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Burundi

Burundi US Consular Information Sheet
April 21, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
One of the poorest countries in the world, Burundi is a small, densely populated central African nation bordering Lake Tanganyika, Rwanda, Tanzania and the Democrati
Republic of Congo. After more than 12 years of civil and ethnic strife, an electoral process deemed free and fair resulted in the installation of a democratic government in 2005. Years of fighting have devastated a historically fragile economy that depends largely on subsistence agriculture. Poor public health and education, weather disasters such as drought and floods, crop diseases and lack of infrastructure exacerbate the effects of conflict and delay recovery. Facilities for tourism, particularly outside the capital, are limited. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Burundi for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: A passport, visa and evidence of immunization against yellow fever are required for entry. Travelers with an expired visa are not permitted to leave the country without acquiring an exit visa prior to departure. The latest information about visas may be obtained from the Embassy of the Republic of Burundi, Suite 212, 2233 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20007, telephone (202) 342-2574, or from the Permanent Mission of Burundi to the United Nations in New York at telephone (212) 499-0001 thru 0006.
For information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction, please refer to related web pages at http://travel.state.gov. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
See the Department of State’s Travel Warning for Burundi.
For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME: Crime, often committed by groups of armed bandits, poses a high risk for foreign visitors to Bujumbura and Burundi in general. Common crimes include mugging, purse-snatching, pick pocketing, burglary, automobile break-ins and carjacking. Many criminal incidents involve armed attackers. Armed criminals often ambush vehicles, particularly on the roads leading out of Bujumbura. Criminals in Bujumbura often operate in pairs or in small groups involving six or more individuals. Due to insufficient resources, local authorities in any part of Burundi are often unable to provide timely assistance in case of need.
U.S. Government personnel are prohibited from walking on the streets during the hours of darkness and using local, public transportation. Foreigners, whether in vehicles or at home, are always potential crime targets. Americans should exercise common sense judgment and take the same precautions as one would in any major city.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to the local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, help you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Medical facilities in Burundi generally do not meet Western standards of care. Travelers should carry an ample supply of properly-labeled prescription drugs and other medications with them, as certain medications and prescription drugs are unavailable or in short supply. Sterility of equipment is questionable, and treatment is unreliable. Ambulance assistance is non-existent. Hospital care in Burundi should be considered in only the most serious cases and when no reasonable alternatives are available.
Malaria prophylaxis is recommended for travel to all parts of Burundi.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance companies prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policies apply overseas and/or cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: When in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Burundi is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
While travel on most roads is generally safe during the day, travelers must maintain constant vigilance. There have been regular reports of violent attacks on vehicles traveling the roads throughout the country outside of Bujumbura. U.S. Government personnel are required to travel upcountry via two-vehicle convoys and have their trips pre-approved by the Regional Security Officer. The Embassy recommends that Americans not travel on the national highways from dusk to dawn. Drivers without valid permits, and the ease with which a driver's license can be acquired without training, make Burundian drivers less careful, predictable, or mindful of driving rules than Western drivers may expect.
There are no traffic signals in Bujumbura, and virtually nothing of the kind elsewhere in the country. Roadways are not marked, and the lack of streetlights or shoulders makes driving in the countryside at night especially dangerous. Additionally, drivers may encounter cyclists, pedestrians, and livestock in the roadway, including in and around the capital. Mini-vans used as buses for 18 persons should be given a wide berth as they start and stop abruptly, often without pulling to the side of the road.
Large holes or damaged portions of roadway may be encountered anywhere in the country, including in Bujumbura; when driving in the countryside, it is recommended that travelers carry multiple spare tires. During the rainy season, many side roads are passable only with four-wheel drive vehicles. Burundi’s supply of gasoline and diesel fuel are imported predominantly from Kenya and Tanzania, and are relatively expensive due to high transportation costs. Service stations are rare outside of the major cities.

Third-party insurance is required, and it will cover any damages (property, injury, or death). If you are found to have caused an accident, you automatically will be fined 10,000 Burundian francs (approximately $10 U.S.) and your driver's license will be confiscated until the police investigation is completed. Although the law provides for the arrest of drunk drivers, in practice, the police do not act on this law. In the city of Bujumbura, the number for police assistance is 22-22-37-77; there is no comparable number outside the capital. If you are involved in an accident causing death, it is advised that you leave the scene of the accident and proceed to the nearest police station.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Burundi, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Burundi’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
There are no ATMs located in the country and most Burundian hotels and businesses do not accept credit cards. Many hotels in Bujumbura accept payment in U.S. dollars or Euros from non-Burundians. Travelers should be aware that Burundian banking practices prohibit acceptance of U. S. currency printed before the year 2003.
The Embassy recommends that visitors do not photograph airports, military installations, or other government buildings, and obtain permission from individuals before taking their photographs. Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Burundian laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled from the country, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Burundi are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Burundi are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration website so that they can obtain updated information on travel within Burundi and the Embassy’s current security policies, including areas that are off-limits to U.S. Government personnel for security reasons. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located on Avenue des Etats-Unis, telephone (257) 22-22-34-54, fax (257) 22-22-29-26. The Embassy's web site is http://burundi.usembassy.gov/.
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Burundi dated July 18, 2007, to update sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Medical Facilities and Health Information, and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 17:49:51 +0200 (METDST)

Nairobi, Aug 14, 2019 (AFP) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said Wednesday that Burundi had begun vaccinating frontline workers against Ebola at its border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, where an outbreak of the virus has killed close to 1,900 people.   The campaign to vaccinate at-risk staff against the deadly hemorrhagic fever started Tuesday at Gatumba, the main crossing point from Burundi to its much-larger neighbour, WHO said.

Burundi has received doses of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine, an unlicensed product that has been shown to be effective against the Zairian strain of the virus raging in DR Congo.   It would be administered to those at greatest risk such as health workers along the border, laboratory staff and burial teams, WHO said.   "The vaccination of health and frontline staff is a significant step forward in preparing for the response to this disease," said Dr Kazadi Mulombo, WHO representative in Burundi. 

The vaccine, developed by US pharmaceutical group Merck, proved "highly effective" in a trial conducted in Guinea in 2015 during the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, he added.    The vaccination campaign will be overseen by WHO and Burundi's health ministry.   The Ebola outbreak in eastern DR Congo is the second-worst in history. A total of 1,892 deaths have been recorded since the outbreak began on August 1 2018.   No cases of Ebola have been recorded so far in Burundi, a tiny nation of 11 million.    But its border with DR Congo is 236 kilometres (147 miles) long and considered highly porous, and the whole region is on high alert.

In June, three people from one family died in Uganda from Ebola after returning from DR Congo via an unofficial crossing point.   Burundi also shares a border with Rwanda and Tanzania.   The Congo outbreak is the first where vaccines have been rolled out on a large-scale.   The rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine has already been administered to some 170,000 people, especially frontline workers, in DR Congo.   This week, US researchers announced that two prototype drugs being tested among Ebola patients in eastern DR Congo boost chances of surviving the disease.
Date: Thu 8 Aug 2019 05.00 BST
Source: The Guardian [edited]

A serious outbreak of malaria in Burundi has reached epidemic proportions, killing almost as many people as the Ebola crisis in the nearby Democratic Republic of the Congo.  The outbreak in the tiny Great Lakes country has infected almost half the total population, killing about 1800 people since the beginning of the year [2019].  According to figures gathered by the World Health Organisation, almost 6 million cases have been recorded since the 1st week of January to the end of July [2019], with infections reaching crisis levels in May. The figures look on course to outstrip the epidemic of 2017, when more 6 million cases were recorded for the whole year. The situation has continued to worsen as the government of Burundi has refused to declare an emergency.

The scale of the outbreak was described in the latest report for the UN's office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, which warned that the outbreak had reached "epidemic" proportions.  "The national malaria outbreak response plan, which is currently being validated, has highlighted a lack of human, logistical, and financial resources for effective response," reported the organisation.  The organisation and other experts have blamed a number of issues for the crisis, including low use of preventative measures and a vulnerable population with low levels of resistance. Experts have also noted an increase in drug resistant strains of the disease in common with other parts of the world.

The climate crisis has been cited as a contributing factor. Mosquitoes, which spread the disease, are reaching higher altitudes in the mountainous country, and have displayed behavioural changes including more aggressive feeding habits.  The country's agricultural policies have also encouraged an increase in rice production that has seen farmers encroach on mosquito-infested areas.  While Burundi has long struggled with malaria, the figures for the current outbreak suggest a 50% increase compared to the equivalent period last year [2018]. The UN organisation noted bleakly that the number of health districts that have passed the epidemic threshold had continued to increase.

Although Burundi declared a national health emergency in 2017 after 1.8 million cases and 700 deaths were recorded, it has declined to declare one for the current outbreak, apparently concerned of the potential impact ahead of elections slated for next year [2010]…  [Byline: Peter Beaumont]
========================
[The WHO profile of malaria in Burundi can be found at

In 2017, the entire population of an estimated 10.9 million people lived in _Plasmodium falciparum_ high-endemic areas. In 2017 the annual incidence of _P. falciparum_ was estimated at 800 cases per 1000 population (WHO 2017 as above).

In 2017 there was an estimated 2.1M [range: 1.3M, 3.4M] cases with an estimated number of deaths of 5300 [range: 4300, 6200] (WHO). The 1st line treatment is artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) introduced in 2003. Malaria control relies on insecticide treated nets (ITN) but only around 30% of the population used a net the previous night one survey found (WHO 2017 as above) and it was also found that 80% of the mosquitoes were resistant to pyrethroids, the usual class of insecticides used for impregnating nets.

