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Kuwait

Kuwait US Consular Information Sheet
September 2, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Kuwait is a small, oil-rich constitutional monarchy with 10% of proven world oil reserves. Foreign workers constitute approximately 90% of the labor force. Kuwaiti
citizens constitute only 34% of the country's population of three million, and enjoy the benefits of a generous social welfare system that guarantees employment, housing, education and medical care. Facilities for travelers are widely available. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Kuwait for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
Passports and visas are required for U.S. citizens traveling to Kuwait. U.S. citizens can obtain visitor visas for a fee at the port of entry in Kuwait. Travelers who overstay their visas may be required to pay large fines before leaving Kuwait. Travelers who leave Kuwait without completing Kuwaiti exit procedures may also be required to pay large fines if they return to and attempt to depart from Kuwait. This includes travelers proceeding via Kuwait to and from Iraq and Afghanistan. Effective May 15, 2007, the Government of Kuwait no longer admits travelers with a contractor identification card. All contractors entering or transiting the State of Kuwait should have a valid passport. Visas can be obtained upon arrival in Kuwait for a fee of 3 Kuwaiti Dinar (KD). For further information on entry and exit requirements, travelers may contact the Embassy of Kuwait at 2940 Tilden Street NW, Washington, DC 20008, telephone (202) 966-0702, or the Kuwaiti Consulate in New York City, telephone (212) 973-4318.

Kuwaiti officials are extremely sensitive about travel to Iraq. There have been instances in which Americans, especially those of Iraqi descent, have been detained for questioning at ports of entry/exit. Americans seeking to travel to Iraq through Kuwait have also on occasion been turned around and/or detained. On a number of occasions the border between Iraq and Kuwait has been closed without notice, stranding Americans on either side of the border.

Kuwaitis and non-Kuwaitis, including Americans, who have been charged with criminal offenses, placed under investigation, or involved in unresolved financial disputes with local business partners are subject to travel bans. These bans, which are rigidly enforced, prevent the individual from leaving Kuwait for any reason until the matter is resolved. Travel bans can be initiated by any person for almost any reason and may remain in place for a substantial period of time while the case is being investigated. Expatriates have been detained in Kuwait for cases with seemingly little or no evidence or legal merit. A person who has influence with the Kuwaiti government can ensure that a travel ban remains in place even if a judge or government official states the ban should be lifted. In the case of purely financial disputes, it may be possible to depart the country if a local sponsor pledges funds equal to the amount in dispute. Once such legal orders are in place, the U.S. Embassy can assist American citizens in obtaining legal representation, but cannot overcome the ban on exit from the country until the matter is resolved.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Americans in Kuwait should exercise a high level of security awareness. The Department of State remains concerned about the possibility of further terrorist actions against U.S. citizens and interests abroad, specifically in the Middle East, including the Persian Gulf and Arabian Peninsula. Americans considering travel to Kuwait should review the Worldwide Caution.

All U.S. citizens in Kuwait should exercise caution, maintain a low profile, and avoid areas where Westerners are known to congregate. Heightened security awareness should be exercised at all hotels and residential complexes, as terrorists in the past have specifically targeted hotel chains perceived as Western along with a variety of Western housing facilities. Military members, as well as civilians and contractors related to military interests, are also potential targets.

Terrorists do not distinguish between official and civilian targets. Terrorist actions may include bombings, hijackings, hostage taking, kidnappings and assassinations. Increased security at official U.S. facilities may lead terrorists and their sympathizers to seek softer targets such as public transportation, residential areas and apartment complexes, schools and places of worship, oil-related facilities and personnel, and public areas where people congregate including restaurants, hotels, clubs, and shopping areas. U.S. citizens are advised to immediately report any unusual or suspicious activity in Kuwait to the Kuwaiti police or to the U.S. Embassy.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found. Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The U.S. Embassy in Kuwait has an active warden program and records warden notices in both English and Arabic for audio playback. The English-language notices can be heard by calling +965-259-1048; Arabic-language notices are available at +965-259-1049.

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

Additional information regarding security and crime in Kuwait can be found in the Overseas Security Advisory Council’s Crime and Safety Report.
This document can be found at www.osac.gov.
CRIME: The crime threat in Kuwait is assessed as low. Violent crimes against expatriates are rare, but do occur. The U.S. Embassy advises all U.S. citizens to take the same security precautions in Kuwait that one would practice in the United States or any other large city abroad. Physical and verbal harassment of women are continuing problems. The Kuwaiti police accept crime reports at the police station with jurisdiction where the crime occurred. If filing a crime report, it is advisable that an American citizen be accompanied by a person who speaks Arabic or a local attorney. The Embassy’s List of Attorneys is available on the Embassy web site at http://kuwait.usembassy.gov/attorneys.html. Filing a crime report can take several hours as a police investigator will take the victim’s statement orally while composing his investigative report. In all cases of abuse, the victim must obtain a medical report from a Kuwaiti hospital in order to file a police report.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Transactions involving such products may be illegal under local law. In addition, bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines. More information on this serious problem is available at http://www.cybercrime.gov/18usc2320.htm.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

The local equivalent of the “911” emergency line in Kuwait is “777” and can be reached 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
The quality and range of services provided by the emergency line are not equivalent to those provided in the U.S. and response times may vary greatly depending on the time of day and the location of the emergency.
See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: The health care system continues to develop, with many government and private medical facilities available in Kuwait. Medical care at government-run clinics and hospitals is provided at low cost to residents of Kuwait. Private physicians and hospitals charge fees for services, and some do not accept local health insurance. Many hospital and clinic services do not compare to U.S. standards, and staff often have no U.S. experience or training. For information on avian influenza (bird flu), please refer to the Department of State's Avian Influenza Fact Sheet.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

The government of Kuwait has strict regulations regarding certain diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis.
Medical examinations are required for all residency applications and any applicants who are found positive for these restricted diseases will be asked to leave the country immediately and will be permanently barred from re-entry.
Please inquire directly with the Embassy of Kuwait at http://www.embassy.org/embassies/kw.html before you travel.
MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Kuwait is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Driving in Kuwait is hazardous. Although Kuwait has an extensive and modern system of well-lit roads, excessive speeding on both primary and secondary roads, coupled with lax enforcement of traffic regulations and a high density of vehicles (one vehicle for every 2.8 residents), leads to frequent and often fatal accidents. In 2006, the government of Kuwait reported 60410 vehicular accidents with 460 deaths and 9100 serious injuries.
However, these numbers are approximations and the actual numbers are believed to be much higher.
The average age of death was between 21 and 30 years. There are now over one million motor vehicles registered in Kuwait. Incidents of road rage, inattention and distraction on the part of drivers, poor driving skills, and highway brinksmanship are common in Kuwait, and can be unsettling to Western drivers in Kuwait who are accustomed to more rigid adherence to traffic laws.

The government-owned Kuwait Public Transportation Company operates bus services throughout the Kuwait City metropolitan area on 50 different routes, which are widely used by the low-income expatriate labor force. Taxis are available at major hotels and pick up passengers at other locations upon telephonic request. Unaccompanied women should not use taxis after dark. It is now possible to hail taxis on streets. Taxis have meters, but fares are more commonly negotiated.

