WORLD NEWS

Getting countries ...
Select countries and read reports below or

Antartica

General:
**********************************
Cuba is an independent island country situated in the Caribbean. It is the largest of the islands and covers 42,000sq miles. The climate is sub tropical throughout the year with most of the rainfall in
the northern parts of the country. Temperatures of between 20C to 35C are fairly standard throughout the year. Generally the winter effects of the American continent only last for short periods.
Safety & Security:
**********************************
The majority of tourists visiting Cuba will have no difficulty but bag snatching and other street crime appears to be increasing. The old Havana area and other major tourist resorts may be particular areas of concern in this regard. On arrival be careful to only use your recognised tour operator. If you are taking a taxi at any stage make sure it is a registered one and not a private vehicle. It is unwise to carry large quantities of money or jewellery away from your hotel and try not to flaunt wealth with your belongings. Pickpockets are too common an occurrence on buses and trains and at train stations so be careful with your essential documents and credit cards. Valuables should not be stored in suitcases when arriving in or departing from Havana as there have been a number of thefts from cases during the time the cases are coming through baggage handling. There is an airport shrink-wrap facility for those departing Havana which reduces the risk of tampering. Remember to carry a photocopy of your main documents (passport, flight tickets etc).
Road Safety:
**********************************
Following a number of serious road accidents involving tourists, you are advised not to use mopeds for travelling around Cuba or in Havana. Also, if you are involved in any accident a police investigation will be required to clear you and this may significantly delay your travel plans. On unlit roads at night there have been a number of accidents associated with roaming cattle (sounds like Ireland!). The traffic moves on the right side of the roads. There is a main highway running the length of the country but many of the country roads are in poor repair.
Local Laws & Customs:
**********************************
When arriving into Cuba make sure you are not carrying any items which could be considered offensive. Any illicit drug offense is treated very seriously and Cuban law allows for the death penalty to be used under these circumstances. If you require personal medication for your health, make sure it is in original packing and carry a letter from your doctor describing the medication. Never agree to carry any item for another individual and always secure your cases once they are packed. Taking photographs of military or police installations or around harbours, rail and airport facilities is strictly forbidden.

Currency:
**********************************
Since 1993 it is now possible to use US dollars for all transactions within Cuba. Remember, there is a 20$ airport departure tax. Certain travellers cheques and credit cards may not be acceptable within Cuba. This is particularly true of American Express cheques and cards but check your situation with the travel operator before departure.
Health Facilities:
**********************************
Generally healthcare facilities outside of Havana are limited and many standard medications may not be available. It is important to carry sufficient quantities of any medications which may be required for the duration of your time in Cuba.
Food & Water:
**********************************
The level of food and water hygiene varies throughout the country and between resorts. On arrival check the hotel cold water supply for the smell of chlorine. If it is not present then use sealed bottled water for both drinking and brushing your teeth throughout your stay. Cans and bottles of drinks are safe but take care to avoid pre-cut fruit. Peel it yourself to make sure it is not contaminated. Food from street vendors should be avoided in most cases. Bivalve shellfish are also a high risk food in many countries and Cuba is no exception in this regard. (Eg Mussels, Oysters, Clams etc)
Malaria & Mosquito Borne Diseases:
***********************************************
Malaria transmission does not occur within Cuba and so prophylaxis is not required. However, a different mosquito borne disease called Dengue has begun to reoccur in the country over the past few years. This viral disease can be very sickening and even progress to death. It is rare for tourists to become infected but avoiding mosquito bites is a wise precaution.
Swimming, Sun & Dehydration:
************************************
The extent of the Cuban sun (particular during the summer months (April to October) can be very excessive so make sure your head and shoulders are covered at all times when exposed. Watch children carefully as they will be a significant risk. Drink plenty of fluids to replace what will be lost through perspiration and, unless there is a reason not to,
take extra salt either on your food or in crisps, peanuts etc. Take care if swimming in the Caribbean to stay with others and to listen to local advice. Never swim after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Rabies Risk in Cuba:
**********************************
This viral disease does occur throughout Cuba and it is essential that you avoid any contact with all warm blooded animals. Dogs, cats and monkeys are the most commonly involved in spreading the disease to humans. Don't pick up a monkey for a photograph! If bitten, wash out the wound, apply an antiseptic and seek urgent medical attention.
Vaccinations for Cuba:
**********************************
There are no essential vaccines for entry / exit if coming from Ireland. However, for your own personal protection travellers are advised to have cover against the following;
*
Tetanus (childhood booster)
*
Typhoid (food & water borne disease)
*
Hepatitis A (food & water borne disease)
For those planning a longer or more rural trip vaccine cover against conditions like Hepatitis B and Rabies may also need to be considered.
Summary:
**********************************
Cuba is becoming a popular destination for tourists and generally most will stay very healthy. However commonsense care against food and water borne disease is essential at all times. Also take care with regard to sun exposure, dehydration and mosquito bites.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2019 03:03:18 +0100 (MET)
By Pierre-Henry DESHAYES

Half Moon Island, Antarctica, Dec 6, 2019 (AFP) - The swimsuit-clad tourists leap into the icy water, gasping at the shock, and startling a gaggle of penguins.   They are spectators at the end of the world, luxury visitors experiencing a vulnerable ecosystem close-up.   And their very presence might accelerate its demise.   Antarctica, a vast territory belonging to no one nation, is a continent of extremes: the coldest place on Earth, the windiest, the driest, the most desolate and the most inhospitable.   Now, it's also a choice destination for tourists.

All around Half Moon Island, off the Antarctic Peninsula, blocks of ice of all sizes float by on a calm sea, their varying forms resembling weightless origami shapes.    On this strip of land, that juts out of the Antarctic Polar and towards South America, visitors can see wildlife normally only viewed in zoos or nature documentaries along with spectacular icy landscapes.   The ethereal shades of white that play across the pillowy peaks change with the light, acquiring pastel hues at dawn and dusk.   "Purity, grandeur, a scale that's out of this world," says Helene Brunet, an awestruck 63-year-old French pensioner, enjoying the scene.    "It's unbelievable, totally unbelievable. It's amazing just to be here, like a small speck of dust."

AFP joined the 430 passengers on board the Roald Amundsen, the world's first hybrid electric cruise ship, on its maiden voyage in the Southern Ocean.    "It's not your typical beach, but it's awesome to do it," says a numb Even Carlsen, 58, from Norway, emerging from his polar plunge in the three-degree C (37.4 F) water.   When tourists go ashore, bundled up in neon-coloured windbreakers and slathered in SPF50 sunscreen, they have to follow strict rules: clean your personal effects so you don't introduce invasive species, keep a respectful distance from wildlife to avoid distressing them, don't stray from the marked paths and don't pick up anything.   "We mucked up the rest of the world. We don't want to muck up Antarctica too," says an English tourist, as she vacuums cat hair off her clothes before going ashore.

- 'Heart of the Earth' -
The Antarctic peninsula is one of the regions on Earth that is warming the fastest, by almost three degrees Celsius in the past 50 years, according to the World Meteorological Organization -- three times faster than the global average.    In March 2015, an Argentinian research station registered a balmy 17.5 degrees Celsius, a record.    "Every year you can observe and record the melting of glaciers, the disappearance of sea ice... (and) in areas without ice, the recolonisation of plants and other organisms that were not present in Antarctica before," said Marcelo Leppe, director of the Chilean Antarctic Institute.

Antarctica is "like the heart of the Earth," he added, saying that it expands and contracts like a heart beating, while the mighty current which revolves around the continent is like a circulatory system as it absorbs warm currents from other oceans and redistributes cold water.   The Antarctic Treaty, signed 60 years ago by 12 countries -- it now has 54 signatories -- declared the area a continent dedicated to peace and science, but tourism has gradually increased, with a sharp rise in the past few years.   Tourism is the only commercial activity allowed, apart from fishing -- the subject of international disputes over marine sanctuaries -- and is concentrated mainly around the peninsula, which has a milder climate than the rest of the continent and is easier to access.

Cruise ships have roamed the region for around 50 years, but their numbers only started to increase from 1990, as Soviet ice-breakers found new purposes in the post-Cold War era.   Some 78,500 people are expected to visit the region between November and March, according to the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators (IAATO).   That's a 40-percent increase from last year, due in part to short visits by a few new cruise ships carrying more than 500 passengers, too many to disembark under IAATO regulations.     "Some might say 'Well, 80,000 people, that doesn't even fill a national stadium'... (and that it) is nothing like Galapagos which welcomes 275,000 a year," says IAATO spokeswoman Amanda Lynnes.    "But Antarctica is a special place and you need to manage it accordingly."

- 'Leave Antarctica to the penguins' -
It is Antarctica's very vulnerability that is attracting more and more visitors.   "We want to see this fantastic nature in Antarctica before it's gone," Guido Hofken, a 52-year-old IT sales director travelling with his wife Martina, says.    They said they had paid a supplement to climate compensate for their flight from Germany.

But some question whether tourists should be going to the region at all.   "The continent probably would be better off being left to penguins and researchers, but the reality is, that is probably never going to happen," said Michael Hall, professor and expert on polar regions at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand.   "Vicarious appreciation never seems to be enough for humans. So with that being the case, it needs to be made as low risk to the Antarctic environment and as low carbon as possible," said Hall.    "However, when the average tourist trip to Antarctica is over five tonnes of CO2 emissions per passenger (including flights), that is a serious ask."

Soot or black carbon in the exhaust gases of the scientific and cruise ships going to the region is also of concern, said Soenke Diesener, transport policy officer at German conservation NGO Nabu.   "These particles will deposit on snow and ice surfaces and accelerate the melting of the ice because the ice gets darker and will absorb the heat from the sun and will melt much faster," he told AFP.   "So the people who go there to observe or preserve the landscape are bringing danger to the area, and leave it less pristine than it was," he added.

- Responsible tourism -
Antarctic tour operators insist they are promoting responsible tourism.   The trend is for more intimate, so-called expedition cruises, in contrast to popular giant cruise liners elsewhere which are criticised for being invasive and polluting.   With greener ships -- heavy fuel, the most commonly used for marine vessels, has been banned in Antarctica since 2011 -- cruise companies have sought to make environmental awareness a selling point, occasionally earning them accusations of greenwashing.

Global warming, pollution and microplastics are the result of human activities on other, faraway continents, say tour operators.   Here, their motto is "Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints, keep nothing but memories".   But before they've even set foot on the cruise ships departing from South America -- the most common itinerary -- visitors to Antarctica will already have flown across the world, causing emissions that harm the very nature they have come so far to admire.

Most visitors hail from the Northern Hemisphere, and almost half are from the United States and China, IAATO says.   "I'm a tourist who feels a little guilty about taking a flight to come here," admits Francoise Lapeyre, a 58-year-old globetrotter om France.   "But then again, there are priorities. There are some trips I just won't take, because they leave a big footprint and they're not worth it.   "Crisscrossing the planet to go to a beach for example," she says.

- Don't mention climate change -
Like other expedition cruises where accessible science is part of their trademark, the Roald Amundsen, owned by the Hurtigruten company, has no dance floor or casino.  Instead, there are microscopes, science events and lectures about whales and explorers like Charles Darwin.   But they steer clear of climate change, which is only mentioned indirectly.   That's a deliberate decision as the subject has proven "quite controversial", said Verena Meraldi, Hurtigruten's science coordinator.   "We held several lectures dedicated specifically to climate change but it leads to conflicts. There are people who accept it as a fact, others who don't," she said.   Onboard, "passengers" are referred to as "guests" and "explorers" rather than "cruisers".   "Explorers" are typically older, well-heeled, often highly travelled pensioners who are handed walking sticks as they step ashore.   "My 107th country," says a Dane, stepping ashore onto Antarctica.

The Roald Amundsen "guests" choose between three restaurants, from street food to fine dining -- a far cry from the conditions endured by the Norwegian adventurer for whom the ship is named, who had to eat his sled dogs to survive his quest to reach the South Pole in 1911.   They have paid at least 7,000 euros ($7,700) each for an 18-day cruise in a standard cabin, and up to 25,000 euros ($27,500) for a suite with a balcony and private jacuzzi.   Other cruises are banking on ultra-luxury, with James Bond-like ships equipped with helicopters and submarines, suites of more than 200 square metres (2,153 square feet) and butler services.   With a seaplane to boot, the mega-yacht SeaDream Innovation will offer 88-day cruises "from Pole to Pole" starting in 2021. The two most expensive suites, with a price tag of 135,000 euros per person, are already booked.
 
- Worlds collide -
Outside, in the deafening silence, wildlife abounds.   All around are penguins, as awkward on land as they are agile in water. Massive and majestic whales slip through the waves, and sea lions and seals laze in the sun.   On Half Moon Island, chinstrap penguins -- so called because of a black stripe on their chin -- strut about in this spring breeding season, raising their beaks and screeching from their rocky nests.   "This is to tell other males 'This is my space' and also, maybe, 'This is my female'," ornithologist Rebecca Hodgkiss, a member of the Hurtigruten's scientific team, explains, as a group of tourists stroll around ashore.   The colony of 2,500 penguins has been gradually declining over the years, but it's not known if that is man's fault or they have just moved away, according to Karin Strand, Hurtigruten's vice president for expeditions.   Invisible to the naked eye, traces of humankind are however to be found in the pristine landscape.   Not a single piece of rubbish is in sight but microplastics are everywhere, swept in on ocean currents.   "We've detected them in the eggs of penguins for example," Leppe told AFP.

- Venice under water -
The Antarctic, which holds the world's largest reserve of freshwater, is a ticking time bomb, warn experts and studies.   They say that the future of millions of people and species in coastal areas around the world depends on what is happening here.   As a result of global warming, the melting ice sheet -- especially in the western part of the continent -- will increasingly contribute to rising sea levels, radically re-drawing the map of the world, says climate scientist Anders Levermann, of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.   This meltwater will contribute 50 centimetres (almost 20 inches) to the global sea level rise by 2100, and much more after that, he said.   "For every degree of warming, we get 2.5 metres of sea level rise. Not in this century, but in the long run," he said.

Even if the international community meets its obligations under the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to under two degrees Celsius, sea levels will still rise by at least five metres.   "Which means that Venice is under water, Hamburg is under water, New York, Shanghai, Calcutta," he said.   It's impossible to predict when, but the scenario appears unavoidable, says Levermann.   In the same way that a cruise ship powering ahead at full speed can't immediately stop, sea levels will continue to rise even if all greenhouse gas emissions were to cease immediately, a study has said.

- Changing the world? -
The tourism industry says it hopes to make "ambassadors" out of Antarctica visitors.   "It's good for the animal life and for the protection of Antarctica that people see how beautiful this area is, because you cherish what you know and understand," said Hurtigruten chief executive Daniel Skjeldam.   Texan tourist Mark Halvorson, 72, says he is convinced.   "Having seen it, I am that much more committed to having a very high priority in my politics, in my own inner core convictions to being as environmentally friendly in my life as I can," he said.   So, do Guido and Martina Hofken see themselves as future "ambassadors of Antarctica"?    "Just a little bit, probably. But I don't think I will change the world," Guido Hofken concedes.    "The best thing would be for nobody to travel to Antarctica."
Date: Thu, 17 May 2018 09:57:07 +0200

Buenos Aires, May 17, 2018 (AFP) - Tourism regulation in Antarctica has become an urgent matter due to environmental threats, officials from the 53 member countries of the Antarctic Treaty warned at their annual meeting, held this week in Buenos Aires.

In the absence of rules, travel agencies offer trips to the region on boats sometimes equipped with helicopters or submarines, according to Segolene Royal, French ambassador for the Arctic and Antarctic poles.   "This activity creates considerable disturbance ... we are witnessing a race toward large-scale tourism that is dangerous for ecosystems," she said at the assembly on Wednesday.

During the austral summer of 2016/2017, around 44,000 tourists set off for Antarctica, compared with just 9,000 in 1995/1996, according to French authorities.   However, the push for regulation is not about banning tourism, former environmental minister Royal said, but rather about ensuring it is managed in compliance with the treaty and its environmental protection protocol.

In Buenos Aires, the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting  -- whose mission is to regulate human activity on the continent -- also sought to encourage scientific cooperation between countries that have collectively set up around 100 research bases across the ice.   Also up for analysis is China's proposed fifth permanent scientific station in Antarctica, which would be located in the Ross Sea area south of New Zealand.
Date: Wed, 5 Jul 2017 13:01:49 +0200
By Marlowe HOOD

Paris, July 5, 2017 (AFP) - A chunk of ice bigger than the US state of Delaware is hanging by a thread from the West Antarctic ice shelf, satellite images revealed Wednesday.   When it finally calves from the Larsen C ice shelf, one of the biggest icebergs in recorded history will be set adrift -- some 6,600 square kilometres (2,550 square miles) in total, according to the European Space Agency (ESA).

The iceberg's depth below sea level could be as much as 210 metres (almost 700 feet), or about 60 storeys, it said.   "The crack in the ice is now around 200 kilometres (125 miles) long, leaving just five kilometres between the end of the fissure and the ocean," the ESA said in a statement.   "Icebergs calve from Antarctica all the time, but because this one is particularly large its path across the ocean needs to be monitored as it could pose a hazard to maritime traffic."

Scientists tracking the berg's progression expect it to break of within months.    The Larsen C shelf will lose more than 10 percent of its total surface area.   The massive ice cube will float in water and by itself will not add to sea levels when it melts.   The real danger is from inland glaciers.   Ice shelves float on the sea, extending from the coast, and are fed by slow-flowing glaciers from the land.    They act as giant brakes, preventing glaciers from flowing directly into the ocean.   If the glaciers held in check by Larsen C spilt into the Antarctic Ocean, it would lift the global water mark by about 10 centimetres (four inches), researchers have said.

The calving of ice shelves occurs naturally, though global warming is believed to have accelerated the process.   Warming ocean water erodes the underbelly of the ice shelves, while rising air temperatures weaken them from above.   The nearby Larsen A ice shelf collapsed in 1995, and Larsen B dramatically broke up seven years later.   The ESA is keeping an eye on Larsen C with its Copernicus and CryoSat Earth orbiters.

Man-made global warming has already lifted average global air temperatures by about one degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) since pre-industrial levels.    Antarctica is one of the world's fastest-warming regions.   The world's nations undertook in the Paris Agreement, inked in 2015, to cap average global warming at "well under" 2 C.
Date: Wed, 22 Jun 2016 21:35:09 +0200
By Jean-Louis SANTINI

Washington, June 22, 2016 (AFP) - Two sick workers were evacuated from a remote US research station near the South Pole on Wednesday in a risky rescue mission carried out in the dead of Antarctica's winter, a US official said.   A Twin Otter turboprop plane flew in dark and cold conditions to pick up the workers from the Amundsen-Scott station, about 250 meters from the geographic South Pole, a spokesman for the US National Science Foundation (NSF), Peter West told AFP.

The plane's crew and a medical team had made the 10-hour journey to the South Pole in the middle of Antarctica's 24-hour winter on Tuesday night to reach the unidentified patients, who could not be treated on site.   The NSF -- the US research agency that operates the Amundsen-Scott Station -- organized the rescue mission last week given the condition of the first patient, which was not disclosed for privacy reasons.   "It was really an emergency," West said.   It later became apparent that the second worker also needed to be evacuated.

The sick workers -- employees of the US company Lockheed Martin who worked on base logistics -- were then taken to the Rothera base, a British research station some 2,200 kilometers (about 1,365 miles) away, the spokesman said.   The pair, who were not identified, were then to be transferred to a hospital in South America, West said, without giving further details.   The Amundsen-Scott base was home to 48 people -- 39 men and nine women -- who work on-site throughout the austral winter, which spans February through October.

- Rare rescue mission -
Near the world's southernmost point, workers spend this period withstanding nearly complete darkness and dramatically low temperatures -- on Tuesday, the thermometer dropped to -60 degrees Celsius (-76 degrees Fahrenheit).   It was only the third time that an emergency rescue operation has been launched in the middle of winter.   In 2001, the only doctor at the Amundsen-Scott station was suffering from a life-threatening pancreatic condition and required urgent evacuation. A second medical evacuation was carried out that year.

In 1999, the US station's doctor Jerri Nielsen, who was self-treating her own breast cancer, required medical evacuation but weather conditions were more favorable, as the mission took place in the spring.  The Twin Otter plane, operated by the Canadian company Kenn Borek Air, is specially designed to operate in extremely cold temperatures.

Research projects at the Amundsen-Scott station include monitoring long-term levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere.     The station also operates two telescopes that observe "cosmic microwave background" radiation -- the faint light signature left by the Big Bang -- to study the origins of the universe, dark energy and dark matter.
Date: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 09:04:56 +0200 (METDST)
by Martin PARRY

SYDNEY, June 18, 2014 (AFP) - Antarctic scientists warned Wednesday that a surge in tourists visiting the frozen continent and new roads and runways built to service research facilities were threatening its fragile environment.   Tourist numbers have exploded from less than 5,000 in 1990 to about 40,000 a year, according to industry figures, and most people go to the fragmented ice-free areas that make up less than one percent of Antarctica.   A growing number of research facilities are also being built, along with associated infrastructure such as fuel depots and runways, in the tiny ice-free zones.

It is these areas which contain most of the continent's wildlife and plants, yet they are among the planet's least-protected, said a study led by the Australian government-funded National Environmental Research Programme (NERP) and the Australian Antarctic Division.   "Many people think that Antarctica is well protected from threats to its biodiversity because it's isolated and no one lives there," said Justine Shaw from the NERP of the study published in the journal PLoS Biology.   "However, we show that there are threats to Antarctic biodiversity.   "Most of Antarctica is covered in ice, with less than one percent permanently ice-free," she added.   "Only 1.5 percent of this ice-free area belongs to Antarctic Specially Protected Areas under the Antarctic Treaty System, yet ice-free land is where the majority of biodiversity occurs."   Five of the distinct ice-free areas have no protection at all while all 55 of the continent's protected zones are close to sites of human activity.

- Fragile ecosystems -
Steven Chown of Monash University, another collaborator in the study, said the ice-free areas contain very simple ecosystems due to Antarctica's low species diversity.   This makes its native wildlife and plants extremely vulnerable to invasion by outside species, which can be introduced by human activity.   "Antarctica has been invaded by plants and animals, mostly grasses and insects, from other continents," he said.    "The very real current and future threats from invasions are typically located close to protected areas.    "Such threats to protected areas from invasive species have been demonstrated elsewhere in the world, and we find that Antarctica is, unfortunately, no exception."

The study said the current level of protection was "inadequate by any measure" with Shaw saying more was needed to guard against the threat posed by the booming tourism industry.   "(We need) to protect a diverse suite of native insects, plants and seabirds, many of which occur nowhere else in the world," she said.   "We also need to ensure that Antarctic protected areas are not going to be impacted by human activities, such as pollution, trampling or invasive species."   Antarctica is considered one of the last frontiers for adventurous travellers.   Most travel by sea, some paying in excess of US$20,000 for a luxury cabin in the peak period from November to March. There is also a healthy market for sightseeing flights.

Approximately 30 nations operate permanent research stations on the continent including the US, China, Russia, Australia, Britain, France and Argentina, and more are on the way.   China's state media said in December that the country was building its fourth base and a fifth was being planned.   Fellow study author Hugh Possingham, from NERP, said that without better protection "this unique and fragile ecosystem could be lost".   "Although we show that the risks to biodiversity from increasing human activity are high, they are even worse when considered together with climate change," he added.    "This combined effect provides even more incentive for a better system of area protection in Antarctica."
More ...

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

More ...

Denmark

Denmark, Greenland and the Faeroe Islands US Consular Information Sheet
March 05, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Denmark is a highly developed stable democracy with a modern economy.
Greenland is a self-governing dependency of Denmark.
>The Faroe Islands are a self-governing overseas administrative division of Denmark.
For additional information, visit the State Department page http://www.state.gov/p/eur/ci/da.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS:
Passport and visa regulations are similar for Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroes.
A valid passport is required.
U.S. citizen tourist and business travelers do not need visas for visits of up to 90 days.
That period begins when entering any of the following countries which are parties to the Schengen agreement: Austria, Belgium, The Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden.
Contact the Royal Danish Embassy at 3200 Whitehaven Street NW, Washington, DC
20008, telephone (202) 234-4300 or visit its web site at http://www.ambwashington.um.dk/en for the most current visa information.

Note:
Although European Union regulations require that non-EU visitors obtain a stamp in their passports upon initial entry to a Schengen country, many borders are not staffed with officers carrying out this function.
If an American citizen wishes to ensure that his or her entry is properly documented, it may be necessary to request a stamp at an official point of entry.
Under local law, travelers without a stamp in their passports may be questioned and asked to document the length of their stay in Schengen countries at the time of departure or at any other point during their visit, and could face possible fines or other repercussions if unable to do so.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Denmark remains largely free of terrorist incidents, however, the country shares, with the rest of Western Europe, an increased threat of Islamic terrorism.
Like other countries in the Schengen area, Denmark’s open borders with its Western European neighbors allow the possibility of terrorist groups entering and exiting the country with anonymity.
Americans are reminded to remain vigilant with regard to their personal security and to exercise caution.

Public demonstrations occasionally occur in Copenhagen and other Danish cities and are generally peaceful events.
Prior police approval is required for public demonstrations, and police oversight is routinely provided to ensure adequate security for participants and passers-by.
Nonetheless, as with any large crowd comprised of diverse groups, situations may develop which could pose a threat to public safety.
U.S. citizens are advised to avoid areas where public demonstrations are taking place.

From time to time Copenhagen may experience protest activities from young people in their attempt to defend their self-proclaimed rights to either property (club activity buildings) or other privileges provided by Danish public means.
American citizens should be aware that participation in illegal demonstrations or street riots may result in immediate imprisonment and long term bans on re-entering Denmark.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, including the Worldwide Caution , can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States, or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroes all have relatively low violent crime rates, however, non-violent crimes of opportunity have increased over the last few years, especially in Copenhagen and other major Danish cities, where tourists can become targets for pickpockets and sophisticated thieves.
Criminals frequent airports, train stations, and cruise ship quays to take advantage of weary, luggage-burdened travelers.
Thieves also operate at popular tourist attractions, shopping streets, and restaurants.
In hotel lobbies and breakfast areas, thieves take advantage of even a brief lapse in attention to snatch jackets, purses, and backpacks.
Women’s purses placed either on the backs of chairs or on the floor are typical targets for thieves.
Due to the increase of crimes of opportunity, Embassy Copenhagen has experienced a high rise in passport thefts during the summer of 2007.
Car and home break-ins are also on the rise.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends, and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

Denmark has a program to provide financial compensation to victims who suffer serious criminal injuries.
According to existing regulations, the victim must report the incident to the police within 24 hours.
Danish police routinely inform victims of serious crime of their rights to seek compensation.
The relevant forms can be obtained from the police or the Danish Victims’ Compensation Board:
Civilstyrelsen, Erstatningsnaevnet, Gyldenløvesgade 11, 1600 Copenhagen V, TEL:
(45) 33-92- 3334; FAX:
(45) 39-20-45-05; www.erstatningsnaevnet.dk; email: erstatningsnaevnet@erstatningsnaevnet.dk.
Claim processing time is a minimum of 3 months.
There is no maximum award limit.

See our information for Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Excellent medical facilities are widely available in Denmark.
In Greenland and the Faroe Islands, medical facilities are limited and evacuation is required for serious illness or injury.
Although emergency medical treatment is free of charge, the patient is charged for follow-up care.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC's website at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Denmark is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

A valid U.S. driver's license may be used while visiting Denmark, but the driver must be at least 18 years old.
Driving in Denmark is on the right side of the road.
Road signs use standard international symbols.
Many urban streets have traffic lanes reserved for public transport only.
Unless otherwise noted on traffic signs, the speed limit is 50 km/h in urban areas, 80 km/h on open roads, and 130 km/h on expressways.

Use of seat belts is mandatory for drivers and all passengers.
Children under three years of age must be secured with approved safety equipment appropriate to the child's age, size, and weight.
Children from three to six years of age may use approved child or booster seats instead of seat belts.

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is considered a very serious offense.
The rules are stringently enforced, and violations can result in stiff fines and possible jail sentences.

Copenhagen, the capital and largest city in Denmark, has an extensive and efficient public transportation system.
Trains and buses connect Copenhagen with other major cities in Denmark and to Norway, Sweden, and Germany.
Bicycles are also a common mode of transportation in Denmark.
Passengers exiting public or tourist buses, as well as tourists driving rental cars, should watch for bicycles on their designated paths, which are usually located between the pedestrian sidewalks and the traffic lanes.

Danish expressways, highways, and secondary roads are of high quality and connect all areas of the country.
It is possible to drive from the northern tip of Denmark to the German border in the south in just four hours.
Greenland has no established road system, and domestic travel is performed by foot, boat, or by air.
The majority of the Faroe Islands are connected by bridges or serviced by boat.
Although the largest islands have roads, most domestic travel is done on foot, horseback, boat, or by air.

The emergency telephone number for police/fire/ambulance in Denmark and the Faroe Islands is 112.
In Greenland contact the local police.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
Visit the web site of the country’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety at http://www.denmark.org.
See also additional information on driving in Denmark at http://www.trafikken.dk/trafikken.asp?page=company&objno=7.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Denmark’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for the oversight of Denmark’s air carrier operations.
This rating applies to Greenland and the Faroe Islands as well.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
The official unit of currency in Denmark is the Danish krone.
ATM machines are widely available throughout Denmark.
Please see our information on customs regulations.

For information concerning the importation of pets into Denmark, please visit the following website:
http://www.foedevarestyrelsen.dk.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protection available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Denmark’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Denmark are severe and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in illicit sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information, see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Denmark are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site, https://travelregistration.state.gov, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Denmark.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located at Dag Hammarskjolds Alle 24; 2100 Copenhagen, telephone: (45) 33-41-71-00; Embassy fax: (45) 35-43-02-23; Consular Section fax: (45) 35-38-96-16; After-hours emergency telephone: (45) 35-55-92-70.
Information is also available via the U.S. Embassy’s web site at http://denmark.usembassy.gov/.
The United States has no consular presence in Greenland or the Faroe Islands.
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated August 23, 2007 to update the sections on Entry Requirements and Information for Victims of Crime.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat 5 Jan 2020
Source: Food Safety News [edited]

Several people part of a _Salmonella_ outbreak in Denmark tasted or ate raw or undercooked sausage, according to a recently published study. In November 2018, an outbreak of monophasic _Salmonella_ Typhimurium was detected. It sickened at least 49 people across the country.

A traditional form of raw Danish pork sausage called medister sausage was believed to be the source of illnesses. Product samples were negative for _Salmonella_, and investigations at the production site did not reveal the source of contamination. Medister sausage is often served in the late autumn months and Christmas season. It is a long, thick sausage made from ground pork, seasoned and stuffed into casings. Due to a control program, _Salmonella_ Enteritidis is all but eliminated in Danish broiler poultry and egg production, but _Salmonella_ Typhimurium still exists in pigs and pork.

In mid-November 2018, Statens Serum Institut (SSI) noted 8 cases of monophasic _Salmonella_ Typhimurium belonging to the same WGS cluster. The sequence type (ST) 5296 had not been detected before but was closely related to ST 34, which is often found in pork products.

In 8 initial hypothesis-generating interviews, 7 people said they had eaten a certain type of classic Danish raw pork sausage known as medister sausage, according to a study published in the journal Epidemiology and Infection. The median age was 65 years with a range from 11 months to 97 years, and 53 percent were male. Seven of 49 cases were children less than 18 years of age. 30 people were hospitalized, and 13 reported bloody diarrhea as one of the symptoms. There were no deaths. The onset date of illness was known for 38 of 49 patients and was between 14 Oct 2018, and 17 Jan 2019.

Almost all interviewed patients had eaten fresh pork, and 28 of them ate medister sausage in the week prior to becoming ill with Salmonella. Six patients said they had partly eaten the medister sausage raw or undercooked. Five people said they had failed to boil it prior to frying as is normally recommended on packages and by the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration (DVFA). In one family, a child had eaten medister sausage that was not thoroughly cooked.

"Consumers have to make sure that pork is handled correctly, in particular when it comes to raw products that need to be thoroughly cooked before consumption. Tasting raw meat or eating undercooked pork meat should be discouraged," said researchers.

Traceback investigations pointed to one manufacturer of minced meat and prepared meat products. A total of 90 batches of ground meat and of prepared meat, including 9 batches of medister sausage, were analyzed for _Salmonella_. Only one sample from a batch of minced pork patty sampled in January 2019 found _Salmonella_, but it was not related to the outbreak strain. Medister sausages were packed at the production site, and no handling of the sausage took place at supermarket level.

"No breaches in procedures or obvious incidents that could explain the presence of a specific type of _Salmonella_ in multiple batches of medister sausage in a prolonged period of several weeks were identified," according to researchers. The DVFA also investigated results of routine sampling at the slaughterhouse providing meat to the manufacturer. As part of mandatory sampling, one of every 1000 carcasses were swap sampled and analyzed for _Salmonella_. It was detected 8 times in these samples, but none were identical to the outbreak strain.

Because shelf life of medister sausage is short, and fresh meat is used for production, none of the raw material meat used to produce the batches suspected of having caused illness was available from the manufacturer by the time the outbreak was detected and investigation started. Researchers said it was likely the bacteria might be present in low numbers and unevenly distributed in the raw material, so the chance of detecting it at sampling might be limited. High fat content may also increase thermal resistance of bacteria so they are not fully eliminated by heating. "It is also likely that only a low _Salmonella_ dose is sufficient for patients to become ill, as medister sausage is a product with a high content of fat (10 to 20 percent) that protects the bacteria past the barrier of the gastric acid."

Samples of medister sausage from more manufacturers, as part of routine surveillance and companies own checks, were positive for Salmonella during the outbreak period. This includes finding the serovars Mbandaka, Typhimurium, and its monophasic variant, which was different from the outbreak strain.  [Byline: Joe Whitworth]
===================
[By monophasic, it is meant that the organism does not have the
complete set of flagellar serotypes. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Thu 24 Oct 2019
Source: Eurosurveillance 2019, 24(43) [edited]

[ref: Agergaard CN, Rosenstierne MW, Boedker R, et al. New tick-borne encephalitis virus hot spot in Northern Zealand, Denmark, October 2019. Euro Surveill. 2019; 24(43): pii=1900639]
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Abstract
--------
Tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a member of the family Flaviviridae, genus _Flavivirus_, causes tickborne encephalitis (TBE). In Denmark, TBE is endemic only on the island of Bornholm, with an incidence of 4 per 100 000 inhabitants per year [1,2]. Here we report 3 clinical cases of TBE in patients hospitalised within a month [June/July 2019] and all residing at the boundary of the same forest, Tisvilde Hegn [Capital Region], in Northern Zealand.

Discussion
----------
The incidence of TBE has been increasing in Denmark, in its neighbouring countries as well and in the rest of Europe in recent years, which mirrors the increased abundance of ticks, the increased geographic spread and potentially climate changes [8-11]. The vector for the European virus subtype, TBEV-Eu, is _Ixodes ricinus_, which is prevalent in most of Europe and the dominant tick species in Denmark (greater than 90%) [12]. In 2009, 2 clinical cases of TBE were reported outside Bornholm and TBEV was detected in Northern Zealand in ticks collected in the forest of Tokkekebb Hegn, which is 40 km [25 mi] south east of Tisvilde Hegn, in 2009, 2010, and 2011 [4,5]. Surprisingly, TBEV was no longer detected in the same area in Tokkekoeb Hegn during 2016 and 2017 [13]. In 2018, another 2 human cases of TBE outside Bornholm were identified on the Island of Funen and in Jutland, respectively, but no new micro foci of TBEV has been localized [14], (data not shown).

All 3 patients presented here live close to Tisvilde Hegn in Northern Zealand, and had typical biphasic disease starting with fever, gastrointestinal or influenza-like symptoms and fatigue, followed by a few days of recovery before clinical meningitis/meningoencephalitis at hospitalisation and neurologic sequelae in terms of primarily fatigue and dizziness.

Subsequent collection of _I. ricinus_ ticks from a part of Tisvilde Hegn surrounding a well-visited forest playground, where Case 3 recalled a tick bite, identified a specific area adjacent to the playground to be an acute, new, high-risk TBEV micro-focus in Northern Zealand. The estimated high prevalence of TBEV is 8% at the centre of the focus which exceeds recent prevalence estimates of 0.6% from endemic Bornholm, as well as Denmark's neighbouring countries and most European countries [4,5,8,10,11,13,15]. The presence of the virus in nymphs, but not adult ticks, and the molecular evolutionary analyses of the homogeneous TBEV sequences suggests a single TBEV introduction in 2019, probably by migrating birds from Norway. Tisvilde Hegn and the forest playground is well-visited by Danish and international tourists, and containment measures such as fencing, grass cutting and signage along the playground's eastern side have been made in order to minimise the risk of further infections and spreading.
====================
[The complete article including figures, tables, and references is available at the source URL above.  There were previous reports of human cases TBE virus infection in Denmark in 2009 and again in 2018. The authors note that TBE virus was not found in ticks in the area in 2016 and 2018, nor were any human cases identified there then. They speculate that the virus was introduced by ticks on migratory birds.

TBE is caused by 3 different subtypes of tick borne encephalitis virus: Western European TBE virus, Far Eastern TBE virus, and Siberian TBE virus. Western European TBE (also known as Central European encephalitis) is endemic in western and central European countries and is expanding its range. - ProMED Mod.TY]

Date: Fri 26 Jul 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]
<https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/07/wgs-project-helps-denmark-uncover-campylobacter-outbreak/>

Fifty people are ill in Denmark from campylobacteriosis after eating chicken meat but authorities believe the actual number of patients may be much higher. Statens Serum Institut (SSI), Danish Veterinary and Food Administration (Fødevarestyrelsen) and DTU Food -- National Food Institute are investigating the _Campylobacter jejuni_ outbreak. _Campylobacter_ is the main cause of bacterial intestinal infections in Denmark and more than 4500 cases were registered in 2018. The same type of _Campylobacter_, sequence type 122, identified in patients by whole genome sequencing has also been found in chicken meat from one slaughterhouse, named as HKScan in Vinderup, a town in North-western Jutland.

HKScan is a Nordic meat and meals company employing more than 600 people in Denmark at production units in Vinderup and Skovsgaard. The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration is continuing to investigate and officials have been sent to help the company track and eliminate the source of infection. Those sick are 20 women and 30 men aged 14 to 87 with a median age of 49 years. As part of a project this year [2019] involving the Clinical Microbiology Department (KMA) in Aalborg, the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration and SSI; _Campylobacter_ isolates from patients diagnosed in Aalborg since March 2019 have been collected, sent to SSI and whole genome sequenced. _Campylobacter_ isolates are not routinely submitted and sequenced so the outbreak has been detected due to the project and may otherwise have gone unnoticed. In the past it has been difficult to detect and solve such outbreaks.

Some isolates also come from other KMA's as part of the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) project. Steen Ethelberg, a senior scientist at SSI, said patients have fallen sick over a couple of months and are still being reported. "The most recent estimate for how many more cases are in the population relative to the diagnosed laboratory controlled cases is a factor of 12 so there would be more cases that are actually ill in any outbreak," he told Food Safety News. "The reason we know about this outbreak is because we are running a project in one part of the country where all the patient isolates are being collected and subjected to whole genome sequencing.

Since the outbreak is mainly based on one of the 10 labs only you would expect patients all over the country. It seems likely that there could be more cases and we also have some smaller clusters detected in the project." Ethelberg said the project is trying to see how WGS may be helpful in understanding _Campylobacter_. "It is about collecting patient isolates from one lab and at the same time analysing chicken meat and subjecting the _Campylobacter_ isolates in chicken meat to WGS and then comparing the sequences. In the project we are learning about the aetiology of _Campylobacter_ but we also see outbreaks in real time.

This outbreak is big enough that we thought it should be reported to the public but in a sense it is not so different because we know many people are ill from _Campylobacter_ from poultry products." The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration has been taking samples for _Campylobacter_ of various cuts of chicken from different stores and these have been sequenced. Annette Perge, from the agency, told Food Safety News that it was still too early to conclude the outbreak was over. "The slaughterhouse produces both fresh and frozen products hence we can't rule out that products may still be on the market or bought and stored frozen at private households.

Based on patient interviews it has not been possible to point out specific products, places of purchase, or periods of purchase," she said. "Furthermore there is no legal requirements stating that _Campylobacter_ is prohibited in poultry meat. However even without legal requirements foods used as intended should not result in illness. The slaughterhouse is a large establishment and their products are sold at all the major Danish retail chains." The agency does not yet know if a link was limited to one farm or establishment, according to Perge. "The link between food isolates and routine samples taken at the slaughterhouse, samples of thigh skin from chickens taken routinely for analyses, and the patient isolates was seen when comparing whole genome sequencing results.

However it has not been possible to verify the link through interview with patients. We have no indication that this outbreak is due to a contamination persisting in the slaughterhouse. They have been allowed to continue production. They are assisting us in any way possible to solve the case." Perge said samples from chickens from a specific farm showed a close resemblance to the patients. "The farm has been visited by the audit team from the slaughterhouse and corrections to practices have been made. At the moment no chickens are delivered for slaughter as they are not yet old enough. Meat from chickens slaughtered from that farm will be tested for _Campylobacter_ and eventual isolates will be sequenced and compared to the outbreak strain. If the meat contains larger numbers of _Campylobacter_, the use of the meat will be restricted." [Byline: Joe Whitworth]
========================
[The source of the outbreak may we'll be chicken, a common vehicle for this enteric pathogen. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Denmark:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/111>]
Date: Tue 28 May 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]
<https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/05/ongoing-yersinia-outbreak-traced-to-fresh-spinach-more-than-50-sick/>

An outbreak of yersiniosis in Denmark and Sweden with more than 50 cases has been linked to fresh spinach. Statens Serum Institut, a public health research institute in Denmark, reports 20 people have been infected in the country. One person needed hospital treatment. The Public Health Agency of Sweden has recorded 37 confirmed cases. In March 2019, 20 cases of _Yersinia enterocolitica_ [infection] were found in Denmark. There were 11 women and 9 men aged 2 to 74 years old, with most cases aged 20 to 30. Patients were distributed throughout Denmark in Hovedstaden, Sjaelland, Syddanmark, Midtjylland, and Nordjylland.

The link to spinach was based on a case control study and the traceback investigation, which indicated spinach from Italy was responsible. In March 2019, most fresh spinach in Denmark comes from Spain or Italy. No specific batch of product was found to be the source of the outbreak and no product testing was conducted. After interviews with patients, Statens Serum Institut did a study in which healthy people of the same gender and age, and who lived in the same municipality as those sick, were asked if they had eaten certain foods that many of the yersiniosis patients ate. The study showed patients had consumed fresh spinach to a far greater extent than the control people.

The investigation found spinach was bought in Netto and a supermarket chain in Sweden. Danish officials said the implicated product is no longer on the market because the country had not seen any cases since March 2019 and given duration of the outbreak it was likely only one batch that was contaminated. The cause of the outbreak was _Yersinia enterocolitica_ serotype O3, biotype 4. Whole genome sequencing found all patients were infected with the same bacterial strain. "Although the outbreak is over, we can use this knowledge to prevent it from happening again. It is also a good reason to remind consumers that leafy greens always must be washed thoroughly before eating," said Luise Müller, an epidemiologist from Statens Serum Institut.

Denmark sees about 400 _Yersinia enterocolitica_ cases a year, with 366 having been reported in 2018. In Sweden, the increase in _Yersinia_ infections started in March [2019] and the 37 cases were from across the country. 7 men and 20 women with an age range from 6 to 62 years fell ill. Swedish officials said they were not able to analyse food samples since no case had spinach left at home and their case-control study did not identify a specific food item. Infection with yersinia is relatively rare in Sweden, with between 200 to 300 cases reported annually. Previous outbreaks have been caused by raw or undercooked meat consumption and contaminated ready-to-eat vegetables.

After an incubation period of 3 to 7 days, symptoms includes fever, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain in the right lower part of the abdomen. [byline: Joe Whitworth]
========================
[It is not specifically stated whether the strains in Denmark and Sweden are genetically related. The 2 species of _Yersinia_ associated with foodborne disease are _pseudotuberculosis_ and _enterocolitica_. The latter species can be associated with abdominal pain as a hallmark symptom. As a mesenteric lymphadenitis, yersiniosis can mimic appendicitis but may also cause infections of other sites, such as wounds, joints, and the urinary tract.

As noted in the FDA "Bad Bug Book" (<https://wayback.archive-it.org/7993/20170406190140/https://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/CausesOfIllnessBadBugBook/ucm070040.htm>, "Strains of _Y. enterocolitica_ can be found in meats (pork, beef, lamb, etc.), oysters, fish, and raw milk.

The exact cause of the food contamination is unknown. However, the prevalence of this organism in soil, water, and animals, such as beavers, pigs, and squirrels, offers ample opportunities for it to enter our food supply. Poor sanitation and improper sterilization techniques by food handlers, including improper storage, cannot be overlooked as contributing to contamination." In addition, some strains of these organisms can be associated with blood transfusion-associated illnesses due to an ability to grow at refrigerator temperatures. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Denmark: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/111>
Sweden: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/108>]
Date: Wed 2 May 2019
Source: CPH Post [edited]

A bacterial infection found in the intestines of many animals and common in pigs, _Yersinia enterocolitica_, has been found in 18 Danes since 30 Mar 2019. So far, 10 women and 8 men aged 2-74 from all over Denmark have been diagnosed with the rare infection, reported BT.  "Right now, we have an outbreak of the bacterium _Yersinia enterocolitica_. It is a disease like salmonella that typically infects people via food," said Luise Muller from the State Serum Institute (SSI).

The disease is not common in Denmark. Over the last 5 years, there have only been 3 outbreaks. SSI is trying to localise the source of the infection by looking for common threads in the infected people's diet.

Typical symptoms are generally feeling under the weather, violent stomach pains, fever, and diarrhoea. The incubation period is usually 3-7 days. "The best advice we can give people is to cook meat thoroughly and wash fruit and vegetables carefully," said Muller.

Sweden has seen a similar outbreak, and the Danish and Swedish authorities are working together to map the infection.

In the 1980s, the infection used to be just as common as salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis, but it has become rarer nowadays. In 2014 there were 414 registered cases.  [Byline: Stephen Gadd]
==========================
[The 2 species of _Yersinia_ associated with food-borne disease are _pseudotuberculosis_ and _enterocolitica_. The latter species can be associated with abdominal pain as a hallmark symptom. As a mesenteric lymphadenitis, yersiniosis can mimic appendicitis but may also cause infections of other sites, such as wounds, joints, and the urinary tract.

As noted in the FDA "Bad Bug Book" (<https://wayback.archive-it.org/7993/20170406190140/https://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/CausesOfIllnessBadBugBook/ucm070040.htm>), "Strains of _Y. enterocolitica_ can be found in meats (pork, beef, lamb, etc.), oysters, fish, and raw milk. The exact cause of the food contamination is unknown. However, the prevalence of this organism in soil, water, and animals, such as beavers, pigs, and squirrels, offers ample opportunities for it to enter our food supply. Poor sanitation and improper sterilization techniques by food handlers, including improper storage, cannot be overlooked as contributing to contamination."

Additionally, some strains of these organisms can be associated with blood transfusion-associated illnesses due to an ability to grow at refrigerator temperatures. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
More ...

Mauritania

Mauritania US Consular Information Sheet
September 23, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Mauritania is a developing country in northwestern Africa.
Arabic is the official language, but French is widely used and several local languages are als
spoken.
Tourist facilities in the capital, Nouakchott, are adequate, but limited or non-existent elsewhere.
Read the Department of State Background Notes on Mauritania for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport and a visa are required, as is evidence of a yellow fever vaccination.
For the most current visa information, contact the Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, 2129 Leroy Place NW, Washington, DC
20008, tel. (202) 232-5700, or the Mauritanian Permanent Mission to the UN, 211 East 43rd Street, Suite 2000, New York, NY 10017, telephone (212) 986-7963 or 8189, or e-mail Mauritania@un.int.
Overseas, inquiries should be made at the nearest Mauritanian embassy or consulate.

See our information on dual nationality, the prevention of international child abduction and Customs regulations.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
There is increasing activity by the terrorist group Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) in Mauritania.
On December 24, 2007, terrorists shot and killed four French tourists and wounded a fifth near the town of Aleg, in southeastern Mauritania.
On December 26, 2007, terrorists killed four soldiers near the town of El Ghallaouiya in northern Mauritania.
These two attacks were followed by an attack on the Israeli Embassy and an adjoining nightclub frequented by westerners early in the morning of February 1, 2008.
The perpetrators of these attacks are believed to be linked to AQIM.
These are the first attacks that have occurred in Mauritania since June 2005, when members of the terrorist group GSPC (now known as AQIM) attacked a military outpost based at Lemgheity, near the Algerian and Malian borders.
In the attack, they killed or wounded about 35 soldiers.
Travelers should avoid all non-essential travel to the Hodh El Charghi region of southeastern Mauritania due to increased AQIM activities in the border area.
Official Americans continue to travel to the town of Atar, although AQIM has also talked about targeting Westerners there.
Travelers should check http://mauritania.usembassy.gov for current Consular Warden messages concerning Mauritania.

Travelers should exercise prudence and caution when traveling in Mauritania.
They should not venture outside of urban areas unless in a convoy and accompanied by an experienced guide, and even then only if equipped with sturdy vehicles and ample provisions.
The U.S. Embassy in Nouakchott has received reports of banditry and smuggling in the more remote parts of Mauritania.
Landmines also remain a danger along the border with the Western Sahara and travelers should cross only at designated border posts.
The U.S. Embassy recommends that travelers avoid travel in regions north and east of Zouerate, Ouadane, and Tichit unless with a government escort.
Travelers planning overland trips from Mauritania to Morocco, Algeria, Senegal or Mali should check with the U.S. Embassy in Nouakchott before setting out.
For more information about travel in Mauritania, please see the section “Traffic Safety and Road Conditions” below.

The Mauritanian military led a bloodless coup on August 6, 2008.
There has been increased political unrest following the coup, but no violence.
There have also been increased political gatherings and street demonstrations.
The police have been using tear gas to break up some anti-coup demonstrations.
An increased police presence and additional vehicle controls may also be expected.
U.S. citizens should avoid large crowds and maintain security awareness at all times.

In Nouakchott and other major cities in Mauritania, there is an increased security presence and additional checkpoints.
Police routinely conduct road blocks at which they may ask for proof of identity and drivers’ licenses.
These checkpoints should be respected.
Americans visiting Mauritania should be prepared for such inquiries and carry their identification cards at all times.
It is best to drive cautiously and be prepared to stop at short notice.

American citizens should be aware of their surroundings at all times and maintain good personal security practices, including always locking their homes and cars.
They should avoid established patterns and take care not to draw attention to themselves.
When going out, they should avoid being part of large, highly visible groups of Westerners and when in restaurants or cafes, avoid sitting in areas that are easily visible from the street.

Although U.S. citizens are generally welcomed in Mauritania, there were reports of anti-American incidents such as threats and stoning of vehicles, following the 1998 U.S.- and British-led intervention in Iraq, and demonstrations outside the Embassy during the 2003 U.S. intervention in Iraq.
Some Muslim extremists have occasionally perceived Christian non-governmental organizations as a threat.
However, local authorities closely monitor political violence and religious extremist groups.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affair’s web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Public Announcements, including the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada or, for other callers, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. eastern time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
Crime in Mauritania is moderate but steadily increasing.
Most incidents occur in the cities and larger towns, and are petty crimes such as pick pocketing and the theft of improperly secured and openly visible valuables left in vehicles.
Most criminal activity occurs at night and walking alone at night is not advisable.
Residential burglaries and robberies, particularly at the beaches in Nouakchott, are not uncommon.
In Nouakchott, travelers should avoid the beach at night.
During the day, beach-goers should travel in large groups or stay in popular areas because of the increase in the number of thefts and robberies, some involving injury to victims, reported there in the past several years.
Violent crimes and crimes involving the use of weapons are rare, but increasing.
Rapes and assaults have occurred and, in some instances, involved the American community.
Foreign tourists, including Americans, might be targeted for kidnapping in Mauritania.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you in finding appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends, and explain how funds can be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical facilities in Mauritania are limited.
There are few modern clinics or hospitals beyond the capital and a few major towns.
At local pharmacies, some medicines are difficult to obtain; travelers are advised to bring their own supplies.

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease.
Chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum malaria is a severe form of the disease that is found in many parts of western Africa, including Mauritania.
Because travelers to Mauritania are at high risk for contracting malaria, they should take one of the following anti-malarial drugs:
mefloquine (Lariam™), doxycycline, or atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone™).
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have determined that a traveler who is on an appropriate anti-malarial drug has a greatly reduced chance of contracting the disease.
In addition, other personal protective measures, such as the use of insect repellents, may help to reduce malaria risk.
Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area and up to one year after returning home should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what anti-malarial drugs they have been taking.
For additional information on malaria, protection from insect bites, and anti-malarial drugs, please visit the CDC travelers’ health web site at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Mauritania is provided for general reference only and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Public transportation is not safe and road conditions in Mauritania are generally poor, particularly in the interior.
Overland travel is difficult and roadside assistance is almost nonexistent.
The country’s size and harsh climate make road maintenance and repair especially problematic.
Mauritania has only about 2,070 km (1,286 miles) of surfaced roads, 710 km (441 miles) of unsurfaced roads, and 5,140 km (3,194 miles) of unimproved tracks.
Drivers should not offer rides to hitchhikers, nor should visitors to Mauritania accept rides offered by strangers.


The traditional route to Nouadhibou, prior to the completion of a paved road, was along the beach during low tide.
Some travelers continue to use this route, as do visitors to coastal fishing villages and other points of interest, and smugglers and others who try to avoid the security checkpoints that are often established along the asphalt roads.
Pedestrian visitors to the beach should exercise caution because of the beach’s use as a route for motorized vehicles.

U.S. citizens traveling overland for long distances in Mauritania should travel in convoys and be sure to have suitable four-wheel drive vehicles, a local guide, an adequate supply of water and food, and a second fuel reservoir.
Multiple vehicles are recommended in case of breakdown.
A Global Position Satellite (GPS) receiver and satellite phone are essential when traveling in remote areas.
Visitors are urged not to travel alone into the desert.

Driving in Mauritania is treacherous, and we encourage travelers to hire a trained local driver.
Traffic patterns differ considerably from American-style “rules of the road,” and many Mauritanians drive without regard to traffic signs or rules.
Roadway obstructions and hazards caused by drifting sand, animals, and poor roads often plague motorists; when combined with the number of untrained drivers and poorly maintained vehicles, heightened caution is imperative at all times.
Drivers should be alert to conditions and always wear their seat belts.
Motorcycle and bicycle riders should wear helmets and protective clothing.
Nighttime driving is discouraged.

The telecommunications infrastructure is limited and cellular telephone coverage is not wide spread.
For those traveling outside the major urban areas, it is recommended to have a satellite telephone readily available.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Mauritania, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Mauritania’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s internet website at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Mauritanian customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary import or export of items such as firearms, narcotics, alcoholic drinks and pork products.
Contact the Embassy of Mauritania in Washington, DC for specific information regarding customs regulations.

The local currency is the ouguiya, and it may not be imported or exported.
Credit cards can be used only at a few hotels in the capital, Nouakchott, and the northwestern city of Nouadhibou.
ATM machines are available only in Nouakchott.
Major foreign currencies are changeable in banks and numerous currency exchanges; however, this service is not always available without advanced notice or prior arrangement.
There is a risk of getting fraudulent bank notes even from banks which often do not have the security means to detect fake bank notes.
Furthermore, credit card fraud is a problem, so it is strongly advisable to pay hotel bills in cash.

Islamic ideals and beliefs in the country encourage conservative dress.
Sleeved garments and below-the-knee skirts are recommended, and people should avoid wearing shorts.
Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Mauritania’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession or use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Mauritania are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Mauritania are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Mauritania. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located between the Presidency building and the Spanish Embassy on Rue Abdallaye.
The postal address is B.P. 222, Nouakchott, telephone (222) 525-2660/2663, 525-1141/45, or 525-3038 (ext. 5441), and fax (222) 525-1592.
The Consular Section may be contacted by e-mail at ConsularNKC@state.gov
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated April 29, 2008, to update the section on Safety and Security.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Mon 30 Apr 2018
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/crimean-congo-hemorrhagic-fever-case-reported-mauritania-28755/>

The Mauritania Ministry of Health has reported a confirmed case of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever [CCHF] in Ould Yengé commune, Guidimaka region located in the southern-most part of the country. The case-patient is a 58-year-old male herder from Elghabra locality who became ill on [16 Apr 2018] (reportedly) after tending to a sick cow days earlier. He presented to a private clinic the same day [16 Apr 2018] with high fever, arthralgia and headache. He was admitted, managed for an unspecified medical condition and discharged on [18 Apr 2018].

The following day [19 Apr 2018], he developed bleeding from the gums and nose, and was admitted to the regional hospital where he was transfused and subsequently discharged on [20 Apr 2018], following an apparent clinical improvement. On [21 Apr 2018], the case-patient's health deteriorated and he was taken to Guerou health centre, from where he was immediately referred to Cheikh Zayed hospital in Nouakchott on [22 Apr 2018].

A blood specimen was obtained and shipped to the national public health laboratory. The test result released on [24 Apr 2018] was IgM positive for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever. A total of 32 close contacts, including 10 health workers and 4 family members, have been listed and are being followed up. Efforts to identify other close contacts are ongoing.

The case-patient used public transportation and a taxi at various stages of his movement during the course of illness. Preliminary investigations also established that all the 4 healthcare facilities that managed the case-patient did not apply appropriate infection prevention and control measures, potentially indicating a higher number of contacts.

According to the WHO, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever is a widespread disease caused by a tick-borne virus (_Nairovirus_) of the _Bunyaviridae_ family. The CCHF virus causes severe viral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks, with a case fatality rate of 10-40 percent. CCHF is endemic in Africa, the Balkans, the Middle East and Asian countries south of the 50th parallel north - the geographical limit of the principal tick vector.

The hosts of the CCHF virus include a wide range of wild and domestic animals such as cattle, sheep and goats. Animals become infected by the bite of infected ticks and the virus remains in their bloodstream for about one week after infection, allowing the tick-animal-tick cycle to continue when another tick bites.

Although a number of tick genera are capable of becoming infected with CCHF virus, ticks of the genus _Hyalomma_ are the principal vector. The CCHF virus is transmitted to people either by tick bites or through contact with infected animal blood or tissues during and immediately after slaughter. The majority of cases have occurred in people involved in the livestock industry, such as agricultural workers, slaughterhouse workers and veterinarians. Human-to-human transmission is possible.
=======================
[There is need to emphasize inter-sectoral collaboration involving health, veterinary and entomology/environmental services to map the areas of vector distribution. Furthermore, awareness messages among the high exposure groups should be widespread as CCHF vector propagates from May onwards leading to higher transmission rates in summer. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Guidimaka Region, Mauritania: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/25044>]
Date: Mon 27 Nov 2017
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

Following cases of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) reported this spring and summer [2017], the Mauritania Ministry of Health has reported an addition CCHF case last week [week ending Sun 26 Nov 2017] in a 48-year-old male farmer from Haye Sakin community in Dar Nairn, at the outskirt of the capital city, Nouakchott. He fell sick on the [11 Nov 2017] and was later treated and discharged last week.  The frequency of these events affirms the relative prevalence of the pathogen and the reservoir and vector for CCHF virus (Hyalomma ticks) in the country.

According to the WHO, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a widespread disease caused by a tick-borne virus (Nairovirus) of the _Bunyaviridae_ family. The CCHF virus causes severe viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks, with a case fatality rate of 10-40 percent.  CCHF is endemic in Africa, the Balkans, the Middle East and Asian countries south of the 50th parallel north - the geographical limit of the principal tick vector. The hosts of the CCHF virus include a wide range of wild and domestic animals such as cattle, sheep and goats.

Animals become infected by the bite of infected ticks and the virus remains in their bloodstream for about one week after infection, allowing the tick-animal-tick cycle to continue when another tick bites. Although a number of tick genera are capable of becoming infected with CCHF virus, ticks of the genus _Hyalomma_ are the principal vector.

The CCHF virus is transmitted to people either by tick bites or through contact with infected animal blood or tissues during and immediately after slaughter. The majority of cases have occurred in people involved in the livestock industry, such as agricultural workers, slaughterhouse workers and veterinarians. Human-to-human transmission is possible.
=========================
[Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), an acute viral disease in humans, is characterized by extensive ecchymoses, bleeding, and hepatic dysfunction and is associated with a 30 percent case-fatality ratio (World Health Organization Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever. Fact sheet no. 208. Geneva: the Organization; 1998). It is caused by CCHF virus (genus _Nairovirus_, family _Bunyaviridae_).

CCHF is a zoonosis transmitted to large and small mammals and birds by ticks. Although the virus has been isolated from several genera and species of ixodid ticks, the main group of vectors involved in CCHF virus transmission appears to be ticks of the genus _Hyalomma_ (Hoogstraal H. The epidemiology of tick-borne Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Asia, Europe, and Africa. J Med Entomol. 1979;15(4):307-417.). Immature ticks acquire the virus by feeding on infected small vertebrates. Once infected, they remain infected throughout their development and, when they are mature, transmit the infection to large animals, such as livestock. Transovarian transmission has also been demonstrated.

The circulation of CCHF virus and the high prevalence of infected animals and ticks have been well documented in Mauritanian farming areas since 1983 (Gonzalez JP, LeGuenno B, Guillaud M, Wilson ML. A fatal case of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Mauritania: virological and serological evidence suggesting epidemic transmission. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1990;84(4):573-6).

Mauritania experienced a fairly large CCHF outbreak in 2003, involving 38 cases with a case fatality rate of 28.6 percent. Over 90 percent of the cases (35/38) were resident in Nouakchott. In 2017, the WHO reported confirmation of a 3rd CCHF case in Boutilimit as well as in 2 patients referred from Mauritania to Dakar, Senegal who tested positive between May and June 2017. These cases had also originated from the capital city Nouakchott. This may be indicative of the relative prevalence of the reservoir and vector for the CCHF virus (Hyalomma ticks) in the country.

Even though the country has established adequate diagnostic capacity, which facilitated rapid confirmation of cases; the national authorities and partners need to carry out extensive outbreak investigations, including seroprevalence studies, to determine the potential risk for continued CCHF outbreaks in humans and institute effective prevention and control measures, with a strong animal health component  (<http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/258794/1/OEW34-192582017.pdf>).

The case reported in this report is a farmer admitted in early
November [2017], however no exposure history is mentioned. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map Nouakchott, Nouakchott, Mauritania:
Date: 28 Aug 2017
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

On 24 Aug 2017, the Mauritania Ministry of Health notified WHO of a confirmed case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in a 47-year-old shepherd, from Arafat Village in Mohammedia, Boutilimit Prefecture, located about 150 km southeast of the capital, Nouakchott.

In May 2017, health officials reported 2 imported cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Senegal imported from Mauritania. A 3rd imported case was reported in June 2017.

He developed headache, muscle and joints pains and diarrhea on 20 Aug 2017 and sought medical attention. He was treated with anti-malarial medicines and analgesics.

After 2 days, he returned for medical care as his condition worsened. He was tested for CCHF because of bleeding manifestations and was IgM positive for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The patient is still hospitalized and in stable clinical condition.

Mauritania experienced a fairly large CCHF outbreak in 2003, involving 38 cases with a case fatality rate of 28.6 percent. According to the WHO, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a widespread disease caused by a tick-borne virus (Nairovirus) of the Bunyaviridae family. The CCHF virus causes severe viral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks, with a case fatality rate of 10-40 percent.

CCHF is endemic in Africa, the Balkans, the Middle East and Asian countries south of the 50th parallel north, the geographical limit of the principal tick vector. The hosts of the CCHF virus include a wide range of wild and domestic animals such as cattle, sheep and goats.

Animals become infected by the bite of infected ticks, and the virus remains in their bloodstream for about one week after infection, allowing the tick-animal-tick cycle to continue when another tick bites. Although a number of tick genera are capable of becoming infected with CCHF virus, ticks of the genus _Hyalomma_ are the principal vectors.

The CCHF virus is transmitted to people either by tick bites or through contact with infected animal blood or tissues during and immediately after slaughter. The majority of cases have occurred in people involved in the livestock industry, such as agricultural workers, slaughterhouse workers and veterinarians. Human-to-human transmission is possible.  [Byline:  Robert Herriman]
==================
[An outbreak of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever was documented in Nouakchott, the capital of Mauritania in 2003. The index case was detected on 18 Feb 2003. By 21 Mar 2003, the Ministry of Health of Mauritania had reported a total of 35 cases (18 laboratory confirmed) of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF), including 6 deaths [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever - Mauritania (04) http://promedmail.org/post/20030324.0732].

In the period from February to August 2003, 38 persons were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus; 35 of these persons were residents of Nouakchott. The 1st patient was a young woman who became ill shortly after butchering a goat. She transmitted the infection to 15 persons in the hospital where she was admitted and 4 members of her family. In Nouakchott, 2 disease clusters and 11 isolated cases were identified. Of the patients not infected by the 1st case-patient, almost half were butchers, which suggests that the primary mode of animal-to-human transmission was direct contact with blood of infected animals.

Cattle heavily infested with ticks were more likely to be CCHFV seropositive, and vector control to reduce the tick burden can result in reduced seroprevalence. Cattle are noted as the most sensitive indicator of low-level CCHFV circulation because they tend to be highly infested with _Hyalomma_ spp. ticks, which are the most common vectors of CCHF  [<http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0004210>].

The circulation of CCHF virus and the high prevalence of infected animals and ticks have been well documented in Mauritanian farming areas since 1983 [Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Rift Valley fever in south-eastern Mauritania. Saluzzo JF, Digoutte JP, Camicas JL, Chauvancy G Lancet. 1985 Jan 12; 1(8420):116].

Since then, this is the latest case reported from that country, with history of exposure to livestock. - ProMed Mod.UBA]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/13859>.]
Date: Sat 3 Jun 2017, 11:08 AM
Source: Alakhbar [in French, trans. Mod.AB, edited]

A suspected case of Rift Valley fever (RVF) was discovered at the Nouakchott Hospital Center according to a source for Alakhbar.

The patient is a 37-year-old Mauritanian. He was isolated upon his arrival at the hospital after the 1st medical tests revealed the existence of fever. Further in-depth analyzes are required for confirmation.

The Mauritanian health authorities have often denied the existence of the virus in its 1st appearances.

RVF is a disease that mainly affects animals but can contaminate humans either by mosquito bites or by contact with blood, physiological fluids, or organs of infected animals. The RVF virus was 1st identified in 1931 during an investigation of an epidemic affecting sheep in a Rift Valley farm in Kenya.
=====================
[If this case were to be definitively confirmed in the laboratory, it would have occurred almost 18 months after the series of cases, including 4 fatal cases, which Mauritania had experienced over various provinces in October 2015. At the same time, at least 4 foci of the disease occurred in sheep and goats in Brakna region (Aleg, Tidjikja, Magta-Lahjar, Kiffa).

The recent episode of RVF in Niger (September 2016 to February 2017) could be the cause of the re-emergence of the disease in Mauritania because, although these 2 countries do not share a common border, there is an incessant movement of livestock between the different areas of the Sahel where nomadism is a widespread lifestyle. It would appear that veterinary surveillance in these areas is sub-optimal, and this would explain why the detection of human cases precedes that of animal cases at the origin of these cases. - ProMED Mod.AB]

[RVF virus likely is endemic in parts of Mauritania, with cases of human and domestic animals occurring sporadically there. ProMED Mod AS provided an excellent comment on RVF previously; "Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a peracute or acute zoonotic disease of domestic ruminants. It is caused by a single serotype of a mosquito-borne virus of the _Bunyaviridae_ family (genus _Phlebovirus_). The disease occurs in climatic conditions favouring the breeding of mosquito vectors and is characterised by abortion, neonatal mortality, and liver damage. The disease is most severe in sheep, goats and cattle. Older, non-pregnant animals, although susceptible to infection, are more resistant to clinical disease. There is considerable variation in the susceptibility to RVF of animals of different species. Camels usually have an inapparent infection with RVF virus (RVFV), but sudden mortality, neonatal mortality, and abortion occur, and abortion rates can be as high as in cattle.

"Humans are susceptible to RVFV and are infected through contact with infected animal material (body fluids or tissues) or through bites from infected mosquitoes. RVFV has also caused serious infections in laboratory workers and must be handled with biosafety and biocontainment measures. It is recommended that laboratory workers be vaccinated if possible.

"RVFV is endemic in many African countries and may involve several countries in the region at the same time or progressively expand geographically over the course of a few years. In addition to Africa, large outbreaks have been observed in the Arabian Peninsula and some Indian Ocean Islands. These generally, but not exclusively, follow the periodic cycles of unusually heavy rainfall, which may occur at intervals of several years, or the flooding of wide areas favouring the proliferation of mosquitoes.

"Rainfall facilitates mosquito eggs to hatch. _Aedes_ mosquitoes acquire the virus from feeding on infected animals and may potentially vertically transmit the virus so that new generations of infected mosquitoes may hatch from their eggs. This provides a potential mechanism for maintaining the virus in nature, as the eggs of these mosquitoes may survive for periods of up to several years in dry conditions. Once livestock is infected, a wide variety of mosquito species may act as the vector for transmission of RVFV and can spread the disease.

"Low level RVF activity may take place during inter-epizootic periods. RVF should be suspected when exceptional flooding and subsequent abundant mosquito populations are followed by the occurrence of abortions, together with fatal disease marked by necrosis and haemorrhages in the liver that particularly affect newborn lambs, kids and calves, potentially concurrent with the occurrence of an influenza-like illness in farm workers and people handling raw meat.

"During an outbreak, preventive measures to protect workers from infection should be employed when there are suspicions that RVFV-infected animals or animal products are to be handled.

"The above and much more information is available at

ProMED would appreciate receiving additional information including laboratory results about this case and any new ones that might appear as they become available, in addition to information on presumed location of infection as the diagnosis was made in the capital city, but no mention of where the individual came from. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Tue 22 Mar 2016
Source: Points Chaud [in French, trans. Mod.MPP, edited]

A Mauritanian who came from Angola with yellow fever died on Monday [20 Mar 2016] at the Friendship Hospital. According to the Mauritanian community in Angola, the deceased had contracted the disease in Angola and decided to return to the country 2 days ago on a plane from a Moroccan company. His situation deteriorated after having been transferred to the Friendship Hospital where he died on Monday [20 Mar 2016].

It's not known whether the health authorities of the country had or did not have any concept of the severity of his disease. It's known that Angola presently has an epidemic of yellow fever ongoing that has already killed [more than] 158 people.

Yellow fever is a serious disease transmitted by insects that proliferate in standing water in dirty locations and places with waste.
=====================
[This is yet another case where a yellow fever virus infected individual travelled to a distant country in Africa. YF-infected individuals have travelled from Angola to the DR Congo and to Kenya. The risk of ongoing transmission in Mauritania is unknown, but health authorities there should be vigilant. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps can be accessed at
More ...

British Indian Ocean Territory

General:
**********************************
Cuba is an independent island country situated in the Caribbean. It is the largest of the islands and covers 42,000sq miles. The climate is sub tropical throughout the year with most of the rainfall in
the northern parts of the country. Temperatures of between 20C to 35C are fairly standard throughout the year. Generally the winter effects of the American continent only last for short periods.
Safety & Security:
**********************************
The majority of tourists visiting Cuba will have no difficulty but bag snatching and other street crime appears to be increasing. The old Havana area and other major tourist resorts may be particular areas of concern in this regard. On arrival be careful to only use your recognised tour operator. If you are taking a taxi at any stage make sure it is a registered one and not a private vehicle. It is unwise to carry large quantities of money or jewellery away from your hotel and try not to flaunt wealth with your belongings. Pickpockets are too common an occurrence on buses and trains and at train stations so be careful with your essential documents and credit cards. Valuables should not be stored in suitcases when arriving in or departing from Havana as there have been a number of thefts from cases during the time the cases are coming through baggage handling. There is an airport shrink-wrap facility for those departing Havana which reduces the risk of tampering. Remember to carry a photocopy of your main documents (passport, flight tickets etc).
Road Safety:
**********************************
Following a number of serious road accidents involving tourists, you are advised not to use mopeds for travelling around Cuba or in Havana. Also, if you are involved in any accident a police investigation will be required to clear you and this may significantly delay your travel plans. On unlit roads at night there have been a number of accidents associated with roaming cattle (sounds like Ireland!). The traffic moves on the right side of the roads. There is a main highway running the length of the country but many of the country roads are in poor repair.
Local Laws & Customs:
**********************************
When arriving into Cuba make sure you are not carrying any items which could be considered offensive. Any illicit drug offense is treated very seriously and Cuban law allows for the death penalty to be used under these circumstances. If you require personal medication for your health, make sure it is in original packing and carry a letter from your doctor describing the medication. Never agree to carry any item for another individual and always secure your cases once they are packed. Taking photographs of military or police installations or around harbours, rail and airport facilities is strictly forbidden.

Currency:
**********************************
Since 1993 it is now possible to use US dollars for all transactions within Cuba. Remember, there is a 20$ airport departure tax. Certain travellers cheques and credit cards may not be acceptable within Cuba. This is particularly true of American Express cheques and cards but check your situation with the travel operator before departure.
Health Facilities:
**********************************
Generally healthcare facilities outside of Havana are limited and many standard medications may not be available. It is important to carry sufficient quantities of any medications which may be required for the duration of your time in Cuba.
Food & Water:
**********************************
The level of food and water hygiene varies throughout the country and between resorts. On arrival check the hotel cold water supply for the smell of chlorine. If it is not present then use sealed bottled water for both drinking and brushing your teeth throughout your stay. Cans and bottles of drinks are safe but take care to avoid pre-cut fruit. Peel it yourself to make sure it is not contaminated. Food from street vendors should be avoided in most cases. Bivalve shellfish are also a high risk food in many countries and Cuba is no exception in this regard. (Eg Mussels, Oysters, Clams etc)
Malaria & Mosquito Borne Diseases:
***********************************************
Malaria transmission does not occur within Cuba and so prophylaxis is not required. However, a different mosquito borne disease called Dengue has begun to reoccur in the country over the past few years. This viral disease can be very sickening and even progress to death. It is rare for tourists to become infected but avoiding mosquito bites is a wise precaution.
Swimming, Sun & Dehydration:
************************************
The extent of the Cuban sun (particular during the summer months (April to October) can be very excessive so make sure your head and shoulders are covered at all times when exposed. Watch children carefully as they will be a significant risk. Drink plenty of fluids to replace what will be lost through perspiration and, unless there is a reason not to,
take extra salt either on your food or in crisps, peanuts etc. Take care if swimming in the Caribbean to stay with others and to listen to local advice. Never swim after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Rabies Risk in Cuba:
**********************************
This viral disease does occur throughout Cuba and it is essential that you avoid any contact with all warm blooded animals. Dogs, cats and monkeys are the most commonly involved in spreading the disease to humans. Don't pick up a monkey for a photograph! If bitten, wash out the wound, apply an antiseptic and seek urgent medical attention.
Vaccinations for Cuba:
**********************************
There are no essential vaccines for entry / exit if coming from Ireland. However, for your own personal protection travellers are advised to have cover against the following;
*
Tetanus (childhood booster)
*
Typhoid (food & water borne disease)
*
Hepatitis A (food & water borne disease)
For those planning a longer or more rural trip vaccine cover against conditions like Hepatitis B and Rabies may also need to be considered.
Summary:
**********************************
Cuba is becoming a popular destination for tourists and generally most will stay very healthy. However commonsense care against food and water borne disease is essential at all times. Also take care with regard to sun exposure, dehydration and mosquito bites.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

More ...

Swaziland

Swaziland US Consular Information Sheet
February 10, 2009
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Swaziland is a small developing nation in Southern Africa.
Several well-developed facilities for tourism are available.
The capital is Mbabane.
R
ad the Department of State Background Notes on Swaziland for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport is required.
Visas are not required for tourists and business travelers arriving in Swaziland for short visits (less than 60 days) on standard U.S. passports.
Most travelers visiting Swaziland enter through South Africa.

PLEASE NOTE:
All travelers traveling to South Africa are strongly encouraged to have several unstamped visa pages left in their passports. South Africa requires two unstamped visa pages, excluding amendment pages, to enter the country. Visitors who do not have enough free visa pages in their passport risk being denied entry and returned to the U.S. at their own expense.

For the most current information on Swaziland’s visa requirements, contact the Embassy of the Kingdom of Swaziland, 1712 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009; phone (202) 234-5002.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Public protests, demonstrations, and strikes occur from time to time in Swaziland and are mostly in response to on-going labor relations/difficulties.
When a strike is pending, armed soldiers may be called to augment the police force, and they have used force to disrupt such events.
During the course of such events, police may not distinguish between “innocent bystanders” and protesters.
Americans should avoid crowds, political rallies and street demonstrations.
For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.
Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Violent crime is a concern and is the most significant threat to American citizens visiting or working in Swaziland.
Incidents of petty crime and occasionally violent crime are most prevalent in Mbabane, the capital city, and Manzini, Swaziland’s urban industrial center, but also affect most other urban and rural areas.
Criminals will resort to force if necessary, including deadly force, in order to accomplish their goal.
Gangs are not deterred by confrontations with their intended victims.
Carjacking occurs and, as with other crimes, can be potentially violent if victims do not immediately cooperate.

Congested dark urban areas are particularly dangerous at night and daytime attacks are not uncommon.
The presence of others on the street should not be misinterpreted as an indication of security.
Many victims report being robbed in the presence of large numbers of witnesses.
Pedestrians are cautioned not to wear jewelry or carry expensive or unnecessary valuables in public.
American citizens are also advised against displaying cell phones and large sums of cash, as they are targets for thieves.
Money should only be converted at authorized currency exchanges and never with street vendors.
Exercise caution with using local taxis.
Ensure the taxi you use is from a reputable company.
Never enter a taxi that is occupied by anyone else besides the driver.
It is good practice to call a friend to let them know the plate number of the taxi you are using.
Crime tends to increase during the holiday season from December to January.
Crime victims should immediately report the incident to the nearest police station.
If there is an emergency, the police can be contacted by dialing 999.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for assistance.
The embassy/consulate staff can, for example, help you find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Swaziland is 999.
Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Swazi laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Swazi are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Swaziland does not have any unusual customs/currency regulations nor any visa registration requirements.
It is illegal to photograph Swaziland’s government buildings, members of the Swazi armed forces, royal residences and official ceremonies without prior permission from government authorities. Please see our Customs Information sheet.
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical facilities are limited throughout Swaziland and emergency medical response capabilities (including ambulance transport) are almost non-existent.
Although the Mbabane Clinic in the capital is small and currently undergoing building renovations, it is well equipped and well staffed for minor procedures. For advanced care, Americans often choose to go to South Africa where better facilities and specialists exist.
Most prescription drugs are available locally or can be imported from South Africa, but travelers are advised to bring sufficient quantities of their own required medication.
A doctor’s note describing the medication may be helpful if questioned by authorities.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Swaziland.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site.
Further health information for travelers is available from the WHO.
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Swaziland is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
Traffic accidents in Swaziland may pose an even greater hazard than crime.
Visitors should use extreme caution when driving, given the relatively high rates of speed of drivers on major thoroughfares.
Other hazards include poor lighting and traffic signals; presence of pedestrians, animals, and slower moving vehicles; aggressive driving behavior; and erratic stopping for pedestrian and animals.
Traffic drives on the left in Swaziland, which requires U.S. drivers to exercise particular caution.
Special care should be used in driving at night and in fog, especially in rural areas.
Rural and suburban areas are poorly lit and pose additional safety hazards as pedestrians and animals cross the road.
Many vehicles are poorly maintained and lack headlights.
Extreme caution is recommended if/when using mini-bus taxis, which follow fixed routes and are flagged down by passengers almost everywhere on the streets and roads of Swaziland.
Many of these vehicles fail to meet minimal safety standards.
Drivers frequently overload the vehicles and travel at excessive speeds.
Fatal accidents involving these conveyances are very common.
The Royal Swaziland Police Service set up periodic road blocks and also uses radar to monitor your speed.
Respect the local laws.
If you are pulled over for a moving violation you will be responsible for the consequences.
Always drive with your driver’s license.
Failure to do so will result in a fine.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
Visit the web site of the country’s national authority responsible for road safety.
AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Swaziland’s Civil Aviation Authority as not being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for the oversight of Swaziland’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA web site.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Swaziland are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Swaziland.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the embassy or consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located in the Central Bank Building on Mahlokohla Street in the capital city of Mbabane.
The mailing address is Box 199, Mbabane, Swaziland.
The telephone number is (268) 404-6441/5; fax (268) 404-5959. For after-hours emergencies involving American citizens, please dial 268-602-8414.
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Swaziland dated August 6, 2008, to update sections on Entry/Exit Requirements, Crime, Medical Facilities and Health Information, and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2019 17:36:56 +0200 (METDST)

Manzini, Swaziland, Oct 2, 2019 (AFP) - Angry teachers and government workers clashed with police in the tiny kingdom of eSwatini on Wednesday as they rallied to demand better pay and lower living costs in Africa's last absolute monarchy.   Civil servants took to the streets in Manzini, the kingdom's second largest town, singing protest songs and blowing horns.   "We want cost of living adjustment not bullets," read a banner wielded by one protester.

The crowd threw stones at the police, who responded with water canons, rubber bullets and tear gas.   Civil servants launched a series of strikes across the kingdom of eSwatini -- formerly known as Swaziland -- last month.   They accuse King Mswati III of spending public money on expensive trips abroad and royal ceremonies at the expense of their salaries.   "King Mswati is not considerate of the plight of the people of the country," said a worker in Manzini, who wished to remain anonymous.   "We are told that there is no money, the economy is in bad shape but he continues to take expensive trips abroad... with his extended family and friends," he told AFP, adding that a revolution was "on the cards".

An AFP reporter at the scene said the majority of shops in Manzini were closed due to the unrest.   "Let's continue the fight for democracy," said Mbongwa Dlamini, head of the Swaziland National Association of Teachers, adding that some people had been arrested.   The authorities were not immediately available to verify that claim.   Protests are rare in eSwatini, where opposition parties and anti-government movements are effectively banned.   But undercurrents of frustration have surfaced in recent months.   Government spokesman Percy Simelane said last week that police would open an investigation into the recent demonstrations and that offenders would "face justice".   "It would be unfortunate if trade unionism could be taken as a chaos club," Simelane told local media.
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2019 19:16:45 +0200 (METDST)

Mbabane, eSwatini, Sept 25, 2019 (AFP) - Violent clashes erupted in eSwatini on Wednesday after police cracked down on civil servants protesting against low pay and rising living costs in Africa's last absolute monarchy.

Teachers and workers went on strike last week in the four main towns of eSwatini -- a tiny southern African kingdom until recently known as Swaziland, surrounded by South Africa and Mozambique.   They accuse King Mswati III of draining public coffers at the expense of his subjects, and flocked to the capital Mbabane from Friday to discuss action with opposition pro-democracy groups.

Police fired tear gas, stun grenades and water canons on Wednesday to disperse the crowd, who responded by pelting rocks at police cars and government buildings.   "Our problem is that we have a selfish king," said Sibongile Mazibuko, who heads the Ngwane National Liberatory Congress pro-democracy group. "He loots national coffers to satisfy his personal greed."    Mazibuko blasted the king for wasting money on "expensive" royal ceremonies and trips abroad involving "huge delegations" and "shopping sprees".    "The same government says they have no money," he said.

- Growing frustrations -
Frustrations have boiled over into a series of protests around the country this week.   More than 3,500 people marched in Mbabane and the neighbouring city of Manzini on Monday, and around 3,000 protesters showed up in the capital again on Wednesday.

South Africa's trade union federation announced "border protest action" in the neighbouring province of Mpumalanga on Wednesday "in support" of the eSwatini strike.   "The workers demand only 7.8 percent salary adjustment while the Mswati regime spends millions of rands for his lavish lifestyle," said the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) in a statement.   Wandile Dludlu, national coordinator of an eSwatini pro-democracy coalition, welcomed COSATU's support.     "This is (a) fight," said Dludlu. "Protest action is not like a coffee session."

The government said earlier this month that it was unable to meet the protesters' demands.   "Government is in a challenging financial situation, hence (its) inability to award civil servants with a cost of living adjustment for the past two years," Prime Minister Ambrose Dlamini said in a statement.      King Mswati III was crowned in 1986, when he was just 18. He has come under fire for his expensive tastes, frivolous spending and prioritising his family's needs.

The king's older daughter Princess Sikhanyiso was appointed as a member of cabinet last year, stoking outrage among pro-democracy groups.   He is currently attending the UN general assembly in New York.   "It is not true that there is no money in this country," said Dludlu.   "The PM is not a problem, we know where our problem lies. We have a greedy king. The royal family impoverishes this country," he told AFP.   eSwatini ranked 144 out of 189 the UN's latest Human Development Index. Around two thirds of the country's 1.4 million inhabitants lives below the poverty line.
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2017 12:55:52 +0200

Paris, July 24, 2017 (AFP) - Swaziland, which bears the world's heaviest HIV burden, has halved the rate of new infections in five years by boosting access to virus-suppressing drugs, researchers said Monday.   The country where about one in three adults are infected with the AIDS-causing virus, has vastly expanded public programmes to test people for HIV infection and put them on life-saving anti-retroviral treatment (ART).   "Since 2011, national HIV incidence in Swaziland dropped by almost half," a research team led by Velephi Okello of the Swazi health ministry said in a written presentation to an HIV science conference in Paris.   Incidence is the word used by epidemiologists for the rate of new infections in a population.   "Sustaining these achievements will be paramount to Swaziland's success in curbing its severe HIV epidemic," said the researchers.   In 2011, 31 percent of adults (aged 18-49) out of a total country population of just over 1.2 million, were infected with HIV, according to government data.   This made Swaziland the country with the highest national rate of new infections, said the authors of the new study, as well as the highest proportion of people living with HIV.

The latest data, based on blood tests from about 11,000 people aged 15 and over, showed that 27 percent were HIV-positive in 2016.   This translated to an infection rate of 1.39 percent among 18- to 49-year-olds, down from 2.58 percent in 2011 -- a 46-percent reduction.   "Incidence was higher among women than in men," said the report to the International AIDS Society conference. The decline was also steeper for men at 52 percent than for women at 40 percent.   The survey showed that 73 percent of people on ART had achieved suppression of the virus, compared to 35 percent in 2011.   ART not only stops HIV from replicating and attacking a patient's immune system, but also curbs its spread to sexual partners.   The gains were the fruit of a much improved HIV treatment programme, said the researchers.   The number of HIV tests conducted in Swaziland more than doubled from 176,000 in 2011 to 367,000 in 2016, and the share of infected people on ART rose from 37 percent to 74 percent.
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 19:48:51 +0200

Mbabane, Swaziland, Aug 11, 2016 (AFP) - Drought-stricken Swaziland Thursday said it would begin sever water rationing in the capital Mbabane after levels in the main dam supplying the city fell to a critical low.   Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) said the restrictions would begin on Friday and probably last until the arrival of summer rains expected around October.

Under the measure, there will be no mains water for four days a week. Residents will collect water from mobile tanks instead.   "This is because of the dire drought situation which has decreased water levels at the Hawane Dam," said SWSC spokeswoman Nomahlubi Matiwane.   She said water levels in the dam had dropped from 15 percent of capacity in the last few weeks to just nine percent.

Swaziland is one of a number of countries in southern Africa that have been badly hit by El Nino -- a weather phenomenon that is centred on the countries in the Pacific but can affect other regions as well.   In February, dry conditions gripping the agricultural sector prompted the government to declare a state of emergency.   Water resources in the impoverished country of 1.2 million people have more than halved, contributing to higher food prices and poor crops.   Last month aid organisations estimated that El Nino had affected 12.3 million people across southern Africa.
Date: Sat 1 Dec 2012
Source: Observer.org (Swaziland) [edited]

A rabies outbreak has been reported in the Manzini region almost 2 months after dogs were vaccinated countrywide.  The most affected areas are Ludzeludze, Ngabezweni and Dwaleni Power Station, and the outbreak is so bad that the ministry of agriculture has decided to revaccinate canines.

The outbreak was 1st spotted at Ngabezweni when a dog from a legislator's family, a Dlamini, went berserk, chasing after people and barking at its shadow.

Because the dog was a nuisance to the community, they decided to team up against it and stoned it to death then called for veterinary assistance from Ludzeludze Rural Development Area (RDA), who took it for tests.

A few days later, another report was received from Dwaleni (Power) about a troublesome dog, whereby veterinary officers took it for tests. "The dogs tested positive to rabies, and it was then that we resolved to undertake the revaccination exercise. Our investigations also revealed that owners of both dogs did not vaccinate them when the ministry conducted the exercise in September [2012?]. One wonders why people fail to vaccinate their dogs when called to do so, because it is free," said a source from the ministry of agriculture.

It was then gathered that the revaccinating exercise began on Monday [26 Nov 2012], and areas within a radius of 7 km also have to be visited, where all the dogs will be revaccinated.

The source revealed that one of the major challenges that might compromise the revaccinating exercise was the shortage of chemicals [vaccines?].

Reached for comment, Director of Veterinary Services Dr Xolani Dlamini said he was not aware of the matter and had to investigate it further.  [Byline: Faith Vilakati]
======================
[As with the entire African continent, animal rabies is endemic in Swaziland, mainly involving dogs. According to Swaziland's annual OIE reports, the number of cases in dogs for 2011 was 26 and for humans 38 (rate per 100 000 population = 3.2371). For comparison: India, generally regarded to rank high among rabies-stricken countries, reported 162 human cases (0.015 per 100,000) during 2010 (most recent available quantitative information).

During 2011, 60 868 dogs have reportedly been vaccinated in Swaziland. - ProMed Mod.AS]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/r/3psa>.]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Fri 17 Jan 2019
Source: Front Page Africa [edited]

The Surveillance Officer of Grand Bassa County Health team has confirmed to FrontPage Africa that there is a Lassa fever outbreak in District 4, Grand Bassa County leading to 3 deaths and 20 others confirmed infected with the virus.

Gabriel B. Kassay said over 60 specimens were taken to Monrovia for testing as a result of the outbreak.  "Out of the 60 plus, over 20 specimens were confirmed affected with Lassa fever," he said, adding that 3 persons have died from the disease at the Liberia Agricultural Company (LAC) concession area in Wee Statutory District.

Kassay said there were several incidents of Lassa fever in the LAC plantation area in 2019.  "According to the Liberia health law, one confirmed case of Lassa fever is considered an outbreak, and so since August 2019, there have been lots of people affected in the LAC area," he said while expressing concern that "the lack of awareness is a major factor" for the frequent cases of the virus in the county.  "The Grand Bassa Health Team has been very instrumental in helping to curtail the spread of the disease in the affected area, but there is a need for awareness in the entire county."

Kassay said the spread of Lassa fever might increase if the citizens are not trained to know the cause and effects of Lassa fever.
=====================
[The number of cases has increased from 9 on 2 Dec 2019 (See Lassa fever - West Africa (43): Liberia http://promedmail.org/post/20191207.6828798) to 20 confirmed cases now. The reported number of deaths remains at 3. The previous ProMED-mail post (see Lassa fever - West Africa (31): Liberia http://promedmail.org/post/20190902.6653653) reported that according to MoH data, a total of 92 suspected cases between 1 Jan-25 Aug 2019, including 21 deaths, have been reported. Of these, 25 cases have been confirmed by RT-PCR (Nimba (9), Bong (10), Grand Bassa (5), and Grand Kru (1)), while 9 remain suspected cases, the release recorded. The case-fatality rate among confirmed cases in that report was stated as 36% (9 deaths out of 25 confirmed cases). Males are mostly affected by the disease (56%) of confirmed cases as compared to females.

Occurrence of Lassa fever cases in areas outside the usual "Lassa fever belt" is of concern, and the Ministry of Health is wise to increase public information and advize citizens about measures that should be taken to avoid infection with the virus. Occurrence of Lassa fever in Liberia is not new, and cases have occurred there sporadically for several years. Between 1 Jan and 27 Jun 2018, 20 cases were laboratory confirmed (see archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20180711.5898495). Apparently, all those Lassa fever virus infections were acquired by contact with infected rodents or their excretions. Lassa fever virus can be acquired from infected rodents or patients in the hospital. Transmission can occur in health facilities when personal protective equipment is not employed or barrier-nursing practices or biocontainment facilities in the laboratory are not adequate to protect staff from blood and secretions of infected patients.

As mentioned in previous posts, Lassa fever virus transmission to humans occurs when people are in contact with the reservoir rodent host, the multimammate mouse (_Mastomys natalensis_ and _M. erythroleucus_) and the African wood mouse (_Hylomycus pamfi_) or their excreta, as was likely the situation in many of these cases. Rodent control has to be undertaken at the village level with individual households employing the preventive measures listed above. This requires an extensive and continuous public education effort.

Images of the _Mastomys natalensis_ mouse, the rodent reservoir of Lassa fever virus, can be seen at
_M. erythroleucus_ and _Hylomycus pamfi_ at

Date: Sun 19 Jan 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

With the arrival of summer when the occurrence of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, such as yellow fever, increases, the Brazilian Ministry of Health is alerting the population to get vaccinated against the disease.  The alert is mainly focused on the population that lives in the South and Southeast regions of the country due to the confirmation of 38 monkey deaths in the states of Parana (34), Sao Paulo (3), and Santa Catarina (1). In total, 1087 reports of suspected monkey deaths were recorded in the country.

The alert is given because the regions have a large population and a low number of people vaccinated, which directly contributes to the cases of the disease.

The target public for vaccination is people from 9 months of age and 59 years of age who do not have proof of vaccination.

Regarding human cases, 327 suspected yellow fever cases were reported in the same period, of which 50 remain under investigation and one has been confirmed.

The yellow fever vaccine is offered in the National Vaccination Calendar and distributed monthly to the states. In 2019, more than 16 million doses of the yellow fever vaccine were distributed throughout the country. Despite this availability, there is a low demand from the population for vaccination. For 2020, the portfolio acquired 71 million doses of the vaccine, enough to serve the country for more than 3 years.

In 2020, the Ministry of Health will gradually expand yellow fever vaccination to 1101 municipalities in the Northeast states that were not yet part of the vaccination recommendation area. Thus, the whole country now has a vaccine against yellow fever in the routine of services.

Another change in the calendar was that the children started to have a booster vaccine at the age of 4. The decision came because recent scientific studies have shown a decrease in the child's immune response, which is vaccinated very early, at 9 months, as predicted in the child's National Vaccination Calendar. Since 2017, the Ministry of Health has followed the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) to offer only one dose of the yellow fever vaccine in a lifetime.
=========================
[The current expansion of yellow fever in South America raises concern for public health and also about potential conservation problems for susceptible non-human primate species in the continent. Yellow fever virus was introduced into the Americas approximately 400 years ago, yet the complex interactions that were established after its introduction are far from being elucidated. There is a need for more research on the eco-epidemiology of the disease in the continent, especially in the presence of the persistent anthropogenic global environmental change. - ProMED Mod.PMB]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Brazil:
Date: Sat 18 Jan 2020 03:15 WAT
Source: Actualita [in French, machine trans., edited]
<https://actualite.cd/2020/01/18/rdc-une-maladie-inconnue-fauche-des-vies-kiri-5-morts>

An unknown disease has already killed 5 people at Kiri General Hospital, in the province of Mai-Ndombe, in the west of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to the authorities. The provincial minister of public health has said that all measures are underway to detect [diagnose?] the mysterious disease. "Admittedly, this was an abnormal situation; however, the situation is manageable because we have just gone into this health facility and we have tried to carry out investigations. My collaborators and I took some samples which have quickly been sent to the National Institute for Biomedical Research (INRB) in Kinshasa for the appropriate medical tests which can give us accurate [diagnosis] on this abnormal situation," declared the minister Jean Claude Bola. First, added the same official, "it is not an Ebola epidemic, contrary to the rumour circulating in the Kiri territory and in the social networks."

In an exclusive interview with actualita.cd, the provincial authority also confirmed the deaths. "However, I warn all those who broadcast through the various media and social networks that there is Ebola in Mai-Ndombe that they have neither qualification nor competence to do so, because the only authority having jurisdiction in the provinces to declare an epidemic is the provincial governor," declared Paul Mputu Boleilanga. "Severe and disciplinary sanctions will be reserved against usurpers of power," he threatened. According to provincial authorities, a team from the National Institute of Biomedical Research (INRB), a team is expected in the Kiri territory for "rapid" management of all patients and to determine the disease underlying deaths in this region.
=============================
[Other than the number of deaths and the geographical location of the cases there is no additional information to permit reasonable speculation as to the aetiology or dates of illnesses. ProMED Mod.MPP noted that Ebola denial leads one to suspect this is a viral haemorrhagic fever.

Laboratory tests should confirm or rule out diseases such as yellow fever or Lassa fever. However, there is no indication that these cases are due to a virus or other infectious agent. Toxicants should also be ruled out. Additional information about these or new cases would be appreciated. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Maps of DR Congo: <http://goo.gl/DM2AT8> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/194> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/65284>]
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2020 17:48:09 +0100 (MET)

Barcelona, Jan 17, 2020 (AFP) - Spain's Balearic Islands passed a bill Friday aimed at clamping down on alcohol-fuelled holidays in the Mediterranean archipelago which bans happy hours when drinks are offered a discount and open bars.   "This is the first law adopted in Europe which restricts the sale and promotion of alcohol in certain touristic areas," the regional government of the Balearic Islands which have long been a magnet for young German and British tourists, who often drink heavily and enjoy rowdy late-night clubbing.

The restrictions will apply to three areas with a reputation for excess: San Antoni on the island of Ibiza and El Arenal and Magaluf -- which has been nicknamed "Shagaluf" because of its reputation for drunken casual sex -- on Mallorca, the largest of the Balearic's four islands.   The law, which was drawn up in consultation with the tourism industry also bans pub crawls and two-for-one drink offers, prohibits the sale of alcohol in shops between 9:30 pm and 8 am and forbids advertising party boats in the designated areas.   Establishments that break the new rules risk fines of up to 600,000 euros ($669,000) and the threat of being closed down for three years.

The new law also takes aim at the so-called "balconing" craze, the term given to holidaymakers who decide to jump into a swimming pool from a hotel or apartment balcony, a stunt which claims several lives every year.   It bans "balconing" across the entire archipelago and requires hotels to evict anyone who does it. Those caught jumping from balconies face fines of up to 60,000 euros ($67,000).   Up until now only some resorts on the Balearics imposed fines for "balconing".

The regional government of the Balearics said the law, which stiffens measures already introduced in 2015, will "fight excesses in certain tourist zones" and "force a real change in the tourism model of those destinations".   Magaluf made global headlines in 2014 after a video showing a young woman performing oral sex on several men on the dance floor of a nightclub went viral.   Local shops sell souvenir T-shirts with the catchphrase "On it 'till we vomit".

The four islands which make up the Balearics -- Palma de Mallorca, Ibiza, Menorca and Formentera, received nearly fourteen million tourists in 2018, drawn by their crystal clear waters, and in many cases by all-inconclusive package holidays.   The archipelago is Spain's second most visited region. Spain is the world's second most visited country after France.
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2020 12:55:16 +0100 (MET)

Rennes, France, Jan 17, 2020 (AFP) - Several oyster farmers along France's Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts have been forced to halt sales since December after their sites were contaminated by the highly contagious norovirus, which they blame on overflowing sewage treatment plants.   Authorities ordered the suspensions at 23 of the country's 375 designated fields, and recalls of affected oysters as well as mussels and clams, after tests revealed the virus, which can cause severe vomiting and diarrhoea.

The move came just before the year-end holidays, when oysters are a traditional delicacy on millions of French tables.   "The oysters are not sick. They're carrying the virus because it's in the water they are constantly filtering," Philippe Le Gal, president of France's national shellfish council (CNC), told AFP this week.   "They were in the wrong place at the wrong time," he said, adding the ban had prompted many people to stop eating oysters altogether.   Local officials say oyster farmers are paying the price of insufficient spending on wastewater treatment, with facilities strained to the limit even as development of coastal areas has surged in recent years.

Heavy rains before Christmas prompted treatment basins to overflow, they say, spilling tainted water into rivers.   "This was predictable -- they've kept issuing building permits even though treatment sites are already at full capacity," said Joel Labbe, a senator for the Morbihan region in Brittany.   Oyster farmers are demanding compensation, and a delegation met with agriculture ministry officials in Paris last week warning that more than 400 businesses had been impacted by the sales ban.

This week, angry growers dumped trash bins full of oysters and mussels in front of the offices of the regional ARS health authority in Montpellier over the decision to halt sales from a nearby basin on the Mediterranean coast.   "We're the victims, and we shouldn't have to suffer any financial damages," Le Gal said.
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2020 04:44:41 +0100 (MET)

Suva, Fiji, Jan 17, 2020 (AFP) - Fiji opened evacuation centres and warned of "destructive force winds" Friday as a cyclone bore down on the Pacific island nation for the second time in three weeks.   Two people were missing after attempting to swim across a swollen river late Thursday when heavy rain fell ahead of the advancing Cyclone Tino, police said.   On the outer islands, locals prepared to go to emergency shelters while many tourists fled beach resorts and made their way to the capital Suva before regional flights and inter-island ferry services were suspended.

The Fiji Meteorological Service said Tino was strengthening as it headed for Fiji's second-largest island, Vanua Levu, warning of wind gusts of up to 130 kilometres per hour (80 mph), heavy rain, coastal flooding and flash flooding in low lying areas.    "I'm preparing to go to an evacuation centre soon with my family and wait for the cyclone to pass," Nischal Prasad, who lost his home in northern Vanua Legu when Cyclone Sarai struck just after Christmas, told AFP.   "Sarai destroyed my house and almost left my family homeless. My daughters had to hide under their bed from the strong winds. It was a scary experience," he said.

Russian tourist Inna Kostromina, 35, said she sought safety in Suva after being told her island resort was in the path of the cyclone.   "We didn't want to get stuck in there and with the authorities warning of coastal flooding, anything can happen. So we decided to move to Suva for now. I think we will be much safer here."    Police said a man and his daughter, believed to be aged nine or 10, were attempting to swim across a flooded river when they were caught in the strong currents.    The incident happened on Thursday before the storm developed into a tropical cyclone, but a police spokesman linked the tragedy to "heavy rain brought about by the current weather system (which) raised the river level".   Although the Pacific islands are popular tourist destinations in summer it is also the cyclone season, and Fiji is being targeted for the second time in three weeks.

In late December, Tropical Cyclone Sarai left two people dead and more than 2,500 needing emergency shelter as it damaged houses, crops and trees and cut electricity supplies.    On its present track, Tino would hit Tongatapu, the main island of neighbouring Tonga, on the weekend.    Two years ago, Tongatapu was hit by Cyclone Gina, with two people killed and nearly 200 houses destroyed.
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:38:39 +0100 (MET)
By Hiroshi HIYAMA

Tokyo, Jan 16, 2020 (AFP) - Japan has confirmed a case of a mystery virus that first emerged in China and is from the same family as the deadly SARS pathogen, authorities said Thursday.   It appears to be only the second time the novel coronavirus has been detected outside China, after the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed a case in Thailand.   Japan's health ministry said a man who had visited the central Chinese city of Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was hospitalised on January 10, four days after his return to Japan. He reported a persistent fever.

Tests on the patient, who was released from hospital on Wednesday, confirmed he was infected with the new virus.   "This is the first domestic discovery of a pneumonia case related to the new coronavirus," the ministry said in a statement.   "We will continue active epidemiological research while also coordinating efforts with the World Health Organization and related agencies to conduct a risk assessment."   The outbreak has killed one person so far, with 41 patients reported in Wuhan.

The outbreak has caused alarm because the new virus is from the same family as the pathogen that causes SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed 349 people in mainland China and 299 in Hong Kong in 2002 and 2003.   Authorities in Wuhan said a seafood market was the centre of the outbreak. It was closed on January 1.   Japanese authorities said the man had not visited the market and that it was possible he had been in contact with a person infected with the virus while in Wuhan.

- Outbreak in Japan 'unlikely' -
Health ministry official Eiji Hinoshita told reporters that the risk of the disease spreading from the patient was considered low, with careful checks done on those who had been in close contact with him.   "At this point, we feel it is unlikely this will lead to a dramatic outbreak," he said, adding that the patient was no longer suffering a fever and was recuperating at home.

Officials declined to give further information on the man, including his nationality, citing privacy concerns.   Local media said the patient was a Chinese national in his 30s living in Kanagawa, just southwest of Tokyo.   Public broadcaster NHK said he had already recovered and was resting at home, as quarantine officials at Tokyo's Narita airport boosted health checks on all travellers.

The health ministry urged people who develop a cough or fever after visiting Wuhan to wear a surgical mask and "swiftly visit a medical institution".   Hinoshita said Japan would need to be on guard ahead of the Lunar New Year, a popular travel period in China.   "It is expected that Japan will see many visitors from China," he said.   It is not yet clear whether the mystery virus can be transmitted between humans, but on Wednesday authorities said it was possible it had spread inside a family.

The woman diagnosed in Thailand, who is in a stable condition, also said she had not visited the Wuhan seafood market.   And WHO doctor Maria Van Kerkhove on Tuesday said she "wouldn't be surprised if there was some limited human-to-human transmission, especially among families who have close contact with one another".   Hong Kong authorities on Tuesday said several dozen people had been hospitalised with fever or respiratory symptoms after travelling to Wuhan, but no cases of the new virus have so far been confirmed.
Date: 20 Jan 2020
Source: News Joins [In Korean, machine trans. edited]
----------------------------
An unexplained pneumonia in China caused the Korean quarantine authorities to strengthen the quarantine, and a fever-sensing camera is installed to monitor the body temperature of Chinese tourists who entered Korea at Incheon Port 1 International Passenger Terminal. 

Pneumonia confirmed by the new coronavirus, which is prevalent in Wuhan, China, was confirmed for the first time on [20 Jan 2020]. According to health officials, a Chinese woman, A, who arrived at Incheon International Airport on a plane from Wuhan last weekend, was confirmed with pneumonia. The patient showed signs of pneumonia, including high fever and cough. The health authorities entered the airport at the same time, confirmed the symptoms of high fever, suspected pneumonia, and went into quarantine and testing. The Centers for Disease Control immediately quarantined A and entered treatment with a nationally designated quarantine bed. The Centers for Disease Control will hold an emergency press conference at 1:30 pm on [20 Jan 2020] and release the reporter A.
 
Meanwhile, Beijing's Daxing District Health and Welfare Committee said 2 fever patients who had been to Wuhan were confirmed as a new pneumonia patient on [19 Jan 2020]. They are currently being treated at a designated hospital and said they are stable. Daxing District is where Beijing New Airport opened last year [2019]. The Guangdong Provincial Health and Welfare Committee said on [19 Jan 2020] that a 66-year-old man who had visited a relative's home in Wuhan showed fever and lethargy and was diagnosed with Wuhan pneumonia. Confirmation patients have also emerged in Shenzhen, a neighbouring Hong Kong province in southern China, raising concerns that the new pneumonia has already spread throughout China.
 
The Chinese government has said that "there is no basis for human-to-human propagation," but domestic experts pointed out that "the nature of coronavirus is less likely to prevent human-to-human propagation."   [Byline: Esther Toile]
========================
[This is now the 4th international identification of the 2019-nCoV (novel coronavirus) associated illness reported outside of China.  To date, all 4 cases have reported being in Wuhan China in the 14 days preceding onset of illness.  Illness in each involved a history of fever and dry cough.  Cases were reported by Thailand (2 cases) and Japan, and now South Korea.  An update following a Ministry of Health Korea press conference mentioned that there were 5 individuals accompanying this woman, none of whom were currently showing symptoms. (<http://news1.kr/articles/?3821049>).

As mentioned in an earlier post (see Novel coronavirus (10): China (HU, GD, BJ) http://promedmail.org/post/20200119.6898567), there have also been cases confirmed in China outside of Wuhan City, with cases reported in Beijing, Guangdong and possibly Shanghai. It is becoming more difficult to conclude that there has been limited person-to-person transmission as the case numbers are climbing both inside of Wuhan City, elsewhere in China, and in individuals travelling from Wuhan China to other countries (Japan, Thailand and South Korea).

A map of South Korea can be found at:
Date: 15 Jan 2020
Source: Fox News [edited]

CDC is facing criticism over its response to a polio-like illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed 10 additional cases of acute flaccid myelitis.  An Ohio teen is determined to walk again despite doctors' warnings that she may not after she contracted a rare polio-like illness that's left her paralyzed from the waist down.  IK, a catcher on her middle school's softball team, said it started with what felt like a cramp in her leg on Christmas. "I just thought, 'Oh gosh, it's just growing pains or a Charley horse,'" NK, the 13-year-old's mother, told News 5 Cleveland.  But the next day, IK couldn't stand on her own, and her worried parents rushed her to Akron Children's Hospital, where she was diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). It's a rare but serious condition that affects the nervous system, specifically the grey matter of the spinal cord, which weakens the body's muscles and reflexes.

Health officials have noticed an increase of cases in children occurring every 2 years since 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And while it often is referred to as a "polio-like" illness, tests so far have tested negative for poliovirus.  Symptoms typically begin with sudden onset of arm or leg weakness and loss of muscle tone and reflexes, but can also include facial droop or weakness, difficulty moving eyes, drooping eyelids, difficulty swallowing,  slurred speech, and pain in the arms and legs.  Severe symptoms may include respiratory failure, or serious neurological complications, according to the CDC. Parents are encouraged to seek medical care right away if a child is suspected of developing any symptoms

Since her diagnosis, IK has been working in physical therapy and has received steroid treatments as well as multiple plasma exchange, according to the news outlet. Her mother said it's been like "a bad dream" for the family as they watch her struggle to gain strength.  "It's a lot, but I just try to go with the flow, just to push through," IK, who has received support from her teammates, classmates and members of the community, told News 5 Cleveland.  [Byline: Alexandria Hein]
======================
[Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a rare but serious condition. It affects the nervous system, specifically the area of the spinal cord called gray matter, which causes the muscles and reflexes in the body to become weak.

In 2019, there were 33 total confirmed cases in 16 US states
[<https://www.cdc.gov/acute-flaccid-myelitis/cases-in-us.html>].

The case definition for AFM is based on clinical and lab criteria

Clinical Criteria: An illness with onset of acute flaccid limb weakness.
Laboratory Criteria:
Confirmatory Laboratory Evidence: a magnetic resonance image (MRI) showing spinal cord lesion largely restricted to grey matter and spanning one or more vertebral segments. Supportive Laboratory Evidence: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with pleocytosis (white blood cell count over 5 cells/mm3) Case Classification:
- Confirmed: Clinically compatible case AND Confirmatory laboratory evidence: MRI showing spinal cord lesion largely restricted to grey matter and spanning one or more spinal segments.
- Probable: Clinically compatible case AND Supportive laboratory evidence: CSF showing pleocytosis (white blood cell count over 5 cells/mm3)

With the high number of cases reported in 2018 and 2019, CDC enhanced AFM surveillance through collection of data at the national level by encouraging healthcare providers to recognize and report to their health departments all patients whom they suspect may have AFM; health departments are being asked to send this information to CDC to help us understand AFM activity nationwide. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Sat 18 Jan 2020
From: Guido Calleri <guidocalleri@aslcittaditorino.it> [edited]

90 persons presented to the Infectious Diseases Hospital Amedeo di Savoia, Torino, North-West Italy between 24 Dec 2019 and 10 Jan 2020 after consuming raw sausages from a wild boar hunted in the area of Susa Valley, 50 km [31.1 mi] away from Torino, in late November 2019.

All of them either were symptomatic (fever, muscle and/or abdominal pain, nausea) or had peripheral blood eosinophilia over 500/cmm, or both. IgG serology for trichinella was performed by immunoblot (Trichinella E/S IgG kit, EFFEGIEMME, Milan, Italy) and resulted positive in 48/90 (53.3%), allowing a diagnosis of confirmed trichinella infection.

Otherwise, a diagnosis of suspected trichinella infection was made with a negative serology, probably due to performing the test too early, before the development of antibodies or possibly a false negative result. In a few cases (under 10 cases) an alternative diagnosis was considered.

All patients were treated with oral albendazole 400 mg twice daily for 10 days and prednisone 50 mg/day.

Most likely, all patients were infected after eating meat from a single animal, given the low prevalence of the infection in this area: no human case has ever been detected in Torino province, and only one wild boar has been found positive for trichinella at microscopy in Susa valley in the last 10 years.
---------------------------------------
Guido Calleri, Filippo Lipani, Giovanna Paltrinieri, Silvia Faraoni,
Valeria Ghisetti
ASL Citta di Torino, Infectious Diseases Unit and Microbiology Lab,
and ASL TO3,
Department of Prevention
Torino, Piedmonte, Italy
======================
[ProMED thanks Guido Calleri, Filippo Lipani, Giovanna Paltrinieri, Silvia Faraoni, and Valeria Ghisetti for sending us this information. The report underlines that _Trichinella_ are found in wild boars in Europe and should be assessed by a certified laboratory for _Trichinella_ before used for human consumption. Sausages made of smoked meat are especially dangerous, because the temperatures seldom reach what is needed to kill the trichinella larvae. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at: