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Greece

Background
Greece offers a great variety of attractions for the international traveller. A beautiful climate linked with great beaches, a vibrant nightlife and historical monuments to rival any other location throughout the world. All of this located
within western Europe and a short flight away from many of the cooler northern destinations - like Ireland. Travellers from these regions descent on Greece in very significant numbers each year and for the vast majority of them they will have a splendid and healthy time. However for some this may not be the case and serious illness and accidents are regularly reported. Following some commonsense rules would go a long way to avoiding disaster and ensuring that this trip is truly one to be remembered for all the right reasons.
Climate
Situated in southern Europe the country enjoys mild winters but very hot summers. There may be occasional cool breezes (meltemia) but these can serve only to fool the traveller into thinking that they are unlikely to burn. Rain is very uncommon during the height of summer (July and August) and all travellers should be advised to use very adequate sun-block lotion at all times.
Slip, Slop, Slap
Following the Australian mantra of Slip, Slop and Slap makes perfect sense. Slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen and slap on a hat when out and about during the day and this should help protect against the intense suns rays. Nevertheless, despite all their best intentions, travellers get burnt. This is particularly a problem in the first few days after their arrival when they do not realise the intensity of the suns rays and how easily they can be exposed. Falling asleep beside the hotel's swimming pool or on the beach is a very common problem and must be avoided against. The tips of the ears, shoulders (especially along the bra-strap line, ankles and behind the knees are commonly exposed and forgotten areas.
After Sun care
To treat significant sunburn it is important to increase fluid intake but also to take extra salt on your food (unless medically contraindicated for some specific condition like high blood pressure etc). Soothing water soluble lotions (especially ones containing a mild anaesthetic and/or steroid cream) are probably best but certainly avoid any of the ones which paste the skin with a thick layer - which is almost impossible to remove without causing serious pain! The more severe sunburn cases may need medical care and even hospitalisation which really ruins a holiday.
Food & Water
As a European destination Greece has a good level of food and water hygiene. Unfortunately this can vary - especially as you move away from the main tourist destinations and also as the summer temperatures rise and food goes 'off' more quickly. Eating hot food, avoiding cold foods (side-salads, lettuce etc) and never eating undercooked bivalve shellfish (mussels, oysters, clams etc) makes perfect sense. Eating food or taking fruit juice drinks from street vendors is a risk just not worth taking.
Insect bites
There may be both mosquitoes and sandflys about so having good repellents (DEET based ones) is worthwhile. The biggest problem will be early in the morning and towards the end of the daylight hours. However sitting in the shade while having lunch may be nice and cool but it is also often a place where these insects tend to hover looking for their next meal. Just don't allow that meal to be the blood in your unguarded ankle!
Seeing the Monuments
As mentioned previously Greece is covered with ancient monuments and these attract many thousands of tourists each year. The ruins are often not the most hospitable places for sun-sensitive tourists so taking care against the suns rays is essential - especially while standing carefully listening to the tour guide explain some complicated piece of history while the back of your legs get roasted! The other issue, for those trekking through the ruins, is the distinct possibility of a nasty twisted ankle.
Laser Night shows
Many of the ancient sites have beautiful night shows which depict something of the past splendour and are definitely worth seeing. However it is wise to wear good shoes as stumbling across loose stones is a particular problem at night and also bring a small torch, if possible, to guide your way. Getting separated from your travelling companions, or not being able to find your return bus, can lead to some understandable panic so listen carefully to any instructions and look out for some land marks before you get too far away into the night time crowd.
Animal bites
Some tourists may forget that rabies is a problem in many countries throughout the world and, even though Greece is regarded as rabies-free', there is always a problem if someone should get bitten. The possibility that this animal could have been recently smuggled into the country cannot be out ruled and so many would advise full post exposure treatment should this contact occur. Children may be at particular risk due to their inquisitive nature.
Swimming
Sunburn and swimming go hand in hand but drowning can also occur all too frequently within this region. Strong currents, swimming after meals (or alcohol) and the ever popular romantic midnight swim are all serious risk factors. Also children running around the deep end of the pool may lose their footing and topple in without warning. Unfortunately a very small child sinks instantly with very little sign of the emergency to those close by. Parents need to keep aware of this risk at all times.
The summer working holiday
Many of our students head towards Greece for 2 to 3 months during the summer to work. The attractions are obvious but commonsense and sensible life-style choices are needed throughout their stay to lessen the risk of illness or them returning home with an infection they had not bargained for. Unfortunately many return home with life-long illnesses which have been contracted from a single unprotected sexual contact.
Vaccinations for Greece
As a general rule the usual travel vaccines are not recommended for most short-term travellers to this region. However for the student planning to spend a more prolonged period it would be sensible to consider cover against both Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B and also to check that their Tetanus cover is up-to-date.
Summary
This is still one of the most popular destinations for northern European travellers and, in the vast majority of cases, they will have a fantastic time with only good memories. Unfortunately some less prepared folks will end up with serious sunburn and other illnesses or diseases which perhaps are frequently associated with their own lack of care and protection rather than anything specific to this beautiful country.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

6th December, 2019
HSE Health Protection Surveillance Centre

On 27/11/2019, a possible case of diphtheria was reported to the Department of Epidemiological Surveillance and Intervention through the Mandatory Notification System in Greece. It concerned an 8 years old boy of Greek nationality, who was hospitalized in the ICU of General Children's Hospital  where he died.  This child had underlying conditions (severe pulmonary hypertension) and was admitted to ICU  on 22/11/2019 with clinical presentation of laryngitis (without the presence of characteristic pseudo membranes) and pneumonia, immediately intubated, covered with double antibiotic regimen and died due to deterioration of his clinical presentation on 26/11/2019.
 
According to the epidemiological data given , there is no travel history, group living, no connection to another case and the child does not belong to a specific population group. Regarding his immunization status, the child was vaccinated with at least 3 doses against diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis.
 
Laboratory investigation of bronchial exudate isolated Corynebacterium diphtheriae via VITEK. Further laboratory testing was performed by the Public Health England  reference Laboratory for Corynebacteria. On Thursday 5/12/2019, the National Public Health Organization was informed that multiplex PCR testing was positive for C. Diphtheriae and positive for the diphtheria toxin gene. The Elek test was also positive for toxin production. The results of the child's post-mortem exam are pending.

Contact tracing and management is ongoing and has identified most of the close contacts of the patient. The National Public Health Organization provided recommendations on obtaining nasopharyngeal cultures in close contacts to evaluate carriage as well as the necessary preventive measures to protect the child's close contacts as well as the medical staff involved in direct patient care (i.e. awareness for potential compatible with diphtheria symptoms and administration of antibiotic prophylaxis together with booster or complete vaccination series as appropriate) according to the WHO’s Diphtheria Surveillance Standards (September 2018). In addition we have initiated the procedure for the procurement of a limited stockpile of DAT.
Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2019 09:20:47 +0100 (MET)

Athens, Nov 27, 2019 (AFP) - A strong 6.1-magnitude undersea earthquake shook the Greek island of Crete on Wednesday and was felt in other parts of the country, officials said.   "It was a major earthquake, the whole island shook but fortunately so far no damage has been reported," Crete regional governor Stavros Arnaoutakis told state TV ERT.   The Athens observatory said the quake struck at 9:23 am (0723 GMT) and had a depth of over 70 kilometres (44 miles).

The tremor occurred a day after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake in Albania that has left more than 20 dead and hundreds injured.   Shortly after the Albania tremor, a 5.4-magnitude shock hit Bosnia, the European-Mediterranean Seismological Center reported on Tuesday.   Greece lies on major fault lines and is regularly hit by earthquakes but they rarely cause casualties.   In July 2017, a 6.7-magnitude earthquake killed two people on the island of Kos in the Aegean sea, causing significant damage.
Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2019 12:31:30 +0200 (METDST)

Athens, Oct 2, 2019 (AFP) - Greek workers staged a fresh 24-hour strike Wednesday against government plans to deregulate the labour market, paralysing road and rail transport, closing banks and shutting down news outlets.   Buses and trams stayed in their depots, the Athens metro was shut down and ferries serving islands on both sides of Greece stayed in port. The action also hit rail services, including to Athens airport.   Banks were closed Wednesday and Poesy, the journalists' union, said there would be no news bulletins over the 24-hour strike period.