Visitors can use international driving permits issued by their respective countries within the time limit of their visas; however, the visitor must also have liability insurance. It is illegal to drive in Kuwait without a license and car registration documents. If you are stopped and cannot produce them, you may be taken to a police station and held until they are presented on your behalf.

The Government of Kuwait may provide American citizens with a Kuwaiti driver’s license if their valid American driver’s license is first certified by the American Embassy. This service costs 9 KD and is available from the American Citizens Services Unit of the Consular Section. The Embassy’s certification must be authenticated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the American permit must be translated by an approved translation service. Additional information is available at the Embassy’s Consular Section.

If you are in an accident, Kuwaiti law mandates that you must remain at the scene until the police arrive. The use of front seat belts is mandatory in Kuwait. Driving is on the right side of the road. Speed limits are posted. Making a right turn on a red light is not permitted unless there is a special lane to do so with a yield sign. Parking is not allowed where the curb is painted black and yellow. Digital cameras for registering traffic violations, including speeding, are in use on Kuwaiti roads.

Driving while under the influence of alcohol (possession and consumption of alcohol is illegal in Kuwait) is a serious offense, which may result in fines, imprisonment, and/or deportation. Repeat traffic violations or violations of a serious nature may also result in the deportation of an expatriate offender. When a driver flashes his/her high beams in Kuwait, it is meant as a request to move your car into a slower lane to allow the driver with the flashing beams to proceed ahead.

Kuwait has one of the highest per capita rates of cellular telephone ownership in the world and using a cellular telephone while driving remains legal. Local emergency service organizations may be contacted by dialing 777. Ambulance crews do not respond as quickly as in the United States and do not often include trained paramedics.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the web site of the Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior at www.moi.gov.kw for information and statistics in Arabic about traffic safety and road conditions in Kuwait.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Kuwait’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Kuwait’s air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
The workweek in Kuwait is Sunday through Thursday for most businesses, government offices and commercial banks.

Kuwaiti customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Kuwait of items such as firearms, religious materials, pornography, and alcohol. Alcohol, pork products, and pornography are illegal in Kuwait. Travelers with prescription medications should carry them in their original packaging or bottle, as dispensed, and carry a copy of their prescription in case customs authorities question their importation into Kuwait. Kuwaiti customs authorities screen the baggage of all travelers entering Kuwait. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Kuwait in Washington, D.C. or Kuwait's Consulate in New York for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Photographing government and public buildings, military installations and economic infrastructure, particularly that related to the oil industry, is against the law and can result in arrest, investigation, and prosecution. Also, some traditionally-dressed women find being photographed to be offensive and may complain to the local police. If photographing public scenes or persons, visitors should take care to ask permission beforehand and not to inadvertently cause offense that could lead to an official complaint to the authorities.

Humiliating a person, including a police officer or a public official, is a crime in Kuwait similar to disorderly conduct or harassment in the United States. A person charged with humiliating another is subject to police investigation and possible prosecution. Persons under investigation can be prevented from departing Kuwait. Proselytizing is prohibited for all religions except Islam.

Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Kuwaiti laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Kuwait are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Kuwait are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Kuwait. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy in Kuwait is located at Al-Masjid Al-Aqsa Street, Block 6, Plot 14, Bayan, Kuwait. The mailing address is PO Box 77, Safat 13001, Kuwait. The primary telephone numbers are 965-259-1001 or 259-1002. The fax number is 965-259-1438 or 538-0282. The after-hours number is 965-538-2097. Additional information may also be obtained through the Embassy's web site at http://kuwait.usembassy.gov
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information for Kuwait dated January 16, 2008 to update the sections on Information for Victims of Crime and Medical Facilities and Health Information.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu 12 Apr 2018
Source: Arab Times Kuwait English Daily [edited]

Almost 270 cases of scabies disease have been recorded lately in the country. Among them, 200 cases were recorded in Adan Hospital and the remaining 70 were recorded in Jahra Hospital.

The recorded cases are within Ahmadi and Jahra governorates, while it is widespread in Khafji and Hafr Al-Baten areas along Saudi border. This revelation coincided with a series of cases recorded in several regions of Saudi Arabia, especially along the border of Kuwait.

There are growing concerns that the disease could spread massively across the country if not handled properly in accordance with the rules and regulations. This includes providing necessary treatment to the affected people and raising awareness among citizens and expatriates.

According to spokesperson of Ministry of Health Dr. Ahmad Al-Shatti, individual cases within the country cannot be regarded as an epidemic.

He [Dr. Ahmad Al-Shatti] assured that the authority will take necessary steps to wipe out the disease, raise the level of awareness and instruct doctors to treat affected people with authorized medications. Dr Al-Shatti did not rule out the possibility that several cases could be recorded without reaching the level of epidemic, especially since the ministry has enough medicines to deal with the disease.  [Byline: Stephanie McGehee]
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[Just a week ago [week of Sun 1 Apr 2018] ProMED reported a widespread outbreak of Scabies in schools in Mecca, which was not related to the Umrah. This report suggests that at least some cases have links to Saudi Arabia. Further epidemiological mapping is needed. As discussed in our posting the [Fri 6 Apr 2018], scabies is highly contagious and outbreaks are usually seen in cramped conditions with poor hygiene. It is important to treat both patients and close contacts for instance the entire household. Classical treatment with for instance a whole body cream containing a pyrethroid has been replaced by treatment with oral ivermectin.

A map of Kuwait: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/129>. - ProMED Mod.EP]
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 2017 14:40:12 +0100

Kuwait City, Feb 6, 2017 (AFP) - A fire broke out Monday at a cultural centre in Kuwait that houses the Gulf state's opera house, the fire department said.   The blaze started during maintenance work on the titanium roof, the department said in a statement on Twitter.   It said the fire was put out and caused no injuries.

Parts of the roof were seen to be missing after the blaze but it was unclear if that was the result of the maintenance work or the fire.   The centre was launched in October with a performance at the 2,000-seat opera house by Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli.   The sprawling 214,000-square-metre (2.3 million square feet) centre, located in the heart of the capital Kuwait City, cost $750 million.
Date: Thu 14 Apr 2016
Source: Arab Times [edited]

Assistant Undersecretary for Public Health Affairs at Ministry of Health Dr Majdah Al-Qattan revealed that Kuwait recorded 5 cases of cholera in people who came from Iraq and they have been treated. On the sidelines of the inaugural ceremony of the Scientific Conference on Latest Surgeries for Breast and Kidney Cancers, Dr Al-Qattan affirmed that the precautionary measures taken so far for preventing the spread of cholera in the country are being closely monitored to complement the previous steps.

She said it was decided during that meeting of the GCC [Gulf Cooperation Council] Epidemic Committee last month [March 2016] that the GCC member states must take proactive steps to prevent incursion and spread of cholera, indicating that this is the reason why the Customs officers have been screening travelers from Iraq and other affected countries.

Dr Al-Qattan revealed that the import of food items from these countries has also been banned till further notice. She stressed the ministry's keenness to bring new vaccines for the disease and take all necessary steps in that regard, stating that the Higher Committee on Vaccination follows certain procedures with the concerned companies and storage facilities for approving the import of new vaccines.  [Byline: Marwa Al-Bahrawi]
====================
[A map showing Kuwait and Iraq is available at

The mortality from cholera is related to non-replacement of fluid and electrolytes from the diarrheal illness.

As cited in Lutwick LI, Preis J: Cholera. In: Tropical Pediatrics. Roach RR, Greydanus DE, Patel DR, Homnick DN, Merrick J (eds), 2014, Nova Science Publishers, 2015, oral rehydration therapy can be life-saving in outbreaks of cholera and other forms of diarrhea:

"As reviewed by Richard Guerrant and colleagues (1), it was in 1831 that cholera treatment could be accomplished by intravenous replacement and, although this therapy could produce dramatic improvements, not until 1960 was it 1st recognized that there was no true destruction of the intestinal mucosa, and gastrointestinal rehydration therapy could be effective, and the therapy could dramatically reduce the intravenous needs for rehydration. Indeed, that this rehydration could be just as effective given orally as through an orogastric tube (for example, references 2 and 3) made it possible for oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to be used in rural remote areas and truly impact on the morbidity and mortality of cholera. Indeed, Guerrant (1) highlights the use of oral glucose-salt packets in war-torn Bangladeshi refugees, which reduced the mortality rate from 30 percent to 3.6 percent (4) and quotes sources referring to ORT as "potentially the most important medical advance" of the 20th century. A variety of formulations of ORT exist, generally glucose- or rice powder-based, which contain a variety of micronutrients, especially zinc (5).

The assessment of the degree of volume loss in those with diarrhea to approximate volume and fluid losses can be found in reference 6 below. Those with severe hypovolemia should be initially rehydrated intravenously with a fluid bolus of normal saline or Ringer's lactate solution of 20-30 ml/kg followed by 100 ml/kg in the 1st 4 hours and 100 ml/kg over the next 18 hours with regular reassessment. Those with lesser degrees of hypovolemia can be rehydrated orally with a glucose or rice-derived formula with up to 4 liters in the 1st 4 hours, and those with no hypovolemia can be given ORT after each liquid stool with frequent reevaluation."

References
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1. Guerrant RL, Carneiro-Filho BA, Dillingham RA: Cholera, diarrhea, and oral rehydration therapy: triumph and indictment. Clin Infect Dis 2003; 37: 398-405.
2. Gregorio GV, Gonzales MLM, Dans LF, Martinez EG: Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009; (2): CD006519. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006519.pub2.
3. Gore SM, Fontaine O, Pierce NF: Impact of rice based oral rehydration solution on stool output and duration of diarrhoea: meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials. BMJ 1992; 304(6822): 287-91.
4. Mahalanabis D, Choudhuri AB, Bagchi NG, et al: Oral fluid therapy of cholera among Bangladesh refugees. Johns Hopkins Med 1973; 132(4): 197-205.
5. Atia AN, Buchman AL: Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review. Am J Gastroenterol 2009; 104(10): 2596-604.
6. WHO: The treatment of diarrhoea, a manual for physicians and other senior health workers. 4th ed. 2005.

An illustration (supplied by ProMED Mod.JW) of how to make a "home brew" oral rehydration solution can be found at
Date: Mon 23 Nov 2015
Source: Kuwait Times [edited]

Minister of Health Dr Ali Saad Al-Obaidi yesterday [22 Nov 2015] said the incidence of swine flu in Kuwait is nothing to worry about, according to WHO global health estimates, stressing the ministry's keenness to speak frankly with citizens and residents about all similar situations.

Speaking after opening the Haya Abdulrahman Al-Mujil Kidney Center yesterday [22 Nov 2015], Obaidi said the ministry is seeking to apply the strategies and protocols developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in order to ensure the safety and health of citizens and residents. He explained that swine flu has been widespread since 2009, adding that the number of casualties began to decline after a global fight against the virus. He said the ministry of health is taking all preventive precautions to halt the spread of infection, pointing to the success of the ministry's efforts in dealing with more serious diseases such as Ebola and MERS. The minister said flu vaccinations given in August and November [2015] have reduced much of the incidence of the disease.
==================
[Excerpted from WHO

Most swine influenza viruses (SIVs) do not cause disease in humans. However, some countries have reported cases of human infection with SIVs. Most of these human infections have been mild and the viruses have not spread further to other people. The H1N1 virus that caused the influenza pandemic in 2009-2010, thought to have originated in swine, is an example of an SIV that was able to spread easily among people and also cause disease.

Because pigs can become infected with influenza viruses from a variety of different hosts (such as birds and humans), they can act as a "mixing vessel," facilitating the reassortment of influenza genes from different viruses and creating a "new" influenza virus. The concern is that such "new" reassortant viruses may be more easily spread from person to person, or may cause more severe disease in humans than the original viruses. WHO and animal health sector partners are working at the human-animal interface to identify and reduce animal health and public health risks within national contexts.

Manifestations of H1N1 influenza are similar to those of seasonal influenza. Patients present with symptoms of acute respiratory illness, including at least 2 of the following: fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue, diarrhea and vomiting.

There is no evidence that this current set of cases of H1N1, most likely H1N1pdm09, originated with pigs. This influenza strain is now a seasonal flu that spreads from human to human. - ProMed Mod.LK]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
Date: Thu 19 Nov 2015
Source: Gulf News [edited]

Public schools in Kuwait have been put on alert after the discovery of 4 cases of the swine flu [H1N1; probably not truly a swine flu, see below - ProMed Mod.LM] at facilities in the Hawalli and Adeiliya areas, said Minister of Education Dr Bader Al Eisa on Thu [19 Nov 2015].

Those who contracted the disease are being given treatment, and the necessary precautions have been taken to prevent the spread of the disease, the minister told the Kuwait News Agency (Kuna). The cases were reported by the families.

"The Ministry of Education will continue to coordinate with the Ministry of Health, and schools that record more than 5 swine flu [H1N1] cases will be shut down," he said. "There are steady and regular contacts with the health ministry for advice and guidance, and doctors are visiting all the schools," he said. Reports said there is not enough vaccine available for all students.

On 10 Nov [2015], Al Eisa said there was one confirmed case of swine flu [H1N1] in a 6-year-old student in a private school.

Reports emerging from Kuwait said that a University of Kuwait teacher tested positive for the swine flu.

The case at the social sciences college triggered an alert among the teachers and staff and the preparation of a special room for suspected cases. A hotline was set up to help with queries and assistance. However, the college dean denied rumours that courses were being suspended, insisting that the staff were working normally.

According to Kuwaiti daily Al Jareeda, several parents have refused to allow their children to go to school citing concerns about health risks. Schools where suspected cases were noticed have not been willing to inform parents for fear they will keep their children at home. However, several parents have been exchanging information on social media and agreed that the school has suspected cases and that their children should not attend classes.

A hospital in Kuwait City has received 69 swine flu [H1N1] cases in the last 2 months, reports said. Health officials told local daily Al Jareeda that 58 patients left Al Adan Hospital after receiving the necessary treatment while the remaining 11 are still being treated. Some of the cases are in the intensive care unit, while others are in isolated rooms, the officials said.

One patient, a 68-year-old Kuwaiti, died on Wed [18 Nov 2015] from the disease, while an Indian expatriate passed away 3 days earlier, the officials said.

However, the hospital is taking all the measures possible whenever they are dealing with any suspected case, including contacting families and friends and providing them with the necessary vaccine while monitoring their health for 10 days, the officials added.  Byline: Habib Toumi
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Uruguay

Uruguay - US Consular Information Sheet
May 01, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Uruguay is a constitutional democracy with a large, educated middle class and a robust developing economy.
The capital city is Montevideo .
Tourist facilit
es are generally good with many 5-star accommodations at resort destinations such as Punta del Este and Colonia de Sacramento.
The quality of tourist facilities varies according to price and location.
Travelers are encouraged to seek travel agency assistance in making plans to visit Uruguay .
Read the Department of State Background Notes on Uruguay for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:
All United States citizens entering Uruguay for business or pleasure must have a valid passport.
U.S. citizens traveling on a regular passport do not need a visa for a visit of less than three months.
U.S. citizens traveling on diplomatic or official passports require a visa.
Air travelers are required to pay an airport tax upon departure.
This fee may be paid in U.S. dollars or in Uruguayan pesos.
For further information on entry requirements, contact the Embassy of Uruguay at 1913 “Eye” Street NW, Washington, DC 20006, tel. (202) 331-4219; e-mail: conuruwashi@uruwashi.org.
Travelers may also contact the Consulate of Uruguay in New York, Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Puerto Rico.
Visit the Embassy of Uruguay web site at http://www.uruwashi.org/ for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
Regular protests, some with an anti-American flavor, take place outside Congress, City Hall and the “University of the Republic.”
U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Uruguay are advised to take common-sense precautions and avoid any large gatherings or any other event where crowds have congregated to demonstrate or protest.
If travelers encounter a protest they should walk the other way or enter a commercial establishment until the protest passes.
Taking pictures of protesters is not a good idea.

Although there have been no past instances of violence directed at U.S. citizens from cross-border extremist groups, U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the more remote areas of Uruguay near the border with Argentina and Brazil are urged to exercise caution.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up to date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada , a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays.)

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
Petty street crime is prevalent in Montevideo .
The criminals tend to be non-violent.
However, criminals often resort to violence if the victims resist.
Travelers should exercise reasonable caution to minimize their exposure to crime.
Criminals prey on the unaware, particularly those carrying cameras, pocketbooks, laptops, or backpacks.
Travelers are advised to lock most valuables in secure hotel safes and to download their wallets of excess credit cards and cash.
If dining at an outdoor restaurant take extra care with pocketbooks or bags.
There are no “off limits” areas of the city and parts of “Ciudad Vieja” are popular tourist attractions.
However the only sections of Ciudad Vieja with continual police patrols are Plaza Independencia, the pedestrian street Sarandi, and the Mercado del Puerto.
Mugging is common in other parts of Ciudad Vieja - particularly for travelers walking alone, or couples walking at night.
A smart alternative is to call for a taxi for evening travel between restaurants, bars, and hotels.

Victims are usually foreign tourists, individuals openly carrying valuable items, and motorists in unlocked vehicles stopped at busy intersections, particularly on Montevideo 's riverfront road known as the Rambla. Drivers should keep all car doors locked, the driver's window open only one inch, and purses, bags, briefcases and other valuables out of sight on the floor or in the trunk. Parked cars, particularly in the Carrasco neighborhood, are also increasingly targeted for break-ins. During the summer months (December-March), beach resort areas such as Punta del Este attract tourists, and petty street crimes and residential burglaries--similar to those that occur in Montevideo --rise significantly. Visitors are advised to exercise common sense in the conduct of their activities around Montevideo and in Uruguayan resort areas. They should be very attentive to personal security and their surroundings in the aforementioned areas.

Those planning to live in Montevideo should note that burglaries and attempted burglaries seem to be on the rise in upscale neighborhoods.
The perpetrators are mostly non-confrontational but determined teenagers.
A combination of preventive measures including rigorous use of locks and alarms, strong grillwork on all windows, guard dogs, keeping a residence occupied as much as possible, and using a security service is highly recommended.

Montevideo continues to experience armed robberies of patrons at crowded restaurants in the Pocitos neighborhood.
Most of these crimes have occurred very late at night.
Restaurant patrons should exercise extreme caution for late night dining.

Uruguayan law enforcement authorities have increased the number of uniformed policemen on foot in areas where criminal activity is concentrated and the number of patrol cars in residential areas. The clearly marked patrol cars are equipped with cellular phones and the phone numbers are conspicuously painted on the vehicles.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Facilities for medical care are considered adequate. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost tens of thousands of dollars.


Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization's (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States .
The information below concerning Uruguay is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in particular location or circumstance.

The Uruguayan Ministry of Transportation is responsible for maintaining safe road conditions countrywide. The Uruguayan Ministry of Interior highway police (tel. 1954) are responsible for traffic safety on highways and other roads beyond city limits. In urban and suburban areas, transit police and municipal employees share road safety responsibilities.

Driving is on the right-hand side of the road. Wearing seat belts and using headlights on highways and other inter-city roads 24 hours a day are mandatory. Children under 12 must ride in the back seat. Motorcyclists must wear helmets. The use of cellular phones while driving is prohibited. Right turns on red lights and left turns at most intersections marked with a stoplight are not permitted. Drivers approaching an intersection from the right or already in traffic circles have the right of way.
Flashing high beams indicate intent to pass or continue through unmarked intersections.
Many drivers ignore speed limits and traffic signs.
If you plan to drive, use extreme caution and drive defensively.

For driving under the influence, violators are fined and confiscated licenses may be retained for up to six months. In accidents causing injury or death, drivers are brought before a judge who decides if incarceration is warranted.

Inter-city travel is via bus, taxi, car service (remise), car, and motorcycle. Speed limits are posted on highways and some main roads. Most taxis have no seat belts in the back seat. Cycling outside the capital or small towns is hazardous due to a scarcity of bike paths, narrow road shoulders and unsafe driving practices.

Illumination, pavement markings, and road surfaces are sometimes poor. Route 1, which runs between Montevideo and Colonia or Punta del Este, and Route 2, between Rosario and Fray Bentos, are particularly accident-ridden because of heavy tourist traffic. Road accidents rise during the austral summer beach season (December to March), Carnaval (mid-to-late February), and Easter Week.

Within Montevideo , the emergency number to contact the police, fire department, rescue squad, or ambulance service is 911. In the rest of the country, dial 02-911 to connect with the Montevideo central emergency authority, which will then contact the local emergency service. The Automobile Club of Uruguay responds to emergency calls for roadside assistance at 1707, “Car Up” at 0800-1501 and the Automobile Center of Uruguay at 2-408-6131/2091. SEMM (tel. 159) and UCM (tel. 147), Montevideo-based ambulance services manned by doctors, have agreements with emergency medical units in other cities.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.
You may also telephone Uruguay ’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety in Miami at (305) 443-7431.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed Uruguay ’s Civil Aviation Authority as not being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Uruguay ’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Uruguay 's customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Uruguay of items such as precious jewels, gold, firearms, pornography, subversive literature, inflammable articles, acids, prohibited drugs (medications), plants, seeds, and foodstuffs as well as some antiquities and business equipment. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Uruguay in Washington, D.C., or one of Uruguay 's consulates in the U.S. for specific information regarding customs requirements. Note: Travelers entering Uruguay with precious jewels or gold worth more than $500.00 ( U.S. ) must declare them to customs officers at the port of entry or face possible detention or seizure of the goods and charges of contraband or evasion of customs controls. Visitors are expected to comply with local law and regulations by approaching a customs officer before routine inspection of all incoming baggage, conducted on standard security equipment.
Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Uruguay ’s laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Uruguay are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States .
Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

The Uruguayan Ministry of Agriculture and Fishing strictly enforces all regulations regarding hunting permits, as well as seasonal and numerical limits on game. Visitors who contravene local law have been detained by the authorities and had valuable personal property (weapons) seized. Under Uruguayan law, seized weapons can only be returned after payment of a sum equivalent to the value of the property seized. Hunters are also subject to stiff fines for practicing the sport without all appropriate permits.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages onintercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Uruguay are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department's travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Uruguay .
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located at Lauro Muller 1776; telephone (598) (2) 418-7777; fax (598) (2) 418-4110 or -8611. Internet: http://uruguay.usembassy.gov/, email: MontevideoACS@state.gov. Consular Section hours for American Citizen Services are Monday to Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., except U.S. and Uruguayan holidays.
* * *
This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated August 28, 2007 to update Sections on Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Aviation Safety Oversight, Children’s issues, and Registration/Embassy Location.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 19 Jul 2018 03:23:55 +0200
By Lucia LACURCIA

Montevideo, July 19, 2018 (AFP) - Enrique Curbelo is delighted. Selling cannabis has allowed the affable 76-year-old to keep his privately owned pharmacy in Montevideo open in a market dominated by big chains.   "I had to sell what they didn't sell," he told AFP. "For me it's like selling aspirin."   It's been this way for a year now.   Every Wednesday, Ismael Fernandez receives a WhatsApp message from his local pharmacist telling him a new stock of cannabis has arrived.   After leaving work, he heads there and buys the 10 grams that Uruguayan law permits, costing 400 pesos, around $13.

Fernandez then heads home and rolls a joint "to relax" with his partner Stefania Fabricio.   No longer do they need to surreptitiously contact a dealer and pay more for Paraguayan or Brazilian marijuana that's been "pressed, mixed (and is) sometimes very bad and full of chemicals."   "Now it's much easier than when it started," Fernandez, a 31-year-old who works for a cleaning company, told AFP.   It has been four and a half years since marijuana use became legal in Uruguay and a year since it has been sold in pharmacies -- up to 40 grams a month per person.

Initially, there was insufficient supply, leaving people standing in long queues as stocks sometimes ran out. Pharmacies are better prepared now.   "They send you a message with a number which you use later to go and collect it, and in my pharmacy you can order it online," added Fernandez, the father of a three-year-old.   Hairdresser Fabricio, also 31, says "it's good quality," but not too strong.   "It doesn't send your head spinning, but it's not meant to. You get a hit but you can still do things perfectly."   - 'Privileged' -   She says she feels "privileged" to live in a country that enacted a law to "get tons of people out of the black market."   As a result, she said, the stigma attached to those who smoke pot is changing, "albeit slowly."

The system is simple: to buy cannabis in a pharmacy you must be at least 18, live in Uruguay and sign up as a "buyer" at the post office.   An initial stumbling block arose when banks refused to work with establishments selling cannabis due to international rules against drug-trafficking.   But the country plowed on, and last year it became the first in the world to fully legalize its sale.   But Enrique Curbelo had to get over his own prejudices before deciding to join the select band of pharmacies selling the plant.   There are 14, half of them in the capital, serving the 24,812 registered buyers.

- 'Normal people' -
Users can choose between two brands and two types of cannabis -- sativa and indica -- both provided by an official distributor.   Customers are generally not the stereotypical grubby-looking student or idle waster.    On this day in Curbelo's store they include two young women, a man in his 50s and an older lady -- "normal people," says the pharmacist.   Official statistics say 70 percent of buyers are male and 49 percent are between the ages of 18 and 29.

To keep anyone from exceeding their monthly allowance, a fingerprint machine is used to register every sale.   Along with the ability to purchase cannabis in a pharmacy, Uruguayans have the right to grow their own -- up to a six-plant maximum -- or to join a cannabis club, which can have up to 45 members and 99 plants.   Federico Corbo, a 41-year-old gardener, grows cannabis in his garden on the outskirts of Montevideo. He experiments by crossing species in an attempt to improve quality and optimize the flowering period.   Corbo is not impressed with the quality on offer in pharmacies.   "It's not the worst, but it's low," he said, insisting quality control needs to be improved.   "Marijuana that doesn't reach the minimum standards -- with crushed flowers, no aroma, low quality -- shouldn't be sold in the pharmacy.   "Maybe, as I'm a grower, I'm very demanding, but there is a cost associated to the product and it must be offered to the public in the best way possible."

According to the Institute of Cannabis Regulation and Control (Ircca), an average cultivator or club member supplies cannabis to two other people, while those who buy it in a pharmacy share it with one other.   "Approximately half of marijuana users have access to regulated cannabis," says Ircca.   The rest prefer to continue buying the drug on the black market, put off by the need to register as a user.   "It's wrong -- if they legalize it they have to do so in a way in which the state doesn't keep a paternalistic role in overseeing how much you smoke or stop smoking," one clandestine user, who wished to remain anonymous, told AFP.   This 48-year-old lawyer simply doesn't trust the authorities. He pointed to the danger a change of government could bring, or even the return of dictatorship.   "Right now that seems impossible," he said, "but you can never discount it."
Date: Thu 1 Feb 2018 23:02hs UYT
Source: LaRed 21 [in Spanish, machine trans. edited]

The Ministry of Public Health (MSP) issued a statement through which it reports that it has detected cases of infection by the bacterium _Vibrio vulnificus_ in Montevideo, Canelones, and Maldonado [departments]. The State Secretariat assured that every year there are cases of this bacterium, but so far in 2018, 4 serious cases have been reported, of which 3 died. All of them had underlying illnesses.

"90 percent of these cases, in the world, are associated with the consumption of undercooked or raw seafood. Infrequently, the infection can be acquired when entering the sea with open wounds, especially in elderly people or people with diseases that affect the immune system," explained the MSP. It is an event "extremely rare in our country," said the State Secretariat. It also indicated that fewer than 10 cases per year are registered per year for this bacterium.

It is an infection that "can be serious and in some cases fatal, so it is recommended to avoid the consumption of undercooked or raw sea products (as well as their handling without protection measures) and in the same way, avoid entering the sea with wounds or cuts on the skin." The bacteria can be found in coastal marine waters and estuaries in areas of tropical and subtropical climates that have a moderate degree of salinity and temperatures that usually exceed 18 C [64.4 F].
====================
[The following is extracted from the previous edition of the "Bad Bug Book," Center for Safety and Applied Nutrition, US FDA (Food and Drug Administration). The newest version is available at:  <https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/UCM297627.pdf>:

"_Vibrio vulnificus_, a lactose-fermenting, halophilic, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen, is found in estuarine environments and associated with various marine species such as plankton, shellfish (oysters, clams, and crabs), and finfish. Environmental factors responsible for controlling numbers of _V. vulnificus_ in seafood and in the environment include temperature, pH, salinity, and amounts of dissolved organics. It may be normal flora in salt water, and acquiring this organism from shellfish or water exposure does not imply that the water is contaminated by sewage.

"Wound infections result either from contaminating an open wound with sea water harbouring the organism, or by lacerating part of the body on coral, fish, etc., followed by contamination with the organism. The ingestion of _V. vulnificus_ by healthy individuals can result in gastroenteritis."

The "primary septicaemia" form of the disease follows consumption of raw seafood containing the organism by individuals with underlying chronic disease, particularly liver disease. The organism can also enter through damaged skin. In these individuals, the microorganism enters the blood stream, resulting in septic shock, rapidly followed by death in many cases (about 50 percent). Over 70 percent of infected individuals have distinctive bullous skin lesions (shown at <http://safeoysters.org/medical/diagnosis.html>).

There are 2 points to be emphasized: that vibrios are normal flora in warm saltwater (not indicative of any sewage contamination) and that most of the life-threatening illnesses occur in individuals with underlying medical illnesses, including immunocompromised states, chronic liver disease, and diabetes. So-called normal individuals often just develop gastroenteritis. The range of disease due to _V. vulnificus_ can involve more northern geographical areas as overall global warming takes effect. - ProMED Mod.LL]

Date: Mon 29 Jan 2018
Source: Monte Carlo [in Spanish, trans. ProMED Mod.TY, edited]

Personnel of the Ministry of Public Health are investigating the death of a young --28-years old -- agronomist caused by [a] hantavirus [infection]. After completion of the specific studies, which could take 48 hours, they will be able to determine if the young woman died as a consequence of the virus [infection].

The disease is contracted by the inhalation of excretions or secretions of rodents infected by the hantavirus.

As a preventive measure, personnel of the Department of Epidemiology of the Ministry of Health will go to the rural area in Canelones, where the young woman resided.  [Byline: Enrique Puig]
====================
[No information is given about the symptoms that the young woman experienced prior to her death, nor the date of her illness and death. Presumably, the diagnosis of a suspected hantavirus infection leading to death was hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HPS).

The report above does not mention which hantavirus was responsible for this or earlier cases in Uruguay. Central Plata hantavirus could be the etiological agent responsible (for this and previous HPS cases). Its rodent host is the yellow pygmy rice rat, _Oligoryzomys flavescens_, complex of rodents. This rodent reservoir host sheds the virus in its saliva, urine and faeces, contaminating the environment in which it lives and breeds.

An image of this rodent can be accessed at

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map showing the location of Uruguay in South
America can be accessed at: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/28995> and
Canelones department in southern Uruguay at
Date: Wed, 19 Jul 2017 22:41:35 +0200
By Mauricio RABUFFETTI

Montevideo, July 19, 2017 (AFP) - Pharmacies in Uruguay started selling marijuana Wednesday under a four-year-old law that has made the small South American country the first in the world to legalize pot from production to sale.   At a pharmacy in Montevideo's Old Town, five customers were waiting to buy when the store shutters went up at the start of the day, and lines grew longer as the day went on.   "I've been smoking since I was 14. Let's give it a try," said a 37-year-old man who would not give his name.   "It's funny," a pharmacy employee told AFP on grounds of anonymity. "In two hours we filled only three prescriptions, but 30 people came to buy marijuana."

Some pharmacies saw as many as 20 people lining up to make their first legal pot purchase.    "We did not expect this kind of movement," said Sebastian Scafo, 33, a pharmacy manager.    In all, 16 pharmacies have been authorized to sell marijuana under state controls, barely enough to cover a country of 3.5 million people.   No major pharmacy chain has agreed to sell the drug.   Many pharmacies have been unwilling to participate in the scheme because of concerns about security and doubts that the small market of registered users is worth the trouble.   Only about 5,000 people, most of them age 30 to 44, have signed up as prospective buyers since Uruguay's state registry opened in early May.   Walk-in sales are not allowed under the law, and only residents of Uruguay can register to buy pot -- thereby preventing marijuana tourism.

-- Blow to drug-dealers? --
Among those trying the new legal distribution system was Xavier Ferreyra, a 32-year-old city employee, who was making his first purchase at a pharmacy in Montevideo's Old Town.    He said he saw two main advantages to the new approach: "safety and the quality" of the drug, adding, "I no longer have to go buy it in some slum."   Pharmacy sales are the last of three phases set out under the 2013 law.   Under the early phases, nearly 7,000 people registered to grow weed at home, and more than 60 smokers' clubs were authorized.   Only two companies were authorized to produce marijuana for pharmacies -- under military protection, and with no public access.

The state Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCC) has authorized the sale of two types of marijuana, to be sold in five-gram packets.   On Monday, the National Drugs Council tweeted an image of what the packages would look like: blue-and-white sealed sachets that look something like condom packets.   An "Alfa I" package contains "Alfa I variety cannabis hybrid with Indica predominant."    Another sort has "Beta I variety cannabis" with Sativa. The levels of THC -- the psychotropic constituent in cannabis -- are given on the outside, for consumer information.   The packets also bear a "Warnings" section about the risks of consuming marijuana and recommendations on how to do it more safely.

-- 'A marvelous plant' --
The buyers who talked to AFP reporters all said they had bought 10 grams of pot, a packet of each variety on sale.   The packets are being retailed at $6.60 each, according to the IRCCA.   Customers are identified through a digital fingerprint reader, which allows them to buy without having to show other forms of identification in the store.   Uruguay's goal in legalizing the sale of marijuana for recreational use is to cut down on illegal smuggling.   Camila Berro, a 24-year-old business student, walked out of a pharmacy smiling, two packets of pot in hand.    "I feel very lucky to be able to get it legally," she said. "I have friends in other countries who were imprisoned for smoking a joint."   To Ferreyra, the municipal worker, "Uruguay has taken a very big step... I hope one day they can legalize a lot more drugs."   And former President Jose Mujica, who enacted the marijuana reforms while in office from 2010 to 2015, said that while "no addiction is good," it was "horrible to condemn a marvelous plant."    Uruguay, he added, is "trying a new path."
Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2017 23:01:15 +0200

Montevideo, July 14, 2017 (AFP) - Uruguay will allow pharmacies to sell marijuana starting next Wednesday, in the final phase of a law making the small South American country the first in the world to legalize and regulate pot from production to sale.   Under legislation approved in 2013, Uruguayans have been allowed to grow their own pot and smoke it in clubs.   But working out a timetable for pharmacies to sell it -- the third and last conduit called for in the legislation -- proved more tricky. This has now been resolved, the state agency regulating marijuana said in a statement Friday.

People have to register to buy pot in pharmacies, and so far 4,700 have done so, most of them in the 30 to 44 age group, according to government figures. Uruguay's total population is 3.4 million.   Under the first phase of the 2013 law, more than 6,600 people have registered to grow weed at home, and 51 smokers' clubs have been authorized.   The state Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCC) has authorized the sale of two types of marijuana, to be sold in packages of five and 10 grams.

Pharmacists say they are not sure how profitable pot sales will be -- registered smokers can buy no more than 40 grams a month, at $1.30 a gram -- and they have expressed concern about training the employees who will handle pot, and providing security against theft.   There have also been questions about the quality and potency of the officially provided weed, with some saying it is remarkably weak.   Only two companies were authorized to produce marijuana for pharmacies -- under military protection, and with no public access.   Government officials insist they will prevent "cannabis tourism." Only Uruguayans and legal residents will be allowed to partake.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2018 06:41:40 +0100

Hanoi, Dec 13, 2018 (AFP) - Floods caused by heavy downpours have killed 13 people in central Vietnam, officials said Thursday, as farmers scrambled to save crops and livestock ahead of more bad weather forecast for this week.   Torrential rains have lashed six provinces in the centre of the country since Saturday, killing thousands of cows and chickens and flooding several cities -- including the coastal resort town of Danang.    More than 50 centimetres (20 inches) of rain hit some areas, with more downpours expected in the coming days, the disaster management office said Thursday.   "Thirteen people were killed, while one remains missing in Quang Ngai province," the office said.    Around 12,000 hectares of crops were destroyed, and some 160,000 livestock killed, it added.

One farmer in Quang Nam province said he lost all his chickens in the flooding, costing him tens of thousands of dollars.       "The water receded but thousands of our chickens were dead. We had to collect them for burial as the smell was so bad," Nguyen Thanh said, quoted by state-run Tuoi Tre newspaper.    Several areas in Quang Nam and Quang Ngai provinces were still inundated on Thursday after hydropower plants discharged reservoir waters.    Vietnam is frequently hit by heavy downpours during the typhoon season from May to October, but forecasters said the rains arrived late this year.     More than 200 people have been killed in weather-related disasters in 2018, down from 389 last year.
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2018 08:14:22 +0100

Bangkok, Dec 12, 2018 (AFP) - A French tourist was gunned down early Wednesday by an off-duty Thai cop after a drunken bar fight in a seedy Bangkok district, police said.   The 41-year-old Parisian was shot dead at a downtown apartment block after an altercation with the police sergeant major who had approached the tourist's Thai girlfriend.     "They were drunk... they started to argue and then had a fist fight but the policeman couldn't fight back," the Chief of Thailand's Immigration Police Surachate Hakpan told AFP.   "The policeman followed him back to his place and shot him twice," he said, adding the victim had been in Thailand for several months.

The officer has been arrested and "will be fired... and prosecuted on a murder charge", Surachate added.   Police are hunting a second suspect seen on CCTV.    Gruesome pictures circulated on Thai media showed the victim lying in a pool of blood in front of a doughnut shop at his apartment block.    Bangkok is one of the world's most visited cities, famed for its food and racy nightlife, much of it around Nana district where the murder took place.    Thailand as a grim reputation for its gun culture, with drunken arguments, business disputes and soured romances frequently resolved by violence.
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2018 02:09:59 +0100

Mexico City, Dec 12, 2018 (AFP) - A massive fireworks explosion during a procession at a Mexican church killed eight people Tuesday and left some 50 wounded, authorities said.   Two children aged 11 and 12 were among those killed in the accident, which occurred around dawn at the San Jose parish atrium in Tequisquiapan, some 145 kilometres (90 miles) northwest of Mexico City.

Parishioners had donated the fireworks for a festival, but "something went wrong and they exploded," said Gabriel Bastarrachea, emergency response official for the state of Queretaro.   A video posted on social media showed people marching toward the church in a festive procession when suddenly a giant, fiery blast sent them running and screaming.

It was the latest in a string of deadly fireworks accidents in Mexico, where a thriving but dangerous cottage industry supplies a seemingly endless array of colourful explosives to celebrate holidays and festivals.   At least 24 people were killed in a series of fireworks explosions last July in the town of Tultepec in central Mexico, and 42 people were killed there when a rocket exploded in December 2016 at the height of the Christmas fireworks rush.
Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 22:14:43 +0100

Bogota, Dec 11, 2018 (AFP) - The abandoned building where Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar lived will be covered in posters paying tribute to the victims of his Medellin Cartel before it is torn down next year.   The exhibition is part of a move by municipal authorities to tell the other side of Escobar's story -- that of his victims -- to counter a surge of television series glamorizing his life and that of his cartel.   "Respect our pain, honour our victims (1983-1994). 46,612 fewer lives," reads the message on one of the posters that now greet Medillin's "narco-tourists" flocking to the Monaco apartment block.

Portraits of slain journalist Guillermo Cano, gunned down in 1986, former presidential candidate Luis Carlos Galan and police chief Valdemar Quintero -- both murdered in 1989 -- are emblazoned over a message that reads, in English: "It is not fiction, it is reality."   Mayor Federico Gutierrez told reporters that the tourist site had become a "symbol of illegality."   "Now, there are messages that should lead us to reflect," he said.   The posters will remain affixed to the building until municipal workers tear it down on February 22, more than 25 years after Escobar was shot dead by police in 1993.     The former luxury block will be replaced by a municipal park.
Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 19:29:44 +0100

Beni, DR Congo, Dec 11, 2018 (AFP) - Children account for a third of Ebola cases in an outbreak of the disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo, with hundreds orphaned or isolated, the United Nations said on Tuesday.   Nearly 300 people have died from the highly contagious disease since August in the restive east around the city of Beni.

The UN children's agency UNICEF said the organisation and its partners had identified more than 400 children who have been orphaned or isolated during the outbreak.    "We are deeply concerned by the growing number of children confirmed to have contracted Ebola," said UNICEF's Regional Director for West and Central Africa, Marie-Pierre Poirier, returning from Beni.    "The earlier children infected with Ebola receive treatment in a specialised health facility, the greater their chances of survival. Community mobilisation and public awareness activities are also crucial."

After it was declared on August 1 -- the tenth outbreak in DR Congo since 1976 -- at least 285 people have died, according to the last health ministry update on December 9.   Nearly 44,000 people have been vaccinated.   The outbreak has hit an area already struggling with violence from armed groups.   In November, medical and vaccination efforts were briefly suspended and health workers evacuated after clashes between UN peacekeepers and fighters from the local Allied Democratic Forces militia.
Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 14:28:55 +0100

Paris, Dec 11, 2018 (AFP) - The soaring Arc de Triomphe at the top of the Champs-Elysees in Paris will reopen Wednesday after being covered in graffiti and ransacked during anti-government protests which rocked the capital on December 1, the French monuments commission said.   The arc, under which lies the tomb of the unknown soldier, commemorating France's war dead, has been a focal point of the "yellow vest" rallies against fuel tax increases and the cost of living which began on November 17.   But the demonstrations degenerated into daylong clashes with police early this month, with protesters spray-painting the arc with slogans such as "the yellow vests will win."

The protesters later managed to break into the monument where they smashed sculptures and display cases in an underground gallery and snatched commemorative medals and other items.   They also snuffed out the eternal flame burning on the tomb of the unknown soldier.    Some protesters were also seen on the top of the landmark building which offers panoramic views of the capital.   "All the networks and equipment essential for the security and proper functioning of the monument will have been restored and repaired," the commission said in a statement Tuesday.   "Some furniture, notably in the gift shop and library, have been temporarily repaired while awaiting new installations," it added.   It said the damage was estimated at several hundred thousands of euros (dollars).   Thirteen people were charged last week over the looting and destruction and investigations are continuing to identify other suspects.
Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 13:30:30 +0100

Madrid, Dec 11, 2018 (AFP) - Spanish railway workers will stage a nationwide strike on December 21 and January 7 during the busy Christmas holiday period over job cuts and working conditions, a union said Tuesday.   The "main reason" for the strike is the "continued reduction in the number of staff" at state train operator Renfe and state rail infrastructure company Adif, the CCOO union, one of the main trade unions representing rail workers, said in a statement.   "We are mobilising to recover the jobs which have been lost, improve purchasing power and ensure agreed pay increases come into effect," said Manuel Nicolas Taguas, general secretary of the railway workers sector at the CCOO.   The union says that since 2005 the workforce employed by the two companies in charge of Spain's rail network has been slashed by around 5,000 workers to roughly 26,000 employees.   The union representing Renfe rail guards has called a one day strike on December 14 to protest working conditions.
Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2018 14:05:06 +0100

Nairobi, Dec 10, 2018 (AFP) - South Sudan will vaccinate key health workers against Ebola close to the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, which faces a new epidemic, the World Health Organization said Monday.   The ministry of health's vaccination campaign, with cooperation from the WHO, will target healthcare and frontline workers in the high-risk states of Juba, Yei, Yambio and Nimule, the UN agency said in a statement.   South Sudan is one of several countries bordering the vast DRC, where the new outbreak of the highly contagious viral disease had since August claimed 271 lives by December 6, according to Congolese Health Minister Oly Ilunga Kalenga.

A total of 2,160 doses of the experimental vaccine rVSV-ZEBOV have been allocated to South Sudan for a programme starting on December 19. This trial vaccine is not yet licenced but is considered safe and provided "under the compassionate-use guidelines in response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in DRC", the WHO said.   Like neighbouring Uganda, where similar measures have been taken for health personnel, South Sudan has declared a state of alert because of the risk that Ebola may be carried into its territory. At present, no cases have been reported, according the WHO.   The experimental vaccine first went on trial during the terrible epidemic of Ebola that ravaged parts of West Africa between the end of 2013 and 2016, at a cost of more than 11,300 lives. The disease spreads through contact with bodily fluids from other people or infected animals.

The vaccine was created by Canadian public health specialists at the National Microbiology Laboratory and is considered highly effective by the WHO, but it works only against the Ebola virus-Zaire strain, confirmed in the outbreak in the DRC.   South Sudan has been torn by civil war for five years in a conflict that has left nearly 400,000 dead. More than four million people -- about a third of the population -- have fled.   The main belligerents signed a peace accord in September, but the work of humanitarian organisations remains complicated and dangerous.   Participants in the vaccination programme have been trained on rVSV-ZEBOV and undertaken a simulation exercise. Meanwhile, the Ebola preparedness contingency plan covers measures ranging from screening travellers, community engagement and provision for safe and dignified funerals, the WHO said.
Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2018 11:42:55 +0100

Bangkok, Dec 10, 2018 (AFP) - An Iranian man has been arrested after using travel freebies to lure an unsuspecting Japanese tourist into smuggling a bag of clothes laced with crystal meth, Thai police said Monday.   The tourist, whose name has not been disclosed, found the deal on a travel website that offered free getaways to Thailand, Shanghai and Frankfurt, complete with thousands in spending money.

But after arriving in Thailand last week, he was handed "suspicious" luggage for his next trip to Shanghai, Itthipol Itthisarnronnachai, deputy chief of Thailand's immigration department, told reporters.   "Inside the bag, he found clothes that felt more solid than usual. He then contacted the Japanese embassy," Itthipol said.   Police said the clothes had been coated with crystal methamphetamine -- known as ice.

Four bags of the drug were also found, adding up to 2.2 kilogrammes (4.9 pounds) in total.    Thailand gets 35 million tourists a year and some fall prey to low-level scams or robbery, but few are swept up in transnational drug-running.   "It's a never-seen-before method, luring tourists to traffick drugs out of the country," Itthipol added.

Demand for meth is surging in the region at a time when authorities are attempting to crack down on the lucrative business.   Police said the Iranian national was arrested when he went to retrieve the luggage after the Japanese man pretended to be sick and said he wanted to cancel the trip.   They found 10 kilogrammes of ice and ice-coated clothing in the suspect's apartment.   "We will pursue this case and investigate networks in Thailand and Japan to take down this scam," Itthipol said.
Date: Mon, 10 Dec 2018 08:53:28 +0100

Frankfurt am Main, Dec 10, 2018 (AFP) - Germany was plunged into transport chaos Monday as most train services were halted by a railworkers' strike over pay, affecting millions of passengers.   Inter-city and regional services as well as many urban commuter trains were cancelled throughout Europe's biggest economy by the four-hour stoppage from 5:00 am (0400 GMT), Deutsche Bahn (DB) said.   The strike halted all high-speed ICE trains and other inter-city services as well as most cargo trains, and its ripple effects and delays were expected to continue well into the afternoon.   In the capital Berlin, where additionally the entire public announcement system broke down, frustrated commuters were asked to switch from S-Bahn commuter trains operated by DB to subways, buses or trams.

The strike came after talks broke down Saturday between the DB and the EVG rail workers' union, which is demanding a 7.5-percent salary rise for 160,000 employees.   "The employer made offers which did not correspond to the demands of our members," said EVG negotiator Regina Rusch-Ziemba.   DB shot back and described the strike as a "completely unnecessary escalation", insisting its offer was "attractive and met the main demands" of employees.   DB had offered a pay rise of 5.1 percent in two phases, with an option for staff to take extra time off instead, and a one-off payment of 500 euros ($570), the DPA national news agency reported.   Deutsche Bahn in a tweet also denied it had broken off the negotiations, charging that "the EVG left the talks and went on strike".   "DB remains ready to continue the negotiations at any time. There is an open invitation for today."

The strike also impacted DB customer services offices, meaning that in many stations passengers were left without information over loudspeakers or display boards.   DB said that purchased tickets would remain valid until next Sunday or could be refunded and urged passengers to delay travel where possible.   It also called on the union -- which threatened follow-up strikes if necessary -- to return to the negotiating table quickly.   A DB spokeswoman said: "Parties that negotiate must be prepared to make concessions. DB has asked the EVG to continue the talks this afternoon."