/en/>

Disease surveillance confirms the presence of dracunculiasis in Angola. The World Health Organization (WHO) has received confirmation of a human case (29 Jun 2018) of dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease) in Angola -- a country not known to have had any cases in the past. "The patient is an 8 year old girl from Cunene Province.

Signs of worm emergence in April this year [2018] were characteristic of guinea worm disease and the worm appeared identical to _Dracunculus medinensis_," said Dr Maria Cecília de Almeida of the Angolan Guinea Worm Eradication Programme and who is also director of Control Programmes for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Health. "The case-management protocol was observed, including the preservation of the worm specimen, and we are investigating further to determine the extent of transmission and burden of the disease." The case was detected through a nationwide guinea worm case search during the national immunization campaign against measles and rubella.

The specimen was sent to the WHO Collaborating Center for Dracunculiasis Eradication at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [1] test confirmed the worm as _Dracunculus medinensis_ [2]. "This is the first confirmed case of human infection in Angola. The discovery is part of measures taken by the Ministry of Health, following a WHO evaluation mission to Angola in 2016 to assess the country's level of readiness to finalize its dossier requesting a WHO certification," said Dr Dieudonné Sankara, team leader of WHO's guinea worm eradication programme.

After the evaluation mission of 2016, the International Commission for the Certification of Dracunculiasis Eradication recommended that Angola should use all available opportunities to gather robust evidence of absence of guinea worm disease in the country before submitting its certification request. WHO is supporting Angola through all 3 of its operating levels -- Country Office, Regional Office and Headquarters -- to implement its roadmap for certification of dracunculiasis-free status. "With the discovery of this new case, measures are being put up to strengthen surveillance, reporting and investigation of all suspicious cases through the country's Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response," said Dr Nzuzi Katondi, field officer, WHO Country Office, Angola. "Intelligence and alerts are being reported and rumours are being followed up and investigated."

Efforts are also being made through the country's broader mapping exercise of other neglected tropical diseases. To achieve global certification of dracunculiasis eradication, WHO must formally certify every individual country even if no transmission has ever taken place in that particular country. Confirmation of the 1st case in Angola comes as the global guinea worm eradication programme is tackling _Dracunculus medinensis_ infection in both humans and dogs, mainly in Chad. From 1 Jan to 31 May 2018, Chad reported 3 human cases and 534 infected dogs. Ethiopia and Mali, 2 other countries with recent cases, reported zero human cases.

South Sudan, which reported its last human case in November 2016, declared interruption of dracunculiasis transmission in March 2018. The latest confirmation from Angola brings the global total, so far this year [2018], to 4 human cases. Dracunculiasis is a crippling parasitic disease caused by a long threadlike worm. The infection is transmitted mostly when people drink water contaminated with parasite-infected water fleas. When the eradication campaign began in 1986, there were an estimated 3.5 million cases.  PCR is a technique used in medical and biological research laboratories. It is used in the early stages of processing DNA for sequencing, for detecting the presence or absence of a gene to help identify pathogens during infection, and when generating forensic DNA profiles from tiny samples of DNA.  _Dracunculus medinensis_, a nematode (worm), is the causative agent of guinea worm disease.
============================
[According to the latest guinea worm update from WHO (Weekly Epidemiology Report 2018;32:409-16. 10 Aug 2018; <http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/273782/WER9332.pdf>) the reported numbers for other countries in 2018 are Chad, 5544; Ethiopia, 5044; Mali, 91; Sudan, 0. South Sudan did not file a report. Even though this is just a single case, the finding indicates that there is a focus. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[Cunene province is in the south of Angola bordering Namibia (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunene_Province>).

HealthMap/ProMED map available at: Angola: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/165>.]
Date: Tue 8 May 2018
Source: AllAfrica.com [edited]

A total of 21 positive cases of sleeping sickness were diagnosed in the last 2 weeks in the municipality of Banga, Kwanza Norte province, during the prospecting campaign held by the Provincial Department of the Institute of Combat and Control of Trypanosomiasis (Icct).

Angelino Francisco Correia, the supervisor of the campaign, said that 2800 had been examined, and 21 cases were diagnosed, of which 5 were confirmed as sleeping sickness patients.

The official called the active participation of the population in the campaigns of prospection of the disease.
=====================
[A review of human trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) in Africa (Fevre EM, Wissmann Bv, Welburn SC, Lutumba P (2008) The Burden of Human African Trypanosomiasis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2(12): e333. <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000333>) found that Angola is a highly endemic country with more than a 1000 cases annually. For background information on human trypanosomiasis in Africa see the ProMED posting "Trypanosomiasis - Angola http://promedmail.org/post/20110709.2081".

A map of Kwanza Norte Province, Angola:
Monday 16th April 2018

- Ndalatando. 11 Apr 2018. At least 78 suspected cases recorded in the period 4-9 Apr 2018 in northern Cuanza Norte Province.
More ...

Ethiopia

Ethiopia - US Consular Information Sheet
November 26, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia is a developing country in East Africa.
It is comprised of nine states and two city administrations (Addis Aba
a and Dire Dawa).
The capital is Addis Ababa.
Tourism facilities can be found in the most populous regions of Ethiopia, but infrastructure is basic.
The ruling EPRDF party and Prime Minister Meles Zenawi maintain strong control of the government and economy.
Despite several years of high economic growth, the country remains vulnerable to external economic shocks and recurring drought.

Read the Department of State Background Notes on Ethiopia for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
To avoid possible confusion or delays, travelers are advised to obtain a valid Ethiopian visa at the nearest Ethiopian Embassy prior to arrival, and must do so if entering across any land port-of-entry.
For example: travelers wishing to enter Ethiopia from Kenya at the land border at Moyale, must obtain an Ethiopian visa first.
Ethiopian visas ARE NOT available at the border crossing point at Moyale.
Travelers should apply for Ethiopian visas at the Ethiopian Embassy in Nairobi or at other Ethiopian embassies in other countries.
Ethiopian visas are available to U.S. citizens upon arrival at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa.
U.S. citizens may obtain one-month or three month, single-entry tourist visas or 10-day single-entry business visas upon arrival at Bole International Airport.
This service is available only at Bole International Airport and is not available at any other ports of entry in Ethiopia.
The visa fee at Bole International Airport is payable in U.S. dollars.
Such visas can be extended by applying at the Main Immigration Office in Addis Ababa.
Business visas of up to three-months validity can also be obtained at Bole International Airport upon arrival if the traveler has a sponsoring organization in Ethiopia that has made prior arrangements for issuance through the Main Immigration Office in Addis Ababa.
Travelers whose entry visa expires before they depart Ethiopia, must obtain a visa extension and pay a monthly penalty fee of $20 USD per month.
Such travelers may also be required to pay a court fine of up to 4000 ETB (USD $435) before being permitted to depart from Ethiopia.
Travelers are required to pay the penalty fee before they will be able to obtain an exit visa (USD $20) permitting them to leave Ethiopia.

Individuals intending to stay in Ethiopia for a prolonged period of time are advised to contact the Ethiopian Embassy in Washington prior to traveling.
The Ethiopian Embassy is located at 3506 International Drive NW, Washington, DC 20008; telephone (202) 364-1200; fax (202) 587-0195.
For the most current visa information, visit the Embassy’s web site at www.ethiopianembassy.org.
Inquiries by Americans located overseas may be made at the nearest Ethiopian embassy or consulate.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
While Ethiopia is generally stable, domestic insurgent groups, extremists from Somalia, and the heavy military buildup along the northern border pose risks to safety and security, particularly along Ethiopia’s border areas and in the Somali region.
In the past year, there has been an increase in targeted bombings in Addis Ababa and in other parts of Ethiopia.
In November 2008, the Government of Ethiopia issued a warning to its citizens alerting them of the potential for terrorist attacks and subsequently increased security measures to unprecedented levels.

Throughout Ethiopia:
Americans are strongly advised to review their personal safety and security posture, to remain vigilant and to be cautious when frequenting prominent public places and landmarks.
Targeted bombings in Addis Ababa and south eastern Ethiopia in 2008 resulted in numerous injuries and deaths.
Americans are advised to avoid public gatherings and public places, including hotels, if possible, and using public transportation and transportation hubs.
They are advised to beware of unattended baggage or packages left in any location, including in mini-buses and taxis.

Ethiopia/Eritrea Border Area:
Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace agreement in December 2000 that ended their border war.
However, the border remains an issue of contention between the governments of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
The border area is a militarized zone where there exists the possibility of armed conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean forces.
American citizens are advised to avoid travel in the areas along the Eritrean/Ethiopian border (within 50 km/30 miles of the Ethiopian/Eritrean border) because of the dangers posed by land mines and because of the possibility of conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean defense forces.
Due to abductions and banditry, Americans are advised to avoid travel within 30 miles of the Ethiopian-Eritrean border west of Adigrat to the Sudanese border, with the exception of the town of Axum, and within 60 miles east of Adigrat to the Djiboutian border.
Embassy personnel are permitted to travel in these areas only on a case-by-case basis. Travel to the northern Afar Region towards the Eritrean border is also discouraged.
Embassy personnel are permitted to travel there only on a case-by-case basis.

Somali Region:
Since the mid-1990's the members of the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) have clashed with Ethiopian government forces near the city of Harar and in the Somali regional state, particularly in the Ogaden zones.
In April 2007, the ONLF claimed responsibility for attacking a Chinese oil exploration installation south of Jijiga, in Ethiopia's Somali region.
The attack resulted in deaths, kidnappings and the wounding of dozens of Chinese and Ethiopian citizens.
In 2008, a hotel in the town of Jijiga was bombed and two hotels in the town of Negele Borena were bombed.

American citizens are reminded that the U.S. Embassy strongly discourages travel to Ethiopia's Somali region and that a Travel Warning for Somalia has been issued that advises against all travel to that country.
Armed insurgent groups operate within the Somali, Oromiya and Afar regions of Ethiopia.
In December 2006, the Ethiopian Government, at the invitation of the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia, began military operations against extremists in Somalia.
As of November 2007, military operations continue in Mogadishu, where an African Union peacekeeping force, AMISOM, is deployed.
In 2008, two staff members of a non-governmental organization (NGO) were abducted in the Somali region.

Gambella Region:
Sporadic inter-ethnic clashes remain a concern throughout the Gambella region of western Ethiopia following outbursts of violence there in 2003 - 2004.
There is a heavy military and police presence in the town of Gambella.
While the security situation in the town of Gambella is calm, it remains unpredictable throughout the rest of the region, and violence could recur without warning.
Travel to this region is discouraged.

Travel in Ethiopia via rail is discouraged due to past episodes of derailment, sabotage, and bombings.
In southern Ethiopia along the Kenyan border, banditry and incidents involving ethnic conflicts are also common.
Travelers should exercise caution when traveling to any remote area of the country, including the borders with Eritrea, Somalia, Kenya and Sudan.
Ethiopian security forces do not have a widespread presence in those regions.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Pick-pocketing, “snatch and run” thefts, and other petty crimes are common in Addis Ababa.
These are generally crimes of opportunity rather than planned attacks.
Travelers should exercise caution in crowded areas and should avoid visiting the Mercato in Addis Ababa, a large open-air market.
Violence in the Mercato has been on the rise.
In 2008 an explosion in the Mercato killed several and wounded more than a dozen individuals.
Also in 2008, there was a shooting in the Mercato.
Travelers should limit the amount of cash they carry and leave valuables, such as passports, jewelry, and airline tickets in a hotel safe or other secure place.
Travelers should keep wallets and other valuables where they will be less susceptible to pick-pockets.
Travelers should be cautious at all times when traveling on roads in Ethiopia.
There have been reports of highway robbery, including carjacking, by armed bandits outside urban areas.
Some incidents have been accompanied by violence.
Travelers are cautioned to limit road travel outside major towns or cities to daylight hours and travel in convoys, if possible.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

There is no local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Ethiopia.
Distress calls should be made to the local police station, the telephone number of which can be obtained by calling directory assistance at 997.
This is the number for directory assistance throughout Ethiopia.
In Addis Ababa, the number for police is 991, for the fire brigade 939, and for an ambulance 907.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Health facilities in Addis Ababa are very limited and are generally inadequate outside the capital.
Even the best hospitals in Addis Ababa suffer from inadequate facilities, antiquated equipment, and shortages of supplies (particularly medicines).
There is a shortage of physicians.
Emergency assistance is limited.
Psychiatric services and medications are practically nonexistent.
Serious illnesses and injuries often require travelers to be medically evacuated from Ethiopia to a location where adequate medical attention is available.
Such “medevac” services are very expensive and are generally available only to travelers who either have travel insurance that covers medevac services or who are able to pay in advance the considerable cost of such services (often in excess of USD 40,000).
See Medical Insurance below.
Travelers must carry their own supplies of prescription drugs and preventive medicines, as well as a doctor's note describing the medication.
If the quantity of drugs exceeds that which would be expected for personal use, a permit from the Ministry of Health is required.
Malaria is prevalent in Ethiopia outside of the highland areas.
Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area and up to one year after returning home should seek prompt medical attention and explain to the health care provider their travel history and which anti-malarials they have been taking.
For additional information on malaria, protection from insect bites, and anti-malarial drugs, please visit the CDC Travelers' Health web site at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/index.htm.
Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Ethiopia.
For further information, please consult the CDC's Travel Notice on TB at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/yellowBookCh4-TB.aspx