The strike caused long traffic jams in Athens as the GSEE, the largest union representing private-sector workers, organised a rally in the city centre to protest the planned legislation.    It denounced "the suppression of collective conventions" and what it said was an assault on the unions.   This was the second strike in a week against the planned reforms of conservative Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, which he argues will open the way to investment and encourage growth of more than two percent.   A strike last week hit transport, hospitals, schools and the courts.   The unions say the proposed reforms will undermine collective agreements and make it harder to organise strikes.

The proposed law would require a more-than 50 percent turn-out of the workforce in any strike vote for it to be valid.   Union leaders have also denounced a law passed in August which they say makes it easier to sack people in the private sector.   Adedy, the federation of public-sector unions, which organised last week's strike, called on its members to join Wednesday's action.   Mitsotakis came to power in July, replacing the left-wing government of Alexis Tsipras.
Date: Thu 12 Sep 2019, 7:54 PM
Source: Ekathimerini [edited]

The death toll from the West Nile virus since June this year has risen to 20, according to this week's report by the National Health Organization (EODY).

Up until [12 Sep 2019], authorities had diagnosed a total of 176 cases of the mosquito-borne virus. Of these, 109 developed illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as encephalitis or meningitis.

EODY is urging the public to spray insect repellent on bare skin and clothing, to install mosquito nets and screens, to remove stagnant water from basins, vases and gutters, to regularly mow lawns and to water plants in the morning.
=============================
[The first report mentions 20 fatal human cases as compared to the latest ECDC update that mentions 19 and the total case number is 176 versus 171 (ECDC report).

West Nile fever is a disease caused by West Nile Virus (WNV), which is a _Flavivirus_ related to the viruses that cause St. Louis encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. It causes disease in humans, horses, and several species of birds. Most infected individuals show few signs of illness, but some develop severe neurological illness which can be fatal. West Nile Virus has an extremely broad host range. It replicates in birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals, mosquitoes and ticks <https://www.oie.int/doc/ged/D14013.PDF>.

The reservoir of the virus is in birds. Mosquitoes become infected when they bite an infected bird ingesting the virus in the blood. The mosquitoes act as carriers (vectors) spreading the virus from an infected bird to other birds and to other animals. Infection of other animals (e.g. horses, and also humans) is incidental to the cycle [as also evident in the ECDC update above] in birds since most mammals do not develop enough virus in the bloodstream to spread the disease.

Key to preventing the spread of West Nile fever is to control mosquito populations. Horses should be protected from exposure to mosquitoes. Likewise, people should avoid exposure to mosquitoes especially at dusk and dawn when they are most active, use insect screens and insect repellents, and limit places for mosquitoes to breed. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 2019 15:38:29 +0200 (METDST)

Athens, Sept 15, 2019 (AFP) - More than 160 firefighters on Sunday battled to contain a large fire near Athens blazing for a second day amid gale force winds, officials said.   And in another emergency, authorities evacuated dozens of people from two villages and a hotel on the island of Zakynthos after a new fire broke out on Sunday.

The fire department said the blaze near Athens burned in the mountains above Loutraki, a coastal resort some 60 kilometres (35 miles) west of Athens.   "The fire is burning near the top of the mountain," Stefanos Kolokouris, the fire department's deputy chief of operations, told state TV ERT.   "We are trying to create a perimeter but the terrain is very difficult, with ravines," he said.   Four water bombers and six helicopters were participating in operations. Given a lack of roads in the area, two squads of firefighters had to be carried to the mountaintop by Super Puma helicopter, state agency ANA said.   Officials had already evacuated 50 people from a local monastery when the fire broke out on Saturday, but stressed that other inhabited areas were not in danger.

On Zakynthos, officials ordered the evacuation of the villages of Agalas and Keri in the south of the island. Some 120 tourists were also relocated to a safe area.   The Greek fire department on Sunday said it had been called to nearly 80 fires over the past 24 hours.   It has already faced more than 9,600 rural and urban fires this year.
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Egypt

Geographical Information:
Egypt has a total area of about 385,000 sq. miles and sits on the North Eastern corner of Africa. It is bounded by the Mediterranean Sea and on the East by Israel and the Red Sea. The Southern border is with Sudan (the large
t country in Africa) and on the West it shares a border with Libya. The country extends about 675 miles from north to south and is widest at its southern border where it covers 780 miles. Egypt is well known for the great Nile river which courses throughout its length. It is the longest river in the world and has historic links stretching back to at least 3200BC.
Climate:
The hot season in Egypt is from May to September. During this time temperatures can easily reach 370C though northern winds can provide a very necessary respite. November to March is the cooler time of the year and typical temperatures reach 140C though, during the evenings, temperatures can occasionally fall to near freezing. The humidity is mainly along the Mediterranean coastline and the average rainfall here is only about 8".
Medical Facilities:
In the main towns and cities the level of medical care is very adequate for the tourist. English speaking doctors will be associated with all the larger hotels but nevertheless care should always before being admitted to a ‘clinic’ for further treatment should this ever become necessary. Travellers are encouraged to contact the Irish Embassy in Cairo for emergency assistance should the need ever arise.
Food & Water Hygiene:
A significant number of tourists visiting Egypt suffer stomach complaints. In many cases this is due to eating food from the market places or using the hotel tap water supply for drinking or brushing teeth. The hotter climate of the country and the poorer level of food hygiene leave the unwary tourist at particular risk. Salads and shellfish meals should particularly be avoided.
Cruising along the Nile:
Over the past number of years many Irish holiday makers have enjoyed themselves cruising along the Nile for a week and then visiting Luxor in the southern part of the country. In most cases these travellers remain very well with no particular health problems. Nevertheless, in a small number they appear to forget the basic rules of food and water hygiene and will sample the local foods in the market places on shore. This practice is frequently associated with a ruined second half of the holiday. Commonsense rules of looking but not touching are much wiser.
Sun Stroke:
The ambient temperatures in Egypt can be very high and tourists are frequently exposed to the strong sunlight during their time in Egypt. It is essential that an adequate fluid intake is maintained (much higher than at home) and that travellers remember they may need to increase their salt intake (if this is not contraindicated because of heart disease or blood pressure). Small children and the elderly are at special risk.
Malaria risk in Egypt:
The risk of malaria in Egypt is small. The disease is usually only found during the warmer summer months (June to October) in the El Faiyûm area. Travellers may require prophylaxis but they should continuously remember to use adequate protection against mosquitoes and other insects.
Swimming in Egypt:
The fresh water rivers of Egypt are commonly infected with a disease called Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia). This parasite penetrates through intact skin and can cause significant health problems. Travellers are encouraged to swim only in the Mediterranean, the Red Sea or in well maintained swimming pools to avoid exposure.
Health Care while Diving:
Many of the world's most beautiful sites for diving are situated along the Red Sea. These are common tourist destinations and generally the risk of significant health worries will be small. However, check out the professionalism of the diving company before you develop too close a relationship. Make sure their equipment is in good working order and that their instructors are insisting on standard safety procedures for any proposed dive. Never dive after a large meal or following alcohol intake. Remember that you can get significantly sunburnt while snorkeling so take care to cover your back and shoulders with either a suit or sufficient water repellent cream.
Diving at night may be a beautiful experience but take extra care. Never dive beyond your personal limits and ensure that the 'buddy system' is fully operational at all times. Even the most experienced divers can have problems at times so never let you guard down and stay alert.
Rabies:
This disease is widespread in Egypt and is normally transmitted through the bite of warm blooded animals. Any bites, licks or scratches from these animals should be treated seriously by washing out the wound, applying an antiseptic and the seeking urgent competent medical attention.
Vaccines for Egypt:
All Irish travellers to Egypt should ensure that their vaccines against Poliomyelitis, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A are in date. Those staying for longer periods or trekking through the country may require further protection against diseases like Rabies, Meningitis and Hepatitis B.
Further Information:
Further general health information on staying healthy while travelling abroad may be obtained free-of-charge from the Tropical Medical Bureau at either of our centres. Please always remember that each traveller is distinct and so individual specific information will require a medical consultation.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 20:16:40 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, Dec 28, 2019 (AFP) - At least 28 people including textile workers and several Asian tourists were killed Saturday in two separate road crashes in Egypt, official media and other sources said.   The deadliest accident occurred when a bus transporting textile workers collided with a car on the road between the cities of Port Said and Damietta in northern Egypt, state-run Al-Ahram newspaper said on its website.   At least 22 men and women who worked for a clothing factory were killed and eight others injured, the report said.   The accident came only hours after two buses carrying tourists collided with a truck east of Cairo on the road to the Ain Sokhna resort on the Red Sea, according to a security official.