In 2005 the annual incidence was estimated at less than 50 cases per 1000 population (WHO 2017 as above) illustrating that since then the national malaria control programme has failed to improve the situation.

It is particularly worrying that the report above mentions treatment failure and possible drug resistance. With artemisinin resistance spreading in southeast Asia (see ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20190723.6583616) any signs of a slow parasite clearance need to be followed up by molecular analysis looking for mutations in key genes. No studies have looked at mutations in key genes predicting reduced susceptibility to the artemisinins or the 4-aminoquinolones (amodiaquine).

Since Burundi's independence in 1962, 2 genocides have taken place in the country: the 1972 mass killings of Hutus by the Tutsi-dominated army (<http://www.preventgenocide.org/edu/pastgenocides/burundi/resources/>), and the mass killings of Tutsis in 1993 by the Hutu majority. Both were described as genocides in the final report of the International Commission of Inquiry for Burundi presented in 2002 to the United Nations Security Council (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burundi>). - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Burundi:
Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2019 10:38:45 +0200 (METDST)

Nairobi, Aug 6, 2019 (AFP) - Malaria has killed more than 1,800 people in Burundi this year, the UN's humanitarian agency says, a death toll rivalling a deadly Ebola outbreak in neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo.   In its latest situation report, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said 5.7 million cases of malaria had been recorded in Burundi in 2019 -- a figure roughly equal to half its entire population.   Of those cases, a total of 1,801 died from the mosquito-born disease in Burundi between January 1 and July 21, OCHA said.

The tiny country of 11 million people in the African Great Lakes region has still not declared a national emergency, despite OCHA saying the outbreak crossed "epidemic proportions" in May.   "The national malaria outbreak response plan, which is currently being validated, has highlighted a lack of human, logistical and financial resources for effective response," OCHA said in its latest weekly bulletin on humanitarian emergencies.   "All stakeholders, including the national authorities and partners are called upon to provide the requisite resources to mount a robust response to this event before it escalates."   A lack of preventative measures like mosquito nets, climatic changes and increased movements of people from mountain areas with low immunity to malaria were driving the crisis, OCHA said.

- 'Many crises' -
An OCHA official told AFP that "the decision to declare an epidemic is the sovereignty of the Burundian state".   The country declared a malaria epidemic in March 2017, when the country had recorded 1.8 million cases and 700 deaths, but was resisting doing the same now.   A senior government official, who declined to be named, said the government did not want to admit weakness with elections set for 2020.   "We are less than a year away from the presidential election. (President Pierre) Nkurunziza, who is facing many crises, does not want to recognise what could be considered a failure of his health policy," the official told AFP.   Burundi has been in crisis since 2015, when Nkurunziza ran for a third term and was re-elected in elections boycotted by most of the opposition.

At least 1,200 people were killed and more than 400,000 displaced in violence the UN says was mostly carried out by state security forces.   Nkurunziza announced in 2018 that he would not stand again, confounding critics who accused him of working to extend his grip on power.   UN investigators said in July that "drastic" steps were needed to boost democratic freedoms in Burundi if the government wanted the elections to be considered credible.

Burundi, one of the poorest countries in the region, abuts DR Congo, where the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history has killed more than 1,800 people amid fears the infectious fever could spread beyond its borders.   But malaria is a much bigger killer on the continent.   The World Health Organization recorded nearly 220 million cases of the parasitic illness in 2017, with an estimated 435,000 deaths. More than 90 percent of malaria cases and deaths were in Africa.
Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2018 14:39:07 +0100

Nairobi, March 16, 2018 (AFP) - Nine workers at a construction site outside Burundi's capital Bujumbura were killed in a landslide on Friday, police said.   Heavy seasonal rains caused the hillside next to the Gasenyi river, east of the city, to collapse burying the workers who were building a channel to redirect the river's floodwaters.   Police said in a statement that nine bodies had so far been found, while rescue efforts continue.
Date: Sat 7 Oct 2017 11:52:12 CAT
Source: Global Times, Xinhua News Agency report [edited]

At least 5 cases of cholera were reported this week [week of 2 Oct 2017] in Rugombo town in Cibitoke province, 72 km [about 45 mi] northwest of the Burundian capital Bujumbura, the Burundi News Agency reported Fri 6 Oct 2017. All those 5 cholera cases were reported at Rusiga, adding that lack of clean water is the origin of the propagation of cholera in that area, the state-run agency reported.

The Burundi Red Cross has deployed its agents to distribute drugs in infected households at Rusiga to avoid the propagation of the epidemic, it reported. Cibitoke Governor Joseph Iteriteka on [Fri 6 Oct 2017] held a meeting with health and administration officials based in Cibitoke province to look at ways of curbing the propagation of cholera in Rugombo and Cibitoke town, according to the report. During the meeting, they urged the country's Water and Electricity Company (REGIDESO) to supply water to the 2 towns -- Rugombo and Cibitoke -- as they are the worst threatened, reported the agency.

The Burundian Imbo western lowlands extending from the north in Cibitoke province to the south in Makamba Province near Lake Tanganyika are vulnerable to cholera every year in the dry season, especially between August and October. By the end of August 2017, the east African country's health ministry confirmed 24 cholera cases in Nyanza-Lac in the south-western province of Makamba, which originated from a fisherman who had come from the Democratic Republic of the Congo with symptoms of cholera.
===================
[Cibitoke province is one of the 18 provinces of Republic of Burundi. It is located in extreme northwest Burundi and can be seen on a map at <http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/burundi.pdf>. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at
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French Guiana

French Guiana US Consular Information Sheet
August 14, 2006

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: French Guiana is an overseas department of France. It is a sparsely populated tropical area located on the northern coast of South America. French is the pred
minant language; English is not widely spoken. Tourist facilities are available, especially in the larger cities such as Cayenne and Kourou, but in some instances are not highly developed.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: Passports are required of U.S. citizens entering French Guiana. Visitors who arrive by land or on a commercial air carrier with a return ticket may enter for up to 90 days without a visa. See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on French Guiana and other countries. Visit the Embassy of France web site at for the most current visa information, or contact the Embassy of France at 4101 Reservoir Road N.W., Washington, DC 20007; telephone (202) 944-6000; or the nearest French Consulate in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, New Orleans or San Francisco.

Find more information about Entry and Exit Requirements pertaining to dual nationality and the prevention of international child abduction . For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information .

SAFETY AND SECURITY: For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site , where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement , Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State's pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad .
CRIME: Petty street crime occurs throughout the major cities. Individuals should make sure to keep valuables out of sight, especially if left unattended in an automobile.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime .
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Medical care within French Guiana is limited, and hospital facilities are available only in major urban areas. Patients' rooms in hospitals are primarily open-air facilities; instead of glass panes, hospital windows are fitted with wooden slats.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC's Internet site at For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization's (WHO) website at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at .

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas .

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning French Guiana is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Primary roads in French Guiana are well paved and well maintained. Emergency call boxes are available at regular intervals on the main highways. Roads in rural areas are less developed. Roads leading to more remote regions in the interior are often improved dirt roads. French Guiana has a relatively moderate to high volume of traffic and police enforce traffic safety. Night driving can be dangerous, especially in the remote interior regions or on less-developed rural roads. Public transportation in the form of taxis and vans is relatively safe.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of the French National Tourist Organization at http://www.franceguide.com.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of France as being in compliance with ICAO international aviation safety standards for oversight of France's air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA's Internet web site at .
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: In addition to being subject to all French laws affecting U.S. citizens, dual nationals may also be subject to other laws that impose special obligations on French citizens. For additional information, please see our Dual Nationality flyer .
French customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from French Guiana of items such as firearms, medications, animals, etc. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of France in Washington or one of the many French consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.
Customs authorities encourage the use of an ATA (Admission Temporaire/Temporary Admission) Carnet for the temporary admission of professional equipment, commercial samples, and/or goods for exhibitions and fair purposes. ATA Carnet Headquarters , located at the U.S. Council for International Business , 1212 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036, issues and guarantees the ATA Carnet in the United States. For additional information call (212) 354-4480, e-mail atacarnet@uscib.org, or visit www.uscib.org for details. Please see our Customs Information .

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating French laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in French Guiana are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties .

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children's Issues website.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Suriname are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department's travel registration website and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Suriname. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located at Dr. Sophie Redmondstraat 129, telephone (011)(597) 472-900, web site http://paramaribo.usembassy.gov. The Consular Section hours of operation for routine American citizen services are Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm, or by appointment, except on American and Surinamese holidays. U.S. citizens requiring emergency assistance evenings, weekends, and holidays may contact an Embassy duty officer by cell phone at (011)(597) 088-08302.
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated November 2, 2005 to update all sections.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Tue 14 Aug 2018
Source: France Guyane [in French, trans. ProMED Corr.SB, edited]
<http://www.franceguyane.fr/actualite/education-sante-environnement/un-cas-de-fievre-jaune-contracte-en-guyane-412398.php>

A 47-year-old man of Swiss nationality contracted yellow fever in French Guiana. He was diagnosed last weekend by the Institut Pasteur. The fact that he had been present in French Guiana for 4 months without having apparently left it makes it very likely that he contracted the virus in the department, and more precisely in the area of the County Bridge.

In a message addressed to certain health professionals, the Regional Health Agency (ARS) details the situation: "A new case of yellow fever was confirmed last weekend by the Pasteur Institute of Guyana, and after that diagnosed in France. After a visit to CHAR, the patient was transferred urgently to a liver resuscitation unit in Paris.

