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Cape Verde

General
The Cape Verde islands are situated off the west coast of Africa (adjacent to Senegal) and are becoming a more popular destination for European travellers aiming to avoid the major busy tourist destinations of the world. There are nine inhabi
ed islands within the group and also some uninhabited volcanic ones. The capital is Praia (on Santiago) and Portugese is the official language. The major port is Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente.

Travelling to Cape Verde
There is a recently opened international airport in Praia and a second international airport (Amilcar Cabral) located on Sal Island which is about 150 kms northeast of the capital. Generally the facilities for tourists are still quite limited though improving and most developed on Sal.
Arriving in Cape Verde
The climate is oceanic tropical with temperatures varying from 20oC to 30oC throughout the year. The light rainfall tends to occur in Aug to November. During this time humidity can be higher but this is not usually a significant factor.
Food & Water
In line with many hotter regions of the world the level of food and water hygiene varies greatly from area to area and depending on the establishment. Travellers are advised to eat freshly cooked hot food, to avoid cold meals (salads etc) and particularly to avoid any undercooked bivalve shellfish meals (clams, mussels, oysters etc). Fresh milk may be unpasteurised and should be avoided.
Travelling around the islands
As with many archipelago destinations there is a way of moving from island to island if you wish to explore. This can be by boat or plane in many but not all cases. However if travelling by plane be aware that the limited baggage handling capacity of the small planes may lead to some delay in eventually receiving your luggage. During the dry dusty season (December to April) flights may be cancelled due to poor visibility. The road traffic moves on the right and seatbelts are compulsory for all in the front seat. Motorcyclists must wear helmets and have their lights on at all times.

Accidents
The majority of accidents occur because of unlit narrow winding roads, aggressive driving and alcohol impairing the senses. There are a large number of festivals and around these times alcohol intake increases considerably with the resultant increase in danger for all road users.
Emergency numbers
The emergency numbers are 130 for medical assistance, 131 for fire assistance and 132 for the police. There is no organised roadside assistance and travellers are strongly advised to avoid hiring cars or motorbikes. Taxis and buses provide a reasonable service and are a much safer option.
Sun Exposure & Dehydration
Many travellers from Europe will enjoy the beautiful climate to excess and run the risk of severe sunburn and dehydration. This is particularly true for the first 24 to 48 hours after arrival (when the traveller may fall asleep under the glaring sun) and also for young children. Sensible covering, avoiding the midday sun and replacing lost fluids and salt are essential to maintain your health.
Swimming and Water Sports
Island life in the tropics tends to increase the amount of water exposure for many tourists. It is important to check out the facilities (both the professionalism of their personnel and the equipment) before undertaking any water sports. Talk to others who have already taken part or your holiday representative and listen to their experiences. This will help you make the right choices. Remember the tides and currents around the various islands can be very strong so always follow local advice and never swim alone. Watch children carefully.
Mosquitoes and Malaria
This island chain has only a few species of mosquitoes and the risk of malaria is thought to be negligible. WHO (2006) does not recommend prophylaxis for travellers but comments that there is a mild risk on Santiago mainly between August and November during the rainy season. Good repellents should be used by all travellers - especially at dusk and dawn.
Safety & Security
Unfortunately there is no idyllic destination throughout the world and petty crime occurs in Cape Verde as elsewhere. Take special care at festivals and in market places. Don't flaunt your personal wealth while out and about. Gangs of children have been involved in attacks against tourists so avoid any potential confrontation.
Contacts
U.S. Embassy: Rua Abilio m. Macedo 81, Praia Tel.: 238-61-56-16/17; Fax: 238-61-13-55; Web: usembassy.state.gov/praia
U.K. Embassy: Shell Cabo Verde, Sarl, Av Amilcar Cabral CP4, Sao Vincente
Tel.: 238-32-66-25/26/27; Fax: 238-32-66-29; E-mail: antonio.a.canuto@scv.sims.com
Vaccines
Travelling directly from Europe there are no essential vaccines for entering Cape Verde. It is a Yellow fever risk region but there have been no cases for many years. Other vaccines need to be considered against food and water borne diseases such as Hepatitis A & Typhoid.
Healthcare
This is a beautiful destination and direct flight will increase the numbers travelling. However all travellers to Cape Verde will need to be seen for a detailed medical consultation to ensure that they have appropriate advice and protection for their individual trip. Further information on health issues and all the latest world travel news reports are available at www.tmb.ie

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:16:53 +0100 (MET)

Praia, Cape Verde, March 24, 2020 (AFP) - A 62-year-old British man has died in Cape Verde after contracting COVID-19, the government said Tuesday, marking the West African archipelago's first fatality from the disease.   The man arrived on the island of Boavista -- a tourist hotspot and one of Cape Verde's 10 islands -- on March 9, and began showing symptoms a week later.     His condition "began to worsen, and unfortunately he died on Monday evening," Health Minister Arlindo do Rosario said Tuesday.

All staff at the hotel where the man was staying are now in confinement, according to the authorities.   The British tourist was the first coronavirus case to be detected in the former Portuguese colony.    Authorities have detected two other cases on Boavista: one in a friend of the British tourist, the other in a 60-year-old Dutch tourist, whose case is considered worrying.
Date: Fri, 3 May 2019 12:24:17 +0200
By Anne-Sophie FAIVRE LE CADRE

Cha das Caldeiras, Cape Verde, May 3, 2019 (AFP) - Four years after the volcano erupted -- razing everything in its path in Cape Verde's Cha das Caldeiras valley -- the floor tiles of the small, rebuilt inn are warm to the touch.    "We constructed too quickly on lava that had not yet cooled down," says hotel owner Marisa Lopes, in her early 30s.   "For the first months, the floors in the rooms were so hot that you couldn't walk on them with bare feet."

Lopes is one of dozens of entrepreneurs locked in a perpetual tug of war with the Pico do Fogo volcano towering over Cha das Caldeiras, whose population numbers 500.    The name means Peak of Fire in Portuguese.   The volcano generates the bulk of the crater community's gross domestic product, attracting some 5,000 tourists every year who need hotel beds, food and tour guides -- about 30 make a living as guides in this remote part of West Africa.   But on the downside, the festering giant erupts once a generation -- six times in the last 200 years -- destroying everything in its path; crops, homes, roads.   On November 23, 2014, Lopes watched helplessly as the Pico -- almost 2,900 metres (9,500 feet) high -- erupted after a 19-year slumber.

Lava engulfed her brand new tourist hostel, eponymously named Casa Marisa.   Three months later, she built a new one, again in the flow zone of the crater.   "The volcano took a house from me, but it gave me another. Without it, there would be no tourism," she told AFP, undeterred.   Despite the constant danger and government efforts to dissuade them, the inhabitants of Cha das Caldeiras keep coming back.     After the last eruption, the military evacuated those in the path of the lava and the state provided food aid for six months afterwards.   But it was the people themselves who reconstructed roads and found the materials for rebuilding homes and hotels. Again.

- 'It's home' -
Cicilio Montrond, 42, was also there in 2014, looking on as a river of molten rock spewing from the Pico do Fogo burnt his fruit trees and buried everything he owned in a thick, grey coat.   The eruption killed no one, but left 1,500 people homeless.   After a few weeks in Sao Filipe, a nearby town to where the valley inhabitants were relocated, Montrond returned to Cha das Caldeiras with his wife.   Not a bird stirred in the air still polluted with ash, not a creature moved on the still warm lava ocean that now covered the valley floor.

For weeks, Montrond and his wife lived in a tent on the roof of their destroyed house with no water, no electricity and no food apart from a few canned goods.   "We lived in makeshift shelters, it was precarious, dangerous. But we were home."   For Montrond, it is unimaginable to live anywhere else than the fertile, lava-fed valley that, between outbursts, boasts an abundance of vines, fig trees and cassava.   "It is the volcano that allows us to live," said Montrond, tourist guide-turned-hotelkeeper and restaurateur.   The Pico's eruptions are rarely deadly in terms of human life.   But what about the next time?   "The volcano is my life," Montrond shrugged, as he gazed upon the house he built with his own hands.    "I was born here, I will die here."

- Rocks were falling -
The volcano gives. The volcano takes.   First it destroys the vines, then it provides fruitful soil for the planting of new ones. These produce wines -- some of it for the export market.   Far from fearing or despising the peak's constant threatening presence, the inhabitants appear to embrace it and have made it part of their identity.   They evoke past eruptions with a smile, sometimes even a touch of nostalgia.   Margarita Lopes Dos Santos, 99, has been forced out of her home by the three last eruptions of the Pico do Fogo.

The first was in June 1951, shortly after she gave birth to her first child.   "I remember the first time like it was yesterday," she said, through a beaming, toothless smile.   "It was a lot more violent. Rocks were falling from the sky. There were tornadoes of ash and of smoke," she recounted, while husking beans.   Outside her house, Lopes Dos Santos has planted flowers -- flashes of red begonias that provide the only colour in the grey and black landscape.   "The resilience of the people of Cha is extraordinary," said Jorge Nogueira, president of the municipal council of Sao Filipe, capital of the island of Fogo, Cape Verde.   "As soon as they could, they came back -- to poor living conditions, but no matter: the only thing that counted for them was to be home."
Date: Tue 3 Oct 2017
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

In a follow-up on the locally transmitted malaria increases reported on Cabo Verde [Cape Verde] this year [2017], 254 indigenous cases were reported through [24 Sep 2017].

Most cases (75 percent) have not sought treatment until 48-96 hours after illness onset. Despite this, case fatality rates have remained low (0.4 percent), with one death reported in an indigenous case to date. 7 severe malaria cases and 2 cases of malaria in pregnancy have been reported. There are also anecdotal reports of recrudescence.

To date, the disease has been localized to the city of Praia on Santiago Island without any further spread.

A handful of cases have also been detected on neighbouring islands (Sao Vicente, Sal, and Porto Novo); however, their infections were likely all acquired during travel to Praia or overseas, with no evidence of onward local transmission.

The malaria epidemic in Cabo Verde has begun to show early signs of improvement but the situation remains tenuous, with heavy rainfall continuing between August and October, health officials said.
===================
[The last news from ProMED from 4 Sep 2017 (archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20170904.5293108) reported 116 cases of malaria in Praia. Thus, over the last month 136 new cases have been diagnosed. It is good news that the outbreak has not spread, showing that the control measures are working. Due to the present outbreak, the CDC is now recommending malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers visiting the city of Praia on Santiago Island (<https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/new_info/2017/Cape_Verde_2017.html>). - ProMED Mod.EP]

[Maps of Cape Verde can be seen at
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6553>. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]

08 Sep 2017


Following an increase in malaria cases, additional malaria prevention advice for some UK travellers to the capital city of Praia in Cape Verde is recommended.

Since June 2017, the Ministry of Heath for Cape Verde has reported an increase in locally acquired malaria cases in the capital city of Praia on the island of Santiago. As of 5 September 2017, a total of 164 locally acquired falciparum malaria cases have been reported in the local population [2][3]. Currently, there are no reports of malaria in tourists who have visited Cape Verde in 2017.  

Those travelling to Praia who are at increased risk of malaria e.g. long term travellers, or those at risk of severe complications from malaria: pregnant women, infants and young children, the elderly and travellers who do not have a functioning spleen, should consider taking anti-malarials and seek advice about which antimalarial is suitable for them from their travel health advisor.

Date: Sun 3 Sep 2017 08:58:00 WEST
Source: The Portugal News (TPN) Online [edited]
<http://theportugalnews.com/news/portugal-health-department-issues-malaria-warning-for-cape-verde-capital/43059

The Portuguese health department has advised pregnant women not to travel to the Cape Verde island of Santiago [where the capital, Praia, is located], and if travellers cannot put their journey off, they should take anti-malaria drugs.

The health department warning comes after the World Health Organisation (WHO) said in August [2017] that there was an outbreak of malaria in Praia, the archipelago's capital. Travellers are also advised that adults and children should use insect repellent throughout the day and reapply it as often as necessary. If travellers also use sun cream, they should apply the insect repellent on top of the sun cream, not under it, the warning said. So far, there have been 116 cases of malaria in Praia, numbers never before seen in the city, where the highest number was 95 cases in the whole of 2001.
============
[The Cape Verde authorities reported 45 cases of malaria up to 30 Jul 2017 (see archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20170808.5236283).

The outbreak continues and it is important to introduce identification and spraying of breeding sites. Also using a single dose of primaquine after treatment, which kills gametocytes, to ensure that the cases cannot transmit the infection, as recommended by the WHO (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/atoz/who_pq_policy_recommendation/en/). - ProMED Mod.EP

Maps of Cape Verde can be seen at
<http://www.nationsonline.org/maps/Cape-Verde-Map.jpg>
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/15>. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Thu, 9 Apr 2020 07:30:18 +0200 (METDST)
By Mary Lyn Fonua

Nuku'alofa, Tonga, April 9, 2020 (AFP) - A resurgent Tropical Cyclone Harold flattened tourist resorts in Tonga Thursday, extending a week-long trail of destruction across four South Pacific island nations that has claimed more than two dozen lives.   The cyclone gathered pace as it bore down on the tiny island kingdom, which declared a state of emergency, warning residents to seek shelter from destructive winds and massive sea surges.

By early Thursday it had again become a scale-topping Category Five superstorm -- surprising meteorologists after signs earlier in the week that its intensity was dropping.   Packing winds of up to 260 kilometres per hour (160 miles per hour), it cut power in parts of the country and police said at least three tourist resorts north of the capital Nuku'alofa had been reduced to rubble.

The cyclone killed 27 people in the Solomons late last week before barrelling southeast to directly hit Vanuatu as a Category Five, obliterating entire towns in the northern provinces.   There have been no reports of deaths in Vanuatu, Fiji or Tonga, with emergency workers saying residents in the hardest hit areas took shelter early.   "It appears that many buildings and crops have been destroyed and some people in the most affected areas have lost everything," Red Cross Vanuatu secretary general Jacqueline de Gaillande said.

Harold weakened slightly to a still-formidable Category Four as it lashed Fiji on Wednesday but hopes the storm was dissipating were dashed as it regathered momentum heading towards Tonga.   "It's been a tricky one to predict," meteorologist Bill Singh from New Zealand's Metservice told AFP.   "We knew the track it was going to take but initially everyone thought it was just going to be Cat 3 or 4, but as it progressed over open warm waters it deepened."

- Closed borders -
The storm is expected to head away from Tonga onto the open ocean late Thursday but WeatherWatch.co.nz head forecaster Philip Duncan said there were no certainties.   "It's almost unheard of to see a cyclone tracking south away from the equator, weakening, then suddenly returning back to Cat 5 so far south," he said.

The COVID-19 pandemic has complicated disaster relief efforts, with Vanuatu reluctant to open its international borders as it seeks to remain one of the few countries without any confirmed virus cases.   "No foreign personnel are being brought to Vanuatu for response efforts at the present time, this will be an internally run operation," Vanuatu's National Disaster Management Office said.

Fiji has 15 virus cases and Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama said the virus and cyclone meant "our economy and our people have been dealt two body blows to start the year".   "This storm must not compromise our coronavirus containment efforts, lest we risk damage far more painful than the aftermath of any cyclone," he said.

Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne said an air force plane carrying essential supplies such as tents and water containers was on its way to Vanuatu, while assistance had also been offered to other impacted nations.   "We are acutely conscious that this comes on top of the impact and difficulties created by COVID-19 for those countries," she said.   Vanuatu said any supplies that came into the country would be handled with protective equipment and the air crews delivering them would be isolated in transit areas.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 18:07:06 +0200 (METDST)

London, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Britain on Wednesday reported a record 938 new COVID-19 deaths in its daily update, 152 more than its previous highest toll, as the total number of deaths passed 7,000.    "As of 5pm on 7 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 7,097 have sadly died," the health ministry tweeted, up from 6,159 on Tuesday.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 16:50:53 +0200 (METDST)
By Sofia CHRISTENSEN

Johannesburg, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - A pride of lions flops lazily across a track at a South African game reserve, enjoying newfound tranquility since last month's closure of all national parks to support an anti-coronavirus lockdown.   Rather than the usual Land Rover, a lone elephant rumbles down the road, causing the felines to scatter into the surrounding bush.   A vehicle stands in the background, live streaming the scene for thousands of people watching the animals from the comfort of their homes.   "Since the lockdown occurred we have seen an amazing explosion in our audience," said Graham Wallington, head of a live safari broadcaster called WildEarth.

As the number of viewers tripled over the last days of March, Wallington noted that the audience -- typically American -- was increasingly from South Africa.   "It just happened overnight because all these kids at home with their families are watching these live safaris," he told AFP.   South Africa is almost two weeks into a 21-day lockdown meant to halt the spread of COVID-19.   The country is the worst-affected in Africa, with more than 1,700 infections recorded so far, including 13 deaths.

WildEarth operates from two vehicles in two private game reserves bordering the internationally famous Kruger National Park.   Guides take viewers along for a virtual game drive, finding wildlife and sharing facts about animals encountered along the way.   The cameras are positioned at the back of the vehicles, where passengers would usually be seated, in order to create a real-life experience.   "There it is," guide James Hendry whispered excitedly to the camera after stumbling across a mother hyena and her newborn cubs.   "Tell me, have you ever seen anything that cute in your life before?"   Participants can also send questions to the guides as they go along.

- Rare species emerge -
"You want to know how much water an elephant drinks in a day?" asked ranger Trishala Naidoo, as she drove along a bumpy bush track.   "Around 100 litres if not more," she answered, before pulling over to show viewers a leopard tortoise crossing the road.   Aside from providing entertainment, Wallington believes virtual safaris are an opportunity to observe how wildlife behave in the absence of tourists.   "It's kind of an interesting time where the animals are being left alone," Wallington said, adding that rare species such as the endangered African wild dogs had started venturing into his areas.   "Wild dogs coming in and hunting almost every day... is unheard of," he exclaimed.    "It's because there is no one else there and they've got the run of the place for themselves."
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 16:44:56 +0200 (METDST)

Monrovia, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Liberian President George Weah declared a state of emergency in the West African country on Wednesday, with the capital Monrovia set to go into lockdown in a bid to curb coronavirus.    In a televised statement, the president said that all movement between Liberia's 15 counties would be banned from 11:59 pm on Friday, and that all non-essential businesses and government offices would close.

Residents of four counties -- including Monrovia's, which is home to about 1 million people -- must also stay at home for two weeks, he said.    Authorities in those counties will allow people to leave their homes only to buy food or for health reasons.     "We have to ask ourselves why we should abide by these measures. The answer is simple: to save lives," Weah said.

Wednesday's announcement escalates earlier health measures which banned large gatherings as well as flights to and from virus-stricken countries.   As with other poor countries in the region, there are fears that Liberia is ill prepared to handle a large outbreak.

The nation of some 4.8 million has recorded 13 coronavirus cases to date, with three deaths.  But Liberia was badly hit during the West Africa's 2014-16 Ebola crisis, which killed more than 4,800 people in the country.    Weah warned that the coronavirus was the greatest threat facing Liberia since Ebola.    "The horrific scenarios that are beginning to emerge should serve as sufficient warning for every one of us to spring into action," he said.   Coronavirus "has already arrived in Liberia, and confirmed cases are now on the rise," Weah added.   Decimated after back-to-back civil wars from 1989 to 2003, Liberia also suffers economic woes including rampant inflation and fuel shortages.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 16:42:52 +0200 (METDST)

Cairo, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Egypt will extend a nationwide night-time curfew by a further two weeks in a bid to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouli said on Wednesday.   He told a news conference the measure would be enforced from 8:00 pm (1800 GMT) to 6:00 am and run until April 23.   The curfew would start an hour later, he said, to avoid overcrowding in public transport.   Schools and universities, as well as restaurants and cafes would also remain closed until then, while food outlets would be allowed to offer delivery services only.   To stem the spread of the coronavirus, authorities have also halted air traffic until the end of the month and closed tourist and religious sites.

Penalties against violators including fines of up to 4,000 Egyptian pounds (just over $250) and even prison, the prime minister said.  Madbouli also announced that cabinet members will take a 20 percent salary cut for three months, and allocate that sum to underprivileged Egyptians.   Egypt's health ministry has so far declared 94 fatalities out of 1,450 confirmed cases of COVID-19.   Authorities have in recent weeks carried out sweeping disinfection operations at archaeological sites, museums and other sites across the country.   In tandem, strict social distancing measures were imposed to reduce the risk of contagion among the country's 100 million inhabitants.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 15:46:57 +0200 (METDST)

Beirut, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Millions in Lebanon risk food insecurity due to a coronavirus lockdown unless the government provides urgent assistance, Human Rights Watch warned Wednesday.   Lebanon in mid-March ordered residents to stay at home and all non-essential businesses to close to halt the spread of COVID-19, which has officially infected 575 people and killed 19 nationwide.   Before the pandemic erupted, Lebanon was struggling with its worst economic crisis in decades, with 45 percent of the population facing poverty according to official estimates.   Lockdown measures to slow the spread of the virus have made matters worse with "millions of Lebanon's residents... at risk of going hungry", HRW said in a statement.

Lebanon is home to 4.5 million people, and also hosts around 1.5 million Syrians who have fled the nine-year war next door, most of whom rely on aid to survive.   "The lockdown... has compounded the poverty and economic hardship rampant in Lebanon before the virus arrived," said HRW senior researcher Lena Simet.    "Many people who had an income have lost it, and if the government does not step in, more than half the population may not be able to afford food and basic necessities."

The economic crisis since last year had already caused many people to lose their jobs or take salary cuts, and stay-at-home measures to counter the virus have now prevented even more from earning a wage.   Media has carried reports of a taxi driver who set his car on fire after security forces fined him for breaking the lockdown rules.   And an unemployed Lebanese construction worker unable to afford rent offered to sell his kidney, in an image widely shared online.   HRW Lebanon researcher Aya Majzoub said many families are struggling due to a lack of savings.

The government has said it will pay out 400,000 Lebanese pounds (less than $150 at the market rate) to the most vulnerable.   HRW said the government should also consider suspending rent and mortgage payments throughout the lockdown.   Majzoub said Syrian refugees were also affected.   "Many of them were seasonal workers -- they worked in agriculture, they worked in the service industry -- and they're not able to do that anymore," she said.   But their ability to cope will depend largely on international aid, as before the pandemic.

The World Bank last week said it had re-allocated $40 million from its support to Lebanon's health sector to fight the virus, including for tests and ventilators.   And it has also been discussing "assistance to help mitigate the impact of the economic and financial crisis on the poor through emergency social safety nets", World Bank spokeswoman Zeina El-Khalil told AFP in March.    On Monday, Lebanon's President Michel Aoun urged the international community to provide financial assistance to back economic reforms.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 15:13:03 +0200 (METDST)

Dublin, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Irish police set up nationwide traffic checkpoints on Wednesday, armed with new powers to enforce a lockdown designed to stem the spread of the coronavirus.   Emergency legislation passed in the Irish parliament two weeks ago allows the government to curb non-essential travel during the crisis.

People violating the ban risk a fine of up to 2,500 euros ($2,700) and/or six months in prison.   "The regulations now are in effect," Garda -- Irish police -- commissioner Drew Harris said at a press conference.   "People only should be moving if they have an essential reason to move throughout country. What we'll be doing is making sure that movement is essential."

Over 2,500 officers will be involved in the operation at any one time as it runs from noon Wednesday until midnight on Sunday, with an extension possible.   "It will involve thousands of checkpoints every day," police said in a statement. The roadblocks have been put in place ahead of Easter holidays, traditionally used as an occasion for travel in Ireland.

Harris said nationwide compliance with the ban on movement -- which allows for exercise within two kilometres of home -- had been strong.   But there is a "small minority and perhaps... an increasing number" in breach of the government order.   There have been 210 COVID-19 related deaths and 5,709 confirmed cases of the virus in Ireland according to health department figures released Tuesday.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 13:24:23 +0200 (METDST)

Tehran, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Iran on Wednesday reported 121 new deaths from the novel coronavirus, bringing its overall number of fatalities to 3,993.   In the past 24 hours, 1,997 new cases of COVID-19 infection were detected in Iran, state news agency IRNA quoted health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour as saying.   That put the number of confirmed cases at 64,586, he added.

Iran, which announced its first COVID-19 cases on February 19, is by far the worst hit by the pandemic in the Middle East, according to official tolls.   But there has been speculation abroad that the real number of deaths and infections in the country could be higher.   Jahanpour said that while 3,956 patients were in critical condition, those who recovered had reached 29,812.   The spokesman added that Iran had carried out 220,975 COVID-19 tests to date, according to IRNA.   In a bid to halt COVID-19, Iran has ordered the closure of non-essential businesses and imposed inter-city travel bans, while refraining from a lockdown.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said a "second wave" of the fight against the coronavirus would start from Saturday, and that it would be more difficult.   "Low-risk" businesses would be allowed to reopen from Saturday, he said, because "we want to continue economic activities as much as possible while fighting coronavirus at the same time".   The decision to reopen businesses has drawn criticism from health experts and even some government officials.   But Rouhani said "there is no other way".
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 13:14:26 +0200 (METDST)
By Robbie COREY-BOULET

Addis Ababa, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Ethiopia on Wednesday declared a state of emergency to fight the coronavirus pandemic, which has so far infected 55 people and resulted in two deaths there.    It is the first state of emergency announced under Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who came to power in 2018 and won last year's Nobel Peace Prize in part for expanding political freedoms in the authoritarian nation.    "Because the coronavirus pandemic is getting worse, the Ethiopian government has decided to declare a state of emergency under Article 93 of the constitution," Abiy said in a statement.     "I call upon everybody to stand in line with government bodies and others that are trying to overcome this problem," he added, warning of "grave legal measures" against anyone who undermines the fight against the pandemic.

It was not immediately clear how the state of emergency would affect day-to-day life in Ethiopia.   The government has so far refrained from imposing a lockdown similar to those in effect elsewhere in the region, including in Rwanda, Uganda and Mauritius.

According to the country's constitution, under a state of emergency the Council of Ministers has "all necessary power to protect the country's peace and sovereignty" and can suspend some "political and democratic rights".    The constitution also says lawmakers need to approve a state of emergency, which can last for six months and be extended every four months after that.

Wednesday's decree is likely to "beef up security operations with a greater role for the ederal government, including the military," said William Davison, Ethiopia analyst for the International Crisis Group, a conflict-prevention organisation.    "While this approach is understandable given the situation, it is critical that there is transparency over the government's extra powers and that there is adequate monitoring of implementation," Davison said.

-Opposition challenges move-
Since reporting its first COVID-19 case on March 13, Ethiopia has closed land borders and schools, freed thousands of prisoners to ease overcrowding, sprayed main streets in the capital with disinfectant, and discouraged large gatherings.    But Abiy said over the weekend that a harsher lockdown would be unrealistic given that there are "many citizens who don't have homes" and "even those who have homes have to make ends meet daily."    Jawar Mohammed, a leading opposition politician, said Wednesday this called into question why a state of emergency was necessary.   "Officials have been saying the country is too poor to stop population movement. So why do you need a state of emergency if you are not planning to impose stricter rules?" Jawar told AFP.

During consultations with Abiy earlier this week, the opposition Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) voiced worries that a state of emergency would lead to human rights abuses -- a well-documented problem under previous states of emergency imposed during several years of anti-government protests that swept Abiy to power.    "We explained our concern that the state of emergency has been initiated several times and it has been abused to violate the rights of citizens and other political activists," OLF chairman Dawud Ibsa told AFP.   It's also unclear how the state of emergency might affect planning for hotly-anticipated general elections in Ethiopia.

The country's electoral board announced last week that voting planned for August would need to be postponed because of the pandemic.    It did not provide a timeline for when the elections would ultimately be held, and lawmakers' constitutional mandates expire in October.   Davison, with the International Crisis Group, said the state of emergency could be used "to formally postpone elections" past that deadline, though such a move risks sparking opposition backlash.    "It is therefore essential that the government works with opposition parties on managing this constitutionally sensitive period and making new electoral arrangements," Davison said.
Date: Wed, 8 Apr 2020 13:08:25 +0200 (METDST)

Madrid, April 8, 2020 (AFP) - Spain recorded Wednesday a second successive daily rise in coronavirus-related deaths with 757 fatalities, lifting the total toll in Europe's second-hardest-hit country after Italy by 5.5 percent to 14,555.   The number of new infections rose by 4.4 percent to 146,690, the health ministry said, as Spain has ramped up its testing for the disease.   The number of daily deaths, which peaked on Thursday at 950, rose for the first time on Tuesday after falling for four straight days.

But the rate of increase in both deaths and new infections on Wednesday was largely in line with that recorded the previous day, and half of what was recorded just a week ago.   "We have consolidated the slowdown in the spread of the virus," Health Minister Salvador Illa tweeted after the latest figures were published.   The Spanish government on March 14 imposed one of the toughest lockdowns in Europe to curb the spread of the virus, with people allowed out of their homes only to work, buy food and seek medical care.

The pandemic has stretched the country's public healthcare system close to breaking point, with a shortage of intensive care beds and equipments, but in recent days hospitals have said the situation has improved.   "We have observed a de-escalation at this hospital in particular, and I believe at all hospitals," the spokesman for the Hospital Severo Ochoa in Leganes near Madrid, Jorge Rivera, told AFP.   "We can't let down our guard, emergency services are now working below their full capacity and are working well, they are not saturated and overcrowded but it does not mean that we can relax and go to the emergency ward because you have an ailment."