A medical source said two Malaysian women and an Indian man were killed along with three Egyptians -- a bus driver, a tour guide and a security guard.   At least 24 others were injured, several of them tourists and some left in serious condition, the medical source said without giving further details.   Traffic accidents are common in Egypt where many roads are poorly maintained and regulations are laxly enforced.   But efforts by authorities to crack down on traffic violations, including speeding, appear to have borne fruit in recent years, with official figures showing a decline in road deaths.

In 2018 there were 8,480 road accidents compared with 11,098 the previous year, according to the bureau of statistics.   Deaths from traffic accidents fell from more than 5,000 in 2016 to 3,747 the following year and 3,087 in 2018, official figures show.   Ain Sokhna is a popular seaside resort town in the Suez governorate southeast of Cairo. It is also home to several petrochemical, ceramics and steel factories.
Date: Tue 30 Jul 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]

The public health institute in Germany has reported more than 30 people have been sick with _E. coli_ in 2019 after going to Egypt. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) noted increased reports of enterohemorrhagic _E. coli_ (EHEC) related to or after staying in Egypt. Earlier in July 2019, Public Health England (PHE) also reported an increase in adults and children ill after coming back from Hurghada in Egypt.

In Germany, there are 31 cases of EHEC and 5 people with haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure associated with this form of _E. coli_ infection. This is significantly more than in the same period of previous years. In 2018, there were 21 EHEC and one HUS case. In 2017, 9 EHEC and 1 HUS case were recorded. The rise cannot be explained by the increase in travel to Egypt alone, according to RKI.

It follows a warning by PHE after 18 people fell ill with EHEC infection and one person developed HUS after returning from Egypt in 2019. 4 people needed hospital treatment. A PHE spokeswoman previously told Food Safety News that it was not a single outbreak as a variety of different EHEC strains had been detected in visitors to Egypt with EHEC O157 and EHEC O26 among them. The agency has told the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) about the cases.

What caused the German cases is unknown and sick people have stayed at different hotels in separate places, according to RKI, which has informed Egyptian authorities about the increase.

Dr Nick Phin, deputy director of the National Infection Service at PHE, said there are precautions that travellers can take. "These include ensuring meat is cooked thoroughly, not drinking tap water or ice made from tap water and trying to avoid swallowing water when swimming. Anyone suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting should ensure they keep well hydrated and seek medical advice if their symptoms don't improve within 48 hours. They should also avoid preparing or serving food while they have symptoms and thoroughly wash their hands after using the toilet to stop the bug being passed to others" he said.  [Byline: Joe Whitworth]
=======================
[This is the 2nd European country to report a spike to travel-related cases of EHEC related to Egypt. The German report does not specifically relate the cases to the Red Sea area of the country.

As a review, the classical enterohaemorrhagic _E. coli_ is the O157:H7 serotype although some are non-motile, that is, H-. Most O157 strains do not ferment sorbitol and that characteristic was used to screen for the strain using a sorbitol MacConkey agar. However, since non-O157 EHEC strains such as O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 do ferment sorbitol and, as seen here, some O157 also ferment sorbitol, laboratories now look for these isolates using genetic assays for the Shiga toxin genes.

Around 1903 Smith and Reagh reported on the different behaviour of salmonella strains. Their work was mostly ignored until Weil and Felix, working on _Proteus_ cultures, noted 2 forms, the swarming form called the H form (_mit Hauch_, in English: "with breath") and the non-swarming form, called the O form (_ohne Hauch_, in English: "without breath"). The H form contained both O and H antigens (correctly termed the OH form). These parallels were transposed to other Enterobacteriaceae.

If O antiserum is added to a culture, motility is preserved, whereas if H antiserum is added the culture does not move. Therefore, H antigen was involved with swarming in the agar plate (breathing might have been used to imply the ability to move). (_E. coli_, of course, do not swarm on certain agar plates like _Proteus_ bacteria do). - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Date: Wed 17 Jul 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]

Public Health England has issued a warning after almost 20 cases of Shiga toxin-producing _Escherichia coli_ infection [also called enterohemorrhagic _E. coli (EHEC)] were found in people returning from Egypt in 2019.

All travellers had been to the Hurghada region [Red Sea governorate] of Egypt. A variety of different EHEC strains have been detected in visitors to Egypt with serotypes O157 and O26 identified among them. One person developed haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure associated with _E. coli_ infection.

Public Health England (PHE) scientists are investigating to understand the cause of the infections. The agency has given advice to those going to Egypt after 18 people, including children, returned with serious illnesses caused by EHEC infections. In 2018, there were 22 cases of EHEC in the whole year, and 11 infections in 2017. A PHE spokeswoman told Food Safety News that it cannot provide any further information about patients when asked about onset dates and the demographics of those affected.

"So far this year [2019], 4 cases have been hospitalized and 1 case has developed HUS. In 2018, 5 of 22 cases were hospitalized. We use whole genome sequencing to type all strains of EHEC in England, and the results do not indicate this is an outbreak, as multiple different strains of EHEC have been detected," she said. "Each case is individually followed up. We do not know the specific source of these infections in Egypt. However, the most common ways people get infected with EHEC is through eating contaminated food or water, through person to person spread or through contact with animal faeces."

The spokeswoman added the agency has told the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) about the cases and notified the Egyptian public health authorities to provide them with information for their investigations.

There have been 16 cases of HUS in people, including children, who have been to the Hurghada region of Egypt between 2009 and 2019.

Dr Nick Phin, deputy director of the National Infection Service at PHE, said it was aware of people returning from Egypt with _E. coli_ infections. "We are gathering information about those affected to better understand the cause. There are simple precautions that travellers can take. These include ensuring meat is cooked thoroughly, not drinking tap water or ice made from tap water and trying to avoid swallowing water when swimming," he said. "Anyone suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting should ensure they keep well hydrated and seek medical advice if their symptoms don't improve within 48 hours. They should also avoid preparing or serving food while they have symptoms and thoroughly wash their hands after using the toilet to stop the bug being passed to others."

PHE recommendations to travelers include:
- where possible, avoid eating salads and uncooked vegetables and only eat fruit they can peel;
- avoid unpasteurized milk, cheese and ice cream;
- avoid food left uncovered in warm environments and exposed to flies;
- ensure all meat is cooked thoroughly before eating, avoid meat that is pink or cold;
- only drink bottled water or use ice made from bottled/filtered water;
- wash hands thoroughly after visiting the toilet, and always before preparing or eating food. Alcohol gel can be helpful but not entirely effective when hand washing facilities are not available

The advice also applies to other countries where _E. coli_ infections are common such as Turkey and Spain.
=======================
[Clearly this is not one organism as multiple serotypes of the EHEC have been found. It is not clear what factors involving the tourists have put them at risk for this potentially fatal infection. ProMED-mail previously posted about a case in the UK from this region of Egypt in 2016 (E. coli EHEC - UK (02): (England) ex Egypt http://promedmail.org/post/20160707.4330782).

Hurghada is a beach resort town stretching some 40km along Egypt's Red Sea coast. It is renowned for scuba diving, and has numerous dive shops and schools in its modern Sekalla district. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps
England, United Kingdom: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/279>
Date: Sun, 19 May 2019 21:55:33 +0200

Giza, Egypt, May 19, 2019 (AFP) - A bomb blast hit a tourist bus near Egypt's famed Giza pyramids on Sunday, wounding some of them, including South Africans, in the latest blow to the country's tourism industry.   The roadside bomb went off as the bus was being driven in Giza, also causing injuries to Egyptians in a nearby car, medical and security sources said.   Security and medical sources in Egypt said 17 people were injured, without giving a breakdown of their nationalities. No deaths were reported.   South Africa said in a statement that the "bus explosion" injured three of its 28 citizens who were part of the tourist group.   They would remain in hospital while the rest would return home on Monday, said the statement from the department of international relations.   "A device exploded and smashed the windows of a bus carrying 25 people from South Africa and a private car carrying four Egyptians," the security source said.

Video footage captured by AFP showed the bus and car with broken windows on the side of the road.   According to the security source, the wounded were being treated for scratches caused by the broken glass.   Sunday's incident comes after three Vietnamese holidaymakers and their Egyptian guide were killed when a roadside bomb hit their bus as it travelled near the Giza pyramids outside Cairo in December.   It also comes just little more than a month before the African Cup of Nations hosted by Egypt is to kick off.   Egypt has been battling an insurgency that surged especially in the turbulent North Sinai region following the 2013 military ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, who was replaced by former army general Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.   In February 2018, the army launched a nationwide operation against militants, focusing mainly on the North Sinai region.

- Tourism recovery -
Some 650 militants and around 45 soldiers have been killed since the start of the offensive, according to separate statements by the armed forces.   Since first being elected in 2014, Sisi has presented himself as a bulwark against terrorism, promising stability and increased security.   Recently, the country's vital tourism industry has started to slowly rebound after suffering strong blows due to deadly attacks targeting tourists following the turmoil of the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak.   Figures by the official statistics agency showed that tourist arrivals reached 8.3 million in 2017, compared with 5.3 million the previous year.    Authorities have gone at great lengths to lure tourists back, touting a series of archaeological finds and a new museum next to the pyramids, as well as enhanced security at airports and around ancient sites.    But that figure was still far short of the record influx of 2010 when more than 14 million visitors flocked to see the country's sites.
Date: Fri 10 May 2019
Source: ABC News [edited]

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced a temporary ban on dogs imported to the USA from Egypt on Friday [10 May 2019], citing multiple instances of dogs that contracted rabies in Egypt being brought to the USA in recent years.

Officials say Americans' appetite for adopting puppies has fuelled what regulators call an international smuggling operation that skirts US regulations. "The motives behind illegal puppy importation are not immediately obvious. However, a closer look reveals a big business driven by profit at the expense of the health and welfare of the underage puppies," the CDC says in a blog post.

"Importers aim to get around these regulations because customers demand puppies as young as 8 weeks. Profits decline by the thousands with each month a puppy ages. The puppy-loving public creating the demand is part of the problem."

The CDC estimates 100,000 dogs are imported from countries at high risk for rabies every year, some of the 1.06 million dogs entering the country through airports or ports of entry according to the agency. Three rabid dogs have been imported to the USA from Egypt since 2015, some with falsified health paperwork.

Animal rescue organization throughout the USA have worked with groups in Egypt and other countries to re-home animals, but federal officials have become increasingly concerned about the accuracy of information provided from overseas. The CDC and animal welfare groups say there's no single database to track what happens to dogs brought into the USA from Egypt once they're in the country.

In 2017, "Operation Dog Catcher" was launched after agents from Customs and Border Protection, the CDC, and USDA veterinarians identified more frequent large shipments of puppies at JFK [airport in New York]. The operation discovered smuggling operations where dogs from overseas "puppy mills" are shipped to the USA as rescue dogs valued at USD 0, then sold to the public online or on social media under false or misleading information claiming they were bred in the USA.

The most recent recorded incident was in February of this year [2019], according to the CDC, when 26 dogs imported from Egypt were adopted or placed in foster homes through a rescue in the Kansas City area. One of the dogs bit a technician and [the dog] tested positive for rabies.

The USA has been free of canine rabies since 2007, according to the CDC, but the agency says even one imported dog with the virus could create a public health threat if they interact with people or other animals that go untreated.

"The importation of just one dog infected with CRVV [canine rabies virus variant] risks the re-introduction of the virus into the United States," the CDC says in a draft of its public notice, which will be officially posted Friday [10 May 2019] (<https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2019-09654.pdf>).

The CDC says it has worked with international health organizations to try to clear up the problem, but officials in Egypt have not provided enough information to guarantee the health of imported dogs. Imports will be suspended until the CDC and other federal agencies determine appropriate controls are in place in Egypt to prevent exports of rabid dogs.

While US law says dogs coming into the USA have to be healthy and at least 6 months old, Operation Dog Catcher found animals with fraudulent health documents and vaccination records. In addition to rabies, dogs can spread other diseases capable of spreading to humans and other animals, such as parasites or skin infections.

The CDC and animal advocacy groups say members of the public should research breeders and ask to visit facilities or see inspection reports, even though the full records are not publicly available online. The CDC says adopting from credible animal shelters in the USA also helps decrease demand for puppies sold through fraudulent operations.  [Byline: Stephanie Ebbs]
=========================
[Laramie County, Wyoming, is wise to recommend livestock be vaccinated. It is cheap insurance for your other animals and for your help, your family and yourself. Most often our curious livestock want to see what the odd shuffling animal is crossing their pasture domain, so they stick their noses down, only to get bitten by a rabid animal, frequently a skunk. This is a usually unobserved situation until the bovine animal begins to act odd, even aggressive to its pen-mates or those feeding it. Rabid bovine animals have attacked pen-mates, people, feeding trucks and other objects. In the situation when a rabid bovine attacks a human or dog, it usually does not end well for the one attacked. If more than one animal encounters the skunk or raccoon or other source of rabies, there may be multiple herd animals affected with rabies. I have long advocated vaccinating your stock, so it is wonderful to see an official office promoting this. Also vaccinate your pet, whether they are your dog or cat or horse, or your pet steer. Rabies is a fatal disease. While there is a lifesaving post-exposure prophylaxis in humans, one should not procrastinate if bitten, but rather seek treatment immediately. Such a life-saving treatment is not available to our pets or livestock. Therefore, protect your pets and livestock and vaccinate against rabies.

Rabies is a very serious disease, often resulting in death of the animal victim and often expensive treatment for a human. There are several variants of the rabies virus. Some variants are the skunk variant or the racoon variant. The article about dogs from Egypt mentions the canine variant. This is a specific variant of the disease that has not been in the USA for over 10 years. Dogs can still be infected with the skunk variant or the racoon variant or other variants if bitten by one of those animals carrying a particular strain of rabies. The strain of rabies is one issue. The other issues the article addresses are people unexpectedly being exposed to rabies in an animal touted as having its appropriate vaccines. This is a very serious issue to adopt a pet from another country where the paperwork is fraudulent and thus expose yourself/family to a fatal disease that you believed had been prevented.

The article is correct to say investigate the breeder and where the animals are coming from. Let the buyer beware. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Laramie County, Wyoming, United States:
More ...

India

General Information
*******************************************
India is bounded by the Himalayas in the north and extends 2000 miles southwards into the Indian Ocean, between the Bay of Bengal on the East and the Arabian Sea on the West. The cou

try has three main geographic regions: the Himalaya Mountains on the Nepal-Tibet border; the Gangetic Plain lying below the Himalayas; the Deccan Plateau south of the Gangetic Plain. The climate throughout India is determined, to a large extent, by the massive Himalayan mountainous barrier in the northeastern part of the country. Many Irish travellers to India spend a significant period of time within the country but even those on short holidays or business trips need to take care to maintain their general health.

Climate
*******************************************
Most of the country is tropical or sub-tropical and subject to seasonal monsoon winds. This is especially true in the southwestern regions. * New Delhi There are three distinct seasons in New Delhi. Between mid-April to mid-July there is the hot dry season with dust storms. From mid-July to September there is a rainy season and a cooler season from October to March. * Bombay Bombay has a tropical climate and has an annual average temperature of about 270C. The hot humid season occurs in April and May. A monsoon occurs from June to September with about 70" of rainfall. A cool season extends from November to February when the temperatures can drop somewhat. * Calcutta Humidity remains high throughout most of the year. This is especially true between May to October when humidity levels of 90% are common. Most of the rainfall occurs during the monsoon season between June to October. * Madras The climate remains tropical throughout the year. December and January are relatively cool months and the heat increases rapidly from March to June. Premonsoon rains bring relief in July and the temperatures decrease slowly until the cooler season returns in November.

Safety & Security:
*******************************************
For most Irish travellers this will not be a major concern. However, the experience of travelling through any of the major cities is something many tourists will not forget. Taking care on Indian roads is a constantly essential activity. Parts of the country are unstable and recent earthquakes have led to disruptions to the transport infrastructure. As in many other countries travelling alone or late at night is unwise. In Kashmir tourists have been targeted and it is sensible to check you itinerary carefully before you travel throughout the country. In the northeastern part of the country (Assam, Manipur, Nagaland, Tripura, and Meghalaya) there have been sporadic incidents of violence by ethnic insurgent groups, including the bombing of buses and trains reported.

General Health Issues
*******************************************
It is essential that travellers recognise that there is a higher risk to their health while travelling in India. These risks are mainly associated with malaria and food and water borne diseases but conditions like accidents, rabies, tuberculosis and cholera are also present in many regions.

Food Borne Disease
*******************************************
A vegetarian diet is common throughout the country. Frequently the care taken with food preparation will be below standards usually seen in Western Europe. Work surfaces may be contaminated and food handlers may themselves infect the food before it is served. Cold foods should be avoided, where possible, and travellers should only consume hot food which has been freshly prepared. Stir fries may not reach sufficient cooking temperatures and need to be treated with great care. Shell fish and lettuce should always be avoided as they are one of the main ways food borne diseases are transmitted.

Water Borne Disease
*******************************************
Tap water should NOT be used for drinking or brushing teeth unless the smell of chlorine is obvious. Don’t use water from a jug in the hotel bedroom for anything except general washing. Sealed mineral water bought from your hotel should be used for all consumption and for brushing teeth.

Malaria
*******************************************
Malaria is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. This may occur throughout India, including all the major cities. The highest risk time is during the monsoon season (May to October approximately) but there is risk throughout the year. Travellers should take care against mosquito bites and maintain their prophylactic tablets during their time in India and also for a further four weeks after leaving the country.

Rabies
*******************************************
This viral disease is transmitted by any infected warm-blooded animal. Dogs, cats, monkeys etc are frequently involved. Travellers should avoid all contact with animals and any bite (lick or scratch) should be treated by immediately washing out the area, applying an antiseptic and then seeking urgent medical attention. India reports many thousand deaths each year from this dreadful disease.

Vaccinations
*******************************************
Most short term travellers should consider vaccination cover against Poliomyelitis, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A. Malaria tablets will also be required. For longer trips please contact the Tropical Bureau at the numbers below.

Other Health Information
*******************************************
A full range of information on healthy travelling overseas can be obtained from the educational department of the Tropical Medical Bureau.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 15 Jan 2020
Source: Hindustan Times [edited]

Government High School, Tajpur village, has been put under surveillance after 16 students of the school were found to be infected with mumps, a viral infection that swells up the saliva-producing glands of a person.

A rapid response team had been dispatched to the school last week, after the students, all aged between 11 and 14, were found infected. The school currently has 106 students [enrolled], and all are under observation. The team had also surveyed the entire village and collected samples, to be sent to the Integrated Diseases Surveillance Program (IDSP) lab for testing.

Lack of measles, mumps, and rubella [MMR] vaccination is what leaves a person prone to the infection. Mumps virus spreads from person to person through infected saliva. If an individual is not immune, they can contract the viral by breathing in saliva droplets from an infected person.

Dr. Divjot Singh, epidemiologist, district health department, said the situation is now under control. "We have asked the school's principal to relieve all students infected with mumps. The school will remain under surveillance for 15 more days. Medical officers are also carrying out awareness drive at the school and the village against mumps," said Dr. Divjot Singh.

Last year [2019], a mumps outbreak was reported from 2 areas of the district, including Andlu village in Raikot and Red Cross Bhavan, Sarabha Nagar, Ludhiana.  [Byline: Harvinder Kaur]
Date: Mon 13 Jan 2020, 00.45 IST
Source: The Hindu [edited]

A 58-year-old woman from Seegemakki village in Tumari Gram Panchayat limits in Sagar taluk died due to Kyasanur Forest Disease (KFD), also known as monkey fever, at a private hospital in Manipal in Udupi district on [Sat 11 Jan 2020].

The deceased, H, who had complained of high fever and aches in joints was admitted to government sub-divisional hospital in Sagar city for treatment on [Tue 7 Jan 2020]. Her blood tested positive for KFD.

Rajesh Suragihalli, District Health Officer, told The Hindu that as her health condition had worsened, she was shifted to a private hospital in Manipal on [Thu 9 Jan 2020] for advanced treatment. She failed to respond to the treatment and breathed her last on [Sat 11 Jan 2020], he said.

Following the death, the Department of Health and Family Welfare has sounded an alert in Sagar and Tirthahalli taluks from where 7 positive cases have been reported since [1 Jan 2020]. The vaccination drive has been stepped up in the villages from where positive cases are reported. Three advanced life support ambulances have been stationed in government sub-divisional hospital in Sagar to shift KFD patients with health complications to private hospitals in Shivamogga city or Manipal for additional treatment, he said.
====================
[Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD) is an acute febrile illness caused by Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV), a member of the family _Flaviviridae_, characterized by severe muscle pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, and bleeding manifestations. The virus was 1st identified in 1957 after it was isolated from a sick monkey from the Kyasanur Forest in Karnataka state of India. The disease is transmitted to humans following a tick bite or contact with an infected animal, especially a sick or recently dead monkey. There is no evidence of person-to-person transmission (<https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/kyasanur/index.html>).

The case fatality of Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD) is 2-10% and mortality is higher in the elderly and in individuals with comorbid conditions. There is no specific treatment for KFD. Prompt symptomatic and supportive treatment can reduce morbidity and mortality. Surveillance (human, monkey, and tick), personal protection against tick bites, and vaccination are the key measures for prevention and control of KFD (<https://idsp.nic.in/WriteReadData/l892s/60398414361527247979.pdf>).

As per the media report above, 7 confirmed KFD cases have been reported from Sagar and Tirthahalli taluks in Karnataka state so far in 2020. KFD typically occurs during the dry season from November through May, which correlates with the increased activity of the nymphs of ticks. Exposure to adult ticks and nymphs in rural or outdoor settings increases the risk of infection; herders, forest workers, farmers, and hunters are particularly at increased risk of contracting the disease. Vaccination and personal protective measures against tick bites are keys to prevent KFD.

The recommended preventive measures include using tick repellents, walking along clear trails, avoiding contact with weeds, and wearing full sleeved clothes and long pants to reduce exposed skin to reduce contact with ticks and subsequent tick bites. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Karnataka State, India: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/307>]
Date: Wed 8 Jan 2020
Source: The News Minute (TNM) [edited]

A year after a major outbreak of the disease in the region, 2 confirmed cases of Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD) popularly known as 'monkey fever' have been reported in Shivamogga district of Karnataka in the past one week,

[N] (55) from Hemmakki village in Theerthahalli was diagnosed with KFD on [2 Jan 2020] and [B] (18) from Sagar was diagnosed on [Tue 7 Jan 2020]. The diagnosis was confirmed after tests conducted at the Virus Diagnostic Laboratory (VDL) in Shivamogga.

Both [N] and [B] suffered from fever and dehydration, which are known symptoms of KFD. [N] was shifted to Kasturba Hospital in Manipal after the fever continued to persist. He is currently receiving treatment and is likely to get discharged soon. [B] has been admitted to a government hospital in Sagar.

KFD recurs every year in the months from November to May and is widely reported in the summer months. These are the 1st cases reported in the KFD season of 2019-20. Last year [2019], the disease took the lives of 14 people, including 12 people from Shivamogga district. 441 people were diagnosed with the disease in total. The outbreak of the disease in 2018 began as early as November in Aralagodu village in Shivamogga.

In 2019, the Karnataka Health Department admitted that there were lapses in managing the outbreak of the disease last year. The protocol was not followed in vaccinating a 10 km [6.2 mi] radius when the suspected case of KFD was found in Aralagodu. Subsequently, an outbreak of the disease occurred in Brahmana Ilakale, 8.6 km [5.3 mi] from Aralagodu.

Virologists and public health professionals working in Shivamogga began vaccination drives to contain outbreaks of the disease as early as July in 2019 to ensure that a major outbreak like the one last year can be averted. "Door-to-door vaccination was begun as early as July even though it was the monsoon season. This would earlier begin only in September but after the outbreak last year, it was decided that we would change the approach. This has helped restrict the outbreak of the disease so far," a virologist based in Shivamogga told TNM.

However, virologists also warn that since the monsoon season ended later than usual in 2019, the onset of the disease may be delayed this year [2020].

Since 1957, when KFD was first discovered in the Kyasanur Forest of Shivamogga, the disease has recurred each year during the summer months, taking the lives of people residing in the forest areas. For decades, the virus was reported only in the forests of Shivamogga in the Western Ghat region of Karnataka but in the last 6 years, it has been reported in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Goa, and Maharashtra. Monkey fever is transmitted to monkeys and humans through infected vectors, which are primarily fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes.  [Byline: Prajwal Bhat]
========================
[Surveillance (human, monkey, and tick), personal protection against tick bite, vaccination, and tick control together with information, education communication are the key measures for prevention and control of KFD (<https://idsp.nic.in/WriteReadData/l892s/60398414361527247979.pdf>).

Residents should not bring trees or parts of them from KFD infected areas for cattle bedding material and should avoid visiting areas where recent monkey deaths have been reported provided these areas are clearly marked by local authorities; they should not handle infected monkey carcasses with bare hands without personal protection equipment. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/58331>]
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 07:57:30 +0100 (MET)

New Delhi, Jan 7, 2020 (AFP) - The last decade was India's hottest on record with the national weather office calling the impact of global warming "unmistakable" and extreme weather killing more than 1,500 people last year.   India, home to 1.3 billion people, is at the forefront of climate change suffering devastating floods, dire water shortages and baking temperatures. The southern city of Chennai last year declared "day zero" as taps ran dry.   Temperatures between 2010 and 2019 were 0.36 degrees Celsius (0.65 degrees Fahrenheit) above the long-term average, the hottest decade since records began in 1901, the Indian Meteorological Department said on Monday.

Extreme weather also claimed more than 1,500 lives last year, the seventh-hottest, the IMD said.   They included 850 people killed by heavy rain and flooding and another 350 in summer temperatures of up to 51 Celsius (123.8 Fahrenheit). Lighting and storms claimed another 380 lives.   India's five warmest years on record all fell in the last decade, with 2016 the hottest. Eleven of the 15 warmest years were also during the past 15 years, the IMD said. The average for 2019 would have been higher were it not for record cold in northern India in December.

Last year also saw eight cyclones form over the north Indian Ocean, below the record of 10 last reached in 1976, including five over the Arabian Sea, equalling the previous high of 1902, the IMD said.   "The impact of global warming on India is unmistakable," IMD chief Mrityunjay Mohapatra told the Times of India. "The past year had extreme weather during all seasons."   The United Nations said in December that the past decade was set to be the planet's hottest since records began. Each of the last four decades has been hotter than the preceding one.
Date: Sat 21 Dec 2019
Source: India TV News [edited]

At least 10 people of an Adivasi [indigenous people to the place] village in South Dinajpur district's Kushmandi block [West Bengal state] have been infected with kala-azar [visceral leishmaniasis], officials said. Kala-azar is a form of the disease leishmaniasis marked by emaciation, anaemia, fever, and enlargement of the liver and spleen.

The disease is [transmitted] by the bite of infected female phlebotomine sand flies, an official said. The health department has started spraying insecticides in the village in an effort to stop the disease from spreading.

"Workers of the health department have started visiting the village to give medicines to the infected persons and their families," the Block Medical Officer of Health (BMOH) of Kushmandi, Amit Das, said. They have also started an awareness camp in the village, he said.

"We are keeping a close watch on the families," the Block Development Officer (BDO) of Kushmandi, Saipa Lama, said. A total of 46 families live in the Adivasi village which is known as Namvyle.
=====================
[A study of leishmaniasis in rural Bihar was published in 2012 (Hasker E, Singh SP, Malaviya P, et al. Visceral leishmaniasis in rural Bihar, India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012; 18(10): 1662-4. doi: 10.3201/eid1810.111083; <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3471608/>).

Approximately 200 million persons on the Indian subcontinent are at risk for VL (visceral leishmaniasis) and the annual incidence is approximately 420 000 cases. The disease affects mainly poor rural communities; approximately 80% of all cases in the region are reported from the state of Bihar in India (Joshi A, Narain JP, Prasittisuk C, et al. Can visceral leishmaniasis be eliminated from Asia? J Vector Borne Dis. 2008; 45(2):105-11;  <http://www.mrcindia.org/journal/issues/452105.pdf>). - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of India:
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2020 01:07:04 +0100 (MET)

Wuhan, China, Jan 27, 2020 (AFP) - China's central government said on Monday that the nationwide total of confirmed infections from a deadly respiratory virus had risen to 2,744, with 769 new cases coming to light.   However, it said no new deaths were confirmed outside of Hubei province, which had earlier reported 24 new fatalities to bring the national total to 80 dead.
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2020 22:16:28 +0100 (MET)

Beijing, Jan 26, 2020 (AFP) - Chinese authorities have ordered the extension of a public holiday in an effort to contain an epidemic that has killed 56 people and infected nearly 2,000 worldwide, state-run media reported.   A working group chaired by Premier Li Keqiang to tackle the outbreak decided on Sunday "to reduce population flows" by extending the Spring Festival holiday which had been scheduled to end on January 30, state news agency Xinhua said.   It was not immediately clear how long the extension is.

The group also ordered changes to "the starting dates of schools" and "people to work from home by working online."   "The meeting stressed that the country is at a crucial time in the prevention and control of the novel coronavirus outbreak, urging Party committees and governments at all levels to take more 'decisive, powerful and orderly, scientific and well-planned' measures to effective curb the spread," Xinhua reported.   In a bid to slow the spread of the respiratory virus, the government had previously locked down hard-hit Hubei, a province in central China that is at the outbreak's epicentre, in an unprecedented operation affecting tens of millions of people.

The previously unknown virus has caused global concern because of its similarity to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) pathogen, which killed hundreds across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.   Originating in Hubei's capital of Wuhan, the virus has spread throughout China and across the world -- with cases confirmed in around a dozen countries including as far away as the United States.   Several countries were making arrangements to evacuate their citizens from Wuhan, where an eery calm pervades as new restrictions prohibit most road traffic in the metropolis of 11 million.
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2020 21:47:53 +0100 (MET)

Washington, Jan 26, 2020 (AFP) - US health authorities said Sunday there are now five confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States and more are expected.   Nancy Messonnier, head of the respiratory disease section at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said around 100 people in 26 states are being investigated for the virus, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

Of the confirmed cases, all five people had travelled to Wuhan, Messonier said during a conference call with reporters.   "Every case we have had in the United States is someone who has had direct contact in Wuhan," she said.   Messonier said there are two cases in California and one each in Arizona, Illinois and Washington state. Until now the toll was three.   While Chinese officials have launched an extraordinary emergency response, Messonier insisted that the health risk for Americans in general remains low "at this time."
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2020 13:44:57 +0100 (MET)

Lagos, Jan 26, 2020 (AFP) - Nigerian health authorities have announced stepped-up emergency measures to tackle a rise in Lassa fever cases after 29 people died this month.   "As at 24th of January 2020, 195 confirmed cases and 29 deaths had been reported in 11 states," the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) said in a statement Saturday.   A national emergency operations centre had been activated to coordinate the response "to the increasing number of Lassa fever cases" across the country.

Endemic to Nigeria, Lassa fever belongs to the same family as the Ebola and Marburg viruses, but is much less deadly.   The virus is spread by contact with rat faeces or urine. It starts with fever and can, in worst case scenarios, lead to severe bleeding and organ failure.   Nigeria declared an outbreak of Lassa fever a year ago and around 170 people died from the virus in 2019.

The number of cases usually climbs in January due to weather conditions during the dry season.    Almost 90 percent of the recent confirmed cases have been in Edo, Ondo and Ebonyi states in southern Nigeria, but their have also been deaths in the north.

The NCDC said that compared to the same period last year the fatality rate had dropped from 23.4 percent to 14.8 percent.    It encouraged Nigerians to "practise good hygiene and take measures to protect themselves and their families".   Nigeria, Africa's most populous nation with a population of some 200 million, has five laboratories with the capability to diagnose Lassa fever.
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2020 12:18:19 +0100 (MET)

Beijing, Jan 26, 2020 (AFP) - Two Chinese provinces and three cities have ordered citizens to wear face masks in public, to help control the spread of a deadly virus.   The measure is required in the provinces of Guangdong in the south and Jiangxi in the centre, plus the eastern city of Nanjing, Ma'anshan city in Anhui province, and Xinyang city in Henan, according to local authorities.   China's industry and information technology ministry has said it would "spare no effort in increasing supply" after demand for masks skyrocketed.
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2020 04:03:51 +0100 (MET)

Hong Kong, Jan 26, 2020 (AFP) - Hong Kong's Disneyland announced it was shutting its doors on Sunday until further notice over the deadly virus outbreak in central China, a day after city authorities classified the crisis as an emergency.   "As a precautionary measure in line with prevention efforts taking place across Hong Kong, we are temporarily closing Hong Kong Disneyland park out of consideration for the health and safety of our guests and cast members," the park said in a statement.
Date: 26 Jan 2020
Source: MENAFN [edited]

Two more polio cases have surfaced from Landikotal tehsil in Khyber tribal district, after which the number of reported cases in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has reached 4 this year [2020].

According to the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC), a 2-year-old [male child] from Nekikhel and another child from Torwela have been diagnosed with polio. The samples of these 2 children were sent for laboratory tests in 2019, so these cases will be counted in the tally of 2019, which stands at 141 now.

The 2 cases in Landiktoal were reported 2 days after the emergence of 3 new polio cases in Qambar, Dadu and Sajawal districts of Sindh. Among them, 2 children contracted the crippling disease in 2019, but the cases were confirmed on Friday [24 Jan 2020].

On [21 Jan 2020], the 1st case of polio in Pakistan in 2020 surfaced in Lakki Marwat, the district with the highest number of cases in 2019.

The year 2019 was worse for Pakistan in polio eradication efforts, as 141 cases surfaced in Pakistan, including 96 cases in KP. Most cases in KP surfaced in Lakki Marwat, where 32 children were diagnosed with the crippling disease. In 2018, only 12 cases were reported, while in 2017, 8 cases were reported.

Currently, Pakistan and Afghanistan are the only 2 countries in the world which have not fully eradicated polio. The main cause behind the emergence of so many polio cases is refusal of parents to cooperate with the vaccination teams. According to media reports citing Health Ministry data, over a million parents refused to cooperate with vaccination teams in 2019. Most of the refusal cases were reported in April last year [2019] when rumours spread in Peshawar that many children had fainted after consuming vaccination drops. A total of 1 089 087 parents refused to give vaccination drops to their children in 2019.

The emergence of so many polio cases in Pakistan, particularly in KP, has brought the federal and provincial governments under pressure over their performance and strategy to control the spread of disease.

Experts believe that polio vaccination efforts cannot succeed completely until the refusing parents are convinced to cooperate with vaccination teams.
==================
[The End Polio Pakistan website has not added all of the media reported cases as yet, so it's a bit difficult to follow at times and know which cases were 2019 onset and which were 2020 onset. The above media report clearly states 2019 onset and puts the tally for 2019 as 141 cases, but the media reports from Friday's [24 Jan 2020] report is less clear (see Poliomyelitis update (10): global, Pakistan (BA, SD) http://promedmail.org/post/20200124.6911971).

A good map of Pakistan showing districts and provinces can be found at:
Date: Fri 24 Jan 2020
Source: SciTechDaily [abridged, edited]

Citation: Amman BR, Bird BH, Bakarr IA, et al. Isolation of Angola-like Marburg virus from Egyptian rousette bats from West Africa. Nat Commun. 2020; 11:510.  <https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-14327-8>

Scientists have detected Marburg virus in fruit bats in Sierra Leone, marking the 1st time the deadly virus has been found in West Africa. A total of 11 Egyptian rousette fruit bats tested positive for active Marburg virus infection. Research teams caught the bats separately in 3 health districts.

The presence of Marburg virus, a close relative to Ebola virus that also causes hemorrhagic disease in people, was detected in advance of any reported cases of human illness in Sierra Leone. However, the virus's presence in bats means people who live nearby could be at risk for becoming infected. No outbreaks have been reported to date.

The findings, based on PCR, antibody, and virus isolation data, were officially published today [24 Jan 2020] in the journal Nature Communications. Preliminary findings were announced earlier in December 2018 to ensure rapid notification to the citizens of Sierra Leone and the international health community.

The paper highlights the value of collaborating with government and key stakeholders across human, animal, and environmental sectors to engage at-risk communities about the discovery, address health concerns, and communicate risk-reduction strategies before recognized spillovers occur.

Marburg virus was detected by projects led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the USAID-funded PREDICT project led by the One Health Institute at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine; Njala University, Sierra Leone; and the University of Makeni, Sierra Leone.

"Finding Marburg virus in bats in Sierra Leone before any known cases in people is a huge success, as public health officials and doctors can now include Marburg virus among the possible causes when diagnosing hemorrhagic fever cases in the region," said Tracey Goldstein, co-principal investigator and pathogen detection lead for the PREDICT project from the UC Davis One Health Institute.

To date, there have been 12 known outbreaks of Marburg virus, with the most recent in Uganda in 2017. The largest and deadliest outbreak occurred in Angola in 2005 when 227 people died. Five of the new strains identified among the Marburg-positive bats in Sierra Leone were genetically similar to the strain that caused the outbreak in Angola. This is the 1st time scientists have detected these Angolan-like strains in bats.

The virus-positive bats were all Egyptian rousette bats, the known reservoir for Marburg virus, which primarily feed on fruit. Infected bats shed the virus in their saliva, urine, and feces. Egyptian rousette bats are known to test-bite fruits, urinate, and defecate where they eat, potentially contaminating fruit or other food sources consumed by other animals or people, particularly children. These bats sometimes serve as a food source for local populations as well. People may be exposed to Marburg virus through bat bites as they catch the bats.

Following the announcement of the preliminary findings by the government of Sierra Leone, the PREDICT team worked with government partners, universities, and other key stakeholders to develop and implement evidence-based public health messaging across national, district, and local community levels in Sierra Leone.  "Over a year ago, we worked with our Sierra Leone government colleagues to inform people across the country as fast as possible of this new health risk and remind people not to harm or come in contact with bats," said Brian Bird from the UC Davis One Health Institute and global lead for Sierra Leone and Multi-Country Ebola operations for PREDICT-USAID. "I'm very proud of that work and our teams now that this full report is available."
----------------------------------------------
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail from HealthMap Alerts
<promed@promedmail.org>
and
Mary Marshall
===========================
[The initial report of this finding, prior to this publication, was posted by ProMED-mail (Marburg virus disease - Sierra Leone (02): bats, additional information http://promedmail.org/post/20181223.6221436) when the virus was detected for the 1st time in fruit bats in Sierra Leone.

According to the CDC (<https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/marburg/index.html>), Marburg virus was 1st recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, Germany, and in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia). A total of 31 people became ill, initially laboratory workers followed by several medical personnel and family members who had cared for them; 7 deaths were reported. The 1st people infected had been exposed to imported African green monkeys or their tissues while conducting research. One additional case was diagnosed retrospectively.

The reservoir host of Marburg virus is the African fruit bat, _Rousettus aegyptiacus_. Fruit bats infected with Marburg virus do not show obvious signs of illness. Primates (including humans) can become infected with Marburg virus, and may develop serious disease with high mortality.

Ebola virus is closely related to Marburg virus. "Ebola viral RNA fragments were found in an oral swab from a greater long-fingered bat (_Miniopterus inflatus_), captured in 2016 in Liberia's Sanniquellie-Mahn district, which borders Guinea. The bat, which lives in many parts of Africa, roosts in caves and feeds on insects. Scientists had previously found 2 other Ebola species in a related insect-eating bat, _M. schreibersii_. However, most other evidence has pointed to fruit bats as the carriers of Ebola Zaire, Epstein says [J Epstein, veterinary epidemiologist at EcoHealth Alliance in New York City and a member of the PREDICT consortium]. "What it really says to me is that this is a virus that has multiple hosts, and it might be regionally dependent as to which species carries it."

Supporting the variety of bat hosts for Ebola, the bat implicated in the initiation of the West African Ebola virus outbreak in December 2013 was _Mops condylurus_, long-tailed insect-eating bats, that were previously suspected in an outbreak of the Sudan strain of Ebola virus, which is related to the Zaire strain. - ProMED Mod.LK]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 2020 11:49:16 +0100 (MET)
By Su Xinqi, Jerome TAYLOR

Hong Kong, Jan 25, 2020 (AFP) - Hong Kong on Saturday declared a new coronavirus outbreak as an "emergency" -- the city's highest warning tier -- as authorities ramped up measures to reduce the risk of further infections.   The announcement came as city leader Carrie Lam faced criticism in some quarters over her administration's response to the crisis.

Of the five people who have tested positive for the virus in Hong Kong so far, four arrived via a newly built high-speed train terminal which connects with the mainland.   That led to calls from some medical experts and politicians to limit, or even halt, arrivals from China, the epicentre of the outbreak with 41 people dead.

Lam held emergency meetings with health officials on Saturday morning after returning from Davos.   "Today I declare the lifting of the response level to emergency," she told reporters.   Schools and universities, which are currently on a Lunar New Year break, would remain closed until 17 February, Lam said.   All mainland arrivals to Hong Kong will now need to sign health declaration forms, she added, while public events including a new year gala and next month's marathon, would also be called off.    "We haven't seen serious and widespread infections (in Hong Kong), but we are taking this seriously and we hope to be ahead of the epidemic," Lam said.

- Tragic past -
Hong Kong has a recent experience of deadly viral outbreaks.    Nearly 300 people were killed by SARS in 2003, a tragedy that left a profound psychological impact on one of the most densely populated places on earth.   The city's ability to combat the crisis was hampered by moves in mainland China to cover up and play down the outbreak, leaving a lasting legacy of distrust among many Hong Kongers.   Animosity towards the mainland has intensified in recent years as Beijing tightens political control over the semi-autonomous territory.

The outbreak also comes at a sensitive time for Lam, who currently boasts record low approval ratings after seven months of pro-democracy protests.   "We must stand united so that we can prevent and control the disease," she said, in a nod to the political unrest.   The often violent protests have battered Hong Kong's reputation for stability and helped tip it into recession, with the recent virus outbreak compounding the city's economic woes.

Hospitals are already struggling with the winter flu season, but officials are isolating anyone with a history of travel to central China and those exhibiting respiratory tract infections that look similar to the virus.   So far some 300 people have been tested and monitored for the virus. Quarantine centres have been set up in remote holiday parks for anyone found to have come into close contact with people who tested positive.   On Saturday, officials announced a newly built but still-empty public housing block would be used for medical staff on the frontline who did not want to risk returning to their families.
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 2020 06:46:59 +0100 (MET)
By Mahmut Bozarslan and Fulya Ozerkan in Istanbu

Elazig, Turkey, Jan 25, 2020 (AFP) - A powerful earthquake has killed at least 20 people and injured more than 1,000 in eastern Turkey, as rescue teams searched through the rubble of collapsed buildings for survivors on Saturday.    At least 30 people were missing following the magnitude 6.8 quake on Friday night, which had its epicentre in the small lakeside town of Sivrice in the eastern province of Elazig.   "It was very scary, furniture fell on top of us. We rushed outside," 47-year-old Melahat Can, who lives in the provincial capital of Elazig, told AFP.   President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said all steps were being taken to aid people affected by the quake, which caused widespread fear.   "We stand by our people," Erdogan said on Twitter.

The Turkish government's disaster and emergency management agency (AFAD) said the quake hit Sivrice at around 8.55 pm (1755 GMT). Turkey lies on major faultlines and is prone to frequent earthquakes.    Turkish television showed images of people rushing outside in panic, as well as a fire on the roof of a building.   Interior, environment and health ministers, who were in the quake zone, said the casulties were in Elazig province and in the neighbouring province of Malatya, which lies to the southwest.

At least 20 people died and 1,015 others were wounded, according to AFAD.   "There is nobody trapped under the rubble in Malatya but in Elazig search and rescue efforts are currently under way to find 30 citizens," Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said on Friday.   Rescue teams were searching for survivors trapped in a five-storey collapsed building in a village some 30 kilometres from Elazig, according to AFP journalists at the scene. One person was pulled alive from the rubble.   Emergency staff and people waiting at the scene lit fires in the streets to stay warm in freezing temperatures.   Sports centres, schools and guest houses had been opened to accommodate quake victims in Malatya.

- 'Everybody is in the street' -
Sivrice -- a town with a population of about 4,000 people -- is situated south of Elazig city on the shores of Hazar lake -- one of the most popular tourist spots in the region and the source of the Tigris river.   The lake is home to a "Sunken City", with archaeological traces dating back 4,000 years in its waters.

The tremor was felt in several parts of eastern Turkey near the Iraqi and Syrian borders, the Turkish broadcaster NTV reported, adding that neighbouring cities had mobilised rescue teams for the quake area.   "Everybody is in the street, it was very powerful, very scary," said Zekeriya Gunes, 68, from Elazig city, after the quakes caused a building to collapse on her street.   "It lasted quite long, maybe 30 seconds," added Ferda, 39. "I panicked and was undecided whether to go out in this cold or remain inside."

The US Geological Survey assessed the magnitude as 6.7, slightly lower than AFAD, adding that it struck near the East Anatolian Fault in an area that has suffered no documented large ruptures since an earthquake in 1875.   "My wholehearted sympathy to President @RTErdogan and the Turkish people following the devastating earthquake that has hit Turkey. Our search and rescue teams stand ready to assist," Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis wrote on Twitter.   In Athens, the Greek premier's office said later that Mitsotakis had spoken by phone to Erdogan.   "The Turkish president... said Turkish teams had the situation under control for now and that it would be re-evaluated in the morning," his office added.

In 1999, a devastating 7.4 magnitude earthquake hit Izmit in western Turkey, leaving more than 17,000 people dead including about 1,000 in the country's largest city Istanbul.    In September last year, a 5.7-magnitude earthquake shook Istanbul, causing residents to flee buildings in the economic capital.   Experts have long warned a large quake could devastate the city of 15 million people, which has allowed widespread building without safety precautions.