Ethiopia is a mountainous country and the high altitude may cause health problems, even for healthy travelers.
Addis Ababa is located at an altitude of 8,300 feet.
Travelers may experience shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, headaches, and inability to sleep.
Individuals with respiratory (including asthma) or heart conditions should consult with a health care professional before traveling to Ethiopia.
Travelers to Ethiopia should also avoid swimming in any lakes, rivers, or still bodies of water.
Most bodies of water have been found to contain parasites.
Travelers should be aware that Ethiopia has a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS.
Ethiopia has had outbreaks of acute watery diarrhea, possible cholera, typhoid, or other bacterial diarrhea in the recent past, and the conditions for reoccurrences continue to exist.
Further information on prevention and treatment of cholera and other diarrheal diseases can be found at the CDC web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentDiseases.aspx.
Ethiopian authorities are monitoring the possibility of avian influenza following the deaths of poultry and birds; preliminary results are negative.
For additional information on avian flu please visit the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/.
The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ethiopia.
Please verify with the embassy of Ethiopia before you travel.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Specific medevac insurance, which generally covers evacuation of a patient from Ethiopia to a location where adequate medical attention is available, is often inexpensive and available through a variety of companies that can be accessed online.
Medicare and Medicaid recipients are not covered overseas and are advised to purchase supplemental health and medical evacuation insurances.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.
TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Ethiopia is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Ethiopia has the highest rate of traffic fatalities per vehicle in the world.
Roads in Ethiopia are poorly maintained, inadequately marked, and poorly lighted.
Road travel after dark outside Addis Ababa and other cities is dangerous and discouraged due to hazards posed by broken-down vehicles left in the road, pedestrians walking in the road, stray animals, and the possibility of armed robbery.
Road lighting in cities is inadequate at best and nonexistent outside of cities.
Excessive speed, unpredictable local driving habits, pedestrians and livestock in the roadway, and the lack of basic safety equipment on many vehicles are daily hazards on Ethiopian roads.
While travel during daylight hours on both paved and unpaved roads is generally considered safe, land mines and other anti-personnel devices can be encountered on isolated dirt roads that were targeted during various conflicts.
Before undertaking any off-road travel, it is advisable to inquire of local authorities to ensure that the area has been cleared of mines.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Ethiopia’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ethiopia’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa/.
The Ethiopian government has closed air routes near the border with Eritrea and has referred to the airspace as a “no-fly zone.”
The FAA currently prohibits U.S. aircraft and U.S. pilots from flying in Ethiopian airspace north of 12 degrees north latitude, the area along the country's northern border with Eritrea.
For complete information on this flight prohibition, travelers may visit the FAA's web site at http://www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/air_traffic/publications/notices/2008-11-20/PART3_SEC1.cfm.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Ethiopia does not recognize dual nationality.
The government of Ethiopia considers Ethiopians who have become naturalized U.S. citizens to be Americans.
Such individuals are not subject to Ethiopian military service.
The Ethiopian government has stated that Ethiopian-Americans in almost all cases are given the same opportunity to invest in Ethiopia as Ethiopians.
Several years ago the government of Ethiopia arrested people of Eritrean origin who initially failed to disclose their U.S. citizenship.
However, this has not occurred in recent years.
Ethiopian officials have recently stated that Eritrean-Americans are treated as U.S. citizens and are not subject to arrest simply because of their ties to Eritrea.
For additional information, see our dual nationality flyer.
Permits are required before exporting either antiques or animal skins from Ethiopia.
Antique religious artifacts, including "Ethiopian” crosses, require documentation from the National Museum in Addis Ababa for export.
Foreign currency should be exchanged in authorized banks, hotels and other legally authorized outlets and proper receipts should be obtained for the transactions.
Exchange receipts are required to convert unused Ethiopian currency back to the original foreign currency.
Penalties for exchanging money on the black market range from fines to imprisonment.
Credit cards are not accepted at most hotels, restaurants, shops, or other local facilities, although they are accepted at the Hilton and Sheraton Hotels in Addis Ababa.
Some hotels and car rental companies, particularly in Addis Ababa, may require foreigners to pay in foreign currency or show a receipt for the source of foreign exchange if paying in local currency.
However, many hotels or establishments are not permitted to accept foreign currency or may be reluctant to do so.

Ethiopian institutions have on occasion refused to accept 1996 series U.S. currency, although official policy is that such currency should be treated as legal tender.
Ethiopian law strictly prohibits the photographing of military installations, police/military personnel, industrial facilities, government buildings, and infrastructure (roads, bridges, dams, airfields, etc.).
Such sites are rarely marked clearly.
Travel guides, police, and Ethiopian officials can advise if a particular site may be photographed.
Photographing prohibited sites may result in the confiscation of film and camera.
There is a risk of earthquakes in Ethiopia.
Buildings may collapse due to strong tremors.
General information about natural disaster preparedness is available via the Internet from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at http://www.fema.gov/
Please see our Customs Information.
CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Ethiopia’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Ethiopia are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Ethiopia are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration website so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Ethiopia.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located at Entoto Avenue, P.O. Box 1014, in Addis Ababa; telephone: 251-11-124-2424; emergency after-hours telephone: 251-11-124-2400; consular fax: 251-11-124-2435; web site: http://ethiopia.usembassy.gov/
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Ethiopia dated April 30, 2008 to update sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Information for Victims of Crime, Medical Facilities and Health Information, and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu 23 May 2019 Source: XinHuaNet [edited] <http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-05/23/c_138083427.htm>
An acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) outbreak in Ethiopia's northern Amhara regional state has left 12 people dead, an official said on Thu 23 May 2019. Asaye Gebreselassie, deputy director of Wag Himera zone in Amhara regional state, said the outbreak killed 4 people and sickened 67 others in recent days, according to state media outlet Ethiopia News Agency.
A medical taskforce comprising federal, regional and zonal personnel has been deployed to the affected areas, Gebreselassie said. With the rainy season expected to start in June and continue until mid-September, the government is trying to prevent the spread of the AWD.
Federal and regional health institutions have been combating the diarrhea outbreak by treating unhygienic conditions in factories, health facilities, agricultural areas and eateries.
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Vax Before Travel [abridged, edited]

The eastern African country of Ethiopia has been reporting measles outbreaks for many years, however, in 2019, new information indicates children are the ones most vulnerable for this infectious disease.

According to reporting by the European Commission, approximately 54% of the 4000 measles cases in Ethiopia reported during 2019 affected children under 5 years of age.

Moreover, over 60% of the children had never received their 1st measles vaccine dose.

This new data estimates that by the end of 2019, about 3.5 million children will be susceptible to the measles virus, mainly because of the failure to achieve the 'herd-immunity' necessary to interrupt transmission.

Moreover, these Ethiopian children are not the only under-vaccinated population.

An estimated 169 million children missed out on the 1st dose of the measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017, or 21.1 million children a year on average, said UNICEF on 25 Apr 2019.

And, the measles virus is one of the leading causes of death among children, particularly in developing countries. An estimated 100,000 measles deaths occurred globally in 2017.

Ethiopia announced it would aggressively confront this under-vaccination issue by integrating the measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization program in the 2nd year of life.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health said about 3 348 363 children will receive measles vaccine 2nd doses.

Dr Chatora Rufaro, World Health Organization (WHO) Ethiopia representative said in a press release, "The introduction of the 2nd dose of measles vaccination in Ethiopia will significantly contribute to a reduction of measles morbidity and mortality as well as the overall child mortality by preventing measles outbreaks."

To notify visitors about Ethiopia's ongoing measles risks, the CDC issued an initial Level 1 Travel Alert in 2015. Since then, the CDC advises all visitors to Ethiopia to ensure they are immunized against the measles virus.  [Byline: Don Ward Hackett]
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
Date: Mon 13 May 2019
Source: New Business Ethiopia [abridged, edited]

The outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) has killed 3 people in the North Gondar Tselemt area in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. The 3 people who were getting medical treatment after acquiring AWD have passed away, according to the state broadcaster ETV. The report indicated that currently 151 people affected by AWD are also identified in 3 locations of Amhara region. Currently in North Gondar, Tselemt area, 90 people infected with AWD have been identified and are being treated. While in Abergele area, 58 people and 4 in Beyeda area are getting treatment after acquiring AWD.

The ETV report indicated that the 152 suspected of acquiring AWD are being treated separately in the 3 localities. It is indicated that a medical team at the national, regional, and zone level is mobilized to contain the outbreak in the areas. In addition, teams from WHO and Doctors Without Borders are also engaged to combat AWD in the areas, according to ETV.

Ethiopia has the poorest sanitation facilities in Africa and has been frequently hit by AWD. In Ethiopia, AWD outbreaks have been reported in different parts at different times. The outbreak in Moyale area in the southern part of the country in 2016 resulted in a total of 268 cases and 2 deaths reported. In 2017, it was also reported that some parts of the Somali region of Ethiopia were also affected by an AWD outbreak resulting in the deaths of many people.
=====================
[Especially in east Africa, AWD is used instead of cholera. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
Date: Tue 23 Apr 2019
Source: Addis Herald, an Anadolu Agency report [edited]

At least 28 hippopotamuses were found dead in a national park in southwestern Ethiopia, local media reported on [Mon 22 Apr 2019].

According to the local broadcaster FANA, the giant semi-aquatic creatures died in the Gibe Sheleko National Park, part of the Gibe River which is the largest tributary of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia.

The cause for the deaths is still unknown, FANA said, citing Bahrua Mega, the head of the park. She said the deaths have been reported since fortnight, while 15 of the hippos died in a single day. According to her, most of the large mammals that died at the national park --which is home to nearly 200 hippos--, were aged.

The experts are investigating the cause of the sudden hippo deaths, she added.

"There have been illegal activities threatening the existence of the park," Mega said, adding that people have been cutting trees and using patches of land for settlements within the park. The 36 000 sq km (around 13 900 sq mi) park is located at 250 km southwest of the capital Addis Ababa.

[This article contains a photograph of dead hippos in a lake. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]
=======================
[Gibe Sheleko National Park was established only in 2009 and is administered by the southern region. The park is about 174 km southwest of Addis Ababa, on the edge of the Ethiopian highland massif and covers 248 sq km in 3 districts of the Guraghe Zone. This park is unique due to its high bird species diversity and woodland eco-system.

Anthrax is hyper-enzootic in Ethiopia. In 2017 alone there were 196 bovine outbreaks, and the government has given up reporting the numbers of equine and sheep & goat outbreaks each year. Wildlife outbreaks occur but are under-reported. During 1999 through 2002 there was a total mortality of 1600 animals of 21 different species in the Omo Magoo National Park in the SW of the country. So there is a good probability that Ethiopia has joined the international hippo anthrax association. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2018 14:04:33 +0100

Addis Ababa, Dec 19, 2018 (AFP) - Ten people were killed and one was injured when their minibus was struck by a roadside bomb in a troubled region of western Ethiopia, local television reported Wednesday.   The blast occurred on a highway near the border between the regions of Oromia and Benishangul Gumuz, the pro-government EBC channel reported, quoting regional security official Kemal Endris.

Dozens of people have died and nearly 100,000 have been displaced by violence in the border zone.   Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has received international praise for his reformist agenda since coming to power in April.   However, he is grappling to contain a wave of inter-communal violence in several parts of the country, mostly over land.
More ...

Jordan

General Information:
***************************************
The Middle East is a favourite destination for many Irish holiday makers. The combination of a beautiful climate linked with such historical richness is hard to beat. Unfortunately the
security situation throughout the region has led to some significant concerns over the years. Nevertheless, in the vast majority of cases those visiting the region will not encounter any particular concerns in this regard. It is a wise precaution to ensure that your passport is valid for at least a further six months beyond the time of your holiday as otherwise you may be refused entry.
Security Situation:
***************************************
Security throughout the Middle East is generally tight. Carry some means of identification at all times in case you are requested to produce it by police or army personnel. In Jerusalem the city has been divided and it is sensible to remember which quarter you are in at all times.
Health Facilities:
***************************************
Generally the health facilities throughout the region are excellent. However, when visiting certain rural regions you may find it difficult to obtain hospital care similar to that at home. In Israel, travellers can find information in English about emergency medical facilities and after-hours pharmacies in the "Jerusalem Post" and English language "Ha'aretz" newspapers.
Food & Water Facilities:
***************************************
Again, this depends on your location and the facilities which are there at the time of the year you visit. Bottled water is easily available and food hygiene is usually excellent throughout all the main tourist destinations. However, it is generally wiser not to drink hotel tap water and only to use it for brushing your teeth if there is a clear smell of chlorine. When on organised trips tourists are sometimes offered local tea or other drinks. Generally this will be safe as the water is boiled but take care that the cup hygiene is acceptable.
Sun Exposure:
***************************************
The climatic conditions in the Middle East vary considerably throughout the year. Many tourists visit in late autumn or early spring. At these times the climate is much cooler and the evenings can be distinctly chilly. However, during the main tourist season (May to September) the temperatures rise high into the 80’s or 90’s and dehydration can easily occur. Increasing fluid and salt intake is important under these circumstances. It is essential that travellers are aware of the climatic conditions which should be present for their trip and that sensible clothing is used at all times.
Rabies:
***************************************
Tourists should avoid all animals as this viral disease is transmitted through the bite, lick or scratch of any infected warm blooded animal. In Israel the most common animals involved are foxes and jackals and in Jordan, dogs tend to be the main culprits.
Exploring the Region:
***************************************
Leaving the main tourist routes is unwise. There are a number of security risks which have to be considered and there are also significant health concerns which may be encountered. In July 2000 an 18 year old American tourist died of sunstroke when she became separated from her group in the Dead Sea region of Israel. Those exploring caves and parts of the desert areas also run the risk of diseases like Borreliosis and Rabies.
Walking & Trekking:
***************************************
For many going to these countries their trip will involve visiting some of the major ruins and archeological sites. This will involve a good deal of walking and trekking. Good supporting foot wear is essential and it would be wise to carry a crepe bandage in case of a sprained ankle. Having a suitable painkiller or anti-inflammatory medication would also be advantageous. Check your health will be up to the journey.
Swimming:
***************************************
Pools are usually very well maintained and the risk of disease is small. Those swimming in the sea should remember that the Mediterranean is home to many jelly fish. Swim with others and never alone and especially after alcohol or a heavy meal.
Anthrax:
***************************************
This bacterial disease is rare in the Middle east though travellers should be aware that it can be transmitted through unprepared leather goods usually bought in the local market places. Typically the disease may then present with a black ulcerated skin lesion.

Malaria:
***************************************
Fortunately this disease does not occur in Israel or Jordan. However other mosquito and sandfly diseases do occur and so protection against their bites should be used when necessary.
Hepatitis:
***************************************
There are many forms of this disease but the most common is Hepatitis A, often known as Infectious Jaundice. This disease can keep an infected individual off work for many weeks and it is wise to consider vaccination cover before exposure. In Israel approx 65% of the population will have been infected before 18 years of age.
Vaccinations:
***************************************
There are no essential vaccines for entry/exit however most Irish tourists are recommended to receive cover against; Poliomyelitis, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A. Those living in these countries or planning an extended trip should also consider cover against Hepatitis B and Rabies.
Summary:
***************************************
Due to the unrest within Israel there are concerns regarding the safety of tourists at this time. If you are travelling to this region it is wise to ensure that your insurance policy is sufficient if your circumstances or travel plans change.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat, 10 Nov 2018 16:22:28 +0100

Amman, Nov 10, 2018 (AFP) - Flash floods killed 12 people in Jordan and forced nearly 4,000 tourists to flee the famed ancient desert city of Petra, emergency services said on Saturday.   Search teams were scouring valleys near the historic hill town of Madaba for a young girl who was still missing after Friday's floods, civil defence spokesman Iyad Amru told state television.

Among those confirmed dead after torrential rains swept the south of the kingdom were six people found in the Madaba area southwest of the capital Amman.   To the east, three people were killed near Dabaa on the Desert Highway, one of Jordan's three main north-south arteries, while one was killed near Maan in the south.    It was not immediately clear where the other two died.   Amru said two girls had gone missing in the Madaba region, later announcing that one of their bodies had been found.

Government spokeswoman Jumana Ghneimat said authorities had found alive four Israeli tourists who had gone missing in the Wadi Rum desert in southern Jordan but were looking for two more.   "Our embassy in Tel Aviv contacted the Israeli foreign ministry for information on the identities of the missing Israelis," Ghneimat said in statements carried by the state news agency Petra.   Israel initially confirmed the report but in a later update a spokesman for the foreign ministry said that "all the Israelis in Jordan have contacted us. All of them were found".

- Tourists evacuated -
The Jordanian army deployed helicopters and all-terrain vehicles to help with search and rescue operations after floodwaters cut off the Desert Highway in both directions.   A rescuer was also among the dead, the civil defence spokesman said.   State television said the waters had reached as high as four metres (13 feet) in parts of the red-rock ravine city of Petra and the adjacent Wadi Musa desert.

It broadcast footage of tourists sheltering on high ground on both sides of the access road to Jordan's biggest attraction.   The government spokeswoman said 3,762 tourists were evacuated.   Designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1985, Petra draws hundreds of thousands of tourists a year to its rock-hewn treasury, temples and mausoleums.   Its buildings have been used as sets for several Hollywood blockbusters including "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade".   Wadi Rum, also a UNESCO World Heritage site, has attracted generations of tourists with its spectacular sandstone and granite rock formations.   Its landscapes served as a backdrop in the filming of the Hollywood classic "Lawrence of Arabia".

The latest deaths come after October 25 flash floods in the Dead Sea region of the kingdom killed 21 people, most of them children on a school trip.   Jordan's education and tourism ministers both resigned last week over failings in the government's response to those floods.   The education ministry ordered schools closed nationwide on Saturday amid warnings of more heavy rains.   Jordan's minister of water and irrigation, Raed Abu al-Saoud, said on Saturday that the country's 14 main dams had filled up by some 26 percent of full capacity in the past 48 hours because of the torrential rains.   Jordan is a water-poor country that is 90 percent desert.
Date: Fri, 26 Oct 2018 11:36:00 +0200

Amman, Oct 26, 2018 (AFP) - At least 20 people, most of them school pupils, have been killed in flash floods in Jordan, the emergency services said Friday in an updated toll.   A further 35 people were injured following heavy rains on Thursday, including members of the security forces involved in rescue operations, said an official from the civil defence -- Jordan's fire service -- who asked not to be named.   He said rescuers were still searching for people missing in the area, a popular tourist attraction around 50 kilometres (30 miles) west of Amman.   "Most of the dead were schoolchildren aged 11 to 14 who were taking part in a school trip to the Dead Sea region" when their bus was swept away by floodwaters.   Also among the dead were passers-by who had been picnicking in the area, he said, adding that a nearby bridge had collapsed.   "Security force personnel who were taking part in the rescue operations were among the injured," he added.

The Dead Sea, the lowest point on earth, is surrounded by steep valleys and gullies that frequently see flash floods and landslides.   Education Minister Azmi Mahafzah promised a "full inquiry" into the schoolchildren's deaths.   He said the bus took a route not agreed upon by the ministry and the organiser of the trip bore full responsibility.   Roads leading to the area were closed on Friday morning "to allow the continuation of search and rescue operations", the Directorate of General Security said.   The Israeli military said on Thursday it was helping with the operation, sending helicopters and forces specialised in search and rescue.   Jordanian television reported that King Abdullah II had cancelled a planned visit to Bahrain to monitor developments.
Date: Tue 26 Sep 2017
Source: Jordan Times [edited]

Following a rise in hepatitis A cases among school students in Mafraq's Akeider area, the president of the Lower House's Health Committee, Ibrahim Bani Hani, has called for more governmental attention to the area, which "has suffered negligence for so long".

The Ministry of Health has recorded 32 cases of Hepatitis A in students from the Akeider area, in Mafraq Governorate, since [22 Aug 2017]. Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by a virus transmitted through contaminated food or water, inadequate sanitation and poor personal hygiene, the Health Ministry's spokesperson, Hatem Azrui, told The Jordan Times.

Bani Hani visited Akeider 2 months ago, along with other officials and the Lower House's Environmental Committee, to examine the impacts of the landfill in Akeider on the environment and the health of its citizens. "There is no doubt that hepatitis A has spread in the area due to a lack of hygiene in health and public facilities," he stated.

Mafraq health director at the Ministry of Health, Hani Oleimat, said that the disease is not epidemic and that the rate of [past] infection in adults amounts to over 90 percent.

Azrui said that the ministry has conducted experiments on the water sources at schools and homes and noted that no signs of the virus were found. He said that the disease is spread through sharing personal items like towels at public health facilities.

For his part, Bani Hani stressed that the area is lacking a health centre, which the ministry had promised to build, but noted that "no real measures were taken". He also said that the area suffers from other issues such as the emission of phenol gas from Akeider landfill and the increased number of stray dogs, a potential source of rabies.

Oleimat noted that since the discovery of the cases, no schools have stopped working in the area and noted that the ministry urged the school staff to direct any suspected case to the health directorate, in order to provide the infected students with a 7- to 10-day sick leave. The sickness needs no medication other than rest, Oleimat highlighted, noting that the body of the infected person naturally generates immunity  against the virus.  [Byline: Sawsan Tabazah]
==================
[This is a completely preventable disease using the inactivated hepatitis A vaccine. In the developing world, it is seen primarily in children and by adulthood, almost all individuals are immune. Most infections in children are asymptomatic so a cluster of 32 cases, so far here, implies a great deal more total infections. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Tue 26 Sep 2017
Source: GIDEON (Global Infectious Disease Epidemiology Network) [edited]

re: ProMED-mail Hepatitis A - Jordan: (MA)
-----------------------------------------------------------
The potential benefit for hepatitis A vaccination in Jordan is illustrated by the chart at

In 1999, Israel became the world's 1st country to institute routine hepatitis A immunization (blue arrow), and has since largely eradicated the disease [1].

Reference
---------
1. Chart generated by a Gideon multi-graph tool, see
--------------------------------------------
Communicated by:
Stephen Berger
Geographic Medicine
Tel Aviv Medical Center
Tel Aviv, Israel
=========================
[ProMED thanks Dr Berger for his continued contributions. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Sun 24 Sep 2017
Source: Arab Jordan [in Arabic, trans. ProMED Mod.NS, edited]

A total of 27 children suffered from hepatitis A in Al-Akaider area, 30 km (18 mi) northeast of Al-Mafraq city within Hosha district [Mafraq province]. This prompted the Ministry of Health to send a specialized epidemiological team to determine the causes of the outbreak. According to information received from the people, the disease has reached an epidemic level as the infection has spread among children, especially schoolchildren. This required closing the 2 schools located in the area to maintain the health and safety of children and stop the transmission of the disease.