This is a 47-year-old man of Swiss nationality who had returned by land from Brazil but who had been in French Guiana for 4 months and who had not left the territory (of Guyana) since his arrival. Therefore, we can consider that this is a local infection. The patient was not vaccinated. According to information available at this stage, he was working on the marking of forest roads in the County Bridge area, and it can be assumed that he was infected in these areas, and investigations are underway to detect associated cases and to trace more closely the movements of the patient.

This new case confirms that yellow fever is present in Guyana. While awaiting more precise information, this also seems to indicate that the virus is present in the littoral zone and justifies the vaccination of the whole department's population.
========================
[Sylvatic yellow fever (YF) is endemic in areas of 13 countries and territories of the South American region, including Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana and the island of Trinidad.

A 20 Mar 2018 PAHO/WHO Epidemiological Update on Yellow Fever stated that there were confirmed cases this year [2018] in several South American countries including French Guiana (see Yellow fever - Americas (22): South America http://promedmail.org/post/20180321.5699760). Individuals traveling, working or residing in these areas should be vaccinated against YF.

Unfortunately, the Swiss worker was not. The patient's condition was not mentioned, other than that he was transferred urgently to a liver resuscitation unit in Paris, but was still alive. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at: Switzerland:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/105>

Region d'outre-mer de French Guiana, France:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/577>]
Date: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 22:38:35 +0200
By Marion BRISWALTER

Cayenne, March 26, 2017 (AFP) - French Guiana came to a standstill Sunday on the eve of a major strike which has elbowed its way into France's presidential campaign.   Air France cancelled all flights to the South American territory for Sunday and Monday, when 37 labour unions were to launch a general strike demanding a "Marshall Plan" to improve public services and security.   Barricades have been erected on roads since last week, and the US State Department has warned travellers to stay away, citing the risk of violence.   The protests also led to the indefinite postponement of an Arianespace rocket launch at Europe's Guiana Space Centre in Kourou.

The French government has sent a delegation to negotiate with the strikers, asking them to lay out their demands.   But 13 of the territory's 22 mayors have refused to meet the delegation, demanding along with the strikers that French ministers come in person.   "This has gone on long enough! All we have is plundered, it's time to recognise the people of Guiana," a woman at the barricade blocking access to the airport at Cayenne, the capital, told AFP on Sunday.   "I am listening to the Guianans," said Ericka Bareigts, the minister of overseas territories, though she has ruled out travelling to the territory for now.   "We will be able to go to Guiana once the conditions are right and progress has been made," she said.   The road barricades were temporarily lifted Sunday and some stores opened so that people could stock up on food and other supplies before the strike began.

- 'Failed policies' -
The "Collective to Get Guiana Moving" has called for better access to health services and electricity, economic development and job creation programmes, and renewed efforts to keep children from dropping out of school.   The territory, with about 250,000 inhabitants, relies on huge injections of public funds.   "The government must respond rapidly to these requests," Segolene Royal, the French environment minister, said after a recent visit to the territory.   The visiting delegation has already had a scanner installed at the airport to help stop drug trafficking, and pledged to speed up the arrival of EU aide.   But several of the candidates seeking the French presidency have pounced on the crisis just a month before the first round of voting.   For Francois Fillon, the conservative candidate, "This situation is the consequence of the failed policies of Francois Hollande," the outgoing Socialist president.

Marine Le Pen, the far-right National Front candidate, condemned what she called an "cruel minimum service" of recent governments in Paris toward the territory.   In response, Bareigts, the overseas territories minister, and Interior Minister Matthias Fekl said Sunday after a meeting with Prime Minister Bernard Cazeneuve that "We will not tolerate any exploitation of this social crisis, neither to disrupt public order nor for campaign purposes."   A similar revolt gripped French Guiana in 2008 over soaring fuel prices, shutting down schools and the airport.   The strike ended after 11 days, when the government agreed to cut fuel prices.
Date: Mon, 21 Mar 2016 11:58:00 +0100

Paris, March 21, 2016 (AFP) - Up to a third of flights were cancelled at French airports on Monday as air traffic controllers entered a second day of strikes.    Low-cost airline Ryanair deplored what it said was the 41st strike by French air traffic controllers since 2009.   Around 140 passengers spent the night in Paris's Orly airport where half of flights were cancelled on the first day of strikes on Sunday.

Authorities Monday asked airlines to cut a third of flights at Orly and Marseille airports, and 20 percent at Lyon, Nice and Beauvais near Paris.    The striking union, which represents around a fifth of air traffic controllers, is campaigning against job cuts and the lack of investment in new technology.   Air France said journeys out of Paris's other main airport, Charles De Gaulle, were not facing cancellations, but last-minute delays were possible.    EasyJet said it had cancelled 90 flights and that more disruptions were possible.
Date: Wed 2 Sep 2015
Source: OIE WAHID, weekly disease information 2015; 28 (36) [edited]

Rabies, French Guiana
--------------
Information received on [and dated] 2 Sep 2015 from Dr Loic Evain, Directeur General adjoint, CVO, Direction generale de l'alimentation, Ministere de l'Agriculture, de l'Agroalimentaire et de la Foret, Paris, French Guiana.

Summary:
Report type: Immediate notification
Date of start of the event: 20 Aug 2015
Date of confirmation of the event: 31 Aug 2015
Reason for notification: Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence: October 2009
Manifestation of disease: Clinical disease
Causal agent: Lyssavirus (RABV vampire bat rabies types)
Serotype: RABV
Nature of diagnosis: Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country.

New outbreaks (1)
Summary of outbreaks:
Total outbreaks: 1
Outbreak 1: Cayenne, Cayenne
Date of start of the outbreak: 20 Aug 2015
Outbreak status: continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit: Not applicable
Affected animals:
Species / Susceptible / Cases / Deaths / Destroyed / Slaughtered
Dogs / 1 / 1 / 1 / 0 / 0

Affected population: On Thu 20 Aug 2015, a 6-month-old dog was taken to the veterinarian since he was showing a decreased appetite without neurological signs and again the next day (Fri 21 Aug) following a deterioration of his general condition with convulsions, aggressiveness, visual loss and difficulties with movement. He was hospitalized and died on the night from Friday to Saturday. A rabies investigation was then launched and the Pasteur Institute confirmed the diagnosis on 31 Aug 2015.

Epidemiology:
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection: unknown or inconclusive

Epidemiological comment: The virus isolated in the dog is a Lyssavirus of RABV species and of "vampire bat rabies" type. It is estimated that the virus excretion phase started on 5 Aug 2015. During this period, the dog was in a fully fenced house. No runaway was reported during the period. He just went out for some walks on a lead in the neighbourhood and some visits to the veterinarian. The dog did not bite but could have chewed or lick wounds or the face. The epidemiological investigation has identified to date 12 contact people and no contact animals. However, there are stray cats near the house where the rabid dog was. Although the origin of the contamination of the dog is still uncertain, the most likely hypothesis is the contact with a bat, since the dog has eaten dead animals found in the garden several times. Following confirmation of the diagnosis, a regulated zone was put in place in order to limit the movements of domestic carnivores, to establish increased surveillance and to strengthen the capture of stray animals. Carnivores improperly vaccinated that could have had contact with the case will be euthanized. Carnivores properly vaccinated that could have had contact with the case will be under clinical monitoring for 6 months.

Control measures
Measures applied: movement control inside the country; screening; quarantine; zoning; no vaccination; no treatment of affected animals Measures to be applied: No other measures.

Diagnostic test results:
Laboratory name and type:
Institute Pasteur (Paris) (National laboratory)Species / Test / Test date / Result
Dogs / direct fluorescent antibody (FAT) test / 28 Aug 2015 / Positive
Dogs / pathogen isolation on cell culture / 31 Aug 2015 / Positive

Future Reporting: The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

The location of the outbreak can be seen on the interactive map included in the OIE report at the source URL above.
====================
[This immediate notification officially confirms the information communicated in the ProMED-mail report archive number 20150903.3620512.

"Rabies transmitted by the common vampire bat (_Desmodus rotundus_) is a major public health concern in subtropical and tropical areas of Latin America. Infected vampire bats can transmit rabies to domestic mammals and humans through their haematophagous behavior."  <https://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/nwrc/publications/12pubs/anderson121.pdf>

Pictures of the common vampire bat (_Desmodus rotundus_) can be seen at

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Tue 1 Aug 2015
Source: France-Guyane [in French, trans. ProMED CopyEd.LMI, edited]

Yesterday [31 Jul 2015], the Pasteur Institute in Paris confirmed a case of rabies in a 6-month old puppy living in Cayenne. The animal was hospitalized on 21 Aug 2015 at a veterinary hospital for nervous symptoms. He died the following night. 16 people in contact with the dog were sent to the anti-rabies center at the hospital in Cayenne.

The Director for Food, Agriculture and Forestry (Daaf) continues to investigate to discover the origin of the infection. He reminds people of the following guidelines:
- any sudden death of a domestic animal with no identified cause should be reported to a veterinarian;
- any dog, cat, monkey, bat, or other animal bite should be reported to the Daaf;
- early vaccination (starting at 3 months) of domestic animals, with a yearly booster shot is required.

As a precaution, a lot more will be done to catch stray animals in the neighbourhood and the entire area comprising the Zephyr bypass, Montabo, and Baduel roads, and Saint-Antoine path.
=================
[Cayenne is the capital of French Guiana (FG), an overseas region of France on the northeast coast of South America, bordering, on the west, Suriname and on the east and south, Brazil (the Amapa State). See maps at <http://geology.com/world/french-guiana-map.gif> and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/3486>.

According to French Guiana's reports to the OIE, rabies has been absent there in domestic animals since 2003 and in wildlife since 2009.

According to Ref 1 below, on 28 May 2008, the French National Reference Center for Rabies (Institut Pasteur, Paris) confirmed the rabies diagnosis, based on hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsy and saliva specimens from a Guianan, who had never travelled overseas and died in Cayenne after presenting clinically typical meningoencephalitis.

>From the Author Summary:
"Until 2008, rabies had never been described within the French Guianan human population. Emergence of the 1st case in May 2008 in this French Overseas Department represented a public health event that markedly affected the local population, healthcare workers, and public health authorities. The anti-rabies clinic of French Guiana, located at Institut Pasteur de la Guyane, had to reorganize its functioning to handle the dramatically increased demand for vaccination. A rigorous epidemiological investigation and a veterinary study were conducted to identify the contamination source, probably linked to a bat bite, and the exposed population. Communication was a key factor to controlling this episode and changing the local perception of this formerly neglected disease. Because similar clinical cases had previously been described, without having been diagnosed, medical practices must be adapted and the rabies virus should be sought more systematically in similarly presenting cases. Sharing this experience could be useful for other countries that might someday have to manage such an emergence."

Results of the investigation into the source of infection of the 6-month old domestic dog reported above are anticipated with interest.

The increased incidence of rabies transmission to humans by vampire bats in Latin America, specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, is discussed in Ref 2 below.

References
----------
1. Meynard J-B, Flamand C, Dupuy C, et al: First human rabies case in French Guiana, 2008: PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2012;6(2):e1537. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001537; available at  <http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0001537>.
2. Schneider MC, Romijn PC, Uieda W, et al: Rabies transmitted by vampire bats to humans: an emerging zoonotic disease in Latin America? Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2009; 25(3): 260-9; available at <http://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?pid=S1020-49892009000300010&script=sci_arttext>. - ProMED Mod.AS]
More ...

Spain

Spain and Andorra US Consular Information Sheet
January 13, 2009
Spain and Andorra are both advanced stable democracies and modern economies. Spain is a member of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union.
Read the D
partment of State Background Notes on Spain and Andorra for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
Spain is a party to the Schengen agreement.
As such, U.S. citizens may enter Spain for up to 90 days for tourist or business purposes without a visa.
The passport should be valid for at least three months beyond the period of stay.
For further details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen Fact Sheet.

In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated procedures at entry/exit points.
These often include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child's travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian not present.
Having such documentation on hand, even if not required, may facilitate entry/departure.
For further information concerning entry requirements for Spain, travelers should contact the Embassy of Spain at 2375 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20037, telephone (202) 452-0100, or the nearest Spanish Consulate in Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York, San Francisco, or San Juan.
Spanish government web sites with information about entry requirements (in Spanish) can be found at http://www.mae.es and http://www.mir.es.
Additional information may be obtained from the Tourist Office of Spain in New York, telephone (212) 265-8822, or online at http://www.spain.info/.
For further information on entry requirements to Andorra, travelers should contact the Andorran Mission to the UN, 2 U.N. Plaza, 25th floor, New York, NY 10018, telephone (212) 750-8064 or online at http://www.andorra.ad.
Visit the Embassy of Spain and Andorra web sites for the most current visa information.
Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Spain and Andorra share with the rest of the world an increased threat of international terrorist incidents.
Like other countries in the Schengen area, Spain's open borders with its Western European neighbors allow the possibility of terrorist groups entering and exiting the country with anonymity.
Spain’s proximity to North Africa makes it vulnerable to attack from Al Qaeda terrorists in the Maghreb region.
Americans are reminded to remain vigilant with regard to their personal security and to exercise caution.

In the deadliest terrorist attack in recent European history, in March 2004, Islamist extremists bombed four commuter trains entering Madrid, causing 191 deaths and over 1,400 injuries.
Spanish authorities tried the suspected terrorists and their co-conspirators in February 2007 and convicted in October 2007.
The Basque Fatherland and Liberty (ETA) terrorist organization remains active in Spain.
ETA has historically avoided targeting foreigners, directing their attacks against the police, military, local politicians, and Spanish government targets as well as attempts to disrupt transportation and daily life. However, foreigners have been killed or injured collaterally in ETA attacks.
Two examples of this are the Barajas Airport bombing in December 2006, in which two Ecuadorian nationals were killed and the bombing at the University of Navarre in October 2008, in which 17 students were injured including one American student.
In addition, bombs have been used as part of criminal extortion of businesses, particularly in the Basque region. The risk of “being in the wrong place at the wrong time” in event of an ETA action is a concern for foreign visitors and tourists.
U.S. tourists traveling to Spain should remain vigilant, exercise caution, monitor local developments, and avoid demonstrations and other potentially violent situations.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Andorra has a low rate of crime.
While most of Spain has a moderate rate of crime and most of the estimated one million American tourists have trouble free visits to Spain each year, street crimes against tourists occur in the principal tourist areas.
Madrid and Barcelona, in particular, report incidents of pick-pocketing, mugging and occasional violent attacks, some of which require the victim to seek medical attention.
Although crimes occur at all times of day and night and to people of all ages, older tourists and Asian Americans seem to be particularly at risk.
Criminals frequent tourist areas and major attractions such as museums, monuments, restaurants, outdoor cafes, Internet cafes, hotel lobbies, beach resorts, city buses, subways, trains, train stations, airports, and ATMs.

In Madrid, incidents have been reported in all major tourist areas, including the area near the Prado Museum, near Atocha train station, in Retiro Park, in areas of old Madrid including near the Royal Palace and in Plaza Mayor.
There have been a number of passport and bag thefts reported at Madrid’s Barajas Airport, local hotels, as well as in El Rastro (Madrid’s flea market) and in the Metro.

In Barcelona, the largest number of incidents reported also occurred in major tourist areas, on Las Ramblas, Barcelona’s El Prat airport, Sants train station, Metro stations, in the Sagrada Familia Area, in the Gothic Quarter, in Parc Güell, in Plaza Real, and along Barcelona’s beaches.
There has been a rise in the number of thefts reported at the Port Olimpic Area and nearby beaches.

Travelers should remain alert to their personal security and exercise caution. Travelers are encouraged to carry limited cash, only one credit card, and a copy of their passport; leaving extra cash, extra credit cards, passports and personal documents in a safe location.
When carrying documents, credit cards or cash, you are encouraged to secure them in a hard-to-reach place and not to carry all valuables together in a purse or backpack.
Thieves often work in teams of two or more people.
In many cases, one person distracts a victim while the accomplices perform the robbery.
For example, someone might wave a map in your face and ask for directions, “inadvertently” spill something on you, or help you clean-up bird droppings thrown on you by a third unseen accomplice.
While your attention is diverted, an accomplice makes off with the valuables.
Thieves may drop coins or keys at your feet to distract you and try to take your belongings while you are trying to help.
Attacks are sometimes initiated from behind, with the victim being grabbed around the neck and choked by one assailant while others rifle through or grab the belongings.
A group of assailants may surround the victim in a crowded popular tourist area or on public transportation, and only after the group has departed does the person discover he/she has been robbed.
Purse-snatchers may grab purses or wallets and run away, or immediately pass the stolen item to an accomplice.
A passenger on a passing motorcycle sometimes robs pedestrians.
There have been reports of thieves posing as plainclothes police officers, beckoning to pedestrians from cars and sometimes confronting them on the street asking for documents, or to inspect their cash for counterfeit bills, which they ultimately “confiscate” as evidence.
The U.S. Embassy in Madrid has received reports of cars on limited access motorways being pulled over by supposed unmarked police cars.
The Spanish police do not operate in this fashion.
American citizens are encouraged to ask for a uniformed law enforcement officer if approached.
Theft from vehicles is also common.
“Good Samaritan" scams are unfortunately common, where a passing car or helpful stranger will attempt to divert the driver’s attention by indicating there is a flat tire or mechanical problem.
When the driver stops to check the vehicle, the “good Samaritan” will appear to help the driver and passengers while the accomplice steals from the unlocked car. Drivers should be cautious about accepting help from anyone other than a uniformed Spanish police officer or Civil Guard.
Items high in value like luggage, cameras, laptop computers, or briefcases are often stolen from cars. Travelers are advised not to leave valuables in parked cars, and to keep doors locked, windows rolled up, and valuables out of sight when driving.
While the incidence of sexual assault is statistically very low, attacks do occur.
Spanish authorities warn of the availability of so-called "date-rape" drugs and other drugs, including "GBH" and liquid ecstasy.
Americans should not lower their personal security awareness because they are on vacation.
A number of American citizens have been victims of lottery or advance fee scams in which a person is lured to Spain to finalize a financial transaction. Often the victims are initially contacted via Internet or fax and informed they have won the Spanish Lottery (El Gordo), inherited money from a distant relative, or are needed to assist in a major financial transaction from one country to another.
For more information, please see the Bureau of Consular Affairs web site on International Financial Scams.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Transactions involving such products may be illegal under local law.
In addition, bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines.
More information on this serious problem is available at http://www.cybercrime.gov/18usc2320.htm.
The Embassy’s U.S. Commercial Service receives reports of a type of scam targeting U.S. businesses, utilizing the name of a legitimate Spanish concern and legitimate-appearing Spanish bank references.
The scam usually involves a temptingly large order or business proposal.
The U.S. Commercial Service in Spain at http://www.buyusa.gov/spain/en/ stands ready to counsel any U.S. firm which would like to verify the legitimacy of an unsolicited business proposal purporting to come from a Spanish firm.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, help you find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.
Spain does have a Crime Victim’s Assistance program.
More information can be obtained at http://www.mjusticia.es/Directorio/Victimas?menu_activo=1057821035144&lang=es_es.

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Spain is 112.
Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs.
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Good medical care is available in both Spain and Andorra.
Regulations regarding medications may vary from those in the United States; Americans with need for specific medications are encouraged to bring a supply sufficient for their anticipated period of stay, as the medication may not be available and customs regulations may prohibit certain medications to be mailed from the United States to Spain or Andorra.
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance companies prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and if it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
U.S. medical insurance plans may not cover health costs incurred outside the United States unless supplemental coverage is purchased.
Further, U.S. Medicare and Medicaid programs do not provide payment for medical services outside the United States. You should contact your insurance provider before departure so appropriate arrangements can be made.
Many travel agents and private companies offer insurance plans that will cover health care expenses incurred overseas, including emergency services such as medical evacuations.

When making a decision regarding health insurance, Americans should consider that many foreign doctors and hospitals require payment in cash prior to providing service and that a medical evacuation to the United States may cost well in excess of $50,000.
Uninsured travelers who require medical care overseas often face extreme difficulties, whereas travelers who have purchased overseas medical insurance have found it to be life saving when a medical emergency has occurred.
When consulting with your insurer prior to your trip, please ascertain whether payment will be made to the overseas healthcare provider or if you will be reimbursed later for expenses that you incur.
Some insurance policies also include coverage for psychiatric treatment and for disposition of remains in the event of death.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Spain or Andorra.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning name of country is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
Traffic in Madrid and Barcelona is faster-paced than in U.S. cities and can be unnerving due to unfamiliar signs or motorbikes weaving between traffic lanes.
Drivers should always obey the closest traffic light, as there are separate pedestrian lights in the city.
Drivers should be alert when driving at night in urban areas, due to the possibility of encountering drivers or pedestrians under the influence of alcohol.
Night driving in isolated rural areas can be dangerous because of farm animals and poorly marked roads.
Rural traffic is generally heavier in July and August as well as during the Christmas and Easter seasons.
Traffic regulations in effect in Spain include the prohibition on the use of a mobile phone without a hands-free device while driving a car.
There is a fine of 300 euros for violation of this regulation and loss of driving privileges.
In addition, all drivers and passengers are required to carry a reflective vest and put it on if they need to stop on the roadside.
A reflective triangle warning sign for a vehicle stopped on the side of the road is also mandatory.
Those renting vehicles are encouraged to check with the rental company about traffic regulations and safety equipment.
U.S. citizens using U.S. issued drivers licenses must obtain International Driving Permits prior to their arrival if they plan to drive in Spain.
Pedestrians should use designated crossing areas when crossing streets and obey traffic lights.
Public transportation in large Spanish cities is generally excellent.
All major cities have metered taxis, in which extra charges must be posted in the vehicle.
Travelers are advised to use only clearly identified cabs and to ensure that taxi drivers always switch on the meter.
A green light on the roof indicates that the taxi is available.
Rail service is comfortable and reliable, but varies in quality and speed. Intercity buses are usually comfortable and inexpensive.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
For specific information concerning Spanish driving permits, vehicle inspection, road tax and mandatory insurance, please contact the Spanish National Tourist Organization offices in New York at http://www.spain.info/us/TourSpain.
For information about driving in Andorra, refer to http://www.andorra.ad/en-US/Pages/default.aspx.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Spain’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Spain’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offences.
Persons violating the laws of Spain or Andorra, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Spain and Andorra are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. The cities of Madrid and Barcelona and The Balearics Regional Government have banned the consumption of alcohol in the street, other than in registered street cafes and bars.
Visitors to Madrid, Barcelona, Mallorca, Ibiza, and Menorca should be aware that failure to respect this law might result in the imposition of fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Spain or Andorra are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site to obtain updated information on travel and security within Spain or Andorra.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy is located at Serrano 75; telephone (34) (91) 587-2200, and fax (34) (91) 587-2303. U.S. citizens who register in the Consular Section at the U.S. Embassy, Consulate General, or one of the Consular Agencies listed below can obtain updated information on travel and security within Spain or Andorra.
Additional information and appointments for routine services are available through the U.S. Embassy’s home page at http://madrid.usembassy.gov.
Appointments are required for routine Consular Services.
To make an appointment, go to https://evisaforms.state.gov/acs/default.asp?postcode=MDD&appcode=1.
The U.S. Consulate in Barcelona is located at Paseo Reina Elisenda 23-25; telephone (34) (93) 280-2227 and fax (34) (93) 205-5206.
Visitors to Barcelona can access additional information from the Consulate General’s web page at http://madrid.usembassy.gov/barcelonaen.html.
There are six consular agencies in Spain, which provide limited services to American citizens, but are not authorized to issue passports.
Anyone requesting service at one of the consular agencies should call ahead to verify that the service requested will be available on the day you expect to visit the agency.
Fuengirola (in Malaga Province), at Avenida Juan Gomez Juanito #8, Edificio Lucia 1C, Fuengirola 29640 Spain. Telephone (34) (952) 474-891 and fax (34) (952) 465-189.
Hours 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
La Coruna, Calle Juana de Vega 8, 5º Piso, Oficina I, La Coruna 15003 Spain.
Telephone (34) (981) 213-233 and fax (34) (981 22 28 08).
Hours 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Las Palmas, at Edificio Arca, Calle Los Martinez de Escobar 3, Oficina 7, Las Palmas, Gran Canaria 35007 Spain.
Telephone (34)(928) 222-552 and fax (34)(928) 225-863.
Hours 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Palma de Mallorca, Edificio Reina Constanza, Porto Pi, 8, 9-D, 07015 Palma de Mallorca 07015 Spain.
Telephone (34) (971) 40-3707 or 40-3905 and fax (34) (971) 40-3971.
Hours 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Seville, at Plaza Nueva 8-8 duplicado, 2nd Floor, Office E-2 No.4, Sevilla, 41101 Spain. Telephone: (34) (65) 422-8751 and fax (34) (91) 422-0791.
Hours: 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Valencia, at Doctor Romagosa #1, 2-J, 46002, Valencia 46002 Spain.
Telephone (34) (96)-351-6973 and fax (34) (96) 352-9565.
Hours 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
For Andorra, please contact the U.S. Consulate in Barcelona.
*

*

*
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Spain and Andorra dated July 15, 2008, to update sections on Safety and Security and Medical Facilities and Health Information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2019 13:52:34 +0200 (METDST)

Madrid, Sept 30, 2019 (AFP) - Hundreds of hotels in Spain are facing imminent closure over the collapse of British travel giant Thomas Cook, the head of the Spanish hotel federation warned on Monday.    "There are 500 hotels which are going to close immediately due to the collapse of Thomas Cook and the situation could get worse if the government doesn't take immediate action," Juan Molas, head of Spain's Confederation of Hotels and Tourist Accommodation, told business daily Cinco Dias.

And the sum in unpaid bills left by the demise of the tour operator would be much higher than the initial estimate of 200 million euros ($220 million), said Molas, whose organisation represents 15,000 businesses.    "It will be much more. The amount for only eight chains is close to 100 million."    Of those hotels facing immediate closure, 100 were exclusively dependent on Thomas Cook, he said, while the rest counted on the firm for between 30 and 70 percent of their clients.    One hotel in Fuerteventura, the second largest of the Canary Islands, had recently undergone a 20-million-euro upgrade and was now faced with 700 rooms "which are going to be empty from October 7" and 200 employees it would be forced to dismiss.    Worst hit are those in the Canaries and the Balearic Islands, where 40 percent of hotels are affected. 

The industry has put together an emergency plan to be presented to Tourism Minister Reyes Maroto at the next Spanish tourism board meeting on October 7 which will also address the urgent question of air links with the Canary Islands.   Industry experts fear the impact there could be even more devastating than elsewhere as the resort is very popular as a winter destination among tourists from northern Europe.    "The busy season is starting and Thomas Cook had 30 percent of air capacity," Molas said, indicating the disappearance of the package holidaymaker could affect some 1.3 million airline seats, with Tenerife and Lanzarote particularly badly hit.    He urged the government to contact RyanAir, one of the few carriers that flies there, to urge the budget airline "to reconsider" plans to close four bases in Spain, three of them in the Canaries, saying it was "critical" that the airline maintain its flights.
Date: Thu 12 Sep 2019, 10:57 AM
Source: The Olive Press [edited]

An outbreak of the deadly [infection due to the bacterium] _Listeria_ has been confirmed in Mallorca.

A patient is recovering in a private clinic in Palma as samples of the bacterium are being tested in Madrid to confirm if it is the same strain as the recent outbreak in Andalucia. It seems likely to have originated from the same lethal strain since the patient affected [in Mallorca] had come from Granada.

So far 3 people have died and 7 women have aborted babies out of the 200 people confirmed to have been affected.

The dangerous bacterium spreads through food and can cause severe illnesses including sepsis, meningitis and other life-long problems.  [Byline: Jacque Talbot]
========================
[_Listeria_ have been identified in 3 meat products and in needles used to inject lard into the meat before it is cooked at a meat processing facility in Seville implicated in this outbreak (after cooking, the meat is usually served cold and in thin slices). Proper cooking of the meat at the processing facility should have killed _Listeria_, which suggests either that the meat, may have been improperly cooked or that contamination may have occurred after cooking. The prior news report said that _Listeria_ was isolated from an oven cart used at the processing facility in Seville; if the meat was placed on this cart after cooking, it could explain how the meat became contaminated despite having been previously cooked. The meat processing facility has been closed, and all its products have now been recalled, but because it can take up to 70 days after exposure to _Listeria_ for symptoms of listeriosis to develop, more cases can be expected.

Genotyping clinical isolates of _L. monocytogenes_ will help identify clusters of cases that have a common source, and genotyping the isolates from the food and environmental surfaces at the meat processing facility will help confirm the source, if genotypes match. We await further developments in the investigation of this outbreak.

Palma, with a population of 409 661 residents, the capital and resort city of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands in Spain, is located on the south coast of Mallorca  (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palma_de_Mallorca>).

Mallorca is the largest island in the Balearic Islands, located approximately 300 km [186 mi] off the eastern coast of Spain in the western Mediterranean (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mallorca>). The autonomous community of Andalucia is located in southern Spain, with the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the Mediterranean Sea to the east (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seville>).

A map of Spain showing the locations of Andalucia and Mallorca can be found at

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain:
Date: Tue 3 Sep 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]

Four people are part of a foodborne botulism outbreak in Spain after eating DIA brand tuna. A batch of canned tuna in sunflower oil of the brand DIA has been removed from sale. The Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) said those who became ill ate a homemade salad that included the tuna. Spanish media reported one of the patients was still in hospital.

The foodborne outbreak was suspected to be caused by the tuna or grated carrots from Spain with distribution including Andorra, according to a Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) notice.

AESAN became aware on 9 Aug 2019, through the Spanish rapid information exchange system (SCIRI), of a notification from health authorities in Castilla y Leon of a food poisoning outbreak caused by botulinum toxin linked to consumption of canned tuna in a homemade "Russian" salad. Products have been analysed, and the presence of botulinum toxin was confirmed in late August 2019 in the consumed can of tuna.

Distribuidora Internacional de Alimentacion (DIA) is a Spanish multinational company specializing in distribution of food, household, and personal care products. The company has more than 6000 stores in Spain, Portugal, Brazil, and Argentina. Tuna was distributed through DIA platforms to the communities of Asturias, Castilla y Leon, Cataluna, Aragon, La Rioja, Murcia, Navarra, Castilla - La Mancha, and Valencia.

Canned tuna in sunflower oil 900-gram with lot code 19/154 023 02587 and expiration date of December 2022 made by Frinsa del Noroeste S.A. is affected. This batch of tuna manufactured by Frinsa was removed from all stores on 10 Aug 2019 by DIA, according to a company statement. The firm asked any customers who had the item to return it to their nearest store.

Botulism is a rare but life-threatening condition caused by toxins produced by _Clostridium botulinum_ bacteria. In foodborne botulism, symptoms generally begin 18-36 hours after eating contaminated food. However, they can start as soon as 6 hours after or up to 10 days later. Botulism can cause symptoms including general weakness, dizziness, double vision, and trouble with speaking or swallowing. Difficulty in breathing, weakness of other muscles, abdominal distension, and constipation may also occur. People experiencing these problems should seek immediate medical attention. Symptoms result from muscle paralysis caused by the toxin.
======================
[Seafood-associated botulism is usually type E. Canned tuna is an uncommon source but has been reported (Johnston RW, Feldman J, Sullivan R: Botulism from canned tuna fish. Public Health Rep. 1963; 78: 561-4).

The following was extracted from ProMED-mail Botulism, smoked fish - Finland ex Canada http://promedmail.org/post/20060721.2000: "_Clostridium botulinum_ type E is naturally highly prevalent in aquatic environments and fish, leading to a high risk of contamination. The hot-smoking processes are usually too low to eliminate botulinum spores. Growth and toxin production from spores in vacuum-packed smoked fish products with anaerobic atmosphere and limited preservative factors is likely during extended storage at temperatures above 3 deg C (37.4 deg F). Therefore, the most important factors controlling _C. botulinum_ growth and toxin production are efficient heat treatments, restricted shelf life, and continuous storage below 3 deg C (37.4 deg F)." - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Fri, 30 Aug 2019 18:36:54 +0200 (METDST)

Madrid, Aug 30, 2019 (AFP) - A man died after eating tainted meat in Spain, the third fatality in a listeria outbreak that has also seen five women lose their babies due to the food-borne bacteria, health authorities said Friday.   More than 200 people have been infected with the common bacteria which poses a serious threat to elderly people, pregnant women or those with serious health conditions.

The source of the outbreak, which was declared on August 15, comes from a product of pork stuffed with garlic and other condiments sold under the commercial name "la Mecha".   The delicacy is made by the company Magrudis, based in the southern city of Seville. Its factory has since been closed and its meat recalled from shops.   On Friday, Spain's health ministry and the government of the southern region of Andalusia, the worst affected, said a 72-year-old man who had terminal pancreatic cancer died from the infection.

That comes on top of the deaths of two elderly women this month.    The ministry and regional government both told AFP on Friday that five women had also lost their babies after eating the tainted meat, one in Madrid and the others in Andalusia.   In a statement, the health ministry warned: "The appearance of new cases cannot be ruled out in the coming days."   But it said, "there is a drop in the number of confirmed cases since the start of the outbreak."
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 13:49:40 +0200 (METDST)

Madrid, Aug 28, 2019 (AFP) - Ryanair pilots in Spain said Wednesday they planned to go on strike for five days in September to protest the planned closure of four bases that threatens 512 jobs.   The work stoppage will come on top of a 10-day September strike called by cabin crew at the budget airline in Spain.   Both are protesting against Ryanair shutting its Canary Islands bases of Tenerife, Lanzarote and Gran Canaria as well as Gerona in north-eastern Spain from January.

The airline, which has suffered from two profit warnings in 10 months, announced the closures on Friday, citing "significant overcapacity in the European short haul market."   A spokesman for the Sepla pilots' union told AFP 120 pilots could lose their jobs.   "They have not proposed relocating the pilots to other bases," he said.   Representatives of the union and company are due to meet this week.   If mediation efforts fail, the strike will take place on September 19, 20, 22, 27 and 29, the union said.   According to the USO union that represents Ryanair cabin crew, altogether 512 pilot and cabin crew posts are threatened.   On Friday, Ryanair said it would try to minimise "job losses with transfers."
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World Travel News Headlines

Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2019 11:08:10 +0200 (METDST)

Manila, Oct 14, 2019 (AFP) - Parents lined up from sunrise holding sleeping infants as the Philippines launched a campaign on Monday to vaccinate millions of children against polio, which has re-emerged nearly two decades after the nation's last cases.   Years of falling vaccination rates, made worse by the botched rollout of a dengue vaccine, culminated in an outbreak of the preventable disease in September.   "This is for the welfare of my child," Ruth Miranda told AFP after the vaccine was squirted into her child's mouth at the Manila slum they call home.

Miranda's child is among scores who are unprotected in the capital of about 13 million people, where vaccination rates of young children plunged from 77 percent in 2016 to a mere 24 percent in June.   The atmosphere at the event in Manila was festive -- with ice cream vendors and music -- but the stakes for the campaign are high.

Polio, which can cause paralysis and can be fatal in rare cases, has no cure and can only be prevented with several doses of oral and injectable vaccines.   Two cases were detected in September, the first polio infections in the Philippines since 2001, adding to the woes of a country already hit by deadly measles and dengue epidemic.   The risk of the disease spreading within the Philippines is high, according to World Health Organization, due to low immunisation coverage partly blamed to a dengue vaccine scandal.

The Philippines was the first nation to use Dengvaxia in a mass programme in 2016, but a botched rollout led to claims that children had died after being vaccinated.   A dramatic drop in vaccine confidence followed, with trust plunging from 93 percent in 2015 to 32 percent in 2018, according to a study led by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.   The Philippines polio outbreak has been traced back to the weakened form of the virus used in vaccines, which is excreted by people for a time after they receive it.   According to the WHO, that form can mutate and spread in the surrounding community when immunisation rates get too low.
Date: Mon, 14 Oct 2019 10:25:38 +0200 (METDST)
By Shingo ITO, Sara HUSSEIN

Tokyo, Oct 14, 2019 (AFP) - Tens of thousands of rescue workers in Japan battled on Monday to find survivors of a powerful typhoon that killed at least 43 people, as fresh rain threatened to hamper efforts.   Typhoon Hagibis crashed into the country on Saturday night, unleashing high winds and torrential rain across 36 of the country's 47 prefectures, and triggering landslides and catastrophic flooding.   "Even now, many people are still unaccounted for in the disaster-hit area," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told an emergency disaster meeting on Monday.   "Units are trying their best to search for and rescue them, working day and night," Abe said.

But even as rescuers, including troops, combed through debris, the country's weather agency forecast rain in central and eastern Japan that it warned could cause further flooding and new landslides.   "I would like to ask people to stay fully vigilant and continue watching for landslides and river flooding," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference.   In Nagano, one of the worst-hit regions, rain was already falling and was expect to intensify.   "We are concerned about the impact of the latest rain on rescue and recovery efforts," local official Hiroki Yamaguchi told AFP.   "We will continue operations while watching out for secondary disasters due to the current rain."

- 43 dead, 16 missing: NHK -
By late Monday afternoon, national broadcaster NHK said the toll had risen to 43 dead, with 16 others missing and over 200 people injured. The government gave lower figures but was continuing to update its information.   The dead included a municipal worker whose car was overcome by floodwaters and at least seven crew from a cargo ship that sank in Tokyo Bay on Saturday night, a coast guard spokesman said.   Four others, from China, Myanmar and Vietnam, were rescued when the boat sank and the coast guard was still searching for a last crew member.   While Hagibis, one of the most powerful storms to hit the Tokyo area in decades, packed wind gusts of up to 216 kilometres (134 miles) per hour, it was the heavy rains that caused most damage.

A total of 142 rivers flooded, mainly in eastern and northern Japan, with river banks collapsing in two dozen places, local media said.   In central Nagano, a levee breach sent water from the Chikuma river gushing into residential neighbourhoods, flooding homes up to the second floor.   As water slowly receded Monday, television footage showed patients being transferred by ambulance from a Nagano hospital where some 200 people had been cut off by flooding.   Elsewhere, rescuers used helicopters to winch survivors from roofs and balconies, or steered boats through muddy waters to reach those trapped.

- Japan dedicates rugby win to victims -
By Monday afternoon, some 75,900 households remained without power, with 120,000 experiencing water outages.   The disaster left tens of thousands of people in shelters, with many unsure when they would be able to return home.   "Everything from my house was washed away before my eyes, I wasn't sure if it was a dream or real," a woman in Nagano told NHK.   "I feel lucky I'm still alive."   The storm brought travel chaos over the holiday weekend, grounding flights and halting commuter and bullet train services.

By Monday, most subway trains had resumed service, along with many bullet train lines, and flights had also restarted.   The storm also brought havoc to the sporting world, forcing the delay of Japanese Grand Prix qualifiers and the cancellation of three Rugby World Cup matches.   But a crucial decider pitting Japan against Scotland went ahead, with the hosts dedicating their stunning 28-21 win to the victims of the disaster.   "To everyone that's suffering from the typhoon, this game was for you guys," said Japan captain Michael Leitch.
Date: Sun, 13 Oct 2019 23:31:57 +0200 (METDST)

Kinshasa, Oct 13, 2019 (AFP) - Doctors will use a second Ebola vaccine from November in three eastern provinces in the Democratic Republic of Congo to fight the deadly virus, medical officials said Sunday.   "It's time to use the new Ad26-ZEBOV-GP vaccine, manufactured by Johnson & Johnson's Belgian subsidiary," said Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe, who leads the national anti-Ebola operation in the DRC.    It will arrive in the eastern city of Goma, in North Kivu province, on October 18 and be used from the beginning of next month, he added.   DRC's latest Ebola epidemic, which began in August 2018, has killed 2,144 people, making it the second deadliest outbreak of the virus, after the West Africa pandemic of 2014-2016.

Muyembe said the communes of Majingo and Kahembe had been selected to receive the vaccine as they were considered the epicentres of the epidemic.   "We will extend this vaccination to our small traders who often go to Rwanda to protect our neighbours," he added.   "If it works well, we will expand vaccination in South Kivu and Ituri."   DR Congo's eastern provinces of Ituri, North Kivu and South Kivu sit on the borders with Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi.   The Belgian laboratory will send a batch of 200,000 doses to neighbouring Rwanda and 500,000 doses in the DRC, Muyembe said.   More than 237,000 people living in active Ebola transmission zones have received a vaccination produced by the pharma company Merck Sharpe and Dohme since August 8, 2018. 

The J&J vaccine had been rejected by DRC's former health minister Oly Ilunga, who cited the risks of introducing a new product in communities where mistrust of Ebola responders is already high.   But Ilunga's resignation in July appears to have paved the way for approval of the second vaccine. He currently faces charges that he embezzled funds intended for the fight against Ebola.   In his letter of resignation Ilunga said "actors who have demonstrated a lack of ethics" want to introduce a second vaccine, but did not elaborate.    Muyembe, who took over the Ebola fight in the DRC in July, said "The Johnson & Johnson vaccine has the most science-based data."
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2019 20:02:59 +0200 (METDST)
By Robbie COREY-BOULET

Addis Ababa, Oct 10, 2019 (AFP) - A palace that once housed Ethiopia's emperors and also served as a torture site under the communist Derg regime is to open to the public in a controversial government tourism project.    The palace compound in Addis Ababa, which Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's government has rebranded "Unity Park", was formally launched Thursday and will be open from Friday.    Abiy's office said on Twitter Thursday that the project "symbolises our ability to come together".

But critics have dismissed it as vanity project for Abiy that could prove divisive.   Backed by the United Arab Emirates, the project cost more than $160 million (145 million euros), Ethiopian officials told reporters at a briefing earlier this week.    Built in the late 1800s by Emperor Menelik II, who founded Addis Ababa, the palace was the residence of Ethiopia's rulers for more than a century.   Abiy himself does not live there, and it has seen little activity in recent years.    Abiy's advisers say he has taken a keen interest in transforming the palace into a tourist attraction since coming to power in April 2018 -- visiting the site every day in recent weeks to monitor progress.

The government's "Home-Grown Economic Reform" agenda, unveiled last month, describes tourism as a primary engine of potential job creation.    On Thursday, government officials and the diplomatic corps toured the expansive site before attending a banquet that was expected to draw five regional heads of state and other dignitaries.    The restored rooms feature items like Menelik's sword and a life-size wax replica of former Emperor Haile Selassie, who lived at the palace and was then etained there after the Derg overthrew him in 1974.

The site also includes a sculpture garden with installations representing Ethiopia's nine regions, and a zoo is expected to open by the end of the year.    Aklilu Fikresilassie, an Ethiopian employee of the United Nations who attended the launch Thursday, said he was "really fascinated" to set foot inside a place that had been closed to the public his entire life.    "For us it's like a government house, so now when you enter that palace it tells you that we are getting somehow closer to our leaders," he said.

But not everyone is convinced the palace will succeed in bringing Ethiopians together.   In a country grappling with ethnic divisions, some worry that the palace could alienate ethnic Oromos who contend that their ancestors were forced off their land when Addis Ababa was built.    Journalist and former political prisoner Eskinder Nega said the renovations were undertaken "without consultation from the public", which he called "a huge mistake."    "This is all about heritage, about preserving heritage. The people should have had a say in it," he said.    "Like everything else this was decided from the top and implemented only by the decision of the prime minister."
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2019 13:13:57 +0200 (METDST)

Hanoi, Oct 10, 2019 (AFP) - Selfie-snapping tourists railed against the closure of Hanoi's 'train street' on Thursday after police blocked off the Instragram-famous tracks for safety reasons.   The narrow railway corridor in central Hanoi has become a hotspot among visitors seeking the perfect holiday snap on the tracks -- often dodging trains that rumble through daily.    But Hanoi authorities said this week they would block people from the tracks to avoid accidents, and police on Thursday erected barricades to keep out disappointed visitors.    "I'm very frustrated because today I can't go in and take a picture," Malaysian tourist Mustaza bin Mustapha told AFP, vowing to come back later.

Dozens of other tourists were turned away, though some managed to get onto still-open sections of the railway, moving out of the way as an afternoon train chugged past.    Built by former colonial rulers, the railway once shipped goods and people across France's former Indochina colony and remains in use today by communist Vietnam's state-run railway company.    The stretch of the tracks was once known as a rough part of town, occupied by drug users and squatters until their recent discovery by camera-wielding holidaymakers who have splashed images of the area across social media.

Cafe owners complained that business would be hurt thanks to the new regulations, and that tourists always moved out of the way for oncoming trains.   "There has never been any regretful accidents here," said Le Tuan Anh, who runs a cafe from his home along the tracks.   "Compared to traffic density elsewhere in the city, this is much safer," he said, referring to Hanoi's chaotic, motorbike-clogged streets.   New signs were installed in the area Thursday, warning passersby not to take photos or videos in the "dangerous area", much to the chagrin of British tourist Harriet Hayes.   "People come from all over the world to Hanoi just to see the train go past," she told AFP.   "It's such a shame that we come and have been told that we have to leave."
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2019 06:51:42 +0200 (METDST)
By Holly ROBERTSON

Sydney, Oct 10, 2019 (AFP) - Large numbers of tourists are rushing to scale Uluru -- also known as Ayers Rock -- ahead of a looming ban on climbing a site sacred to indigenous Australians.   Photographs of hundreds of people clambering up the giant red monolith have provoked a social media backlash, with critics lashing as "ignorant" those going against the wishes of the traditional Aboriginal owners of the land, the Anangu.   "A mass of morally and ethically bankrupt people," indigenous woman Laura McBride tweeted alongside an image showing a queue of people snaking up the side of Uluru.    "One even hiking a toddler up, teaching the next generation how to be ignorant."   "Imagine rushing to climb Uluru before it closes just so you could brag about disrespecting the oldest living culture in the world," tweeted National Indigenous Television journalist Madeline Hayman-Reber, who called the scenes "embarrassing".

Officials say the ban, which comes into effect on October 26, is intended to show respect for cultural practices, protect the site from further environmental damage and to ensure visitors' safety.    More than 395,000 people visited the Uluru-Kata National Park in the 12 months to June 2019, according to Parks Australia, about 20 percent more than the previous year. Around 13 percent of those who visited during that period made the climb, park authorities said.    More recent figures are not available but Tourism Central Australia CEO Stephen Schwer said there had been a "significant jump" in the number of people visiting in recent weeks, with the period leading up to the ban coinciding in part with school holidays.   "Its been very busy, particularly down in the national park precinct itself," he told AFP.   "We've had quite an issue with accommodation availability, because there's a lot of people want to climb Uluru before it closes. It's been a busier than normal holiday period."   Japanese visitors and Australians on driving holidays were most likely to want to scale Uluru, Schwer said, though he urged them not to do so.

Australian tourist Belinda Moore, 33, drove to Uluru from her home in central Queensland state to ascend the rock, an experience she said she "absolutely loved".   "It's always been something to tick off the bucket list and when we heard it was closing, we knew it was now or never," she told AFP.   Moore said she did not think her climb was disrespectful to traditional owners as she was not Aboriginal.    "It may be for their own people, because it's their sacred site," she said.   "I'm pretty sad that they're closing it, but it's still amazing just to see it. I would still recommend it."   The climb will be permanently closed as of October 26, the anniversary of ownership being handed back to the Anangu people.

Uluru has great spiritual and cultural significance to indigenous Australians, with their connection to the site dating back tens of thousands of years.   Though visitor numbers were expected to decline once the ban was in place, Schwer said local tourism operators were "not particularly concerned" as it would return the area to normality.   "People need to remember that in central Australia we're a very interconnected community," he said. "The people who are requesting the climb closure are our friends and colleagues.   "We're just looking forward to being able to have the climb consigned to the annals of history."
Date: Wed, 9 Oct 2019 22:01:17 +0200 (METDST)

Kinshasa, Oct 9, 2019 (AFP) - Six people were killed in the Democratic Republic of Congo after torrential rains hit the capital Kinshasa, flooding several neighbourhoods. a local official said.    The bodies were found between Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.    Five people were killed in the capital's Selembao municipality where around 30 houses collapsed, local mayor Augustin Mankesi told Top Congo radio station.   One woman died in the Pelende district after she was electrocuted, he added.    "Our community is stricken," Mankesi added, calling on the Congolese authorities for help.   Fatal floods and rains are frequent in Kinshasa. In January last year 48 people were killed in landslides, floods and after houses collapsed, according to authorities.    Residents told AFP the road from the sea port district of Matadi to the Kinshasa turnoff has been closed due to erosion caused by the rain.    The passage is Kinshasa's main supply route for imported goods and also serves as an exit point for exports.
Date: Tue, 8 Oct 2019 04:13:25 +0200 (METDST)
By Margioni BERMÚDEZ

Caracas, Oct 8, 2019 (AFP) - The small waiting room at the home of self-styled healer "Brother Guayanes" in Caracas' rundown Petare district fills up quickly with patients -- business has never been better.   With Venezuela's chronic medicine shortages and hyperinflation, more and more people are turning to alternative medicine to treat common ailments in the crisis-wracked South American country.   "We go to the hospital and there's nothing there. They don't have medicines, or they're too expensive, what are we to do?" said Rosa Saez, 77, who has come to get treatment for a painful arm.   Carlos Rosales -- he uses the more ceremonious "Brother Guayanes" for his business -- is finishing up a "spiritual intervention" on a patient in what passes for his surgery.   The patient lies, eyes closed, on a cot as, in a series of swishes and clicks, the healer waves five pairs of scissors one after another over his prone body.    The healer says he performs 200 such interventions a week in a dim, candle-lit room that features two camp beds and an array of plaster statues that Rosales says represent "spiritual entities".   A regular visitor to the spiritual center, Saez says she has faith in Rosales' methods: "He healed my kidneys."

- Natural healing -
All across Venezuela, but particularly in poor areas like Petare, patients cannot hope to afford the price of medicines that due to the economic crisis, have become exceedingly rare.  Venezuela's pharmacists' federation say pharmacies and hospitals have on average only about 20 percent of the medicine stock needed.   Rosales' clinic is muggy with the smell of tobacco. A crucifix suspended from a chain around his neck, he practices a seeming mixture of smoke-blowing shamanism, plant-based medicine and mainstream religion.    Posters hung near the entrance remind clients to arrive with a candle and tobacco and "Don't forget that payment is in cash".   Much like a general practitioner, Rosales spends time consulting with his patients, examining them with a stethoscope, before offering a diagnosis. Often he prescribes potions based on plants and fruit, such as pineapple and a type of local squash known as chayote.   "We know medicines are necessary," he says. "I'm not against medicine, but my medicine is botany."

- Plants replace drugs -
At her stall in a downtown Caracas market, 72-year-old Lilia Reyes says she has seen her trade in medicinal plants flourish.   "I can't keep up with the demand," she said at her stall, bathed in the aroma of camomile, one of the 150 plants she sells.   Careless consumption of some herbs can be deadly, warns Grismery Morillo. A doctor at a Caracas public hospital, she says she has seen many cases of acute liver failure in people who have eaten certain roots.   According to Venezuela's opposition parties, some 300,000 chronically ill people are in danger of dying from the shortages of medicines.

But despite the risks, people like Carmen Teresa say they have no alternative.    In the kitchen of her restaurant which closed down three years ago as the economic crisis took hold, the 58-year-old Colombian prepares an infusion of fig leaves to treat "diabetic neuropathy".   The painkillers needed for the condition are "too expensive" and prices are going up due to hyperinflation, so she is cutting back on the pills and supplementing her treatment with herbal infusions.   She needs at least four tablets a day to keep her diabetes at bay. Her mother, bedridden since breaking a leg a year ago, suffers from Alzheimer's disease and needs five pills a day for hypertension.   "I'm still taking my pills, but I reduced the dose," says Teresa, who is also replacing cholesterol pills with lemon juice.
Date: Sun, 6 Oct 2019 12:04:37 +0200 (METDST)

Riyadh, Oct 6, 2019 (AFP) - Saudi Arabia announced Sunday it would allow unmarried foreign couples to rent hotel rooms together as the ultraconservative kingdom begins offering up tourist visas for the first time.   The tourism authority said in a statement published on Twitter that Saudi women travelling alone would also be able to check into a hotel by presenting valid ID.

In the past, couples wanting to stay in a hotel had to prove they were married.    "This is no longer required for tourists," the statement said.   Saudi Arabia announced on September 27 it was opening its doors to holidaymakers with the goal of diversifying its oil-dependent economy.   The kingdom had previously only issued visas to Muslim pilgrims, foreign workers, and recently to spectators at sporting or cultural events.

Kickstarting tourism is one of the centrepieces of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's Vision 2030 reform programme to prepare the biggest Arab economy for a post-oil era.   Citizens from 49 countries are now eligible for online e-visas or visas on arrival, including the United States, Australia and several European nations.   On September 28, Saudi authorities warned that tourists who violated "public decency", including with immodest clothing and public displays of affection, would be subject to fines.
Date: Sat, 5 Oct 2019 03:30:17 +0200 (METDST)
By Giovanna FLEITAS

Petorca, Chile, Oct 5, 2019 (AFP) - For Erick Hurtado, the worst thing about the drought that has devastated his family farm in Chile is the dead animals.   "Going out and seeing the animals dead on the ground is so horrible," Hurtado says as he gazes across the dusty paddocks of his farm in Petorca, near the coastal city of Valparaiso.

Farmers are counting the cost of one of the driest austral winters in six decades, which has destroyed crops and left tens of thousands of farm animals dead in the fields of central Chile.   Hurtado's farm, owned by his grandfather, has lost half its 60 head of cattle.   So far, 106,000 animals have died due to lack of water and fodder, mostly goats, cattle and sheep, according to the agriculture ministry.   President Sebastian Pinera, who last month announced a $5 billion plan to improve water distribution, this week set up a crisis group of government agencies to tackle the water crisis, which he said had become "more extensive and more intense."

In Colina, north of the capital Santiago, the drought has been hard on small farmers. Scrawny cattle pick at sprigs of strawy grass on pastures that have turned to dust. Cows, goats and horses roam hungry on hills have turned to a dry muddy brown.   "The drought has been disastrous for us," said Sandra Aguilar. Her family owned about a hundred head of cattle. Today, only half survive thanks to a trickle of water provided by a neighbor who still has some reserves.   "The situation is complicated," said Javier Maldonado, governor of the province of Chacabuco, where several agricultural areas have been hit particularly hard by the drought.    "We have to be realistic, climate change is here to stay," he said.

- Water shortages -
Dominga Mondaca points out the deep fissures that run through the garden behind her house in the village of La Ligua near Valparaiso. The garden used to be full of strawberries and citrus trees; now it's cracked earth.    "We have had many years with little water. But the last year, it didn't rain at all," said the 73-year-old, one of more than 600,000 people the government is supplying by tanker trucks as part of emergency measures.   She says she has had to give up raising chickens, in order to keep what little water she and her husband receive for their own consumption, washing and cleaning. Whatever is left, she uses to sprinkle on herbs in a small kitchen garden.   The agriculture ministry says 37,000 family farms need assistance in the central Chile.

- Thirsty avocados? -
In Petorca, some rivers have run dry, and the landscape has been left parched, but lush avocado and citrus plantations are nevertheless thriving.   Locals in Petorca say the real, long-term problem is the mismanagement of water resources.    "There is an excess of monoculture plantations that consume all the water," said Diego Soto of the Movement for the Defense of Access to Water, Land and Environmental Protection (MODATIMA) told AFP.   Avocados need a lot of water to grow, said Soto.   "An avocado tree needs 600 liters of water per week, whereas humans consume 50 liters a day, or 350 liters a week," he said.   Producers refute these figures and say the real problem is a lack of infrastructure to store water, both above and below ground.    "The avocado is not a crop that needs more water," insisted Francisco Contardo, chairman of the local producers' committee.   Avocados are a key export for Chile, mostly to the US and China, but drought has reduced exports by 25 percent.

- Less snow -
For many though, the changes being wrought by climate change are overwhelmingly obvious. Snow in the highlands of central Chile was relatively scarce this year.    Scientists predict an average decrease of between five and 10 percent snowfall every 10 years in almost the entire Andes mountains, one of the country's main sources of water.   "The central zone of Chile is highly dependent on the summer melt season, its snow and glaciers, which means that if the snow cover is reduced, there is also a reduction in the availability of water resources," said Paul Cordero, climate change expert at the University of Santiago.   Weak snowfall forced the country's main ski resorts to use artificial snow machines much earlier and more often this season than in previous years.    "Chile has been living as if it were a country with an abundance of water," said Pinera.   "Climate change and global warming have changed this situation probably forever."