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Australia

Travelling to Australia
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Introduction
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Travelling to Australia for business or pleasure can be a most memorable experience and each year many Europeans travel this
route to experience something of life ‘down-under’. Staying healthy and well is essential if you want to enjoy your trip to its fullest extent. Australia is a huge continent and the climatic conditions vary considerably throughout. The main southern cities have a temperate climate similar to North West Europe, Perth enjoys a Mediterranean climate while Queensland and the Northern Territories have a sub-tropical weather pattern.
Preparation
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It is important that all travellers are in good general health before undertaking any long-haul trip. Patients who tire easily on light exercise or who have a significant underlying medical condition will need to take extra care. If you are concerned about this aspect of your proposed trip arrange for a meeting with a doctor at an early stage in your preparations.
Long Haul Flights
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On these long flights you will be travelling across many time zones. You will lose or gain hours depending on the direction of your flight. Your body will take time to adjust to the new time zone and so it is important to allow this to occur naturally. If you arrive during the daylight hours try to stay out in the sun for a period of time as this will help your body release a hormone which counteracts jet lag. (Watch you don’t get sun burnt!) Don’t plan to be too energetic during the first day or two after you arrive. Be sensible. If this is a business trip try not to make any major decisions over the first 24 hours. Even the relatively short flight from South East Asia down to Australia crosses time zones and again it will be important to allow your body to settle.
Stop-Overs in SE Asia
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Frequently travellers will stop-over in Singapore, Bali, Hong Kong or Bangkok on their way to or from Australia. During these short stops it is essential that travellers take all possible precautions to ensure that they rest and are careful about what they eat or drink as contaminated food or water is more common in some of these regions.

Mosquito protection in SE Asia
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Mosquito borne diseases are present depending on the location (Malaria, Dengue Fever, Japanese B Encephalitis etc) One of particular concern is Dengue Fever, which is a viral disease transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito. These mosquitoes tend to bite during the day time. This is in contrast to the mosquitoes which transmit malaria which mainly bite at night. Many of the main tourist destinations throughout SE Asia are malaria free and so tablets to protect against the disease are not usually required. Those going off the usual routes will need to talk this through in depth before leaving.
Road Traffic Accidents
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Frequently, cars are purchased by tourists to Australia for the duration of their stay. Often the cost is low and the maintenance and safety of the vehicle may be somewhat questionable! Long monotonous driving associated with a lack of concentration can cause serious accidents. Car breakdown in the middle of ‘nowhere’ may lead to the risk of dehydration and potential animal attack (kangaroo, dingos, snakes etc). Make sure you always have sufficient food and water and some means of communication (fully charged mobile phone) before leaving to travel across the continent. Make sure other responsible friends or relations back home know of your intended route and inform them of any changes. Get contact numbers for essential services for your journey.

Health Concerns in Australia
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Many travellers feel that Australia is the same as at home in Europe and so little care with personal health needs be taken. This is not always the case as there are many local health variations throughout the country which should be considered.
Sun Exposure
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The northern European skin is usually unaccustomed to intensity of the sun exposure experienced in many parts of Australia. Unfortunately this regularly leads to sun burn among tourists but, more seriously, it also significantly increases the risk of potentially fatal skin cancers. Always use plenty of adequate sun block, cover exposed areas of your body where possible (especially by wearing a wide brimmed hat) and drink plenty of water. (You may also need to replace salt lost through increased perspiration ~ assuming no underlying blood pressure problem)
Northern Australia
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As mentioned previously, the northern parts of Australia are sub-tropical and mosquito borne diseases are more common. Malaria transmission does not occur and many of the diseases transmitted by mosquitoes or other insects cause mild discomfort. Unfortunately some are which are much more severe and can cause long term difficulties.
Ross River Fever
This viral disease is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes a severe arthritic type condition. The disease is often short lived but in some patients the disease may continue to cause arthritis for months and even years. There is no specific treatment and travellers need to be careful about avoiding bites.
Typhus
This disease occurs in isolated parts of Northern Australia through the bite of infected ticks. The disease can cause a skin rash, fever and general unwellness. Antibiotics can help to ease the symptoms but avoiding bites is essential at all times.
Dengue
This mosquito borne disease also occurs in parts of Northern Australia usually by day-biting mosquitoes. (See Dengue leaflet - TMB)
Other Risks
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The sea waters in parts of Australia are infested by sharks and jelly fish. Always take competent local advice before undertaking any sea activities. Drowning occurs regularly each year among tourists who disregard some of the basic rules of water safety. If in desert regions, take care with disturbing rocks in case you awaken a peaceful snake or scorpion.
Medical Care for Travellers
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If travellers have stopped in South East Asia and then become ill on arrival in Australia, they should make contact with a medical centre dealing with Tropical Medicine. Details of the centres in the major cities throughout Australia are available from the Tropical Medical Bureau.
Vaccinations for Stop-Overs
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Usually travellers will have vaccination cover for Typhoid, Poliomyelitis, Tetanus and Hepatitis A. Malaria prophylaxis may not be required depending on your actual itinerary. There is a higher risk of Hepatitis B in central Australia and so this may need to be considered if the risk of contact (mainly blood following accidents) is thought to be higher than usual. Rabies risk in Australia is almost non existent though obviously contact with all warm blooded animals should be avoided at all times.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 21 Aug 2019
Source: The Canberra Times [edited]