The Director of Health of Al-Mafraq, Hani Alimat, stated that the disease is endemic in the region, reducing the negative effect on children because the recovery from the infection gives immunity throughout life.

Alimat said that the ministry had sent a specialized epidemiological team to take samples and examine them in laboratories. He indicated that the tests proved that the children are infected with hepatitis A, which is often caused by the use of unclean toilet facilities. He confirmed that the laboratory tests of the water lines in the houses showed that the water is clean.

Alimat stressed that during visiting the 2 schools that have 280 students, they found that the health environment is poor due to having poor toilet facilities and drinking water, in addition to the absence of walls to protect these facilities and the presence of dead animals around the area. He explained that the increased number of cases made the Directorate of Health allocating a doctor to the health center throughout the day hours to receive patients. There are also field visits to the schools in addition to providing a health educator to give lectures on awareness of how to deal with the infection. Alimat also pointed out that the field visits of the health monitors in the area closed a shop for not complying with health requirements.
======================
[The age-specific seroprevalence rates for hepatitis A antibody as reflected in the citation below supports, in the absence of widespread hepatitis A vaccine use, almost universal hepatitis A infection in Jordan occurring in childhood or adolescence.

Hayajneh WA, Balbeesi A, Faouri S: Hepatitis A virus age-specific sero-prevalence and risk factors among Jordanian children. J Med Virol. 2015; 87: 569-74;

Abstract
--------
Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has been a significant cause of infections among the children and adolescents of Jordan. Availability of safe vaccines made it necessary to identify the ill-defined temporal immunity trends for HAV and possible age-specific prevalence transitions. This community-based cross sectional study was conducted during the period July-August 2008 on 3066 recruited subjects from the 12 governorates of Jordan, with predefined criteria. Several households were chosen at random within each selected block to enrol the subjects. They were interviewed and data were collected. Their sera were tested for total antibodies against HAV. A multivariate model was then performed to identify the possible risk factors.

The HAV seroprevalence rates among the age categories-second year, 2-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and those above 20 years were 26 percent, 32 percent, 44 percent, 63 percent, 78 percent, and 94 percent, respectively. The model revealed the association of several risk factors for higher HAV seroprevalence rates: (i) older age groups; (ii) lower maternal education levels; (iii) residing in certain governorates; (iv) using public net drinking water; and (v) avoiding use of public net sewage system.

This study provided strong evidence for continuous transition of HAV epidemiology towards intermediate endemicity in Jordan, with more susceptible adolescents and adults. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for countries with intermediate endemicity, large-scale hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for children in Jordan. This is strengthened by the availability of effective and safe HAV vaccines, improving the socio-economic status of the Jordanians, and increasing life expectancy among Jordanians. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[Maps of Jordan can be seen at
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/63190>. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

31st May 2019

A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali erupted Friday, spewing a plume of ash and smoke more than 2,000 metres (6,500 feet) into the sky. Mount Agung, about 70 kilometres from the tourist hub of Kuta, has been erupting periodically since it rumbled back to life in 2017, sometimes grounding flights and forcing residents to flee their homes.
Mount Agung is about 70 kilometres from the tourist hub of Kuta

The latest shortly before noon on Friday shot a cloud of volcanic ash high into the sky, but caused no disruption to flights, Indonesia's geological agency said.  Agung remained at the second highest danger warning level, and there is a four-kilometre no-go zone around the crater.

Last summer, dozens of flights were cancelled after Agung erupted, while tens of thousands of locals fled to evacuation centres after an eruption in 2017.

The last major eruption of Agung in 1963 killed around 1,600 people.

Indonesia is situated on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", a vast zone of geological instability where the collision of tectonic plates causes frequent quakes and major volcanic activity.

31st May 2019

Heatwaves across India have exacted heavy casualties this year, including dozens of deaths by sunstroke and other heat-related causes. The deaths have been mainly reported from states like Maharashtra (particularly Vidarbha), Andhra Pradesh (mainly Rayalseema) and Telangana, due to the temperature extremes in these regions. What's worrying is, a study suggests that the heatwave conditions are likely to increase from next year and continue till 2064 because of El Niño Modoki and depletion in soil moisture. Here's how the heatwave is taking a toll in the above states.

Maharashtra

Parts of Maharashtra have been reeling under high temperatures accompanied by severe heatwave condition during this summer. According to a report in The Times Of India, a 50-year old man in Beed succumbed to death because of heatstroke recently, taking the overall number to 8. Reports show a total of 456 cases of heat-related illnesses in Maharashtra this summer. Last year, the number of cases reported was 568. However, the death toll this year is more than last year's figure of 2 victims.

Regions like Nagpur and Akola show the most number of deaths and illnesses in the Vidarbha region. About 163 cases of heat-related illness were reported in Nagpur and 76 ailments were reported in Latur region. Recently, Chandrapur in Maharashtra (which lies 150km south of Nagpur) registered a day temperature of 48°C, the highest recorded in India this summer.

Andhra Pradesh

Parts of Andhra Pradesh have been experiencing temperatures of 45°C and more since the last few days. These conditions have persisted in the state after the heavy rains caused by Cyclone Fani.

Two women going on a two-wheeler and covered themselves with scarfs to protect themselves from the heat wave, in Vijayawada
(Mahesh G, TOI, BCCL, Vijayawada.)

Three people have died in Andhra Pradesh due to heat-related causes this year. Also, 433 people have been diagnosed with heatstroke. Earlier this month, electrical transformers had blown up in many parts of Krishna and Guntur districts, disrupting power supply for more than five hours and intensifying the effects of heatwave conditions and the severe temperatures.

In 2015, Andhra Pradesh experienced the most number of heat deaths in the country: 1,369 people died that year from heat-related illnesses.

Telangana

Seventeen people have succumbed in Telangana over the last 22 days. However, the number of unconfirmed deaths is expected to be higher. The region saw 541 heat-related deaths in 2015, and 27 in 2018. The farmers and those who work in the sun are usually the ones to be affected the most by high temperatures and heatwave conditions.

As heat blankets the country, make sure you stay protected. Follow official guidelines and do not step out in the Sun, especially in the afternoon hours, unless absolutely necessary.

(With inputs from The Times Of India.)

11th June 2019
https://afro.who.int/news/confirmation-case-ebola-virus-disease-uganda

Kampala, 11 June 2019 - The Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) have confirmed a case of Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda. Although there have been numerous previous alerts, this is the first confirmed case in Uganda during the Ebola outbreak on-going in neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The confirmed case is a 5-year-old child from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who travelled with his family on 9th June 2019. The child and his family entered the country through Bwera Border post and sought medical care at Kagando hospital where health workers identified Ebola as a possible cause of illness. The child was transferred to Bwera Ebola Treatment Unit for management. The confirmation was made today by the Uganda Virus Institute (UVRI). The child is under care and receiving supportive treatment at Bwera ETU, and contacts are being monitored.

The Ministry of Health and WHO have dispatched a Rapid Response Team to Kasese to identify other people who may be at risk, and ensure they are monitored and provided with care if they also become ill. Uganda has previous experience managing Ebola outbreaks. In preparation for a possible imported case during the current outbreak in DRC, Uganda has vaccinated nearly 4700 health workers in 165 health facilities (including in the facility where the child is being cared for); disease monitoring has been intensified; and health workers trained on recognizing symptoms of the disease. Ebola Treatment Units are in place.

In response to this case, the Ministry is intensifying community education, psychosocial support and will undertake vaccination for those who have come into contact with the patient and at-risk health workers who were not previously vaccinated.  

Ebola virus disease is a severe illness that is spread through contact with the body fluids of a person sick with the disease (fluids such as vomit, faeces or blood). First symptoms are similar to other diseases and thus require vigilant health and community workers, especially in areas where there is Ebola transmission, to help make diagnosis. Symptoms can be sudden and include:
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
People who have been in contact with someone with the disease are offered vaccine and asked to monitor their health for 21 days to ensure they do not become ill as well.

The investigational vaccine being used in DRC and by health and frontline workers in Uganda has so far been effective in protecting people from developing the disease, and has helped those who do develop the disease to have a better chance of survival. The Ministry strongly urges those who are identified as contacts to take this protective measure.

Investigational therapeutics and advanced supportive care, along with patients seeking care early once they have symptoms, increase chances of survival.

The Ministry of Health has taken the following actions to contain spread of the disease in the country:
  • The District administration and local councils in the affected area have been directed to ensure that any person with Ebola signs and symptoms in the community is reported to the health workers immediately and provided with advice and testing.
  • The Ministry of Health is setting up units in the affected district and at referral hospitals to handle cases if they occur.
  • •Social mobilization activities are being intensified and education materials are being disseminated.

There are no confirmed cases in any other parts of the country.

The Ministry is working with international partners coordinated by the World Health Organization.

The Ministry of Health appeals to the general public and health workers to work together closely, to be vigilant and support each other in helping anyone with symptoms to receive care quickly. The Ministry will continue to update the general public on progress and new developments.
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 14:24:43 +0200

Lima, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Peru has declared a health emergency in five regions, including Lima, after the deaths of at least four people linked to Guillain-Barre syndrome, an autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system.   Health Minister Zulema Tomas said Sunday that in addition to the deaths there were currently 206 cases of the disease.   "We have an outbreak, there has been a brusque increase" since June 5, Tomas said on state-run TV Peru, adding that health authorities were taking steps to control and contain the disease.

While the syndrome is not contagious, a 90-day health emergency was declared because the current cases "have unusual and atypical characteristics that require rapid or immediate initial treatment," Peru's Institute of Neurological Sciences said.   The precise cause of the disorder is unknown, but most cases develop after a person has been sick with diarrhoea or a respiratory infection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US says its research suggests that the syndrome is "strongly associated" with the Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness.   The regions affected by GBS include three on the country's northern coast -- Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad -- tourist destinations known for their archaeological sites and beaches.   Also included was the central region of Junin and Lima, which has nine million inhabitants.   Two deaths were reported in Piura, one in La Libertad and another in Junin.
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 16:39:03 +0200

Madrid, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Three tourists have fallen from their hotel balconies in Spain's Balearic Islands in recent days, one of them dying on impact, police said Monday as the summer season in the party archipelago begins.   The incidents came as Britain's foreign office warned holidaymakers heading to Spain against "balcony falls" and asked them not to "take unnecessary risks... particularly if you're under the influence of drink or drugs."   On Friday in Magaluf, a party resort notorious for its booze-fuelled tourism, a 19-year-old British man fell to his death from the second floor of his hotel, Spain's Civil Guard police force said.

A spokesman said police were looking at two theories -- either "he threw himself off voluntarily, or he fell by accident."   He did not know whether the victim had consumed drugs or alcohol.   On Thursday, a 35-year-old German man fell from the second floor of his hotel too, this time in Palma de Majorca, and was seriously injured, police said.   A source close to the probe, who declined to be named, said the man had drunk, dozed off, woken up and subsequently fallen from the balcony, possibly disorientated.   And on Monday, an Australian man in his early thirties fell from the second floor of his hotel in Ibiza and was seriously hurt, police said, without giving further details.

Balcony falls happen every year in the Balearic Islands and other party resorts in Spain, most of them due to excessive drinking or drug-taking/   Some are accidental slips, while others happen when tourists miss while trying to jump into pools or onto another balcony -- a practice known as "balconing."   The British foreign office's online travel advice for Spain has an entire section warning against "balcony falls".   "There have been a number of very serious accidents (some fatal) as a result of falls from balconies," says the website.    "Many of these incidents have involved British nationals and have had a devastating impact on those involved and their loved ones."
Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2019 06:44:54 +0200

Sydney, June 10, 2019 (AFP) - Australian police said Monday they were scouring bushland for a Belgian teenage tourist missing in a popular surf town for more than a week.   Theo Hayez, an 18-year-old backpacker, was last seen on May 31 at a hotel in the coastal tourist town of Byron Bay -- some 750 kilometres (470 miles) north of Sydney -- New South Wales state police said.   "We have a large amount of resources searching... in bushland that is towards the east and northeast of the town," police Chief Inspector Matthew Kehoe said in a statement.   "We are advised that this disappearance is completely out of character for him."   Police said they were alerted to his disappearance on Thursday after he failed to return to a hostel he was staying in.   Hayez's passport and personal belongings were all left at the hostel, and police believe he had not made any financial transactions since his disappearance or used his mobile phone.
Date: Sat 8 Jun 2019
Source: New Jersey 101.5 [edited]

The potentially deadly Powassan tick-borne virus has been confirmed in 2 Sussex county residents, one of whom died last month [May 2019], state health officials confirmed [Sat 8 Jun 2019].

The Powassan virus is spread by the deer tick [_Ixodes scapularis_]. The illness is rarer than Lyme disease, which is also spread by the tick, but 10% of people who contract the [Powassan virus] illness die from it.

A Department of Health official on [Sat 8 Jun 2019] said that the department had not determined the cause of death for the patient who died last month [May 2019] but said that lab results this week [week of 3 Jun 2019] confirmed that he had the virus.

A 2nd victim continues to recover at home.

Symptoms of the virus include brain swelling, meningitis, fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, loss of coordination, trouble speaking, and memory loss. Symptoms can appear a week to a month after a tick bite, although some people show no symptoms and do not require treatment.

There is no vaccine or cure for the disease. Treatment includes hospitalization, support for breathing, and intravenous fluids.

Prevention involves the same precautions that should be taken to avoid Lyme disease: avoid wooded areas with tall grasses, use insect repellent while outdoors, and check for ticks after being outdoors.

Powassan [virus] -- first discovered in Powassan, Ontario, in 1958 -- has been confirmed in recent years in New Jersey, with one case each in 2013, 2014, and 2015, and 4 cases in 2017, the most recent year for which data is available. The cases were reported in Sussex, Warren, Morris, and Essex counties.

Between 2008 and 2017, there were 125 confirmed cases in the entire country and 9 deaths.

A person who said they were close to the man who died last month [May 2019] posted on Facebook that the man was bitten in the arm by a tick while gardening and fell ill about 2 weeks later. The Facebook post said that there was no bull's-eye mark around the bite -- a known tell-tale sign for Lyme infection. About a day before he was hospitalized, the man reported feeling like he was coming down with a cold and had a high fever.

State health department's tip sheet for preventing Powassan [virus infection]:
- avoid contact with ticks by avoiding wooded areas with high grass;
- when hiking, stay on the center of the trail;
- picnic in areas away from wooded and bushy areas;
- keep children on playground equipment and away from tall grass and shrubs;
- when outdoors, apply insect repellents;
- wear light-colored clothes so it is easy to see and remove ticks;
- wear long-sleeve shirts and pants;
- tuck long pants into socks so ticks cannot crawl under pants;
- do tick checks every couple hours while outdoors and before coming indoors;
- if you see a tick during tick checks, remove it right away;
- keep grass mowed short;
- keep children's toys, playground equipment, pools, and lawn furniture at least 15 feet [4.6 m] from wooded areas;
- create a woodchip or mulch border between your yard and wooded areas;
- keep areas under bird feeders and pet dishes clean, so they do not attract animals that may carry ticks;
- keep trash in closed containers or areas so it does not attract animals that may carry ticks.  [Byline: Sergio Bichao]
=======================
[Powassan virus is endemic in New Jersey, and cases occur there sporadically. The tick vector is the deer tick, _Ixodes scapularis_. Humans become infected with POWV during spillover transmission from the natural transmission cycles. In humans, POWV can be a causative agent of a severe neuroinvasive illness, with 50% of survivors displaying long-term neurological sequelae. Individuals living or visiting areas where the deer tick occurs, should follow the above recommendations to avoid tick bites. If a tick is found feeding, it should be removed with forceps or tweezers grasping the tick at skin level and then gentle, constant force applied. The tick should never be removed by grasping it with thumb and forefinger, as squeezing the tick may cause inoculation of contents containing the pathogenic agent into the feeding site.

POWV was recognized as a human pathogen in 1958, when a young boy died of severe encephalitis in Powassan, Ontario, Canada. In that case, POWV was isolated from the brain autopsy. There are 2 distinct genetic lineages now recognized: POWV (lineage I) and deer tick virus (lineage II). Since the index case in 1958, over 100 human cases of POWV have been reported, with an apparent rise in disease incidence in the past 16 years. This recent increase in cases may represent a true emergence of POWV in regions where the tick vector species are prevalent, or it could represent an increase in POWV surveillance and diagnosis. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of New Jersey, United States:
New Jersey county map:
Date: 6 Jun 2019
Source: Washington Post [edited]

Dominican government officials released more-detailed autopsy results on Thursday [6 Jun 2019] for 3 American tourists who died at adjacent beach resorts owned by the same hotel company during the last week of May 2019.

All 3 victims experienced eerily similar symptoms and internal trauma before their deaths, according to a news release from Dominican authorities. Pathologists said autopsies showed the 3 had internal haemorrhaging, pulmonary oedema, and enlarged hearts.

Toxicology reports are pending [These are likely to be the most interesting. - ProMED Mod.TG].

A U.S. State Department official said authorities have not yet established a connection between the 30 May 2019 deaths of 49-year-old CAD, and 63-year-old NEH, both of Prince George's County, MD, and the death on 25 May 2019 of 41-year-old MSW of Pennsylvania.

The FBI is providing Dominican law enforcement with "technical assistance with the toxicology reports," the State Department official said.

MSW had just checked into the Luxury Bahia Principe Bouganville, in the town of San Pedro de Macoris, and was taking pictures from her room balcony when she started to feel ill.

Less than 2 hours later, she was dead, local authorities said.

The bodies of CAD and HEH were found inside their room at the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana after relatives grew concerned because they had not checked out of the resort.

The hotels are located next to each other on the island's southern coast, about 60 miles from the tourist-heavy Punta Cana area.

Dominican authorities initially did not run toxicology tests for MSW because there were no signs of violence, said Ramon Brito, a spokesman for the National Police's special tourism unit. After the Maryland couple was found, investigators ordered a set of tests to determine whether anything the 3 Americans consumed may have led to their deaths, Brito said.  [Byline: Arelis R. Hernandez]
Date: 31 May 2019
Source: 4 News [edited]

The Alachua County Health Department is warning residents that there are 12 confirmed cases of mumps, primarily from college students at the University of Florida.  "This is a little more than usual," says Steve Orlando, University of Florida spokesman.

Alachua County normally receives around 2 reported cases a year, and UF believes more students could be infected.  "So, it's curious because these are individuals who are vaccinated, and that's what we are seeing nationwide," says Paul Myers, Alachua County Health Department administrator.

Officials say it is still unclear why there has been an uptick with the virus. So far, the CDC shows 736 people have contracted mumps nationwide in 2019.

"The sharing of the utensils, sharing of the cups, sharing of the water bottles, you know it is a very common thing for students to share those things, and that's exactly the kind of thing that could lead to transmission," says Orlando.
Date: Sat 8 Jun 2019
Source: Business Standard [edited]

As many as 14 children have died due to acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in the district, while over a dozen are admitted in hospitals with high fever and other symptoms of the infection.

Sunil Shahi, Superintendent of Shri Krishna Medical College and Hospital (SKMCH), told ANI, "We have received 38 patients so far; most of them have a deficiency of glucose in their blood. Of these, 2 have also tested JE [Japanese encephalitis] positive; the overall casualty till now is 14."

Dr Gopal Sahni, head of Critical Care Unit, said, "When heat and humidity rise, the body's sweat cannot evaporate. The humidity level is over 50 per cent in the last few days. We have about 15 such children admitted in the hospital currently, and 89 such cases come regularly."

Encephalitis is a viral infection, which causes mild flu-like symptoms such as a fever or a headache.
=======================
[Again, this year (2019), cases of AES and JE are appearing in north-western India. Of the 14 AES cases, 2 tested positive for JE. The aetiology of the remaining cases is not stated, but the majority are reported as hypoglycaemic. As noted previously, frequently, in reports of JE cases in India, acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) of undefined aetiology is often mentioned with JE cases that are a minority of those hospitalized.

The determination of the aetiology or aetiologies of AES has been confusing and elusive. Various etiological agents have been proposed in recent years as responsible for AES cases. AES has continued to be attributed to a variety of aetiologies, including Reye syndrome-like disease, possible enterovirus infection from polluted water, heatstroke, lychee fruit consumption, and scrub typhus (_Orientia tsutsugamushi_). Recently, scrub typhus has been implicated in many AES cases. A recent publication (reference below) states that dengue virus is one of the 3 most common agents identified in acute encephalitis syndrome (AES). Unfortunately, existing surveillance for AES does not include routine testing for dengue. Dengue accounts for 5% of AES cases in India, especially in the absence of laboratory evidence for other pathogens tested. Dengue should be added to the list of possible AES etiological agents.

Reference:
Vasanthapuram Ravi, Shafeeq Keeran Shahul Hameed, Anita Desai, Reeta Subramaniam Mani, Vijayalakshmi Reddy, et al.: Dengue virus is an under-recognised causative agent of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES): Results from a 4-year AES surveillance study of Japanese encephalitis in selected states of India. International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2019. doi: <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2019.01.008>.

Maps of India:

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at: