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American Samoa

Samoa US Consular Information Sheet
January 23, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Samoa consists of the two large islands of Upolu and Savai’i and seven small islets. The country has a stable parliamentary democracy with a developing economy. To
rist facilities are accessible by bus, taxi and car and are within walking distance of access roads. Infrastructure is adequate in Apia, the capital, but it is limited in other areas. Nearly all Internet connections use a relatively slow dial-up method. Samoa has two digital telephone service providers, and visitors can easily purchase prepaid phones that cover virtually the entire country. The Samoa Tourism Authority, at http://www.visitsamoa.ws/, provides a wide range of information of interest to travelers. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Samoa for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
U.S. nationals who are not U.S. citizens, and who are resident in American Samoa, must obtain a visitor permit prior to all travel to Samoa. U.S. nationals have not been permitted to travel to Samoa on certificates of identity since May 2005 except on a case by case basis. (U.S. law distinguishes between individuals who are citizens and those who are nationals. The U.S. passport bio-page shows one’s status as either a citizen or a non-citizen national.) As of March 22, 2006, visitor permits to travel to Samoa can be applied for at the new Samoa Consulate General office in Pago Pago, American Samoa. A valid passport and an onward/return ticket are required for all Americans (both citizens and nationals) to travel to Samoa. Visitor permits are not required for U.S. citizens (only for U.S. nationals) seeking to stay in Samoa for up to 60 days. All visitors are required to pay a departure tax of 40 Tala (approximately 17.50 USD) upon leaving the country. Further information about entry requirements and the departure tax may be obtained from the Samoa Mission to the United Nations at 800-2nd Avenue, Suite 400J, New York, NY 10017, telephone (212) 599-6196, fax (212) 599-0797. Visit the Embassy ofSamoa web site at http://www2.un.int/public/Samoa/ for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
In Apia and many villages, stray dogs wander the streets. Visitors should not approach or feed them; they can become aggressive in the presence of food or if they feel threatened.

Although there have been no major accidents involving the ferry service linking Upolu and Savai’i, vessels are sometimes overloaded. One of the ferries, a multi-deck automobile ferry, sometimes transports passengers on its automobile deck. Americans who choose to use this ferry are encouraged not to remain in the automobile deck during the crossing and to ride only in the passenger compartment in order to avoid injury from shifting vehicles.

Samoa has numerous “blowholes” (lava tubes open to the sea where wave action produces, often spectacular, geysers). These blowholes are popular tourist attractions. The footing around the mouths of most blowholes is very slippery. To avoid being swept in, visitors should not approach too closely and should never stand between the opening of the blowhole and the sea.

Snorkeling and diving in ocean lagoons is a popular activity for many visitors to Samoa. Tide changes can produce powerful currents in these lagoons. Visitors are encouraged to consult local residents and tour operators about hazards and conditions at a particular location before venturing into the water.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
Overall, Samoa is considered a low threat environment. Nevertheless, visitors should remain aware of their surroundings, lock their doors at night, and not leave their belongings unattended. Incidents of petty theft/robberies of personal effects are common. Some such incidents have involved residential break-ins. While rare, violent assaults, including sexual assaults have occurred in Samoa. No specific groups have been targeted, nor have there been any racially motivated or hate crimes against Americans. Police responsiveness in Apia is generally good. Because of the very limited police presence elsewhere in Samoa (where order is maintained primarily by local village authorities), police responsiveness elsewhere is problematic.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Health care facilities in Samoa are adequate for routine medical treatment, but are limited in range and availability; complex illnesses and life-threatening emergencies generally need to be treated elsewhere. Dental facilities do not meet U.S. standards, but good dental treatment and some emergency care can be obtained nearby at the LBJ Tropical Medical Center in Pago Pago, American Samoa. The national hospital and a small private hospital are located in Apia, and there are several small district hospitals on Savai'i and in outlying areas of Upolu. There are no hyperbaric chambers on any of the islands for the treatment of scuba diving related injuries. Serious cases of decompression sickness are evacuated to the nearest treatment center in Suva, Fiji, or Auckland, New Zealand. Serious medical conditions and treatments that require hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost thousands of dollars. Travelers should carry emergency evacuation insurance. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services. There is no reported incidence of malaria or rabies in Samoa. Occasional outbreaks of typhoid and non-hemorrhagic dengue do occur.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Samoa is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Safety of public transportation and rural road conditions in Samoa, are considered fair, while urban road conditions/maintenance is considered good. Taxis in particular are widely available and used by Samoans and visitors alike; buses are slow, generally crowded and uncomfortable, and rarely utilized by visitors. Rental cars can also be obtained. No roadside assistance is available. Most major roads are tar-sealed, but secondary roads are predominantly dirt and gravel and may be overgrown with vegetation. A four-wheel drive vehicle is recommended for travel on these roads. Travelers should be aware that vehicle safety regulations are rarely enforced and traffic violations occur routinely. Roads outside Apia are often narrow, winding, relatively steep, with narrow or no shoulders, and poorly lighted. Pedestrians as well as vehicles and livestock regularly travel these roads. Due to poor and deteriorating road conditions, night driving on unlit rural roads can be dangerous and should be avoided if possible. Roads in Samoa often traverse small streams. Drivers are urged to exercise extreme caution when fording these streams, which can become swollen and dangerous with little warning. Vehicles should never enter a stream if the roadbed is not visible or if the water’s depth exceeds the vehicle’s clearance.

Speed limits in Samoa are 25 miles per hour in the Apia area and 35 miles per hour outside Apia, with certain exceptions. At unmarked intersections, traffic on the left has the right of way. As in the United States, vehicular traffic moves on the right side of the road; although right-hand-drive vehicles (mainly from New Zealand) do exist in Samoa. Importing right hand drive vehicles to Samoa is currently legally forbidden.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the web site of the country’s national tourist office at Samoa Tourism Authority at http://www.visitsamoa.ws/.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government ofSamoa’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Samoa’s air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Some overseas treatment centers, known as Behavior Modification Facilities, operate in Samoa. Though these facilities may be operated and staffed by U.S. citizens, the Samoan government is solely responsible for compliance with local safety, health, sanitation and educational laws and regulations, including all licensing requirements of the staff in country. These standards, if any, may not be strictly enforced or meet the standards of similar facilities in the U.S. Parents should be aware that U.S. citizens and non-citizen nationals 14 years of age and older have a right to apply for a passport and to request repatriation assistance from the U.S. government, both without parental consent. Any U.S. citizen or non-citizen enrollee has the right to contact a representative from the U.S. Embassy. For further information, consult the Department of State's Fact Sheet on Behavior Modification Facilities, available via the Bureau of Consular Affairs home page. Parents may also contact the U.S. Embassy in Apia or the country officer in the Office of American Citizens Services, Bureau of Consular Affairs at 202-647-5226.

Financial Transactions:
Although some businesses (especially those in Apia or those frequented by tourists) do accept credit cards, many (including gas stations) do not. Major credit cards (Visa, Master Card, and American Express) are accepted at major hotels and some restaurants and stores. Samoan currency can be obtained from ATMs, which are located in Faleolo Airport and in many locations in Apia. For more information on ATM locations and banking services see ANZ web site at http://www.anz.com/samoa/overview.asp and WESTPAC web site at http://www.westpac.com.ws/pacific/publish.nsf/Content/PFSA+HomePage.

Disaster Preparedness: Samoa is located in an area of high seismic activity. Although the probability that a major earthquake would occur during an individual trip is remote, earthquakes can and will continue to happen. Major cyclones have occurred in the past and are always a concern. Strong winds and very heavy rains are common, especially during the rainy season from November to April. During this period, Samoa receives most of its annual average of over 130 inches of rain. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available via the Internet from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) web site at http://www.fema.gov/.

Customs: Samoa customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Samoa of items such as firearms, fruits, pets and other animals, and drugs. It is advisable to contact the Samoan Mission to the United Nations at 800 2nd Avenue, Suite 400J, New York, NY 10017, telephone (212) 599-6196 for specific information regarding customs requirements. Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Samoa’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Samoa are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
Samoa is not a member of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION/EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Samoa are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security withinSamoa. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located in the Accident Compensation Board (ACB) Building, Fifth Floor, Apia. The Embassy is open to the public from 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday. The Embassy's mailing address is U.S. Embassy, P.O. Box 3430, Apia, Samoa 0815. The telephone numbers are (685) 21436/21631/22696 and 21452. The fax number is (685) 22030. An Embassy officer can be reached after hours in an emergency involving the welfare of a U.S. citizen or non-citizen national at (685) 21514 or (685) 777-1776. Visit the U.S. Embassy’s web site at http://samoa.usembassy.gov/.
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet (now known as Country Specific Information) dated May 21, 2007, to update sections on Country Description and Crime.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

American Samoa. 8 Mar 2017.
(susp) as of mid-February 30 cases of Dengue.

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map showing the location of American Samoa in the Pacific can be accessed at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/380>
and a map of the island at <http://www.nationsonline.org/maps/tutuila-island-map.jpg>. - ProMED Mod.TY
Date: Sat 20 Sep 2014
Source: Radio New Zealand [edited]

Latest figures from Samoa's Ministry of Health show an increase of suspected and confirmed cases of chikungunya [virus infections] from 400 to 626 since the outbreak of the acute fever, rash and joint pain disease was reported in July [2014].

However, the ministry says so far presentation of the main signs and symptoms of those affected have largely been mild.

The highest number of people affected is recorded in the districts of Vaimauga west in the urban area with 151 cases; Faleata east, 139 cases; and 113 in Faleata west.  The majority of patients is young.

In American Samoa, the chikungunya outbreak is on the wane. Health officials say there are now 823 probable cases of the mosquito-borne illness, with 15 people requiring hospital care.
===========
[The chikungunya outbreak continues to grow in Samoa, from 269 cases reported on 25 Aug 2014 to 433 reported on 8 Sep 2014 and now to 626 cases. One hopes that a prompt and aggressive clean up of breeding sites will reduce the vector mosquito population enough to halt, or at least reduce, transmission.

On 26 Jul 2014, it was reported that American Samoa had about 100 cases, with 3 laboratory confirmed as chikungunya virus infections (see ProMED-mail archive no. 20140727.2638925). This is a sharp outbreak, with over 700 cases in a little over one month, apparently peaking at 823 probable cases reported above. Once introduced into American Samoa, spread of the virus is not surprising, because it has had dengue virus transmission in the past, and the same mosquitoes that transmit dengue viruses can transmit chikungunya virus as well.

A map showing the location of Samoa in the Pacific Ocean can be accessed at <http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/oceania/wsnewz.gif>. A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map showing the location of both Samoa and American Samoa in the Pacific Ocean can be accessed at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/380>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
Date: Mon 9 Sep 2014
Source: Radio New Zealand [edited]
<http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/pacific-news/253977/chikungunya-related-cases-reach-over-700-in-american-samoa

The latest reports from American Samoa reveal that chikungunya-related [febrile] cases have now reached over 700, and there is now one probable case in Ofu, Manua. The virus was discovered in the territory in July 2014, but there have been no reported cases in Manua until now.

Health officials are urging residents not to travel to Manua if they have chikungunya, and testing is being done to determine whether the case in Ofu is due to the virus. Since July 2014, there have been 11 hospitalisations with the virus but no deaths.

Health officials continue to urge those with symptoms to drink plenty of fluids, get a lot of rest, and visit the emergency department if symptoms become serious.
=======================
[On 26 Jul 2014, it was reported that American Samoa had about 100 cases, with 3 laboratory confirmed as chikungunya virus infections (see ProMED-mail archive no. 20140727.2638925). This is a sharp outbreak, with over 700 cases in a little over one month. Once introduced into American Samoa, spread of the virus is not surprising, because it has had dengue virus transmission in the past, and the same mosquitoes that transmit dengue viruses can transmit chikungunya virus as well.

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map showing the location of American Samoa in the Pacific Ocean can be accessed at
Date: Tue 5 Aug 2014
Source: Radio New Zealand International [edited]

The American Samoan Department of Health says there are now more than 300 confirmed cases of chikungunya or 'chik' virus in the territory.

The Health Director Motusa Tuileama Nua says his department and LBJ hospital have confirmed the outbreak of fever, rashes, and joint pains among people on the main island of Tutuila is due to chikungunya.

He says there have been 343 recorded cases, with 6 patients hospitalised and no deaths, since the beginning of July [2014].

He recommends those who are ill with fever and body aches do not travel off island.
--------------------------
Communicated by:
Roland Hubner
Superior Health Council
Brussels
Belgium
===============
[CHIKV has been circulating in Pacific islands this year (2014).

Maps showing the location of American Samoa in the Pacific Ocean can be accessed at
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/380>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
****************************
American Samoa: confirmed
Date: Fri 8 Aug 2014
Source: Samoa News [edited]

The American Samoa Department of Health and the LBJ hospital have created a 24 hour a day hotline for the CHIK virus. The CHIK hotline number is 731-7511.

The Health Alert issued yesterday [7 Aug 2014] confirms chikungunya (CHIK) virus as the cause of fever, rash, and joint pains outbreak on Tutuila and there have been more than 390 recorded cases, with 7 patients hospitalized and no deaths since 1 Jul 2014.

According to the health alert, there is no cure for CHIK virus [infection, and] it can usually be treated at home by drinking lots of fluids, taking pain medicine like Tylenol, ibuprofen, or Aleve as needed but only as much and with cautions as recommended on the package.

The health alert urges not to work while your joints are painful, let them rest and apply ice or cold packs on the joints and this may protect against prolonged joint pain.

DOH notes you should go to the Emergency Room to see a doctor if symptoms persist more than 10 days, or if you have bleeding from any part of the body or bruised skin. Call the hotline "or come to the ER or clinic if you are worried about your condition getting worse."

The alert once again urges that people stay indoors in air-con, behind screens, or under bed nets while you are ill, because if you are bitten by mosquitoes while you are ill, you can spread the disease to your family and neighbors.

For travelers, the DOH urges those who are ill not to travel off island, including to Manu'a. "If you travel and become ill when you arrive, tell the doctor who sees you that you may have been exposed to the CHIK virus."  [Byline: B. Chen]
----------------------------------
Communicated by:
Roland Hubner
Superior Health Council
Brussels
Belgium
-----------------------------------
[Interestingly, the 5 Aug 2014 report above indicated that there were 343 reported cases, and in the subsequent report of 8 Aug 2014 above, that number has increased to 390 cases, indicating that transmission of CHIK virus is continuing. - ProMed Mod.TY]
******
Samoa: suspected cases
Date: Fri 8 Aug 2014
Source: Island Business [edited]

Samoa's Ministry of Health has reported 2 deaths from acute fever and rash, saying it is now an outbreak. A press statement from the Director General, Leausa Toleafoa Dr Take Naseri, says there have been 21 recorded cases as of earlier this week with 4 people hospitalised.

The cases are suspected to be chikungunya virus, similar to dengue fever, but results are yet to be confirmed and 3 children and one man have been admitted to the intensive care unit.

The ministry says collaboration with other government agencies, and media campaigns, aim to raise awareness of the outbreak and help its containment.

Samoa has also sought assistance from the Ministry of Health's development partners including the Secretariat of the Pacific Community and the World Health Organisation.

In neighbouring American Samoa, there have been more than 300 confirmed cases of chikungunya.
======================
[This is the 1st ever ProMED-mail report of a chikungunya outbreak in Samoa. Concerning the current outbreak, it would be unusual to have 2 deaths from chikungunya virus infections of a total of 21 recorded cases. One explanation for the high proportion of fatal cases could be significant underreporting of non-fatal cases. No mention is made indicating that there were contributory underlying medical conditions in these 2 fatal cases. ProMED-mail will be interested in receiving results of the laboratory tests when they become available.

Maps showing the location of Samoa in the Pacific Ocean can be accessed at
at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/2>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
Date: Wed 14 May 2014
Source: Radio New Zealand International [edited]

Health officials in American Samoa are warning the public about an amoebic dysentery outbreak which has so far affected 26 people, half of which have been admitted to the LBJ hospital. A Pacific Island Health Officers' Association Epidemiologist, Mark Duran, says the department of health is leading an investigation into the source of the parasite.

Dr Duran says amoebic dysentery is spread through contamination of human waste. "It especially attacks the intestines and invades its way into the wall of the intestines; it causes abdominal pain, it causes bloody diarrhoea, fever." Dr Duran says in serious cases the parasite can travel through the body and cause abscesses especially in the liver.
===================
[Maps of American Samoa can be seen at
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/380>. - ProMed Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
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Bouvet Island

General:
**********************************
Cuba is an independent island country situated in the Caribbean. It is the largest of the islands and covers 42,000sq miles. The climate is sub tropical throughout the year with most of the rainfall in
the northern parts of the country. Temperatures of between 20C to 35C are fairly standard throughout the year. Generally the winter effects of the American continent only last for short periods.
Safety & Security:
**********************************
The majority of tourists visiting Cuba will have no difficulty but bag snatching and other street crime appears to be increasing. The old Havana area and other major tourist resorts may be particular areas of concern in this regard. On arrival be careful to only use your recognised tour operator. If you are taking a taxi at any stage make sure it is a registered one and not a private vehicle. It is unwise to carry large quantities of money or jewellery away from your hotel and try not to flaunt wealth with your belongings. Pickpockets are too common an occurrence on buses and trains and at train stations so be careful with your essential documents and credit cards. Valuables should not be stored in suitcases when arriving in or departing from Havana as there have been a number of thefts from cases during the time the cases are coming through baggage handling. There is an airport shrink-wrap facility for those departing Havana which reduces the risk of tampering. Remember to carry a photocopy of your main documents (passport, flight tickets etc).
Road Safety:
**********************************
Following a number of serious road accidents involving tourists, you are advised not to use mopeds for travelling around Cuba or in Havana. Also, if you are involved in any accident a police investigation will be required to clear you and this may significantly delay your travel plans. On unlit roads at night there have been a number of accidents associated with roaming cattle (sounds like Ireland!). The traffic moves on the right side of the roads. There is a main highway running the length of the country but many of the country roads are in poor repair.
Local Laws & Customs:
**********************************
When arriving into Cuba make sure you are not carrying any items which could be considered offensive. Any illicit drug offense is treated very seriously and Cuban law allows for the death penalty to be used under these circumstances. If you require personal medication for your health, make sure it is in original packing and carry a letter from your doctor describing the medication. Never agree to carry any item for another individual and always secure your cases once they are packed. Taking photographs of military or police installations or around harbours, rail and airport facilities is strictly forbidden.

Currency:
**********************************
Since 1993 it is now possible to use US dollars for all transactions within Cuba. Remember, there is a 20$ airport departure tax. Certain travellers cheques and credit cards may not be acceptable within Cuba. This is particularly true of American Express cheques and cards but check your situation with the travel operator before departure.
Health Facilities:
**********************************
Generally healthcare facilities outside of Havana are limited and many standard medications may not be available. It is important to carry sufficient quantities of any medications which may be required for the duration of your time in Cuba.
Food & Water:
**********************************
The level of food and water hygiene varies throughout the country and between resorts. On arrival check the hotel cold water supply for the smell of chlorine. If it is not present then use sealed bottled water for both drinking and brushing your teeth throughout your stay. Cans and bottles of drinks are safe but take care to avoid pre-cut fruit. Peel it yourself to make sure it is not contaminated. Food from street vendors should be avoided in most cases. Bivalve shellfish are also a high risk food in many countries and Cuba is no exception in this regard. (Eg Mussels, Oysters, Clams etc)
Malaria & Mosquito Borne Diseases:
***********************************************
Malaria transmission does not occur within Cuba and so prophylaxis is not required. However, a different mosquito borne disease called Dengue has begun to reoccur in the country over the past few years. This viral disease can be very sickening and even progress to death. It is rare for tourists to become infected but avoiding mosquito bites is a wise precaution.
Swimming, Sun & Dehydration:
************************************
The extent of the Cuban sun (particular during the summer months (April to October) can be very excessive so make sure your head and shoulders are covered at all times when exposed. Watch children carefully as they will be a significant risk. Drink plenty of fluids to replace what will be lost through perspiration and, unless there is a reason not to,
take extra salt either on your food or in crisps, peanuts etc. Take care if swimming in the Caribbean to stay with others and to listen to local advice. Never swim after a heavy meal or alcohol.
Rabies Risk in Cuba:
**********************************
This viral disease does occur throughout Cuba and it is essential that you avoid any contact with all warm blooded animals. Dogs, cats and monkeys are the most commonly involved in spreading the disease to humans. Don't pick up a monkey for a photograph! If bitten, wash out the wound, apply an antiseptic and seek urgent medical attention.
Vaccinations for Cuba:
**********************************
There are no essential vaccines for entry / exit if coming from Ireland. However, for your own personal protection travellers are advised to have cover against the following;
*
Tetanus (childhood booster)
*
Typhoid (food & water borne disease)
*
Hepatitis A (food & water borne disease)
For those planning a longer or more rural trip vaccine cover against conditions like Hepatitis B and Rabies may also need to be considered.
Summary:
**********************************
Cuba is becoming a popular destination for tourists and generally most will stay very healthy. However commonsense care against food and water borne disease is essential at all times. Also take care with regard to sun exposure, dehydration and mosquito bites.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

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Ethiopia

Ethiopia - US Consular Information Sheet
November 26, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia is a developing country in East Africa.
It is comprised of nine states and two city administrations (Addis Aba
a and Dire Dawa).
The capital is Addis Ababa.
Tourism facilities can be found in the most populous regions of Ethiopia, but infrastructure is basic.
The ruling EPRDF party and Prime Minister Meles Zenawi maintain strong control of the government and economy.
Despite several years of high economic growth, the country remains vulnerable to external economic shocks and recurring drought.

Read the Department of State Background Notes on Ethiopia for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
To avoid possible confusion or delays, travelers are advised to obtain a valid Ethiopian visa at the nearest Ethiopian Embassy prior to arrival, and must do so if entering across any land port-of-entry.
For example: travelers wishing to enter Ethiopia from Kenya at the land border at Moyale, must obtain an Ethiopian visa first.
Ethiopian visas ARE NOT available at the border crossing point at Moyale.
Travelers should apply for Ethiopian visas at the Ethiopian Embassy in Nairobi or at other Ethiopian embassies in other countries.
Ethiopian visas are available to U.S. citizens upon arrival at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa.
U.S. citizens may obtain one-month or three month, single-entry tourist visas or 10-day single-entry business visas upon arrival at Bole International Airport.
This service is available only at Bole International Airport and is not available at any other ports of entry in Ethiopia.
The visa fee at Bole International Airport is payable in U.S. dollars.
Such visas can be extended by applying at the Main Immigration Office in Addis Ababa.
Business visas of up to three-months validity can also be obtained at Bole International Airport upon arrival if the traveler has a sponsoring organization in Ethiopia that has made prior arrangements for issuance through the Main Immigration Office in Addis Ababa.
Travelers whose entry visa expires before they depart Ethiopia, must obtain a visa extension and pay a monthly penalty fee of $20 USD per month.
Such travelers may also be required to pay a court fine of up to 4000 ETB (USD $435) before being permitted to depart from Ethiopia.
Travelers are required to pay the penalty fee before they will be able to obtain an exit visa (USD $20) permitting them to leave Ethiopia.

Individuals intending to stay in Ethiopia for a prolonged period of time are advised to contact the Ethiopian Embassy in Washington prior to traveling.
The Ethiopian Embassy is located at 3506 International Drive NW, Washington, DC 20008; telephone (202) 364-1200; fax (202) 587-0195.
For the most current visa information, visit the Embassy’s web site at www.ethiopianembassy.org.
Inquiries by Americans located overseas may be made at the nearest Ethiopian embassy or consulate.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
While Ethiopia is generally stable, domestic insurgent groups, extremists from Somalia, and the heavy military buildup along the northern border pose risks to safety and security, particularly along Ethiopia’s border areas and in the Somali region.
In the past year, there has been an increase in targeted bombings in Addis Ababa and in other parts of Ethiopia.
In November 2008, the Government of Ethiopia issued a warning to its citizens alerting them of the potential for terrorist attacks and subsequently increased security measures to unprecedented levels.

Throughout Ethiopia:
Americans are strongly advised to review their personal safety and security posture, to remain vigilant and to be cautious when frequenting prominent public places and landmarks.
Targeted bombings in Addis Ababa and south eastern Ethiopia in 2008 resulted in numerous injuries and deaths.
Americans are advised to avoid public gatherings and public places, including hotels, if possible, and using public transportation and transportation hubs.
They are advised to beware of unattended baggage or packages left in any location, including in mini-buses and taxis.

Ethiopia/Eritrea Border Area:
Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace agreement in December 2000 that ended their border war.
However, the border remains an issue of contention between the governments of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
The border area is a militarized zone where there exists the possibility of armed conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean forces.
American citizens are advised to avoid travel in the areas along the Eritrean/Ethiopian border (within 50 km/30 miles of the Ethiopian/Eritrean border) because of the dangers posed by land mines and because of the possibility of conflict between Ethiopian and Eritrean defense forces.
Due to abductions and banditry, Americans are advised to avoid travel within 30 miles of the Ethiopian-Eritrean border west of Adigrat to the Sudanese border, with the exception of the town of Axum, and within 60 miles east of Adigrat to the Djiboutian border.
Embassy personnel are permitted to travel in these areas only on a case-by-case basis. Travel to the northern Afar Region towards the Eritrean border is also discouraged.
Embassy personnel are permitted to travel there only on a case-by-case basis.

Somali Region:
Since the mid-1990's the members of the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) have clashed with Ethiopian government forces near the city of Harar and in the Somali regional state, particularly in the Ogaden zones.
In April 2007, the ONLF claimed responsibility for attacking a Chinese oil exploration installation south of Jijiga, in Ethiopia's Somali region.
The attack resulted in deaths, kidnappings and the wounding of dozens of Chinese and Ethiopian citizens.
In 2008, a hotel in the town of Jijiga was bombed and two hotels in the town of Negele Borena were bombed.

American citizens are reminded that the U.S. Embassy strongly discourages travel to Ethiopia's Somali region and that a Travel Warning for Somalia has been issued that advises against all travel to that country.
Armed insurgent groups operate within the Somali, Oromiya and Afar regions of Ethiopia.
In December 2006, the Ethiopian Government, at the invitation of the Transitional Federal Government of Somalia, began military operations against extremists in Somalia.
As of November 2007, military operations continue in Mogadishu, where an African Union peacekeeping force, AMISOM, is deployed.
In 2008, two staff members of a non-governmental organization (NGO) were abducted in the Somali region.

Gambella Region:
Sporadic inter-ethnic clashes remain a concern throughout the Gambella region of western Ethiopia following outbursts of violence there in 2003 - 2004.
There is a heavy military and police presence in the town of Gambella.
While the security situation in the town of Gambella is calm, it remains unpredictable throughout the rest of the region, and violence could recur without warning.
Travel to this region is discouraged.

Travel in Ethiopia via rail is discouraged due to past episodes of derailment, sabotage, and bombings.
In southern Ethiopia along the Kenyan border, banditry and incidents involving ethnic conflicts are also common.
Travelers should exercise caution when traveling to any remote area of the country, including the borders with Eritrea, Somalia, Kenya and Sudan.
Ethiopian security forces do not have a widespread presence in those regions.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Pick-pocketing, “snatch and run” thefts, and other petty crimes are common in Addis Ababa.
These are generally crimes of opportunity rather than planned attacks.
Travelers should exercise caution in crowded areas and should avoid visiting the Mercato in Addis Ababa, a large open-air market.
Violence in the Mercato has been on the rise.
In 2008 an explosion in the Mercato killed several and wounded more than a dozen individuals.
Also in 2008, there was a shooting in the Mercato.
Travelers should limit the amount of cash they carry and leave valuables, such as passports, jewelry, and airline tickets in a hotel safe or other secure place.
Travelers should keep wallets and other valuables where they will be less susceptible to pick-pockets.
Travelers should be cautious at all times when traveling on roads in Ethiopia.
There have been reports of highway robbery, including carjacking, by armed bandits outside urban areas.
Some incidents have been accompanied by violence.
Travelers are cautioned to limit road travel outside major towns or cities to daylight hours and travel in convoys, if possible.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

There is no local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Ethiopia.
Distress calls should be made to the local police station, the telephone number of which can be obtained by calling directory assistance at 997.
This is the number for directory assistance throughout Ethiopia.
In Addis Ababa, the number for police is 991, for the fire brigade 939, and for an ambulance 907.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Health facilities in Addis Ababa are very limited and are generally inadequate outside the capital.
Even the best hospitals in Addis Ababa suffer from inadequate facilities, antiquated equipment, and shortages of supplies (particularly medicines).
There is a shortage of physicians.
Emergency assistance is limited.
Psychiatric services and medications are practically nonexistent.
Serious illnesses and injuries often require travelers to be medically evacuated from Ethiopia to a location where adequate medical attention is available.
Such “medevac” services are very expensive and are generally available only to travelers who either have travel insurance that covers medevac services or who are able to pay in advance the considerable cost of such services (often in excess of USD 40,000).
See Medical Insurance below.
Travelers must carry their own supplies of prescription drugs and preventive medicines, as well as a doctor's note describing the medication.
If the quantity of drugs exceeds that which would be expected for personal use, a permit from the Ministry of Health is required.
Malaria is prevalent in Ethiopia outside of the highland areas.
Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area and up to one year after returning home should seek prompt medical attention and explain to the health care provider their travel history and which anti-malarials they have been taking.
For additional information on malaria, protection from insect bites, and anti-malarial drugs, please visit the CDC Travelers' Health web site at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/index.htm.
Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Ethiopia.
For further information, please consult the CDC's Travel Notice on TB at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/yellowBookCh4-TB.aspx

Ethiopia is a mountainous country and the high altitude may cause health problems, even for healthy travelers.
Addis Ababa is located at an altitude of 8,300 feet.
Travelers may experience shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, headaches, and inability to sleep.
Individuals with respiratory (including asthma) or heart conditions should consult with a health care professional before traveling to Ethiopia.
Travelers to Ethiopia should also avoid swimming in any lakes, rivers, or still bodies of water.
Most bodies of water have been found to contain parasites.
Travelers should be aware that Ethiopia has a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS.
Ethiopia has had outbreaks of acute watery diarrhea, possible cholera, typhoid, or other bacterial diarrhea in the recent past, and the conditions for reoccurrences continue to exist.
Further information on prevention and treatment of cholera and other diarrheal diseases can be found at the CDC web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentDiseases.aspx.
Ethiopian authorities are monitoring the possibility of avian influenza following the deaths of poultry and birds; preliminary results are negative.
For additional information on avian flu please visit the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/.
The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ethiopia.
Please verify with the embassy of Ethiopia before you travel.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Specific medevac insurance, which generally covers evacuation of a patient from Ethiopia to a location where adequate medical attention is available, is often inexpensive and available through a variety of companies that can be accessed online.
Medicare and Medicaid recipients are not covered overseas and are advised to purchase supplemental health and medical evacuation insurances.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.
TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Ethiopia is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Ethiopia has the highest rate of traffic fatalities per vehicle in the world.
Roads in Ethiopia are poorly maintained, inadequately marked, and poorly lighted.
Road travel after dark outside Addis Ababa and other cities is dangerous and discouraged due to hazards posed by broken-down vehicles left in the road, pedestrians walking in the road, stray animals, and the possibility of armed robbery.
Road lighting in cities is inadequate at best and nonexistent outside of cities.
Excessive speed, unpredictable local driving habits, pedestrians and livestock in the roadway, and the lack of basic safety equipment on many vehicles are daily hazards on Ethiopian roads.
While travel during daylight hours on both paved and unpaved roads is generally considered safe, land mines and other anti-personnel devices can be encountered on isolated dirt roads that were targeted during various conflicts.
Before undertaking any off-road travel, it is advisable to inquire of local authorities to ensure that the area has been cleared of mines.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Ethiopia’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ethiopia’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa/.
The Ethiopian government has closed air routes near the border with Eritrea and has referred to the airspace as a “no-fly zone.”
The FAA currently prohibits U.S. aircraft and U.S. pilots from flying in Ethiopian airspace north of 12 degrees north latitude, the area along the country's northern border with Eritrea.
For complete information on this flight prohibition, travelers may visit the FAA's web site at http://www.faa.gov/airports_airtraffic/air_traffic/publications/notices/2008-11-20/PART3_SEC1.cfm.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Ethiopia does not recognize dual nationality.
The government of Ethiopia considers Ethiopians who have become naturalized U.S. citizens to be Americans.
Such individuals are not subject to Ethiopian military service.
The Ethiopian government has stated that Ethiopian-Americans in almost all cases are given the same opportunity to invest in Ethiopia as Ethiopians.
Several years ago the government of Ethiopia arrested people of Eritrean origin who initially failed to disclose their U.S. citizenship.
However, this has not occurred in recent years.
Ethiopian officials have recently stated that Eritrean-Americans are treated as U.S. citizens and are not subject to arrest simply because of their ties to Eritrea.
For additional information, see our dual nationality flyer.
Permits are required before exporting either antiques or animal skins from Ethiopia.
Antique religious artifacts, including "Ethiopian” crosses, require documentation from the National Museum in Addis Ababa for export.
Foreign currency should be exchanged in authorized banks, hotels and other legally authorized outlets and proper receipts should be obtained for the transactions.
Exchange receipts are required to convert unused Ethiopian currency back to the original foreign currency.
Penalties for exchanging money on the black market range from fines to imprisonment.
Credit cards are not accepted at most hotels, restaurants, shops, or other local facilities, although they are accepted at the Hilton and Sheraton Hotels in Addis Ababa.
Some hotels and car rental companies, particularly in Addis Ababa, may require foreigners to pay in foreign currency or show a receipt for the source of foreign exchange if paying in local currency.
However, many hotels or establishments are not permitted to accept foreign currency or may be reluctant to do so.

Ethiopian institutions have on occasion refused to accept 1996 series U.S. currency, although official policy is that such currency should be treated as legal tender.
Ethiopian law strictly prohibits the photographing of military installations, police/military personnel, industrial facilities, government buildings, and infrastructure (roads, bridges, dams, airfields, etc.).
Such sites are rarely marked clearly.
Travel guides, police, and Ethiopian officials can advise if a particular site may be photographed.
Photographing prohibited sites may result in the confiscation of film and camera.
There is a risk of earthquakes in Ethiopia.
Buildings may collapse due to strong tremors.
General information about natural disaster preparedness is available via the Internet from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at http://www.fema.gov/
Please see our Customs Information.
CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Ethiopia’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Ethiopia are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Ethiopia are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration website so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Ethiopia.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located at Entoto Avenue, P.O. Box 1014, in Addis Ababa; telephone: 251-11-124-2424; emergency after-hours telephone: 251-11-124-2400; consular fax: 251-11-124-2435; web site: http://ethiopia.usembassy.gov/
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Ethiopia dated April 30, 2008 to update sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Information for Victims of Crime, Medical Facilities and Health Information, and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2020 20:22:40 +0100 (MET)

Abidjan, March 26, 2020 (AFP) - Almost all of Africa's airlines are currently grounded because of the coronavirus pandemic and several could go bankrupt, the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) warned Thursday.   "Today, 95 percent of African planes are grounded owing to the pandemic, save for cargo flights," AFRAA secretary general Abderrahmane Berthe told AFP.

A large number of African states have closed their airports and borders because of the virus, forcing carriers to scrap inter-African as well as inter-continental flights.   "If the African carriers do not receive support they will find themselves insolvent come the end of June," warned Berthe, who calculated that the sector would require a bailout of between $2.5 to 3 billion (2.3 to 2.8 billion euros) in emergency aid or tax concessions.

"African carriers were already in a precarious state well before the COVID-19 pandemic. They have been making losses for a decade while other companies elsewhere were making money," Berthe said.   "The past fortnight has been catastrophic for African carriers whose planes are grounded. They have no revenue while at the same time they face costs they cannot squeeze" such as plane hire, maintenance, insurance and parking fees.   AFRAA's 45 member carriers account for 85 percent of inter-African traffic totalling 93 million passengers a year.   Although Africa accounts for just a two percent share of global air traffic, passenger numbers on the continent have been doubling every 15 to 20 years.
Date: Mon, 23 Mar 2020 15:36:01 +0100 (MET)

Addis Ababa, March 23, 2020 (AFP) - Ethiopia on Monday shut its land borders to nearly all human traffic as part of efforts to curb the spread of the coronavirus.    Africa's second-most populous country has so far recorded just 11 infections and no deaths, but officials have struggled in recent days to enforce prevention measures including bans on large gatherings, raising fears the tally could climb.    The land border closure was part of a set of new measures announced Monday by Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's office.   Soldiers will be empowered "to halt the movement of people along all borders, with the exception of incoming essential goods to the country," a statement said.

Security forces will also play a role in enforcing existing measures prohibiting large gatherings and meetings, it added.   Ethiopia has so far refrained from imposing the kind of shutdown seen in other East African countries like Rwanda and Mauritius.    But even its more limited measures have not been fully enforced, and Abiy's Prosperity Party has been criticised on social media for holding large meetings in various parts of the country where attendees have sat close together.    Monday's statement said political parties would "adhere to social distancing and preventative measures when convening meetings."

Ethiopia has kept its main airport open for international flights, although Ethiopian Airlines has been forced to suspend services to destinations in nearly 40 countries, according to its website.    Monday marked the first day of a new rule requiring all passengers arriving in Ethiopia to be quarantined in hotels for two weeks at their own expense.    Ethiopia shares land borders with countries including Eritrea, Sudan, Kenya, Djibouti and Somalia -- all of which have confirmed coronavirus cases.    Djibouti announced its second case on Monday.

Eritrea, with one case, on Monday announced new measures of its own including a ban on gatherings of more than 10 people.   The country's health ministry also urged residents to avoid public transportation and said Eritreans currently living abroad should refrain from returning.   Ethiopia's refugee population of more than 735,000 includes large numbers from neighbouring South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

The UN refugee agency UNHCR has voiced concern about how border restrictions implemented to fight the coronavirus could affect the rights of asylum seekers.    The UN "requests that measures be put in place to take into account access to territory of asylum seekers for those fleeing persecution," Ann Encontre, UNHCR's Ethiopia representative, told AFP on Monday.
Date: Mon 2 Mar 2020
Source: Teller Report [edited]

A mysterious disease has appeared in Ethiopia causing bleeding from the nose and mouth before the patient fell dead due to an infection [or poisoning - ProMed Mod.TG], according to what was reported by the British Daily Mail newspaper on Sunday [1 Mar 2020]. [It is thought this syndrome is] due to the emergence of this disease [related] to toxic waste resulting from oil drilling operations carried out by Chinese companies there.

The newspaper reported the disease, which was said to have spread to villages close to a gas project in Somalia, turns the eyes of its victims yellow before causing them to overheat, swelling their bodies and ultimately [causing] their death. In addition to other symptoms, including yellowing of the palms, lack of appetite and insomnia, according to a report published by Al-Hurra, quoting the British newspaper, the report also included the denial [by] officials in Addis Ababa, published by the Guardian newspaper, [of] allegations of a health and environmental crisis in the region.

The Daily Mail said the cause of the disease is unclear, although many suspect it is the result of chemical waste having poisoned water supplies in the area. The newspaper quoted a former engineer with the Chinese company who claimed there have been regular spills of drilling fluids, including sulfuric acid, over the 3 years he worked at the site in Calop. [Regular spills? This sounds like a planned release of sulfuric acid. - ProMed Mod.TG]

Another said: "These people die from the raw toxins having been spilled as a result of utter negligence. The companies operating in Calop have abandoned their duty to protect the local population." At the same time, the newspaper indicated these chemical spills are historical, or may be caused by companies [of] Ethiopian transport.

For its part, said Kitsila Tadese, director of licenses at the Federal Ministry of Mines and Oil in Ethiopia, according to the Daily Mail, "All gas wells in Kalop and elsewhere in the Ogaden basin are closed, safe and secure...according to international standards."

Ethiopia, located in eastern Africa, had found large quantities of gas in the eastern Ogaden basin in the 1970s. POLY-GCL has been developing the Club and Hilal fields there since the signing of the production-sharing agreement with Ethiopia in 2013. Calub, southeast Jijiga, will start commercial gas production soon.
Date: Thu 31 Oct 2019
Source: News 18 [abridged, edited]

For the past 10 months, Ethiopia has been experiencing a measles outbreak, which began in Oromio region and later affected 3 additional regions: Afar, Amhara and Somali. Since the beginning of the year [2019], a total of 8514 suspected measles cases, including 57 deaths (case fatality ratio 0.67%), were reported.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) says measles is endemic in Ethiopia with outbreaks reported annually. A quarter of the people affected during the current outbreak are 15 years and above, and more than 82.6% of cases were either not vaccinated or their vaccination status was unknown.
Date: Sun 20 Oct 2019
Source: WHO-AFRO [abridged, edited]

Weekly bulletin on outbreaks and other emergencies Week 42: 14-20 Oct 2019
Summary: Cases: 8514; deaths: 57; CFR [case fatality ratio]: 0.67%

Description
=======================
Ethiopia has been experiencing a measles outbreak since late December 2018. The outbreak was initially reported in Oromia region and later affected 3 additional regions: Afar, Amhara, and Somali.

In week 41 (week ending 13 Oct 2019), 24 suspected cases with no deaths were reported. Between week 1 and week 41 in 2019, a total of 8514 suspected measles cases, including 57 deaths (CFR 0.67%), were reported. Of the 8514 suspected cases, 180 samples were tested, and 14 tested IgM-positive for measles virus infection at the Ethiopian Public Health Institute laboratory in Addis Ababa. The peak of the outbreak was reached in week 9 (week ending 3 Mar 2019), with 642 cases reported, followed by a gradual decline in the number of cases to 24 cases reported in week 41.

A total of 4 regions have confirmed measles outbreaks, including 28 zones and 113 woreda [districts]. Oromia region is the most affected, accounting for 58% of the total reported cases, followed by Somali (28%), Amhara (8%), and Afar (6%) regions.

The majority of affected cases are children under 5 years old, comprising 50.4% of all cases, followed by the age group 15-44 years (25.4%) and 5-14 years (23.3%). Upon investigation of the vaccination status of the cases, it was noted that 72.6% had never received a single measles dose.

Public health actions
======================
- A national coordination committee was set up at the Ethiopian Public Health Institute to coordinate the response to the measles outbreak as well as regional coordinating committees in each of the affected regions.
- Enhanced surveillance activities continue to enable the early detection of cases and prompt treatment.
- The Ethiopian government together with WHO, UNICEF, and other partners supported a responsive vaccination campaign in Somali region.
- In early February 2019, Ethiopia launched a measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization programme in the 2nd year of life.
- Management of measles cases is ongoing at healthcare facilities in the affected regions.

Situation interpretation
======================
Measles is endemic in Ethiopia with outbreaks reported annually. A quarter of the people affected during the current outbreak are 15 years and above, and more than 82.6% of cases were either not vaccinated or their vaccination status was unknown. In addition, an effective cold-chain system for storage and transport of the vaccine is lacking in a number of regions, especially Afar and Somali regions. The estimated measles vaccine 1st dose (MCV1) coverage by WHO and UNICEF in 2018 was 61%, and the administrative coverage for the same period was 88%. This is suboptimal to protect a community against an outbreak (to achieve herd immunity, usually 95% and above coverage is required).

There is a need to apply simple yet innovative approaches to address the health system challenges that impact the effective delivery of measles vaccines, and other vaccines, to the population, especially those located in the hard-to-reach areas of the country. Routine measles vaccination for children, combined supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) and strong community engagement are key public health strategies to reduce the incidence of the disease.
================================
[Also see
and
More ...

Turkey

Geographical Information:
*****************************************
Turkey is officially known as the Republic of Turkey and is bordered on the northwest by Bulgaria and Greece, on the north by the Black Sea and on the south by Syria, Iraq and t
e Mediterranean Sea. The capital is Ankara with a population of about 2.5 million though Istanbul is a much larger city (6.6 million). The population of the country is estimated at 62 million with the majority in the cities and along the costal regions.
Climate:
*****************************************
The Mediterranean and Aegean shores of Turkey have long and hot summers with a milder winter. In Istanbul the average July temperature reaches 230C while in January it can drop to 00C. Throughout the country the annual rainfall is about 29". This is mainly during the months of December and January.

Health Care Facilities:
*****************************************
The level of adequate health facilities vary considerably within the country. Most of the better hotels will have access to English speaking doctors but care may be required if hospital admission is required.
Disease Profile:
*****************************************
Cholera and other water borne diseases are frequently reported from Istanbul. In the southeastern city of Diyarbakir there are regular reports of dysentery, typhoid, meningitis and other contagious diseases.

General Food & Water Hygiene:
*****************************************
There can be little doubt that travellers to Turkey who disregard basic hygiene precautions will run a risk of developing significant illness and a ruined holiday. With simple general care most tourists will remain healthy.

Food Rules:
*****************************************
Always eat in clean restaurants and hotels. Eat freshly cooked hot food. Stay away from cold salads, especially lettuce. Don’t eat any of the bivalve shellfish dishes such as oysters and mussels. Never eat food prepared by street vendors. Always peel your own fruit if at all possible.
Water Rules:
*****************************************
Never use the hotel tap water for drinking or brushing your teeth unless you can easily smell chlorine. Don’t allow ice in your drinks and be wary of the hotel water jug which may be in your room each day. Any of the canned drinks or bottles are usually quite safe. Just check the seal first!
Rabies in Turkey:
*****************************************
This disease is only a particularly risk for travellers who plan to have extended trekking holidays throughout Turkey. Most tourists travelling for a ‘sun’ holiday would be very unfortunate to be exposed but nevertheless care should be taken at all times to ensure that there is no contact with warm blooded animals. This is mainly true for dogs and cats but any infected
warm blooded animal can transmit the disease through its saliva. Any bite, lick or scratch should be treated seriously.
*
Wash out the area
*
Apply an antiseptic
*
Attend for urgent medical attention
Sun Stroke:
*****************************************
The immense strength of the sun in the Middle East can often be underestimated by the Irish traveller. This is especially true for small children and the elderly. Try and stay out of the direct sunlight between 11am to 4pm. Use a wide brimmed hat if possible to protect yourself. Drink plenty of fluid (about 2 or 3 times as much as in Ireland) and remember to increase your salt intake unless this is contraindicated because of high blood pressure or heart disease etc. Any signs of dehydration should be recognised and treated early (dry lips, headache etc.).
Anthrax:
*****************************************
This bacterial disease is sometimes contracted by travellers who purchase untreated leather goods while abroad.
Drug Trafficking:
*****************************************
Remember that Turkey is regarded as a gateway to Europe. Never agree to carry belongings for others unless you are certain of the contents.
Malaria in Turkey:
*****************************************
The risk of malaria in Turkey is very limited and transmission usually only occurs between the months of March to November in the Çukurova / Amikova areas and from mid-March to mid-October in southeast Anatolia. These are mainly away from the standard tourist routes and so prophylaxis will usually not be required. Nevertheless there may be an abundant supply of mosquitoes and other insects around. Travellers should carry insect repellents and wear longer sleeved clothing when at risk.
Vaccinations for Turkey:
*****************************************
There are no compulsory vaccines for entry to Turkey from Ireland. However, travellers are advised to ensure that they are adequately covered against Poliomyelitis, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A. Those spending longer in the country or undertaking a trekking holiday may also need to consider vaccination cover against Rabies and Hepatitis B .
Further Information:
*****************************************
Travellers can obtain further health information for overseas travel by contacting either of our offices. Useful web sites for information on Turkey include;

www.WHO.int
www.CDC.gov
www.FCO.gov.uk

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat, 4 Apr 2020 15:26:30 +0200 (METDST)

Istanbul, April 4, 2020 (AFP) - Turkey stepped up controls Saturday on crowded public spaces including markets and ferries in Istanbul a day after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan imposed the use of face masks to curb the coronavirus outbreak.    Turkey has so far recorded 425 coronavirus-related deaths and nearly 21,000 cases, most of them in the country's economic capital Istanbul, according to official figures.   From Saturday, all those going out to shops or markets must wear a face mask, Erdogan said, calling on the population to maintain a distance of "three paces" from each other when outside.

At an Istanbul bazaar in the Besiktas neighbourhood open every Saturday, police and local municipal employees handled the use of masks and hand disinfectants, while checking the temperature of incoming customers at the entrance.   Veli Yildirim, 50, who sells vegetables including tomatoes, said the measures came "too late."   "We are the latest compared to the rest of the world. Even this is not enough, there should be a complete lockdown" in Istanbul, he told AFP.    A 60-year-old customer in the bazaar, Asuman Karaman wearing a mask, agreed: "If these measures had been taken one or two months earlier, maybe the virus would not have been so widespread."   The bazaar looked quite calm -- in stark contrast to its usual noisy and crowded state.

Vendors complained their business was hit badly.    "This has a had a big impact, there is no one at the market, at this time of the day, we have nothing to do here," said Abbas Kose, who sells vine leaves.   At the ferries in Istanbul, passengers were seen wearing face masks.    The city's mayor Ekrem Imamoglu has been calling for total confinement but authorities have so far stopped short of that.    As part of the measures taken nationwide, authorities suspended international flights, issued a confinement order for everyone aged under 20 and over 65 and shut schools.   Erdogan on Friday also said vehicles would no longer be able to leave or enter 31 towns and cities, including Istanbul, for 15 days.
Date: Fri, 3 Apr 2020 20:36:36 +0200 (METDST)

Istanbul, April 3, 2020 (AFP) - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday issued a mandatory confinement order for everyone aged under 20 starting from midnight, as part of tougher measures to stem the spread of the coronavirus in Turkey.    In a television address, Erdogan also announced that vehicles would no longer be able to leave or enter 31 towns and cities, including Istanbul and Ankara, for 15 days.   People aged over 65 or those with chronic medical conditions are already subject to mandatory confinement in Turkey.    "Throughout the country, people aged under 20, that is to say born after January 1, 2000, will not be allowed to go out on the street" from midnight on Friday, Erdogan said.

Also, from Saturday, all those going out to shops or markets will be obliged to wear a face mask, the Turkish leader added, calling on the population to maintain a distance of "three paces" from each other when outside.   Turkey has registered over 20,000 coronavirus cases, 425 of which have been fatal.   Health Minister Fahrettin Koca warned on Friday that the country is just at the beginning of the outbreak, which has left over 50,000 people dead worldwide.   More than half of the Turkish cases have been in the economic capital Istanbul, which has a population of around 16 million people.

The city's mayor Ekrem Imamoglu has been calling for total confinement.    Erdogan's announcements on Friday are the latest moves to stem the spread of the virus in Turkey in recent weeks.   Schools have been closed down, flights grounded and gatherings banned.   Next week the Turkish parliament is set to consider a draft law to free 90,000 prisoners, a third of the population of the overcrowded prisons.   It will concern several categories of prisoners, among them pregnant women and older people with medical conditions.   But it excludes convicted murderers, sexual offenders and narcotics criminals, as well as political prisoners charged under Turkey's controversial anti-terrorism laws.
Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2020 22:13:24 +0100 (MET)

Istanbul, March 17, 2020 (AFP) - Turkey confirmed its first novel coronavirus-related death on Tuesday as the number of cases in the country has risen to 98.   "Today I lost my first patient in our fight against coronavirus," Health Minister Fahrettin Koca told a televised press conference, adding that the patient was an 89-year-old man.
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2020 15:24:02 +0100 (MET)

Istanbul, Feb 6, 2020 (AFP) - The death toll from two avalanches in eastern Turkey rose to 41 on Thursday, the government's disaster management agency said, as rescue teams continued a difficult search for two missing people.    Five were killed in the first avalanche in Van province bordering Iran on Tuesday, only for rescuers to be hit by a second avalanche the following day.    Three more bodies were recovered Thursday, the DHA news agency said, with the AFAD disaster agency saying a total of 84 people had been injured in the twin avalanches.

Rescue efforts continued despite adverse weather conditions that caused transport problems. Authorities have banned civilian access to the scene, DHA reported.    Last month, the eastern province of Elazig was hit by a powerful 6.7-magnitude earthquake that killed 41 people and injured more than 1,600 others.   A 2009 avalanche in the north-eastern province of Gumushane killed 11 climbers in the Zigana mountains.
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 2020 06:46:59 +0100 (MET)
By Mahmut Bozarslan and Fulya Ozerkan in Istanbu

Elazig, Turkey, Jan 25, 2020 (AFP) - A powerful earthquake has killed at least 20 people and injured more than 1,000 in eastern Turkey, as rescue teams searched through the rubble of collapsed buildings for survivors on Saturday.    At least 30 people were missing following the magnitude 6.8 quake on Friday night, which had its epicentre in the small lakeside town of Sivrice in the eastern province of Elazig.   "It was very scary, furniture fell on top of us. We rushed outside," 47-year-old Melahat Can, who lives in the provincial capital of Elazig, told AFP.   President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said all steps were being taken to aid people affected by the quake, which caused widespread fear.   "We stand by our people," Erdogan said on Twitter.

The Turkish government's disaster and emergency management agency (AFAD) said the quake hit Sivrice at around 8.55 pm (1755 GMT). Turkey lies on major faultlines and is prone to frequent earthquakes.    Turkish television showed images of people rushing outside in panic, as well as a fire on the roof of a building.   Interior, environment and health ministers, who were in the quake zone, said the casulties were in Elazig province and in the neighbouring province of Malatya, which lies to the southwest.

At least 20 people died and 1,015 others were wounded, according to AFAD.   "There is nobody trapped under the rubble in Malatya but in Elazig search and rescue efforts are currently under way to find 30 citizens," Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said on Friday.   Rescue teams were searching for survivors trapped in a five-storey collapsed building in a village some 30 kilometres from Elazig, according to AFP journalists at the scene. One person was pulled alive from the rubble.   Emergency staff and people waiting at the scene lit fires in the streets to stay warm in freezing temperatures.   Sports centres, schools and guest houses had been opened to accommodate quake victims in Malatya.

- 'Everybody is in the street' -
Sivrice -- a town with a population of about 4,000 people -- is situated south of Elazig city on the shores of Hazar lake -- one of the most popular tourist spots in the region and the source of the Tigris river.   The lake is home to a "Sunken City", with archaeological traces dating back 4,000 years in its waters.

The tremor was felt in several parts of eastern Turkey near the Iraqi and Syrian borders, the Turkish broadcaster NTV reported, adding that neighbouring cities had mobilised rescue teams for the quake area.   "Everybody is in the street, it was very powerful, very scary," said Zekeriya Gunes, 68, from Elazig city, after the quakes caused a building to collapse on her street.   "It lasted quite long, maybe 30 seconds," added Ferda, 39. "I panicked and was undecided whether to go out in this cold or remain inside."

The US Geological Survey assessed the magnitude as 6.7, slightly lower than AFAD, adding that it struck near the East Anatolian Fault in an area that has suffered no documented large ruptures since an earthquake in 1875.   "My wholehearted sympathy to President @RTErdogan and the Turkish people following the devastating earthquake that has hit Turkey. Our search and rescue teams stand ready to assist," Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis wrote on Twitter.   In Athens, the Greek premier's office said later that Mitsotakis had spoken by phone to Erdogan.   "The Turkish president... said Turkish teams had the situation under control for now and that it would be re-evaluated in the morning," his office added.

In 1999, a devastating 7.4 magnitude earthquake hit Izmit in western Turkey, leaving more than 17,000 people dead including about 1,000 in the country's largest city Istanbul.    In September last year, a 5.7-magnitude earthquake shook Istanbul, causing residents to flee buildings in the economic capital.   Experts have long warned a large quake could devastate the city of 15 million people, which has allowed widespread building without safety precautions.
More ...

Guinea

Guinea US Consular Information Sheet
August 15, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Guinea is a developing country in western Africa, with minimal facilities for tourism.
Travelers who plan to stay in Conakry, the capital, should make reservati
ns well in advance. French is the official language; Pular, Malinké, and Soussou are also widely spoken.
Read the Department of State Background Notes on Guinea for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport, visa, international vaccination record (WHO card), and current yellow fever vaccination are required.
Travelers should obtain the latest information and details from the Embassy of the Republic of Guinea, 2112 Leroy Street, NW, Washington, DC
20008, tel. (202) 986-4300, fax (202) 478-3010.
The Guinean embassy does not maintain a current website. Overseas, inquiries should be made to the nearest Guinean embassy or consulate.
Overseas, inquiries should be made at the nearest Guinean embassy or consulate.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Since early 2008, there has been a constant threat of violent strikes and demonstrations in Guinea.
The price of gasoline increased by more than 60 percent in April 2008, squeezing already economically hard-pressed Guineans and increasing tension in the country.
Parliamentary elections scheduled for late 2008 could result in violence.

While U.S. citizens have not been targeted in past outbreaks of violence, being in the wrong place at the wrong time can be very dangerous.
During periods of civil unrest, public services such as transportation and medical care, as well as availability of goods and services, can be affected.
During many demonstrations, crowds of people gather and burn tires, create roadblocks, and damage vehicles by throwing rocks and bricks. The military has also been known to demonstrate and incite unrest due to their grievances with the government.
Because of the potential for violence, U.S. citizens should avoid large crowds, political rallies, and street demonstrations. They should also avoid sensitive government installations, including the Presidential Palace, official government buildings, and military bases.

U.S. citizens should maintain security awareness at all times. There are no known terrorist groups officially operating in the country.

Most border crossings are controlled jointly by Guinean armed forces, gendarmes, police and immigration officials.
A long land frontier and the military’s lack of physical and monetary resources, however, mean that borders are lightly patrolled. U.S. citizens considering travel to the border regions with Liberia, Sierra Leone or Côte d’Ivoire should consult the latest Travel Warnings and Country Specific Information for those countries (available at the Bureau of Consular Affairs' Web site at http://travel.state.gov) and contact the U.S. Embassy in Conakry for the latest travel and security information.
Crossing land borders requires visas and complete paperwork, and can be difficult.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ website at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
In Conakry, as in many large cities, crime is a fact of daily life.
Residential and street crime is very common.
Sentiments toward Americans in Guinea are generally positive, but criminals regularly target foreigners, including Americans, because they are perceived as lucrative targets.
Nonviolent and violent crimes are a problem.
The majority of nonviolent crime involves acts of pick pocketing and purse snatching, while armed robbery, muggings, and assaults are the most common violent crimes.
In spite of good intentions, the police have been unable to prevent the rapid escalation of crime.
There have also been cases of direct and indirect requests for bribes from the police and military officials. Criminals particularly target visitors at the airport, in the traditional markets, and near hotels and restaurants frequented by foreigners.
Visitors should avoid unsolicited offers of assistance at the airport and hotels because such offers often mask an intention to steal luggage, purses, or wallets. Travelers should arrange for hotel personnel, family members, or business contacts to meet them at the airport to reduce their vulnerability to these crimes of opportunity.

Commercial scams and disputes with local business partners can create legal difficulties for U.S. citizens because corruption is widespread in Guinea.
Business routinely turns on bribes rather than the law, and enforcement of the law is irregular and inefficient.
The U.S. Embassy has extremely limited recourse in assisting Americans who are victims of illegal business deals.

Business fraud is rampant and the targets are usually foreigners, including Americans.
Schemes previously associated exclusively with Nigeria are now prevalent throughout West Africa, including Guinea, and pose a danger of severe financial loss.
Typically these scams begin with the receipt of an unsolicited communication (usually e-mails) from strangers who promise quick financial gain, often by transferring large sums of money or valuables out of the country, but then require a series of "advance fees" to be paid -- such as fees for legal documents or taxes -- to finalize the release of the transferred funds.
The final payoff does not exist; the purpose of the scam is simply to collect the advance fees. A common variation is the scammer’s claim to be a refugee or émigré of a prominent West African family, or a relative of a present or former political leader who needs assistance in transferring large sums of cash.
Still other variations appear to be legitimate business deals that require advance payments on contracts.
Sometimes victims are convinced to provide bank account and credit card information and financial authorization that drains their accounts, incurs large debts against their credit, and takes their life savings.

The best way to avoid becoming a victim of advance-fee fraud is common sense -- if a proposition looks too good to be true, it probably is.
You should carefully check and research any unsolicited business proposal before committing any funds, providing any goods or services, and undertaking any travel.
A good clue to a scam is the phone number given to the victim; legitimate businesses and offices provide fixed line numbers, while scams typically use only cell phones.
It is virtually impossible to recover money lost through these scams.

There is no “911” type of emergency assistance in Guinea.
For additional information on these types of scams, see the Department of State's publication, International Financial Scams.
INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends, and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical facilities are poorly equipped and extremely limited both in the capital city and throughout Guinea. Medicines are in short supply, sterility of equipment should not be assumed, and treatment is frequently unreliable. Some private medical facilities provide a better range of treatment options than public facilities but are still well below global standards. There are no ambulance or emergency rescue services in Guinea and trauma care is extremely limited. Water in Guinea is presumed contaminated, so you should use only bottled or distilled water for drinking. Malaria is a serious risk to travelers in Guinea. For additional information on malaria, including protective measures, see the CDC travelers’ health web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentDiseases.aspx#malaria.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Guinea.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s website at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Guinea is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Drivers in Guinea tend to be poorly trained and routinely ignore road safety rules.
Guinea's road network, paved and unpaved, is underdeveloped and unsafe.
Roads and vehicles are poorly maintained, road signs are insufficient, and roads and vehicles are frequently unlit.
Livestock and pedestrians create constant road hazards and make nighttime travel inadvisable.
Guinea has many roadblocks set up by the police or the military, making inter- and intra-city travel difficult from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.
During the rainy season (July through September), flash floods make some roads temporarily impassable.
There is also a significant increase in banditry along the roadways between towns and upcountry during the hours of darkness.
Americans and other foreigners are strongly discouraged from traveling after dark outside of populated areas.
Roadside assistance is not available in Guinea.

Guinea has no public transportation. Taxis, including small cars and larger vans, are often poorly maintained and overcrowded.
Taxis frequently stop and start without regard to other vehicles, making driving hazardous.
Rental vehicles, with drivers, are available from agencies at major hotels in Conakry.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Guinea, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Guinea’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s Internet web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Guinean customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary import or export of items such as firearms, antiquities, medications, business equipment, and ivory.
You should contact the Embassy of Guinea in Washington (see contact information above in the Entry Requirements section) for specific information regarding customs requirements.

The local currency is the Guinean franc (FG).
Travelers may not have more than 100,000 FG (currently about $23.00 nor more than $5,000 when they depart Guinea.
Guinea has a cash economy.
ATMs are not available, and traveler’s checks are accepted only at some banks and hotels.
Credit cards are accepted at some larger hotels in Conakry, but should be used only at reputable hotels and banks.
Cash advances on Visa credit cards are available at various branches of BICIGUI, a local bank.
Inter-bank fund transfers are possible at BICIGUI branches but can be difficult and expensive.
Money transfers from the U.S. have worked successfully in the past.
Western Union has several offices in Conakry, and Moneygram has an office downtown.

Visitors should restrict photography to private gatherings and should obtain explicit permission from the Guinean government before photographing military and transportation facilities, government buildings, or public works.
Photographing without permission in any public area may provoke a response from security personnel or a dangerous confrontation with people who find being photographed offensive.

Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Guinean laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession or use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Guinea are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Guinea are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Guinea. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located on the Transversale No. 2, Centre Administratif de Koloma opposite the New Radio Station in Ratoma, Conakry, Guinea; telephone +224-30-42-08-61 through 68 or fax +224-30-42-08-71; web site: http://conakry.usembassy.gov/.
*

*

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This replaces the Country Specific Information for Guinea dated August 28, 2007, to update sections on Safety and Security and Medical Facilities and Health Information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2019 17:40:25 +0200 (METDST)

Conakry, Aug 1, 2019 (AFP) - Six children aged between four and 10 died after they were struck by lightning while making tea under a mango tree in north-eastern Guinea on Wednesday, a witness said.   The storm began shortly before 7:00 pm (1900 GMT) in the town of Siguiri, close to the border with Mali, witness Mamadi Doumbouya, a local resident, told AFP.   He said eight children in total, accompanied by two of their mothers, were under a mango tree at the back of his house.   "I invited everyone to take shelter in my living room. The ladies rushed under my roof but the children stayed behind to make the last cups of tea," he added.

Lightning then struck the mango tree and when Doumbouya rushed out, all of the children were on the ground and unconscious, he said in a telephone call.   Six of the children -- five girls and a four-year-old boy -- died while being taken to hospital, he added.    A doctor from Siguiri Hospital said the six dead children were brought there in the early evening and two others were placed under observation for the coming days.   West Africa is currently undergoing its rainy season.   On Saturday a landslide hit a gold mine in the same area as Wednesday's storm, killing four people including a two-year-old girl and her mother.   "The victims were working in a former gold mine where mining was banned because of the risk of landslides" in the heavy rains, "but people were hiding to go to the tunnels", a Red Cross official said.
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 18:17:54 +0100

Conakry, Feb 7, 2019 (AFP) - Medical services in Guinea are on alert after a man died from Lassa fever, health officials said on Thursday, with some 80 people being monitored for the deadly disease.   Lassa fever is caused by a haemorrhagic virus which belongs to the same family as Marburg and Ebola.   The virus was found in a 35-year-old man from the southwestern town of Kissidougou. He died on January 29 in Mamou, some 400 kilometres (250 miles) away, according to officials.   Kissidougou is where an outbreak of Ebola began in December 2013, leading to thousands of deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.   "(We) have set to work to see if there are any hidden cases and to trace all the contacts" of the deceased man, said Sakoba Keita from the National Health Security Agency (ANSS).   Keita said it was not yet clear whether this was "an isolated case or an epidemic". 

Around 80 people -- 30 in Kissidougou and 50 in Mamou -- are being monitored but none have so far shown any symptoms of the disease, Keita said.   Lassa takes its name from the town of that name in northern Nigeria where it was first identified in 1969.   The virus is spread through contact with food or household items contaminated with rats' urine or faeces, or after coming into direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person.   It can be prevented by enhanced hygiene and avoidance of all contact with rats.   Nearly four in five peple who become infected with the virus do not have symptoms of the disease, the World Health Organization (WHO) says on its website.   A Lassa outbreak in Nigeria last year left 171 dead, and a resurgence of the disease there last month killed 16, according to official figures.
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2019 21:26:07 +0100

Conakry, Feb 4, 2019 (AFP) - At least 17 people have been killed in a landslide at a gold mine in northeastern Guinea, local police said Monday.   A local elected official confirmed the death toll, saying he had "seen at least 17 dead" after the accident which took place late Sunday in Norassoba, some 35 kilometres (20 miles) from the town of Siguiri.   "This death toll is clearly provisional as the villagers say there are still many people missing," police lieutenant Marcus Bangoura said.

One local inhabitant said "the landslide apparently took everyone by surprise, there was no sign of danger in this mine where we have been working for several years."  There are many such accidents in mines in mineral-rich Guinea where thousands risk their lives working in illegal pits.   The work becomes even more dangerous in the rainy season.

Guinea has gold, diamonds, bauxite and huge reserves of iron ore but the west African country's population struggle to make ends meet.    The miners include locals and those from nearby countries such as Burkina Faso, Liberia and Ivory Coast.   Authorities say there are more than 20,000 such miners in the Siguiri region.
Date: Sun 3 Feb 2019 9:02 AM GMT+1
Source: Bloomberg [edited]

Guinea's government has reported one case of a 35-year-old man with Lassa fever in the central town of Mamou, some 260-kilometers [162 mi] from the country's capital of Conakry.

An investigative mission will be deployed to the region to support health authorities, the government said on [Sat 2 Feb 2019] in statement posted on the website of the National Health Security Agency. No other Lassa fever cases were reported.

Lassa fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic illness, transmitted to humans through contact with food or household items contaminated by infected rodents.  [Byline: Ougna Camara]
========================
[Although rarely reported in Guinea, this may not be the 1st Lassa fever case that has occurred there. As noted when an earlier case was first posted on Thu 8 Feb 2018, it was the 1st Lassa fever case that ProMED-mail had posted for Guinea (see Lassa fever - West Africa (09): Liberia ex Guinea http://promedmail.org/post/20180210.5620420). That report indicated that the affected individual actually died in Liberia but indicated that the infection was acquired in Guinea. West Africa, including Guinea and Liberia, is endemic for Lassa fever virus.

The situation where the person reported above acquired Lassa fever virus is not indicated in this case. Virus transmission to humans occurs when people are in contact with the reservoir rodent host, the multimammate mouse (in the genus _Mastomys_) or its excreta, as was likely the situation in this case. Rodent control has to be undertaken at the village level with individual households. This requires an extensive and continuous public education effort. Transmission also occurs in health facilities when personal protective equipment is not employed and barrier-nursing practices are not adequate to protect staff from blood and secretions of infected patients.

Images of the _Mastomys_ mouse, the rodent reservoir of Lassa fever virus, can be seen at
<https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/45326-Mastomys-natalensis>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Guinea:
Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2018 14:38:26 +0100

Conakry, Oct 29, 2018 (AFP) - A "dead city" strike call by the opposition in Guinea largely emptied the streets of the capital Conakry on Monday, with no solution in sight to a pay dispute in the education sector.   Streets were deserted in some parts of the West African city, while traffic was jammed in other areas where all drivers were being diverted, an AFP correspondent saw.   Troops and police were placed on alert but few were deployed on the streets. Instead they were gathered in strength in central police stations and gendarmerie barracks, the correspondent said.   Youths burned tyres early in the day along a main Conakry thoroughfare, Le Prince street, but rain soon put out the fires and dampened the ardour of would-be demonstrators.

The political opposition called for the strike in protest against what it considers a violation by the authorities of an agreement reached in August over the appointment of local government officials elected in a hotly disputed vote on February 4.   Rivals of President Alpha Conde have also called for a march and rally in Conakry on Tuesday, a week after a banned demonstration during which opposition leader Cellou Dalein Diallo alleged that police tried to assassinate him.   Also last Tuesday, an 18-year-old was killed in street clashes and his family blamed police, who denied both shooting allegations.

On Monday morning, hundreds of schoolchildren in Siguiri, a town in the far north of the country, took to the streets to call for the return of their teachers, who began "an unlimited strike" on October 3 to press demands for a raise in minimum pay, according to local media.   The teachers decided to take tougher action after the government announced that it would not pay October wages for the strikers, said Aboubabar Soumah, general secretary of the powerful Free Union of Teachers and Researchers of Guinea (SLECG).   "From now on, it's not the worker who gets paid, but the work," Conde warned on state media.   "Teachers will stay at home until the end of the head of state's second mandate in 2020," the SLECG said in response.
More ...

Madagascar

Madagascar - US Consular Information Sheet
November 06, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Madagascar is a developing island nation off the east coast of Africa.
The primary languages are French and Malagasy.
French is less spoken outside
of major cities.
Facilities for tourism are available, but vary in quality.
Travelers seeking high-end accommodations should make reservations in advance.
Read the Department of State Background Notes on Madagascar for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
A passport and visa are required.
Visas are available at all airports servicing international flights, but travelers who opt to obtain a visa at an airport should expect delays upon arrival.
Visas obtained at the airport cannot be extended.
Most international flights arrive in Antananarivo, but there are some limited international flights to/from the nearby islands of Comoros, Mayotte and Reunion from airports in Mahajanga, Toamasina (Tamatave), Nosy Be, Tolagnaro (Ft. Dauphin) and Antsiranana (Diego Suarez).
There are also direct flights between Italy and Nosy Be.
Evidence of yellow fever immunization is required for all travelers who have been in an infected zone within 6 months of their arrival in Madagascar.

Travelers may obtain the latest information and details on entry requirements from the Embassy of the Republic of Madagascar, 2374 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC
20008; telephone (202) 265-5525/6; or the Malagasy Consulate in New York City, (212) 986-9491.
Honorary consuls of Madagascar are located in Philadelphia, and San Diego.
Overseas, inquiries may be made at the nearest Malagasy embassy or consulate.
Visit the Embassy of Madagascar’s web site at http://www.embassy.org/madagascar for the most current visa information.
Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
There are random police vehicle checkpoints throughout Madagascar, so all visitors should carry photo identification (i.e., U.S. passport) in the event of police questioning.
These check points are routine in nature, and should not result in vehicle and/or person searches as long as valid identification is shown.
Political demonstrations occur from time to time.
There have been incidents of violence during demonstrations, but these have not been directed against Americans.
Travelers should maintain security awareness at all times and should avoid political gatherings and street demonstrations.
Certain large gatherings such as concerts or scenes of accidents also may pose a threat to foreigners.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada, or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
The major concerns for visitors to Antananarivo are crimes of opportunity such as pick pocketing, purse snatching and residential and vehicular theft.
Although these incidents are generally non-violent, incidents involving violence by assailants do occur and are on the rise, particularly when the victim resists, and especially when multiple persons confront the victim.
The Embassy has received reports of physical attacks against foreigners, including Americans, particularly in coastal tourist areas.
A number of these attacks resulted in serious injuries and in some cases, fatalities.
Criminal elements in Antananarivo and throughout Madagascar are becoming bolder when selecting their victims, and are also committing more crimes in areas that are considered to be “safe” – those that are generally well lit and well traveled by pedestrians and vehicles.

To reduce the risk of being victimized, travel in groups and avoid wearing expensive jewelry or carrying high cost electronic items (iPods, digital cameras, or high end cell phones) with you in public. Valuable items should never be left in an unattended vehicle or at a hotel (unless locked in the hotel safe). Walking at night, whether alone or in a group is not considered safe in urban areas, including in the vicinity of Western-standard hotels, restaurants and night clubs. Visitors are strongly discouraged from traveling outside of Antananarivo after dark due to banditry, lack of lighting, and poor road conditions. In the last six months there have been several incidents involving nighttime criminal activity that targeted vehicles outside of town.
These events have involved villages designing a “trap” of sand, a tree log or some other substance or condition that makes the only viable road impassible.
Local villagers then “assist” the stranded vehicle and expect monetary compensation. Others have involved armed criminals who stage a “breakdown” that blocks the roadway, forcing the victimized driver to slow down, and hence become more vulnerable.

Criminal gangs comprised of felons, ex-military and police from the former regime are known to commit home invasions and kidnappings, sometimes targeting foreigners.
Organized gangs of bandits are known to patrol areas where foreigners, who are perceived to be wealthy, tend to congregate.
Crimes such as burglary and robbery do occur in areas outside the capital and the threat of confrontational and violent crime has increased in rural and isolated areas throughout the last year.
Specifically, Amboasary, a town in the southeast, has experienced a surge in armed robberies targeting not-governmental organizations (NGOs).
However, Americans visiting Madagascar should not expect to experience any hostility or aggression solely because of their citizenship.

In major cities, the National Police is charged with maintaining peace and security. Outside of major cities, the Gendarmerie is primarily responsible for these duties. Due to lack of resources available to both law enforcement agencies, police response to victims of a crime is often limited, slow and ineffective.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to local police and to the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends and explain how funds can be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.
During an emergency, visitors to Antananarivo can contact local police at telephone numbers 117 and 22-357-09/10 or 22-227-35. See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Standards of healthcare throughout Madagascar are well below U.S. standards.
However, there are foreign physicians in Antananarivo representing a broad range of specialties, but their training is variable and often not to U.S. standards.
The hospitals in Antananarivo vary greatly in standards of care.
Medical care outside of Antananarivo is generally well below the care available in the capital city.
Caution and good judgment should be exercised when seeking hospital and medical services.
The Embassy maintains a list of hospitals and specialists.
A Seventh Day Adventist dental clinic offers emergency procedures and x-ray facilities.
Some medications, generally of French origin, are available in Antananarivo.
If you need to refill a prescription from home, it is important to carry a prescription from your doctor listing the medicine's generic name.
There is limited availability of both prescription and over the counter medications, and outside of Antananarivo, medications may not be available.
Travelers should have a supply of any needed medication sufficient for the entire length of a visit before arriving in Madagascar.
Americans who will be carrying medications with them to Madagascar may wish to contact the Malagasy Embassy in Washington, D.C. regarding any restrictions on imports.

Ambulance services are available in Antananarivo with Polyclinique Ilafy at 22-425-66/69 or 033 11 458 48 / 032 07 409 38; Espace Medical at 22-625-66, 22-219-72, or 032-02-088-16 (cellular); and CDU (Centre de Diagnostic Medical d’Urgences) at 22 329 56 or 032 07 822 28 or 033 11 822 28.
However, due to traffic jams, response times are often dangerously slow.

Malaria is prevalent, particularly in the coastal regions.
Using preventive measures and malaria prophylaxis is strongly recommended.
Rabies is endemic and there are many street dogs.
It is recommended travelers have the pre-exposure vaccination series prior to arrival in Madagascar.
If bitten by an animal, the effected area should immediately be washed with soap and running water for ten minutes.
Seek medical care immediately.
Plague is also endemic to Madagascar.
While the reported HIV prevalence rate is low, particularly by African standards, Madagascar suffers from a very high reported incidence of other sexually transmitted diseases.

The East African Indian Ocean islands have seen a rise in the cases of Chikungunya.
As with Malaria, Chikungunya and Dengue are transmitted by mosquitoes.
Every effort should be made to use repellants, proper clothing and barriers that discourage/prevent mosquito bites.
The CDC web site contains further information on chikungunya at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/chikungunya/ and dengue at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/dengue/.
Travelers should drink bottled water or carbonated beverages.
Local water is not generally potable.
Water purification tablets may be used as necessary.
Bottled water is readily available in Antananarivo but is less so outside the city.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.
TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Madagascar is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
In Madagascar, one drives on the right side of the road, generally yielding the right of way to vehicles coming in from the left.
Some major intersections and traffic circles have police directing traffic.
If a policeman has his back to you at an intersection, you are required to stop.
Laws make seatbelt use mandatory and prohibit cell phone use while driving, even with a hands-free attachment.
Child safety seats and motorcycle helmets are not required in Madagascar.
If you are caught driving under the influence of alcohol, your car will be impounded for a few days and you will have to pay a fine.
If you are involved in an accident involving injuries and/or deaths, there is a mandatory court case.
The losing party of the court case must then pay all costs.

Except for Antananarivo’s main streets and a few well-maintained routes to outlying cities, many roads are in various states of disrepair.
Some may be impassable during the rainy season.
Night travel by private or public transportation outside Antananarivo is strongly discouraged due to poor lighting and road conditions.
Roads tend to be narrow and winding with many one-lane bridges and blind curves.
Most vehicles tend to drive in the center of the road unless another vehicle is present.
It is common to find livestock or human-drawn carts in the middle of the road, even at night.
Local practice is to blow the horn before going around a curve, to let others know of one's presence.
Few pedestrian crosswalks or working traffic signals exist.

Travel within Antananarivo can be difficult with poor road signage, streets congested with pedestrians, bicycles, animal carts, and vehicular traffic, and an abundance of one-way streets.
Taxis are plentiful and are generally reasonably priced.
Bargain for the fare prior to getting into a vehicle.
Most accidents are pedestrian-related, due to narrow roads and lack of sidewalks on many streets.
When traveling between cities, travelers must have clear directions as there are rarely signs indicating where one must turn to reach a destination.
Conditions of rural roads can degrade significantly and with little notice during the rainy season.

Rental cars generally come with a driver who is responsible for maintaining the vehicle and sometimes acts as a tour guide.
Public transportation is unreliable and vehicles are poorly maintained.
Rail services are extremely limited and unreliable.
The Ministry of Public Works, telephone (20) 22-318-02, is Madagascar's authority responsible for road safety.
During an emergency, visitors to Antananarivo can contact local police by dialing 117, 22-227-35, 22-357-09/10.
American citizens can also call the U.S. Embassy at 22-212-57/58/59 if assistance is needed in communicating with law enforcement officials.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Madagascar, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Madagascar’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s Internet web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.
Domestic and international air services operate regularly but are subject to delays and occasional breakdowns.
Air Madagascar often changes in-country flight schedules based on demand; flights that are not full may be cancelled with little or no prior warning to passengers.
Overbooking is also common.
Reconfirmation of tickets prior to flight day is recommended, especially when flying from provincial airports.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Madagascar in Washington or one of Madagascar's consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.
In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available.
Transactions involving such products are illegal and bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines.
Taking photographs of airports or military installations is prohibited.

Madagascar is renowned for its natural resources.
These include a wide variety of gemstones.
The Government of Madagascar recently imposed restrictions on the export of precious gems; before purchasing or transporting any gemstones it is advisable to seek clarification of the applicable laws.

Madagascar is primarily a cash-driven economy.
Although some high-end establishments catering to tourists accept credit cards, normally only Visa-logo cards, most shops and restaurants are cash only.
Although the government changed the local currency from the Malagasy Franc (FMG) to the Ariary several years ago, many Malagasy still think in terms of FMG.
When talking about prices, it is important to quantify whether the price is in Ariary or FMG. (1 Ariary = 5 FMG).
A few ATMs are available in large cities.
Dollars are not widely accepted. Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Malagasy laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Malagasy are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States as well as in Madagascar.
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Madagascar are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Madagascar.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy is located at 14-16 Rue Rainitovo, Antsahavola, Antananarivo.
The mailing address is B.P. 620, Antsahavola, Antananarivo, Madagascar; telephone [261] (20) 22-212-57; fax [261] (20) 22-345-39.
The Embassy’s web site is located at http://www.antananarivo.usembassy.gov/
*

*

*
This replaces the Country Specific Information dated June 2, 2008, to update the section on Crime.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 2020 23:59:35 +0100 (MET)

Antananarivo, March 22, 2020 (AFP) - President Andry Rajoelina on Sunday ordered lockdowns in Madagascar's two main cities to try to contain the spread of the coronavirus across the poor Indian Ocean nation.   "From tomorrow, Monday ... everyone stay at home," he said in a televised broadcast, adding that only the capital Antananarivo and Toamasina in the east were concerned.

Any transport, except for goods, was forbidden, he added. Only stores selling vital products such as food could open for business and only one person per family could go shopping.   Banks will remain open but a curfew during night hours will be introduced, he added.   "Those who don't respect these measures will suffer severe penalties," he warned.   Madagascar, one of the world's poorest countries, has registered 12 cases of COVID-19 so far. No deaths have been reported so far.

Across the world, an estimated 900 million people are already confined to their homes, according to an AFP tally, as part of efforts to contain the deadly pandemic.   At least 14,396 deaths have been recorded since the virus first emerged in December, according to an AFP tally compiled at 1900 GMT on Sunday based on official sources.   More than 14,000 people have died, with Italy reporting the highest toll.
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2020 20:16:23 +0100 (MET)

Antananarivo, Jan 24, 2020 (AFP) - At least 26 people have died in Madagascar after almost a week of heavy rain in the north-west of the island, the government said on Friday.   The tropical Indian Ocean nation is in the midst of an intense six-month rainy season that often results in casualties and widespread damage.   Flooding in the districts of Mitsinjo and Maevatanana has claimed at least 26 lives since Sunday, and 15 more people are still missing and thousands have been displaced, the National Bureau of Disaster Risk Management (BNGRC) announced on Friday.   Strips of road were swept away by the rains and access to affected areas has been cut off.

The BNGRC warned that flooding in lowland and rice-growing areas also posed a risk of "food insecurity and malnutrition".   A disruption in the supply of basic goods could also lead to surge in prices, it added.   Prime Minister Christian Ntsay declared the situation a "national loss".   "The government is calling on national figures and international partners to help the Malagasy people with emergency aid, early recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction," spokeswoman Lalatiana Andriatongarivo said in a statement.   The rainy season usually stretches from October to April in Madagascar, a former French colony off Africa's south-eastern coast.

Global warming has increased the risk and intensity of flooding, as the atmosphere holds more water and rainfall patterns are disrupted.    Built-up urban areas with poor drainage systems are especially vulnerable to heavy downpours, scientists say.   Nine people were killed in January 2019 after heavy rains caused a building to collapse in the capital Antananarivo.   During this period, the country is also often hit by cyclones and other tropical storms.   Cyclone Belna landed in the northwest last month, killing at least two people and displacing hundreds.
Date: 9 Aug 2019
Source: RFI [in French, machine trans. edited]

In Madagascar, the plague season has started. The 1st 3 cases of bubonic plague have just been recorded 50 km west of the capital. No deaths have occurred for the moment, but the Ministry of Health is watching. As every year, awareness campaigns have started. The goal: to prevent the spread of epidemics like that of 2017, the black year, which had more than 200 victims and 2400 people infected by the bacterium throughout the Malagasy territory.

"Do not repeat the mistakes of the past" is the stated ambition of the Ministry of Health. Contacted by telephone, the Director General of Preventive Medicine, Dr. Fidiniaina Randriatsarafara, said that "information and awareness activities have started. Radio clips are being broadcast on local radio stations to remind the public that the appearance of swelling, sudden fever, or chest pains require an immediate visit to the nearest health centre. Clinics are sometimes several hours walking distance away, and patients more easily consult traditional healers.

At present, health centres in plague-endemic areas are all expected to be provided with drugs, since treatment exists to treat both forms of plague on the island. However, some clinics are still awaiting them, according to a ministry official.

Another important preventive measure is the requirement for road transport companies to register the name and telephone number of all passengers during the plague season. In 2017, it was a sick traveller who transmitted the pneumonic plague to other passengers, extending the epidemic to Tamatave. However, according to a regional carrier, many companies do not register passengers and are not sanctioned.
=======================
[Plague infections in Madagascar have been relatively quiet since the dramatic outbreak in 2017.

The following paragraph is from Chanteau S, Ratsifasoamanana L, Rasoamanana B, et al. Plague, a reemerging disease in Madagascar. Emerg Infect Dis 1998;4(1):101-4, PMID: 9452403; available at <http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/4/1/98-0114_article.htm>:

"Between 1930 and 1990, bubonic plague had 'virtually disappeared' on the island due to efficient pest-control and good health management. However, since 1990, an annual 200 cases are being reported, and bubonic plague takes on epidemic form, especially in the port of Mahajanga, each year. In the capital city of Antananarivo, more cases are being notified each year since 1990. Madagascar (pop. 13 million) has accounted for 45% of all the cases of plague in Africa."

Fatalities related to plague usually are caused by spread of the organism from the bubo (the very painful infected lymph node that drains the area where the flea bite occurred) to the bloodstream. The bacteraemia can cause a coagulopathy, producing the purpura seen in the "black plague," and also may spread to the lungs causing a haemorrhagic pneumonia. It is the pneumonia that can facilitate person-to-person transmission.

Madagascar was the location of the isolation of multi-antimicrobial resistant _Yersinia pestis_ in 1995 (Galimand M, Guiyoule A, Gerbaud G, et al. Multidrug resistance in _Yersinia pestis_ mediated by a transferable plasmid. N Engl J Med. 1997;337(10):677-80, PMID: 9278464; available at <http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199709043371004>). The strain was resistant to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and tetracycline but sensitive to fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim as well as other aminoglycosides. This was an ominous observation; however, it is not clear whether this naturally occurring strain has persisted or spread. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Antananarivo, Analamanga, Madagascar:
Date: Thu 9 May 2019
Source: UN OCHA, ReliefWeb, UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) report [abridged, edited]

Madagascar: humanitarian situation report, quarter 1 - 2019
-----------------------------------------------------------
Highlights
----------
- Madagascar is facing an unprecedented measles epidemic due to low measles vaccination coverage (58 per cent nationwide). As of 3 Apr 2019 there were 122 840 registered cases, and 1233 reported deaths. The measles epidemic affects 107 out of 114 districts across all 22 regions of Madagascar.

- For the 1st quarter of 2019, UNICEF vaccinated over 1.9 million children under 5 years against measles. UNICEF also prepositioned emergency stocks consisting of medicines and basic equipment in 5 targeted regions.

- The nutritional status of the population of southern Madagascar remains precarious. The October 2018 Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) results revealed that 970 000 people would be in a food security crisis or emergency between November 2018 and March 2019. From January to March 2019, a total of 6767 severely malnourished children were treated in the UNICEF programme. While, 17 365 mothers were trained in nutrition screening techniques.

- More than 59 166 people gained access to safe water through ongoing water trucking supported by UNICEF and the rehabilitation of 129 boreholes and construction of six new boreholes.

Situation overview and humanitarian needs
-----------------------------------------
Measles
-------
The measles outbreak, which began on 3 Sep 2018, has resulted in 122,840 cases as of 3 Apr 2019. It is a nationwide epidemic, with cases reported across all 22 regions in Madagascar. The epidemic has a national attack rate which is currently 33 042 cases per 1 million inhabitants; demonstrating a high rate of spread. Of concern, measles cases have been exported to Comoros and La Reunion. This epidemic is occurring in a context of poor immunization performance. 2/3 of cases are either unvaccinated or their vaccination status is unknown. There have been 1233 deaths reported among the people with measles. Of these, 640 deaths have been notified in health facilities, and 593 at the community level, of which 191 are measles related and 402 non-classified by the community agents.

In Madagascar, there are basic measures to combat measles as well as good testing expertise, particularly through the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar (IPM). However, due to an overall weak health system, the country does not have the capacity to react to health emergencies of this scale without additional international support.
==================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Madagascar:
Date: Thu 28 Mar 2019
Source: Outbreak News Toady from International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Society [abridged, edited]

Number of people to be assisted: 1,946,656 people in the 10 targeted districts
- Direct targets: 524,868 children for immunization
- Indirect targets: 1,421,788 for sensitization

Host National Society presence of volunteers: Malagasy red Cross Society (MRCS) with 12 000 volunteers across the country. Some 1030 volunteers 206 NDRT/BDRTs, 10 full-time staff will be mobilized through the DREF in the 10 districts.

Red Cross Red Crescent Movement partners actively involved in the operation: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), German Red Cross, Danish Red Cross, Luxembourg Red Cross, French Red Cross through the Indian Ocean Regional Intervention Platform (PIROI).

Other partner organizations actively involved in the operation:
Ministry of Health, WHO, UNICEF

Situation.
In July 2018, the 1st case of measles was notified in the urban health centre of the district of Antananarivo Renivohitra in Madagascar. According to WHO, from 4 Oct 2018 to 7 Jan 2019, 19 539 measles cases and 39 "facility-based" deaths (case fatality ratio: 0.2%) were reported by the Ministry of Public Health (MoH) of Madagascar. Cases were reported from 66 of 114 total districts in all 22 regions of Madagascar.

In February 2019 (weeks 7-8), an overall 774 new cases were recorded in 3 newly affected districts including Andilamena (145 cases in week 7 and 167 cases in week 8); Mahajanga II (142 cases in week 7 and 241 cases in week 8) and Mahanoro (22 cases in week 7 and 57 cases in week 8). Despite stabilizing in some areas, the above-mentioned spikes show that the epidemic is progressing, and the epidemic is now posing significant risk to remote and hard to reach communities as seen in the table below, which summarizes the rate at which the disease has been spreading, with 7288 new cases in March 2019 (weeks 9-12).

Indeed, from the onset of the outbreak until 20 Mar 2019, some 117,075 cases have been recorded with 638 deaths notified by health facilities, while 567 deaths have been reported within the communities (114 deaths related to measles and 453 unrelated deaths as per community volunteers). As per Ministry of Health (MoH), about 56% of cases are unvaccinated or of unknown vaccine status. Most cases have been reported in children under 9 years old. Some 105 districts are currently in epidemic situation in the overall 22 regions of the country. The increase in cases can be seen in graphs in the pdf listed above.

Madagascar has not suffered any measles outbreaks in the last 13 years (since 2005) and was already on the road to eliminating measles.
========================
 [See full report in pdf above. - ProMED Mod.LK]
More ...

Nepal

General:
*******************************
Nepal is regarded as a developing nation which has a great variability of facilities for the tourist depending on the location throughout the country. It is a mountainous country and many travellers to th
s region undertake long arduous treks. It is wise to ensure that your general health will be sufficient for the trip you plan under normal circumstances. Talking your itinerary through with other experienced travellers to this region will be important before you finally book your holiday. The climate varies throughout the year with their monsoon season typically stretching from May to October. During this time significant flooding can occur and the high humidity leads to increased numbers of mosquitoes. Travel to the Terai plains during this period leads to the greatest risk of mosquito borne disease.
Safety & Security:
*******************************
The security situation throughout Nepal has caused quite a degree of concern throughout the past few years. There has been a general increased level of robberies and this has involved tourists on a number of occasions. Those trekking in Nepal are strongly advised to travel with reputable organised groups who will have checked the local situation out carefully before departure. It is very inadvisable to trek alone in Nepal. This is particularly true in the Rasuwa District of the Langtang Area. Airport security in Katmandu has been improved since the hijacking of Indian Airlines flight IC814 in December 1999 but take care of your belongings at all times and never carry anything for strangers no matter how plausible their reason may be.
Health Facilities:
*******************************
The level of Western health facilities in Katmandu and Pokhara are excellent but expensive. Outside of the main city the level of healthcare can be very limited. It is essential that all tourists ensure that they have adequate travel insurance which will cover accidents and evacuation by helicopter. Cover for cancelled flights and loss of belongings is also extremely important. The CIWEC Medical Clinic in Katmandu provides an excellent medical service for travellers and their web page gives extensive advice on travelling throughout Nepal.Telephone numbers Katmandu 228531, or 241732. Web site: www.ciwec-clinic.com
Food & Water Facilities:
*******************************
Katmandu is a large city with a large population and much squalor. The main tourist hotels provide a good degree of hygiene for travellers but those undertaking trekking holidays will leave this relative health security and head to regions of the country where food and water hygiene are very poor. It is essential that all food consumed is freshly prepared and well cooked. Cold vegetables or salads should be avoided as the risk of diseases like amoebiasis and giardiasis is very high. All water should be checked for a smell of chlorine and if this is not present then it should not be used for either drinking or brushing your teeth. Even bottled water from any source outside of the main hotels should be treated with suspicion as in many cases it will be plain untreated tap water.
Rabies risks in Nepal:
*******************************
This viral disease is usually transmitted by the bite (lick or scratch) from any infected warm blooded animal. Usually humans are infected by dogs but cats and monkeys are also frequently implicated. In many of the temples of Nepal there will be a multitude of monkeys and it may be difficult to avoid contact. If you are exposed then urgent medical attention will be required and this will often mean a rapid return to Katmandu. Never treat this disease lightly and always ensure that any contact is followed up as soon as possible.
Altitude Problems:
*******************************
Arriving into Katmandu at 4,500ft usually presents no major difficulty for travellers. However, depending on the actual trek which is proposed you may put yourself at risk of exhaustion, dehydration and altitude sickness. The better tour companies will tailor the actual trek to the abilities of those taking part but try not to allow yourself become attached to a group which will push your health to extremes. Many treks will take travellers to heights reaching 18,000ft.
Malaria risk in Nepal:
*******************************
The main risk of malaria in Nepal will be for those visiting the Terai region. Even here, the significant risk occurs during the monsoon season and for a period afterwards. However, malaria transmission is reported from other regions of the country and this will need to be talked through in depth before you leave home.
Mosquito Borne diseases:
*******************************
Apart from malaria there are two other significant mosquito borne diseases which occur in regions of Nepal. Dengue Fever and Japanese B Encephalitis are both frequently implicated in outbreaks and both diseases can cause severe illness even death. Avoiding mosquito and sandfly bites at all times is essential.
Road & Climbing Safety:
*******************************
The road conditions throughout rural Nepal are poor and care will be required at all times. Many mountainous passes are impassible during the monsoon season and can even be very hazardous at other times throughout the year. In Katmandu the roads are congested, pollution is a significant problem and walkways may be non existent in many places. If undertaking a trek it is important to make sure your general health is sufficient and that you have adequate clothing and shoes to suit both the expected and unexpected.
Local Laws & Customs:
*******************************
The Nepalese customs are very strict regarding importation and exportation of many goods including valuable metals, articles of archeological or religious importance, drugs, arms and communication equipment. Imprisonment can quickly follow any infringement of their rules. Women are advised to dress modestly and generally it is wiser to avoid inappropriate clothing in public such as shorts, sleeveless tops etc.
Vaccination for Nepal:
*******************************
Unless you are entering Katmandu from tropical Africa there are no essential vaccines for entry or exit. We used to receive reports of buses being stopped coming overland from India and for all on board to have evidence of Cholera vaccination. However, this does not appear to be a current problem. Nevertheless, for your own personal health it is recommended that travellers are covered against the following diseases;
*
Poliomyelitis (childhood booster)
*
Tetanus (childhood booster)
*
Typhoid (food and water borne disease)
*
Hepatitis A (food and water borne disease)
For those undertaking a longer more rural trip other vaccines may need to be considered including Hepatitis B, Rabies, Japanese B and Meningitis.
Summary:
*******************************
Tourists will need to ensure the highest level of personal care while visiting Nepal at all times. Many of the conditions and situations mentioned above occur frequently in those who forget the basic commonsense rules about travelling healthy.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 5 Feb 2020
Source: The Himalayan Times [edited]

A person died from viral fever in Swamikartik Khapar rural municipality of Bajura district on Tuesday evening [4 Feb 2020]. The deceased was aged 55, of Joru, in the rural municipality. Five other members of this person's family are known to be sick, said in-charge of Sappata Health Post, Birja BK, adding that hundreds have fallen sick in the rural municipality.

Acting chief administrative officer of Swamikartik Khapar rural municipality, Kuber Shahi, said that over 215 people in ward-1 have fallen ill from the seasonal flu. He added that health workers are finding it difficult to administer treatment after the whole village started falling sick. Shahi quoted the health workers as saying that treatment of patients has become challenging due to lack of sufficient medicines and human resources at the health post. The number of people suffering from the condition increased over the past week.

Meanwhile, the coordinator of the health department at the rural municipality, Bhakta Bahadur Kaila, said health personnel along with available medicines would be mobilised to the viral-fever-affected areas. Health professionals have advised the locals to be alert and take precautionary measures to avoid the spreading of the viral condition.

Himali rural municipality has also reported some cases of the viral fever; a team of health professionals are visiting today to assess the situation.  [byline: Prakash Singh]
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2020 18:26:22 +0100 (MET)

Kathmandu, Jan 24, 2020 (AFP) - Health authorities in Nepal on Friday confirmed that a student who returned from Wuhan, China tested positive for the new coronavirus, becoming the first South Asian country to report the deadly disease.   The 32-year-old student arrived in Nepal on January 9, and entered the Sukraraj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital in Kathmandu four days later after running a fever and reporting trouble breathing, hospital spokesperson Anup Bastola told AFP.

The health ministry confirmed the case in a statement.   "The results of a sample, sent to Hong Kong, have returned positive," Bastola told AFP.    "He was discharged after recovery. We are monitoring the patient and he and his family members are healthy. So are all the health workers in the hospital," Bastola said.

Nepal's health ministry also said in a statement that surveillance has been increased at the airport, "and suspicious patients entering Nepal are being monitored with correct manpower and equipment".   At least 26 people have been killed by the previously unknown SARS-like coronavirus. Cases have been reported in half a dozen countries, including the United States.
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 12:08:14 +0100 (MET)

Kathmandu, Jan 21, 2020 (AFP) - Eight Indian tourists, including four children, have died after they were found unconscious in their room at a hill resort in Nepal on Tuesday, police said.   The eight -- two couples and their children -- had slept in one room at a hotel in Daman, a popular tourist destination in Makwanpur district about 55 kilometres (34 miles) from Kathmandu.   "They were found unconscious this morning and airlifted to Kathmandu but died during treatment," police spokesman Shailesh Thapa Chettri told AFP.

The families, from the south-eastern state of Kerala, used a gas heater in their room to keep warm, a district official told AFP.   "We suspect they died of suffocation, but autopsy reports will confirm the cause," Chettri added.   India is Nepal's biggest source of tourists, making up some 16 percent of visitors to the Himalayan nation.
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2020 14:17:42 +0100 (MET)

Kathmandu, Jan 19, 2020 (AFP) - Avalanches, heavy snow and poor visibility hampered the search Sunday for four South Koreans and three Nepalis caught in an avalanche in the popular Annapurna region of the Himalayas, officials said   Relatives of the missing Koreans have arrived in Kathmandu alongside several officials sent by Seoul to help with the emergency rescue efforts, Ang Dorjee Sherpa of the Korean Alpine Federation told AFP.

The missing group was near the Annapurna base camp around 3,230 metres (10,600 feet) above sea level when the avalanche struck after heavy snowfall on Friday.   "Our team reached the area but could not proceed with their search because of more avalanches. We are exploring ways to move the operation forward," said Mira Acharya from Nepal's tourism department.

Rescuers were working with Korean officials to deploy drones in the search on Monday, said Dilip Gurung of the tourism management committee in Chhomrong, which lies on the trekking route.   "It is difficult for people to go. We will try to fly drones to help find something," Gurung said.   Helicopters were sent out on Saturday to rescue about 200 people stranded around Annapurna and other nearby mountains after the incident.

Guesthouses and the trekking route were blanketed in a thick layer of snow.   "The snow was very deep and it took us more than double the time to dig through and walk," said Jeevan Dahal, a guide who was rescued by helicopter.   "We saw the avalanche-hit area from the helicopter. Everything was white."   Tek Gurung, a guesthouse owner aiding the search operation, said more than two metres of snow (6.6 feet) had fallen on the trekking trails and it was "extremely difficult" to search the snow-covered area on foot.

Six of the missing were part of the same expedition, while one Nepali porter was escorting a different group.   The four foreigners -- two men and two women -- were part of an 11-member team of South Korean nationals. Others have safely descended.    Education officials in Seoul said they were part of a team of volunteer teachers working with children in Nepal.

Two more South Koreans were due to arrive in Nepal on Sunday to help with the search, the country's foreign ministry said.   Sherpa said it had snowed heavily around Annapurna in recent days, making the trek risky.   "The weather and snow got worse and, feeling it was becoming dangerous and difficult, they decided to turn. As they were heading back the avalanche hit," Sherpa told AFP on Saturday.

Annapurna is an avalanche-prone and technically difficult mountain range with a higher death rate than Everest, the world's highest peak.    Thousands of trekkers visit the route every year for its stunning views of the Himalayas.   A snowstorm killed about 40 people on the circuit in 2014, in one of the biggest trekking tragedies to hit Nepal.
Kathmandu. 6 Sep 2019

If laboratory tests carried out at Sukraraj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital today [6 Sep 2019] are anything to go by, roughly 50% of those who visit the hospital with fever and muscle pain are dengue-infected. According to the hospital, of the 372 blood tests done today [6 Sep 2019], 175 tested positive for dengue. "There has been a significant rise in the number of dengue-infected patients at the hospital. Unless people are aware and start working on their own, it is difficult to prevent the infection," said Anup Bastola, spokesperson and consultant tropical medicine physician at Sukraraj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital.

- Kathmandu. 19 Sep 2019.The cases of dengue fever are on the rise in Bhaktapur, indicating that it is gradually taking an epidemic turn. In the past 2 weeks, 197 people have been diagnosed with dengue in the district.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 09:21:43 +0200 (METDST)
By Jing Xuan TENG

Wuhan, China, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Voicing joy and excitement from behind face masks, tens of thousands of people fled Wuhan on Wednesday after a 76-day travel ban was lifted on the Chinese city where the coronavirus first emerged.   Previously quiet train and bus stations bustled as an exodus began from the city of 11 million, with some passengers wearing hazmat suits.

Hao Mei, a single parent from the nearby city of Enshi, said her two children had been home alone since she got stuck in Wuhan, where she works in a school kitchen.   "You have no idea! I was already up around 4 am. I felt so good. My kids are so excited. Mum is finally coming home," the 39-year-old told AFP as she waited to board a train.   "At the start of the lockdown, I cried every night. I was really miserable, because my little girl is still young, she's only 10."

Up to 55,000 people are expected to leave Wuhan on Wednesday just by train, according to government estimates.   Steady streams of cars were on the roads heading out of the city Wednesday morning, after barricades on its outskirts were dismantled with the ban on outbound travel being lifted at midnight.

Ferries, trams and taxis resumed operations and the airport also opened again for domestic flights, with queueing passengers in protective wear wheeling cases.   State news agency Xinhua said there would be around 200 inbound and outbound flights leaving the city on Wednesday.   A group of medics leaving Wuhan hugged their colleagues from the city goodbye as they prepared to board flights home.

- World-first lockdown -
Wuhan led the world with an unprecedented quarantine lockdown on January 23 in a bid to stop the spread of the then-mysterious respiratory virus.   Chinese disease control officials said in January that the virus likely leapt from wildlife to humans at a Wuhan market that sold wild animals for food.   The rest of surrounding Hubei province quickly followed Wuhan, cutting tens of millions of people off from the world.

As the virus spread rapidly around the globe, many countries imposed similar draconian measures that have forced around half of humanity into some form of lockdown.   But while the pandemic continues to worsen in many other parts of the world, with the global death toll surpassing 80,000, the quarantine measures have appeared to pay off in Wuhan and other parts of China.   Its officially reported number of deaths and overall infections has plummeted in recent weeks.

China's ruling Communist Party -- accused of a slow-footed response and an initial attempt to cover up the outbreak -- has portrayed its subsequent containment efforts as a huge success.   "Wuhan deserves to be called the city of heroes," blared an announcement on one of the city's train station PA systems on Wednesday.   "Wuhan has lost a lot in this epidemic, and Wuhan people have paid a big price," a 21-year-old man surnamed Yao, who was heading back to his restaurant job in Shanghai, told AFP.   "Now that the lockdown has been lifted, I think we're all pretty happy."

- 'Not releasing control' -
Restrictions began to be eased for residents of Hubei, which has suffered the majority of China's officially reported 3,300 deaths, about two weeks ago.   Authorities, however, waited until Wednesday to allow normal traffic out of Wuhan amid lingering fears elsewhere in China that people from the city pose a risk.   Those fears were clearly evident throughout Wuhan despite the buzz of excitement.

At the city's Hankou train station, a robot whizzed through crowds of passengers, spraying their feet with disinfectant and playing a recorded message reminding them to wear face masks.   Passengers also had to submit to temperature checks and show a green "health code" on their phone, meaning they are considered healthy, allowing them to travel.   Part of the "health code" approval is based on their neighbourhood having been declared virus-free.

Many travellers from Wuhan will also face two-week quarantines in their destination provinces.   Eastern Zhejiang province said it will make all arrivals from Wuhan for the next two weeks have a nucleic acid test for the virus.   Various restrictions on movement within the sprawling metropolis will also remain in place to guard against a second wave of infections.   The state-run People's Daily newspaper warned Wednesday that opening up "does not mean releasing control".

Officials have said schools in Wuhan will remain closed and citizens are being discouraged from leaving the city, or even their own residential neighbourhoods.   Wuhan public security bureau official Yan Qiangsheng told reporters Wednesday that "lifting the lockdown doesn't mean stopping the anti-virus measures we have in place."    Government estimates said nearly half the people expected to leave Wednesday were bound for the southern economic powerhouse of Guangdong province, a magnet for migrant workers.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 05:36:53 +0200 (METDST)

Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Authoritarian Turkmenistan gathered thousands of citizens for mass exercise events to mark World Health Day, state media said, ignoring the global trend for social distancing to fight the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Central Asian country, along with North Korea, is one of a handful of territories which claim they have no cases of the virus which is sweeping across the globe.   A state television broadcast late on Tuesday showed hundreds of people wearing identical coloured tracksuits cycling in close formation on a cold, damp day in the capital Ashgabat.

Another sequence showed state employees including medical staff doing stretches inside and outside government buildings.   State media said 7,000 citizens participated in cycling events across the gas-rich ex-Soviet country to celebrate the date, which has been marked internationally since 1950.   President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov was shown riding a horse and biking with a small group of officials.

Turkmenistan has yet to register a case of the novel coronavirus that has killed more than 80,000 people worldwide, despite sharing a border with Iran, one of the first countries to be hit hard by the pandemic after China.   The country's government is notoriously secretive and national statistics, whether health-related or economic, are regularly doubted by field experts.

A separate state news report on Wednesday said authorities were building a hospital to treat infectious diseases in the Akhal region that surrounds Ashgabat, but did not mention COVID-19.   Strongman Berdymukhamedov mentioned the coronavirus publicly for the first time last week in a speech where he talked about the economic threat posed by the pandemic.    Turkmenistan and Tajikistan -- another former Soviet Central Asian country that has yet to declare a case of the disease -- both sent children back to school after spring holidays this week.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 20:44:51 +0200 (METDST)
By Mariëtte Le Roux and AFP bureaus

Paris, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - Paris on Tuesday banned daytime jogging to keep people from bending anti-coronavirus lockdown rules as France breached 10,000 deaths due to the outbreak.   Other cities also announced stricter restrictions, some controversial, on the day top health official Jerome Salomon told journalists 10,328 people had died of COVID-19 in France since March 1.   Of these, 7,091 had perished in hospitals -- 597 in the last 24 hours -- and 3,237 in old age homes, Salomon said, warning "the epidemic is continuing its progression."   "We are in the ascending phase of the epidemic, even if it is slowing a bit," he said, adding "we have not yet reached the peak."

Senior government officials warned it was too early to think of lifting the nationwide lockdown which entered into force on March 17 and is set to run until April 15, for now.   Interior Minister Christophe Castaner has urged municipal officials to toughen restrictions on movement if necessary, and Paris announced it would enforce a ban on individual outdoor sports between the hours of 10:00 am and 07:00 pm starting Wednesday.   Under the nationwide orders, people can leave home only for essential purposes, which include a solo walk or run within a one-kilometre (0.6-mile) radius of home.

But amid a spell of sunny spring weather, large groups of Parisians were seen running, walking and congregating over the weekend, even as police stepped up patrols and already overstretched hospitals grappled with an influx of patients.   "Every excursion avoided aids the fight against the epidemic," Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo and police chief Didier Lallement said in a statement Tuesday announcing the partial jogging ban.   Paris and other cities have already closed public parks and gardens as part of the nationwide lockdown that requires people to carry a document justifying any excursion from the home.    Those caught without the document risk a fine starting at 135 euros ($147).   In the north of France, the mayor of Marcq-en-Baroeul has made spitting in public, coughing or sneezing without covering one's face, and throwing used masks and gloves in the street punishable by a fine of 68 euros.

But France's Human Rights League said Tuesday it would take the mayor to court for what it considered a violation of fundamental human liberties.   And the Atlantic coastal resort city of Biarritz on Tuesday overturned a two-minute limit it had set for people to spend on public benches after widespread criticism.   Prime Minister Edouard Philippe told parliament, meanwhile, that "the period of confinement will continue."   The lockdown "is difficult for many French people, I am fully aware of this. But it is essential if we do not wish to find ourselves in an even worse situation than the one we are experiencing today," he said.

- 'Far from over' -
Like many other nations, France on Tuesday also debated the merits of encouraging, even compelling, people to wear face masks to prevent virus spread.   Health Minister Olivier Veran told lawmakers it remained an "open question" that required further scientific investigation.   France's Academy of Medicine, which advises the government on epidemics, has advocated mask-wearing as an aid in curbing the outbreak, but international bodies, including the World Health Organization (WHO) disagree.

The WHO said Monday that asking the general public to wear face masks could be justified in areas where hand-washing and physical distancing were difficult, but warned that masks alone could not stop the pandemic.   France's Order of Pharmacists and two labour unions urged the government Tuesday to allow pharmacies to sell "alternative" non-medical grade masks to members of the public as an added protection.    France also announced that anyone wishing to enter the country starting Wednesday would need a special "travel certificate" in an extension of the lockdown measures.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 18:05:38 +0200 (METDST)

Prague, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - Czech lawmakers on Tuesday gave the green light to extend the state of emergency until April 30, in order to maintain the steps taken against the spread of coronavirus.    The government had asked for an extension until May 11 but failed as 90 of 101 lawmakers present wanted a shorter term.

The state of emergency allows the government to take restrictive steps to combat the coronavirus or buy medical material without declaring a tender.   "I don't want to restrict freedoms a second longer than absolutely necessary," Prime Minister Andrej Babis told lawmakers.   "Unfortunately, the situation is serious and I can't promise that this will be the last time I stand here with this request."

The vote means that all pubs and many shops will remain closed and free movement will be restricted until April 30 in the EU member of 10.7 million people, which has registered 4,944 cases of the virus including 88 deaths.   The cabinet can declare a state of emergency only once for 30 days, which it did on March 12. For an extension, it needs the go-ahead from the parliament.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 18:05:32 +0200 (METDST)

New York, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - New York state has recorded its highest number of COVID-19 deaths in 24 hours, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Tuesday, adding though that hospitalizations appeared to be "plateauing."   Cuomo said 731 people succumbed to the new coronavirus on Monday, bringing the state's total death toll to 5,489. The previous single-day record was 630, set on Friday.   New York has borne the brunt of America's deadly coronavirus pandemic, accounting for around half the number of deaths across the country.   COVID-19 has killed more than 11,000 people in the United States, according to a running tally by Johns Hopkins University.

Cuomo said New York appeared be nearing the peak of its pandemic, with a three-day average of hospitalizations down.   He added that intensive care admissions and intubations had also declined.   "We're projecting that we're reaching a plateau in the number of hospitalizations," Cuomo told reporters.   He said social distancing was working, urging New Yorkers to continue to stay indoors unless absolutely necessary.   "I know it's hard but we have to keep doing it," Cuomo implored.   On Monday, the governor extended a shutdown until near the end of the month, ordering schools and non-essential businesses to remain closed until
April 29.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said it was "too early to draw any definite conclusions" about whether the situation was improving in the Big Apple.   "I want to really make sure none of us in public life tell you we have turned a corner until we are absolutely certain," he told reporters.   Elsewhere, a crew member of the military hospital ship USNS Comfort tested positive for the virus, a navy spokesperson told AFP.   The vessel arrived in New York last month to relieve the burden on hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.   "The crew member is isolated from patients and other crew members. There is no impact to Comfort's mission, and this will not affect the ability for Comfort to receive patients," said the spokesperson.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 16:21:31 +0200 (METDST)

Harare, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - Zimbabwean doctors have filed a lawsuit aimed at compelling the government to beef up coronavirus protection for public hospitals and healthcare workers.   In an application filed to the High Court on Sunday, the doctors said the government had failed to set in place "measures to ensure that health practitioners across the country, who include nurses, nurse aides and pharmacists among others, are adequately protected".   The case is being led by the Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights (ZADHR).   The doctors, according to a statement on Tuesday by country's human rights lawyers, said there was a "dire shortage" of ventilators, oxygen tanks, biohazard suits and N95 facemasks.   Doctors and nurses staged a walkout last month in protest over a lack of protective clothing to care for coronavirus patients.

Zimbabwe has so far recorded 10 cases of infection, including one fatality.   In their case, the doctors also raise concerns over the scarcity of quarantine and isolation facilities, which they say are only found in the capital Harare and the country's second largest city, Bulawayo.   The ZADHR also complained about inadequate screening of people for coronavirus symptoms across the country.   Zimbabwe has only one COVID-19 test centre, situated at a government hospital in Harare.   The public healthcare system in the country already faces shortages of basic drugs and lacks essential equipment and even running water.   A hearing date is yet to be set. The health ministry could not be immediately reached for comment.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 15:38:38 +0200 (METDST)

Riyadh, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - Saudi Arabia's health minister on Tuesday warned of a huge spike in coronavirus cases of up to 200,000 within the coming weeks, state media reported.   "Within the next few weeks, studies predict the number of infections will range from a minimum of 10,000 to a maximum of 200,000," the official Saudi Press Agency reported, citing minister Tawfiq al-Rabiah.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 15:06:49 +0200 (METDST)

Stockholm, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - Sweden on Tuesday reported another 114 coronavirus deaths, bringing the total to 591 in a country that has adopted a softer approach to containing the outbreak than some of its European neighbours.    Sweden's Public Health Agency said it had recorded a total of 7,693 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the country of around 10 million people.

It reported 114 new deaths on Tuesday, an uptick from preceding daily tolls, but cautioned that some of the fatalities occurred in previous days.    State epidemiologist Anders Tegnell said Tuesday the country has been averaging an average of "a little over 40" deaths a day.    He added that Sweden saw a slight decrease in the number of daily new confirmed cases of the new coronavirus over the last few days, but said it was to early to say whether numbers had peaked.

Sweden has not imposed extraordinary lockdown orders seen elsewhere in Europe to stem the spread of the virus, instead calling for citizens to take responsibility to follow social distancing guidelines.    The government has also banned gatherings of more than 50 people and barred visits to nursing homes.

The Nordic country's softer approach has drawn criticism and curiosity abroad and the been the subject of fierce debate domestically.   Sweden's government has rejected accusations it was passive in the fight to curb the virus.   "It's not business as usual in Sweden," Health Minister Lena Hallengren told reporters last week.
Date: Tue, 7 Apr 2020 13:46:16 +0200 (METDST)

Bucharest, April 7, 2020 (AFP) - A Romanian maternity unit was being investigated on Tuesday after 10 new-borns tested positive for the novel coronavirus, with the suspicion they contracted the virus from healthcare staff.   "The mothers tested negative, but the babies tested positive so we have to consider their contacts with medical staff," Health Minister Nelu Tataru said in an interview with the Antena 3 TV station late on Monday.   The babies have no symptoms and all but one of them, together with their mothers, have gone into self-isolation at home.   Tataru pointed to the "failures in the activities of both maternity officials and the local public health directorate (DSP)" and promised severe measures if necessary.

The local DSP chief has already been dismissed.    "For the past two days I have felt like I am living in a horror film," one of the mothers told the local pressalert.ro website.    "The staff were not wearing masks," she said, adding that the mothers had heard on Wednesday through unofficial channels that there was a case of coronavirus in the hospital.   "On Thursday the hospital was disinfected with us inside," she said.   The unit in the western Romanian city of Timisoara was briefly placed under quarantine on March 31 but was reopened the next day on the orders of the local DSP, which insisted at the time that there was "no risk of infection for patients or doctors" even though 13 members of staff had already tested
positive.

The latest case adds to worries about how Romania's system is coping with the epidemic.    Medical staff have spoken out in recent weeks over insufficient equipment for those on the frontline.   There are more than 4,400 confirmed cases in Romania so far and 180 people have died.    Around 700 of those infected are healthcare workers.
Date: Mon 6 Apr 2020, 10:22 PM IST
Source: The Hindu [edited]

A 55-year-old farmer from Udukere village in Tirthahalli [subdivision of a district] has died due to Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD), also known as monkey fever, at a private hospital at Manipal in Udupi district [Karnataka] on Monday [6 Apr 2020].

With this, the total number of persons who have succumbed to KFD in Shivamogga district since [1 Jan 2020] has risen to 5. The deceased was suffering from high fever, fatigue, and pain in joints. His blood samples tested positive for KFD. He was admitted to the private hospital in Manipal for treatment on [30 Mar 2020].

Ashoka MV, Tirthahalli Taluk [sub district] Health Officer, told The Hindu that, on Monday [6 Apr 2020], the health condition of the patient worsened and he passed away at 11 am.

Meanwhile, 3 new positive cases of KFD were reported from Sagar taluk on [Sun 5 Apr 2020] of which one is from Aralagodu, the epicentre of last year's [2019] outbreak; one from Maralagodu village while another case is from Henni-Vadanabailu village.

On [Mon 6 Apr 2020], a 4-year-old child from Seegemakki village in Sharavati river backwater region showing symptoms of KFD was admitted to the government general hospital in Sagar. His blood samples have been sent to Viral Diagnostic Laboratory in Shivamogga [district in the Karnataka state] for testing.

Shivamogga district has recorded as many as 133 positive cases of KFD since [1 Jan 2020] that include 105 cases from Tirthahalli taluk and 28 cases from Sagar taluk.
===================
[The number of KFD cases is steadily increasing with 5 deaths in Shivamogga district of Karnataka since the beginning of 2020, the latest cluster of 3 cases from Sagar taluk is in fact one each from 3 villages. There is a need for setting up active surveillance for KFD in the districts reporting a high number of cases with robust animal surveillance for early detection and response; as well as risk communication with community engagement to control the spread. - ProMed Mod.UBA]