Australian Capital Territory (ACT) health officials are investigating a cluster of hepatitis A cases in Canberra's South Korean community. There have been 8 cases of the virus in the ACT and Sydney since June 2019. The cluster of cases comes as South Korea experiences a large outbreak of the virus, with more than 11,000 cases reported in the country in 2019.

ACT Health said it was working with its counterparts in New South Wales to investigate the cause of the outbreak. An ACT Health spokesman said most of the people affected by hepatitis A in recent weeks in Canberra had not reported travelling overseas recently. "Australia has a low incidence of hepatitis A, and when outbreaks occur, they are linked to consumption of contaminated food products or person-to-person spread," the spokesperson said. "However, at this stage of the investigation, no specific food has been connected to the outbreak."

Symptoms of the virus may include nausea, vomiting, fever and yellowing of the skin, dark urine and pale stools.

"The ACT Health directorate is reminding the South Korean community in Canberra and anyone travelling to South Korea, of the importance of vaccination prior to travel and practicing good hand hygiene to reduce the risk of spread," the spokesman said. Health officials have recommended at least one dose of a hepatitis A vaccination before travel. Two doses prevent an infection.

Handwashing in soap and water for at least 15 seconds has also been recommended by health officials to help prevent the spread of the virus.
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[Since no travel was involved, it is not clear if the cases were from imported food, food contaminated by an infected food handler or from transmission from an asymptomatic person. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Australia:
Date: Thu 25 Jul 2019 4:14 PM AEST
Source: Mirage News [edited]

The Department of Health today [25 Jul 2019] reported that an adult is currently recovering after being diagnosed with meningococcal disease serogroup W, bringing the number of reported cases of invasive meningococcal disease in 2019 to 13. Of the 13 cases, 3 have been serogroup B, 5 serogroup W, and 5 serogroup C meningococcal infections.

Meningococcal disease is an uncommon, life-threatening illness caused by a bacterial infection of the blood and/or the membranes that line the spinal cord and brain, and occasionally of other sites, such as the throat, lungs or large joints.

A total of 41 cases were notified in WA [Western Australia] in 2018. This was less than the 46 cases notified in 2017, but well above the long-term average for annual cases. The number of serogroup W cases in 2018 (30) was also the highest reported in any year.

A vaccine to protect against 4 serogroups of the meningococcal disease (serogroups A, C, W and Y) is offered free to all children in WA at 12 months of age, with a catch-up program for children who have not yet received the vaccine and who are aged 1-4 years. Due to a higher rate of meningococcal disease in Aboriginal people in WA, Aboriginal children are offered vaccination from age 6 weeks to 4 years of age. In addition, the vaccine is offered to all teenagers in Year 10, with a catch up program for 15-19 years.
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[_Neisseria meningitidis_, the cause of meningococcal disease, only infects humans; there is no animal reservoir, and the organism dies quickly outside the human host. _N. meningitidis_ colonizes the mucosal membranes of the nose and throat; up to 5-10 percent of a population may be asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriers, but the carrier rate may be higher in epidemic situations. Droplets of nasopharyngeal secretions from these carriers are responsible for the spread of the disease. Close and prolonged contact with an infected person or a carrier facilitates the spread of the disease. The average incubation period is 4 days but can range between 2 and 10 days.

Immunity following use of a meningococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is specific for the type of capsular polysaccharide that the vaccine contains, with no cross-protection against infection due to other meningococcal polysaccharide groups. Although there are at least 13 _N. meningitidis_ serogroups, based on the antigenic specificity of their capsular polysaccharides, disease due to serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W are most common.

There are vaccines that contain capsular polysaccharide (A, C, Y, W), either alone or conjugated to protein. Conjugate vaccines are preferable, because, unlike the polysaccharide vaccines, conjugate vaccines immunize infants, reduce the carriage of meningococci in the throat and thus its transmission, as well as confer a more sustained immune response, and, therefore, longer-term protection than the polysaccharide vaccines. Serogroup B vaccines are based upon meningococcal B protein antigens, because group B capsular polysaccharide is poorly immunogenic in humans and is a potential auto-antigen.

Following the mass introduction into the population of a vaccine specific for one particular serogroup, the incidence of disease due to that serogroup has been found to fall dramatically, e.g., serogroup C disease in the UK following the introduction of C vaccine and serogroup A in the African Meningitis Belt following A vaccine, only to be replaced by emergence of disease due to other meningococcal serogroups.

In Australia, following the introduction of the conjugate meningococcal C vaccine in 2003, there has been a significant and sustained reduction in serogroup C meningococcal cases from 34 per cent of cases in 2003 to 5.7 per cent in 2012, accompanied by an increase in serogroup B from 60 per cent in 2003 to 83 per cent in 2012 (<http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/cda-cdi3703-pdf-cnt.htm/$FILE/cdi3703e.pdf>). ProMED-mail reported in 2016 that serogroup W, rather than B, had become predominant in Western Australia (ProMED-mail post Meningitis, meningococcal - Australia (03): (WA) sg. W http://promedmail.org/post/20160925.4513543).

Because of the replacement of serogroup C by serogroup W, quadrivalent conjugate (MenACWY) vaccine was funded in 2017 by Western Australia for grade 10-12 students and persons aged 15-19 years who no longer attend school and then in 2018 funded for all children in Australia at 12 months of age, replacing meningococcal C vaccine, and in 2019 for adolescents aged 14-19 years; MenACWY vaccine is strongly recommended, but not funded, for adolescents and young adults aged 20-24 years who live in close quarters or who are current smokers (<http://ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2019-04/Meningococcal-history-April-2019.pdf> and <http://ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2019-05/Childhood-schedule-table_May_2019_Final.pdf>).

MenACWY vaccine is also strongly recommended, but not funded, for: infants younger than 12 months of age; adolescents and young adults aged 20-24 years who live in close quarters or who are current smokers; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 2 months to 19 years; infants and children aged 2 months and older with medical conditions associated with an increased risk of meningococcal disease (additional doses and boosters required); and travellers to areas where meningococcal disease is more common (<http://ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2019-05/Childhood-schedule-table_May_2019_Final.pdf>).

The B vaccine is strongly recommended, but not funded, for: infants and children younger than 2 years of age; adolescents aged 15-19 years; adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years who live in close quarters or who are current smokers; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 2 months to 19 years; and infants and children aged 2 months and older with medical conditions associated with an increased risk of meningococcal disease  (<http://ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2019-05/Childhood-schedule-table_May_2019_Final.pdf>).

Western Australia, covering the entire western 1/3 of Australia, is mostly arid, its population being concentrated in the fertile southwest corner and its capital, Perth (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Australia>). - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/289>]
Date: Wed 17 Jul 2019 12:48 AM
Source: ABC News [edited]

More than 50 people have died from influenza-related illness in Western Australia this season [2019]; the number of new cases has slowed, but authorities do not know if the worst is over; and there has been a big increase in the number of WA parents vaccinating young children. Influenza has claimed 4 more lives in the past week in what is shaping up as Western Australia's most deadly flu season in a decade.

However experts say cases appear to be on the decline, suggesting the worst may be over from a virus that is notoriously difficult to combat through vaccination. This time last year [2018] there had been 2009 confirmed cases and just 5 deaths.

So far this year [2019] WA deaths from influenza-related illnesses have increased 940 per cent to 52, and confirmed cases of the flu have jumped 860 per cent to 19 327. But the Health Department has warned against directly comparing the number of confirmed cases this year with previous years, noting that this year's season began about 2 months earlier than normal. It was too soon to know if the flu season would end early, and therefore ultimately be on par with previous seasons in terms of overall severity.

UWA [University of Western Australia] clinical professor David Smith, a director of the National Influenza Centre, said 2018 had been "a very quiet" flu season, with 21 deaths in WA. "And that possibly means that the population as a whole hasn't been primed well to be ready for the influenza activity this year [2019].

Lauren Bloomfield from Edith Cowan University's School of Medical and Health Sciences said while the number of cases this year was high, there had been a downward trend over the past few weeks. "It's certainly slowing down," she said. "And hopefully it will come to an end soon."

The department's message about the importance of vaccinating against the flu appeared to be getting through to parents, with 46% of children aged 6 months to 5 years recorded on the Australian Immunisation Register, compared to just 16% at the same time last year [2018]. But Dr Bloomfield said getting a shot would not necessarily prevent someone from coming down with the flu, and urged people to adjust their expectations of the seasonal vaccine. "Many people would be used to getting a vaccine once in their life, and going on to have protection that lasts years or perhaps a whole lifetime," she said. "But influenza changes so quickly and so often that we need a new vaccine for it every year."

Each year the World Health Organisation gathers data and uses it to predict what strains of flu are most likely to be circulating in either the northern or southern hemispheres in the coming season. From those predictions they design a vaccine they think wil be a good match. But Dr Bloomfield said it is never foolproof. "There is no guarantee that the vaccines are going to be a very good match for the flu strains that are circulating, and we have seen some years when there has been quite a bad mismatch," she said.

Dr Bloomfield said the Health Department constantly measured what was known as "vaccine effectiveness". "But unfortunately, we do need quite a few people to get the flu in order to be able to test how effective the vaccine was," she said. "It can vary between the strains and it can vary from year to year." She said while interim testing suggested this year's [3019] vaccine was a good match for the strains of influenza spreading across WA, the department would not know for sure until around September. "We're going to have to wait unfortunately until the season is a bit further along to find out how well we go the vaccine matched this year," she said.  [byline: Charlotte Hamlyn]
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Western Australia, Australia:
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2019 09:02:36 +0200

Sydney, July 14, 2019 (AFP) - A strong 6.6-magnitude earthquake struck off northwest Australia Sunday, shaking buildings over a wide area but causing no immediate reports of damage or injuries.   The shallow quake hit early Sunday afternoon 10 kilometres under the Indian Ocean 203 kilometres (126 miles) west of the West Australian beach resort of Broome, the US Geological Survey said. No tsunami alert was issued.   Sergeant Neil Gordon of the Broome police department said the quake rattled the city for more than a minute.   "The building here was shaking for about a minute and a half ... a steady shaking for that period of time," he told AFP by telephone.   He added that there had been "no reports of any injuries or any damage throughout the district," following the tremor.   The national broadcaster ABC said there were some reports of minor damage from the quake, and no injuries.   Australian media said the tremor was felt across a long stretch of the northwestern coast of Australia, from the West Australian capital of Perth and the mining centres of Karatha and Port Hedland to the south and as far as Darwin to the north.
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2019 11:42:26 +0200

Sydney, July 12, 2019 (AFP) - A looming ban on climbing Australia's Uluru rock, intended to protect the sacred site from damage, has instead triggered a damaging influx of visitors, tourism operators said Friday.    Clambering up the giant red monolith, also known as Ayers Rock, will be prohibited from October -- in line with the wishes of the traditional Aboriginal owners of the land, the Anangu.   But a rush to beat the ban has led to a sharp increase in tourists and is causing its own problems for the World Heritage Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.   Families arriving in campers vans and RVs are a particular problem, chief executive of Tourism Central Australia Stephen Schwer told AFP.   "We have got so much of one particular market coming, we don't have enough infrastructure to handle the number of drive travellers."

While most visitors are doing the right thing, camping venues in the area are at capacity with advance bookings, leaving many less organised arrivals to set up illegally.   "People don't realise when they go off the road they are actually trespassing on pastoral land, or Aboriginal land, or protected land," Schwer said.   "We are getting people that are leaving their rubbish behind and lighting fires," he added.   "Sadly, people are also emptying their toilet waste out of their vans on what they think is unpopulated land, but is actually private land."   In the 12 months to June 2019, more than 395,000 people visited the Uluru-Kata National Park, according to Parks Australia, about 20 percent more than the previous year.   Yet just 13 percent of those who visited also climbed the rock, the government agency said.    Tourism operators say that Australian and Japanese tourists most commonly seek to climb Uluru.

The Aboriginal connection to the site dates back tens of thousands of years and it has great spiritual and cultural significance to them.   "Since the hand back of Uluru and Kata Tjuta to traditional owners in 1985, visitors have been encouraged to develop an understanding and respect for Anangu and their culture," a spokesperson for Parks Australia said.     "This is reflected in the 'please don't climb' message," they added.   Lyndee Severin from Curtin Springs station and roadhouse, one of just a few camping venues within 100 kilometres of Uluru, said "the vast majority of people are doing the right thing" but hundreds were setting up illegally by the side of the road or down a bush track.   "So we have some people that think that the rules don't apply to them," she told AFP.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 18:13:17 +0200 (METDST)

London, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - British Airways pilots on Friday said they will strike for three days in September in a dispute over pay, in a move that could affect tens of thousands of travellers.   The strikes on September 9, 10 and 27 were announced by the British Airline Pilots Association (Balpa), which said there had been a 93-percent vote in favour of industrial action.   "It is completely unacceptable that Balpa is destroying the travel plans of tens of thousands of our customers with this unjustifiable strike action," said the airline.   "We are extremely sorry that after many months of negotiations, based on a very fair offer, Balpa has decided on this reckless course of action," it said.

British Airways said it would change schedules to try and ensure as many people as possible can take their flights but warned that "many" customers will not be able to travel.   "We will be offering refunds and re-bookings for passengers booked on cancelled flights," it said.   Balpa said the strikes were "a last resort" but added that pilots had made "sacrifice after sacrifice" in recent years.   Balpa estimated each day of strike action would cost the company around £40 million (44 million euros, $49 million).
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 15:08:04 +0200 (METDST)
By Obert SIMWANZA

Lusaka, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - Children living in a central Zambian mining town are still exposed to high levels of toxic lead 25 years after the mine closed, Human Rights Watch said Friday, as lawyers announced plans to take legal action.   Decades of lead mining have left Kabwe, around 150 kilometres (95 miles) north of Lusaka, severely polluted, with serious health implications for residents.   The mine, which operated from the early 1900s until its closure in 1994, was at one time the world's largest lead mine. It was run by the Zambian government from the early 1970s when the mining industry was nationalised.     In a report published Friday, HRW said the town in the Copperbelt area still has extreme levels of contamination and children continue to be exposed to high levels of toxic lead in soil and dust around their homes, schools and play areas.

HRW's children's rights fellow and report author Joanna Naples-Mitchell described the situation in Kabwe as "a public health emergency" and said the government was "not responding with the sense of urgency that is warranted".    "The Zambian government is aware that Kabwe has been severely contaminated... since the 1990s and efforts to clean up have been inadequate," she told AFP.   A class action suit is being prepared to demand compensation for poisoning from Anglo American South Africa, a former investor in the mine, London-based law firm Leigh Day announced Friday. The law firm deals in human rights issues.   The case will be brought in courts in South Africa, where the mining firm is based, said the lawyers, who are acting on behalf of some 200 children who have been treated for lead poisoning.   Anglo American on Friday said in a statement it did not believe it was "in any way responsible for the current situation" in Kabwe.    "We were concerned to learn of the situation at Kabwe as reported by the press," it said, adding "the nationalisation more than 40 years ago effectively placed these issues under the control of the Zambian Government".

- 'Severely contaminated' -
The HRW report said that although lead and zinc mining have stopped in the town, various medical studies conducted over the past seven years show children there still had elevated levels of lead in their blood.   Between 2003 and 2011, the World Bank funded a government project to decontaminate Kabwe's affected townships, and to test and treat children. But some 76,000 people, or a third of the town's population, still live in contaminated areas.   One recent study published last year and cited by HRW estimated that more than 95 percent of children in the townships surrounding the lead mine have elevated blood lead levels and that about half of them require medical intervention.   "This is the worst environmental disaster I have seen in 30 years of practice," said lawyer Richard Meeran of Leigh Day.    Johannesburg-based collaborating lawyer Zanele Mbuyisa said they will argue that "the environmental damage created has potentially contaminated almost three generations of men, women and children".

- Insufficient resources -
Three years ago, the government launched another five-year World Bank-funded project to get rid of the lead and carry out new rounds of testing and treatment.   The project targets around 10,000 people including children, pregnant women and mothers.   "We think this a very important opportunity for the Zambian government to find a lasting solution to this problem," said Naples-Mitchell.   She urged Zambia to find new and effective methods to clean up the lead, adding that their 2018 study indicated that pollution levels were "as high they had been in the 1970s".    In a letter last month, the government indicated to HRW that it does not have enough resources to address the full scale of the contamination.   The government did not immediately comment on the report.   Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning since they absorb four to five times as much as an adult and this can retard their growth and IQ, while in worst cases it can result in brain damage or even death.
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 14:02:01 +0200 (METDST)

Khartoum, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - Rain and flash floods have killed 54 people in Sudan since the start of July and affected nearly 200,000, the United Nations said Friday.   The worst affected area is While Nile state in the south but Khartoum and other regions have also been affected.   "More than 37,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged," the UN said, quoting figures from the government body it partners with in the crisis response.   "Humanitarians are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods," it said, adding that most of the 54 recorded deaths were due to collapsed roofs and electrocution.

The floods are having a lasting humanitarian impact on communities, with cut roads, damaged water points, lost livestock and the spread of water-borne diseases by insects.   The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said an extra $150 million were needed from donors to respond to the floods, in addition to the $1.1 billion required for the overall humanitarian situation in Sudan.
Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2019 21:40:50 +0200 (METDST)

Warsaw, Aug 22, 2019 (AFP) - At least five people, including two children, were killed and more than 100 others were injured Thursday during a sudden thunderstorm in Poland and Slovakia's Tatra mountains, according to rescuers and officials.   Most of the victims were on the Polish side, where lightning struck a large metal cross on top of Mount Giewont and a metal chain near the summit, rescuers said. One person died in Slovakia.   "There were a lot of incidents involving lightning strikes today in the Tatras," Polish mountain rescue service chief Jan Krzysztof told Poland's PAP news agency.    "More than 100 people are injured," Poland's Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said after arriving in the nearby mountain resort town of Zakopane.

Rescuers believe many hikers were nearby when lightning struck the cross on Giewont's summit.   They had set out to climb Poland's highest mountains when the skies were clear earlier in the day.    "We heard that after (the) lightning struck, people fell... the current then continued along the chains securing the ascent, striking everyone along the way. It looked bad," Krzysztof said.    Lightning also struck on the nearby Czerwone Wierchy mountain massif, injuring a Portuguese citizen.
Date: Wed 21 Aug 2019
Source: Forbes [edited]

A Missouri county has imposed mandatory hepatitis A vaccinations for food handlers. Franklin County, Missouri, joins a handful of jurisdictions across the country with mandatory hepatitis A vaccine programs aimed at preventing further cases. This development is part of a larger trend aimed at expanding vaccinations for hepatitis A and addressing future outbreaks of the disease.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that can cause symptoms ranging from fever to jaundice and, in extreme cases, liver failure and death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the virus is most commonly spread in the USA via the fecal-oral route, meaning that a person unknowingly ingests something contaminated with the faeces of an infected person.

Hepatitis A is a particularly insidious virus, as an infected person is most contagious 2 weeks before symptoms develop, and those symptoms can take as long as 50 days after exposure to develop. Fortunately, hepatitis A is preventable by vaccine.

CDC is investigating outbreaks of hepatitis A across 29 states. According to CDC, 233 individuals have died from hepatitis A between 2016 and 2019 out of over 24 000 reported cases. Several states, including Kentucky, Florida, Ohio, and West Virginia, have seen thousands of cases.

In an effort to curb the increase in reported cases of hepatitis A, many local jurisdictions are considering mandatory hepatitis A vaccines for food service workers. For example, Missouri has reported 387 cases of hepatitis A in the past 2 years. Over 50 of these cases are from Franklin County, which has a population of about 100,000 residents. Franklin County officials have imposed mandatory vaccinations for individuals who handle food. Food establishments, including restaurants, have 90 days to ensure their employees are vaccinated. Nearby St Louis County, Missouri enacted a mandatory vaccine requirement nearly 20 years ago. Similar ordinances requiring vaccines for food service workers were enacted in Kentucky's Ashland and Boyd Counties in 2018.  [byline: Tommy Tobin]
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[A campaign to protect the patrons of restaurants from acquiring hepatitis A from the food as being done now in this county in Missouri is more than reasonable, as has been stated here previously. In addition to the recent outbreak of 23 cases of HAV linked to a New Jersey golf club (see alsos below), the following is an only partial list of recent reports of restaurant employees acquiring HAV:

Washington 16 Aug 2019
Hepatitis A forces Lynnwood restaurant to temporarily close

New York 16 August 2019
Confirmed case of hepatitis A in Platinum Pizza employee, vaccines to be made available to patrons

Florida 6 Aug 2019
Ocala restaurant employee infected with hepatitis A, officials say

Tennessee, Ohio 1 Aug 2019
National epidemic of hepatitis A outbreaks puts restaurant customers at risk

Mississippi 24 Jul 2019
Health officials investigating possible hepatitis A exposure at Mississippi restaurant

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Missouri, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/227>]
Date: Sun 18 Aug 2019
Source: Associated Press [edited]

Health officials in Las Vegas are using the word "outbreak" to describe a sharp spike in hepatitis A cases reported mostly among homeless people and drug users. The Southern Nevada Health District reported on Wednesday [14 Aug 2019] that from November [2018] to June [2019] it tallied 83 cases of the virus that causes liver damage and can lead to death.

That's far more than the 58 cases reported in 2016, 2017, and 2018, combined. The district says more than 80% of reported patients were people without a permanent place to live, and 92% use drugs, whether intravenous or not.

Clinical services chief Dr Fermin Leguen told the Las Vegas Review-Journal recently that the numbers are alarming. He noted that cases are being reported nationwide. Public health emergencies have been declared in cities including Miami and Philadelphia, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking outbreaks in 27 states. An outbreak of hepatitis A among homeless people in San Diego killed 20 in 2017.

Clark County officials announced in July 2019 that during a 2-day count in January 2019, almost 5300 people were tallied living on sidewalks, vacant lots, parks, and drainage tunnels in and around Las Vegas. That was down from about 6100 in 2017. The Southern Nevada Health District said the trend in hepatitis A cases has been upward: 6 reported cases in 2016; 13 cases in 2017; and 39 in 2018.

The Review-Journal accompanied a crisis intervention team visiting hepatitis A "hot spots" in Las Vegas to offer vaccine shots. The vaccine for the hepatitis A virus is effective soon after inoculation, although a 2nd dose is required after 6 months for full coverage.

Fuilala Riley, president of Help of Southern Nevada, told the newspaper that access to running water for people to wash their hands is important in preventing spread of the virus. Hepatitis A is most often transmitted through consumption of water or food contaminated with faeces.
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[Nevada has yet to be listed in the CDC site following this unnecessary outbreak.  As the number of cases continues to rise in a number of states, and news of smaller (so far) outbreaks occur in others, the question at the end of ProMED-mail post http://promedmail.org/post/20190104.6241686 by a Kentucky official -- "This is a disease of developing countries. One has to ask: Why are we seeing it in the USA?" -- is more and more relevant. We are seeing these outbreaks because of the inability to deal with marginalized populations in our midst. The dramatic cutbacks in public health infrastructure in some of these states clearly feed the fire of these outbreaks. They must be addressed by bolstering public health resources and education and directly addressing the needs of these marginalized populations. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Las Vegas, Nevada, United States:
Date: Wed 21 Aug 2019
Source: Bring Me the News [edited]

There have now been 69 people to have fallen sick from the _Escherichia coli_ outbreak at Lake Nokomis. Health officials put out an alert earlier this month [August 2019] after 3 children became sick with the bug after swimming at the lake, prompting the closure of both its beaches.

The Minnesota Department of Health said on Friday [16 Aug 2019] it had received 49 confirmed cases of _E. coli_-related illness since the outbreak, and on Tuesday [20 Aug 2019] revealed that this number had grown to 69. Those affected went swimming at the south Minneapolis lake between 16 Jul and 11 Aug 2019, with the Shiga-toxin producing _E. coli_ taking up to 16 days to show symptoms. [We generally consider 10 days to be the long end of the incubation period. - ProMED Mod.LL]

Both beaches at the lake have been closed and will remain that way for the rest of the season, as part of MDH's response to contain the outbreak. Of the total cases, 20% affected children aged 10 and younger. Fortunately, nobody has required hospitalization.

The Star Tribune reports that with other beach closures at Bde Maka Ska and Lake Hiawatha, among others, this summer, it is the most beach closures seen in the city since it started testing for bacteria in 2003. The MDH advises anyone showing symptoms of a Shiga-toxin _E. coli_ infection -- diarrhea (often bloody), stomach cramps, no or low-grade fever -- should see a healthcare provider.  [byline: Adam Uren]
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[This has become a substantial outbreak.  It is important to understand that there are many different kinds of _E. coli_. The organism is an important component of the human intestinal tract and can perform important functions helpful to its host. These strains can cause human infections if they "escape" from the usual location into the urinary tract, gall bladder, or abdominal cavity. They are also what are mentioned when a beach is closed for _E. coli_ contamination. In this circumstance, officials are measuring the organism or "coliforms" in the water to reflect human sewage contamination.

In addition, some strains of _E. coli_ can produce toxins that can induce diarrhea, and much of so-called travelers' diarrhea is caused by these strains. All of these strains are human bacteria, not zoonotic organisms, that is, not spread from animal hosts. One _E. coli_ group called Shiga toxin producing or enterohemorrhagic _E. coli_ (EHEC), the organism likely to be involved here, is zoonotic. Spread in a number of ways, including via undercooked ground beef, contaminated vegetables, and direct or direct contact with farm animals including contaminated water, EHEC can cause significant disease and even death.

In the spring of 2000, in Walkerton, a town of 5000 in southern Ontario, an outbreak of _E. coli_ O157:H7 infection claimed 7 lives -- 6 adults and a child -- and over 200 were seen at local area hospitals.

Swimming-associated transmission is illustrated in the following references:

1. Keene WE, McAnulty JM, Hoesly FC, et al. A swimming-associated outbreak of hemorrhagic colitis caused by _Escherichia coli_ O157:H7 and _Shigella sonnei_. N Engl J Med. 1994; 331(9): 579-84; available
2. CDC. Lake-associated outbreak of _E. coli_ O157:H7 - Illinois. MMWR 1996; 45(21): 437-9; available at
3. Ackman D, Marks S, Mack P, et al. Swimming-associated hemorrhagic colitis due to _Escherichia coli_ O157:H7 infection: evidence of prolonged contamination of a fresh water lake. Epidemiol Infect. 1997; 119:1-8; available at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Lake Nokomis, Minnesota, United States:
28 Jul 2019

As many as 13 have died while 6677 have been infected across Tanzania. In Dar es Salaam region alone, 6631 cases and 11 deaths have occurred.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Tanzania:
8 Aug 2019

Dengue-type1 outbreak was declared on the 27 Feb 2019 following a laboratory (NZLabPlus) confirmation of 7 dengue type 1 cases. From 28 Jan-4 Aug 2019, a cumulative number of 78 dengue cases have been reported (22 confirmed, and 56 probable-NS1Ag positives). Rarotonga and Aitutaki are the only islands affected and most of the cases have been from the main island of Rarotonga. Aitutaki has managed to contain its number of cases to 3. The last case was reported on 18 Apr 2019. A total of 42 cases have been hospitalised and given free mosquito nets to take and use at home. Apart from some severe cases, the hospitalisation was also an effort to contain and minimise the spread of the infection into the community. Unfortunately, some cases refused to be admitted but were given some health advice and mosquito precautionary measures. No deaths reported.

- Cook Islands. 17 Aug 2019. 78 dengue cases have been reported in Cook Islands since the outbreak began early in the year [2019]. The Cook Islands News reports the Ministry of Health saying 22 were confirmed cases while 56 have been deemed probable positives.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Cook Islands:
19 Aug 2019

358 indigenous cases and 2 imported cases of dengue 2 have been confirmed since the beginning of 2019, according to the latest Health Watch bulletin. Tahiti is still in an epidemic phase: all communes are affected except Mahaena, Pueu, and Teahupoo. In the islands, Bora-Bora is in epidemic phase (at least 3 cases without epidemiological link): Vaitape and Faanui are affected. Moorea is in an epidemic phase: The communes of Afareaitu, Haapiti, and Paopao are affected. Six islands are in the alert phase: Nuku-Hiva (Taiohae), Fakarava, Raiatea, Rangiroa, Huahine, and Hiva Oa (Atuona). Since dengue type 2 has not circulated in the country since the year 2000, the population is poorly immunized, and the epidemic may be large. People under 20 or arriving in French Polynesia after 2000 are most at risk of becoming infected.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of French Polynesia: