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Germany

Germany US Consular Information Sheet
December 08, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Germany is a modern and stable democracy. Tourist facilities are highly developed. In larger towns, many people can communicate in English.
Read the Departme
t of State Background Notes on Germany for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: Germany is a party to the Schengen Agreement. As such, U.S. citizens may enter Germany for up to 90 days for tourist or business purposes without a visa. The passport should be valid for at least three months beyond the period of stay. For further details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our fact sheet. Further information on entry, visa and passport requirements may be obtained from the German Embassy at 4645 Reservoir Road N.W., Washington, D.C. 20007, telephone (202) 298-4000, web site: http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/Startseite.html, or the German Consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, or San Francisco. Passengers transiting Germany en route to other countries should ensure that they are aware of and in compliance with the entry requirements for their final destinations as individuals not presenting appropriate documentation for their destination may be denied boarding on connecting flights.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.
For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information Sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
German authorities remain vigilant in combating the threat posed by foreign and resident extremists. Specific threats have been uncovered and persecutions undertaken, though Germany itself has been largely free of terror incidents. However, like other countries in the Schengen area, Germany’s open borders with its European neighbors allow the possibility of dangerous individuals entering/exiting the country with anonymity. Germany regularly experiences demonstrations on a variety of political and economic themes. Prior police approval is required for public demonstrations, and police oversight is routinely provided for participants and passersby. Nonetheless, these demonstrations can attract counter-demonstrators and have the potential to turn violent. In addition, hooligans, most often young intoxicated “skinheads” have been known to harass or even attack people whom they believe to be foreigners or members of rival groups. On occasion, American have reported that they were assaulted for racial reasons or because they appeared “foreign.” All Americans are cautioned to avoid the area around protests and demonstrations and to check local media for updates on the situation.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Alerts, including the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:
Violent crime is rare in Germany- but can occur, especially in larger cities or high-risk areas such as train stations. Most incidents of street crime consist of theft of unattended items and pick-pocketing. There have been a few reports of aggravated assault against U.S. citizens in higher-risk urban areas. American travelers are advised to take the same precautions against becoming crime victims as they would in any American city.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy or Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. For more information on possible U.S. sources of assistance, see our information on Victims of Crime.

The local equivalent to the 911 emergency line in Germany is 112.
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Good medical care is widely available. Doctors and hospitals may expect immediate payment in cash for health services from tourists and persons with no permanent address in Germany. Most doctors, hospitals and pharmacies do not accept credit .

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. U.S. military facilities in Germany will not provide treatment to private American citizens who are not affiliated with the Department of Defense.

Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Germany is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance. Individuals holding U.S. driver’s licenses may drive in Germany for up to six months without acquiring a German driver’s license.

Road conditions in general are excellent, although caution should be exercised while traveling on older roads in eastern Germany. The high speed permitted on the German autobahn, weather, and unfamiliar road markings can pose significant hazards, and driver error is a leading cause of accidents involving American motorists in Germany. Rules on right-of-way differ significantly from the U.S.
Notice should be taken that it is generally illegal in Germany to pass vehicles from the right and that the threshold for determining whether a person has been driving under the influence of alcohol is lower than in some U.S. states.

Many German streets and sidewalks have dedicated bike lanes for use by bicyclists. Pedestrians should be aware that bicycles have priority use of these lanes and should be careful to observe whether any bicyclist is approaching before crossing or stepping into the bike lane. Bicyclists also have priority over cars turning onto side streets, and motorists should always confirm whether a bicyclist is approaching from either direction before attempting to enter side streets, even when the light is in their favor. Motorists turning into a side street who hit a bicyclist who is using a marked bike lane will be held responsible for any injury or damage caused.
The use of cell phones while driving is prohibited in Germany. For specific information on travel within Germany contact the German National Tourist Board Office in New York at (212) 661-7200, fax (212) 661-7174 or via the Internet at http://www.germany-tourism.de/
Travelers should also note that railroad crossings are marked differently in Germany than in the U.S. There have been several accidents involving Americans in recent years at railroad crossings. In addition to the standard crossbuck (X-shaped) sign, railroad crossings are often marked by signal lights. Signal lights at a railroad crossing means that a train is approaching and that all vehicles should stop.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for information. Visit the website of the country’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety at http://www.germany-tourism.de/
AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Germany’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Germany’s air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Germany’s customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Germany of certain items such as firearms, military artifacts (particularly those pertaining to the Second World War), antiques, medications/pharmaceuticals and business equipment. Under German law it is also illegal to bring into or take out of Germany literature, music CDs, or other paraphernalia that glorifies fascism, the Nazi past of the former “Third Reich.” It is advisable to contact the German Embassy in Washington or one of the German consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs) are widely available throughout Germany. They utilize many of the same account networks that are found in the U.S., so it is possible in most cases to get euros directly from your U.S. bank while you are in Germany without paying any inordinate fees for currency exchange. Credit cards are not accepted as widely as in the United States. Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating German laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Germany are strict and convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.
CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
American citizen parents have at times encountered difficulties having visitation orders enforced in Germany. For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION/EMBASSY AND CONSULATE LOCATIONS:
Americans living or traveling in Germany are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy of Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site, https://travelregistration.state.gov/, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Germany.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

U.S. Consular Sections are located at:
Berlin: Clayallee 170;
Tel: (49) (30)832-9233; Fax: (49) (30) 8305-1215
American Citizen Services Email: ACSBerlin@state.gov
Frankfurt: Giessner Str. 30,
Tel. (49) (69) 75350; Fax: (49) (69) 7535-2304.
American Citizen Services Email:GermanyACS@state.gov
Passport Inquiries Email: FrankfurtPassports@state.gov
Leipzig: Wilhelm-Seyfferth-Strasse 4,
Tel. (49) (341) 213-8418; Fax: (49) (341) 2138417 (emergency service only).

Munich: Koenigstrasse 5,
Tel. (49) (89) 2888-0; Fax: (49) (89) 280-9998.
American Citizen Services Email: ConsMunich@state.gov
There is also a U.S. consular agency in Bremen at Bremen World Trade Center,
Birkenstrasse 15,
Tel: (49) (421) 301-5860; Fax: (49) (421) 301-5861.

When calling another city from within Germany, dial a zero before the city code (for example, when calling Berlin from Munich, the city code for Berlin is 030).
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This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated April 23, 2008 to update information on Entry Requirements, Safety and Security and Medical Insurance.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 2020 17:54:48 +0100 (MET)

Berlin, March 22, 2020 (AFP) - German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Sunday that gatherings of more than two people will be banned in public to control the spread of the novel coronavirus.   "Our own behaviour is the most effective way" of slowing the rate of infection, Merkel said of the unprecedented nationwide measures, which are initially slated to remain in force for two weeks.
Date: Mon, 16 Mar 2020 09:18:14 +0100 (MET)

Bad Reichenhall, Germany, March 16, 2020 (AFP) - Germany on Monday introduced border controls with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg and Switzerland in a bid to stem the coronavirus outbreak.   Only those with a valid reason for travel, like cross-border commuters and delivery drivers, are allowed through, officials said. The measures started at 0700 GMT, AFP reporters said.   At the border between Germany's Kiefersfelden and Austria's Kufstein, police let trucks through but stopped all passenger cars to question drivers, an AFP photographer saw. By 0730 GMT, some 10 cars had been turned back.

German citizens and people with a residency permit will still be allowed to return to the country, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer said on Sunday when he announced the temporary border checks.   It is the latest drastic step taken by German authorities to halt the pandemic.   From Monday, schools and daycare centres in most German states will remain closed, with some exceptions made for parents in critical jobs who have not yet found alternative child care arrangements.   Germany has also banned large gatherings, and states are increasingly asking restaurants, bars, sports clubs and other public places to shut their doors as well.   Germany's islands in the North and Baltic Seas also closed themselves to tourists from Monday.

And Bavaria planned to declare a disaster situation to allow the state's authorities to push through new restrictions faster, including possibly asking the army for assistance.   German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier urged citizens to limit their social contacts.   "Restrictions on our lives today can save lives tomorrow," he told the news site t-online.de.   "We will conquer this virus," he added.   Germany has so far recorded 4,838 confirmed infections and 12 confirmed deaths.   Other neighbouring countries like Poland and the Czech Republic have also closed their borders or introduced severe restrictions.
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2020 10:08:00 +0100 (MET)

Frankfurt am Main, March 2, 2020 (AFP) - German airline group Lufthansa said Monday it was extending flight cancellations on Iran and China routes until late April, part of a broader rollback because of the novel coronavirus.   The group's namesake carrier and subsidiaries Austrian and Swiss will not fly to and from mainland China until April 24, Lufthansa said in a statement.

Meanwhile Tehran flights will be suspended until April 30.   The slashes to the flight plan are part of a wider scheme Lufthansa announced Friday that will ground 23 long-haul aircraft and cut short- and medium-haul services by up to 25 percent.   Lufthansa said Monday it was reducing the frequency of flights between major German hubs like Frankfurt and Munich and Seoul and Hong Kong.

And the group is also reducing frequency on routes to cities in Italy, including Rome, Venice, and Milan, with subsidiary Brussels Airlines affected alongside low-cost carrier Eurowings, Austrian and Swiss.   In northern Italy, 11 towns have been placed under quarantine because of the virus outbreak.   Even within Germany, the group is slashing flight frequency on domestic routes between major cities.   Lufthansa said passengers whose flights were affected by the timetable changes should check the company website for updates.

The group has also suspended new hires as part of its measures to cushion the business impact of the virus, which it said Monday was "not yet possible to estimate".   The International Civil Aviation Organization has said that the virus outbreak could mean a $4-5 billion drop in worldwide airline revenue.   Meanwhile on Monday the global death toll from the coronavirus epidemic passed 3,000 as dozens more patients succumbed in China.   More than 89,000 people have now been infected around the world.
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2020 20:21:48 +0100 (MET)

Berlin, Feb 28, 2020 (AFP) - Organisers of the ITB travel trade fair in Berlin, billed as the world's biggest, said Friday they were cancelling next week's event in the German capital over coronavirus fears.   "With more than 10,000 exhibitors from over 180 countries, ITB Berlin is of great importance for the global tourism industry," said Christian Goeke, chairman of organisers Messe Berlin.   "We take our responsibility for the security and the health of our guests, exhibitors and employees very seriously. It is with a heavy heart that we have to look at the necessary cancellation of the ITB Berlin 2020."

The fair was due to open next Wednesday (March 4), but concerns grew over the viability of hosting huge numbers of visitors as Germany recorded a jump in the number of infected residents.   With confirmed cases of novel coronavirus in Europe's biggest economy rising above 60, more than 1,000 people were in quarantine in Germany's most populous state Friday.

The district of Heinsberg in North Rhine-Westphalia said it had to take the step of keeping around 1,000 on their homes as an infected couple had participated in carnival celebrations in mid-February.   Schools and kindergartens were also shut in the district until Monday as the number of cases linked to the cluster reached 20.   Separately, accountancy giant Ernst & Young told its 1,400 employees at its Duesseldorf office and another 110 in Essen to work from home after one worker reportedly contracted the virus.   In Hamburg, dozens of parents and children who were in contact with an infected paediatrician at a university clinic have also been ordered to stay home for 14 days.

With cases now detected across several further German states including Hesse, Baden-Wuerttemberg and Bavaria, Health Minister Jens Spahn said this week that Europe's biggest country was "at the beginning of a coronavirus epidemic".   The government has ordered local authorities in the country's 16 states to update their pandemic readiness plans.   It also from Thursday began requiring travellers arriving from China, South Korea, Japan, Iran and Italy to provide contact details in case their movements had to be traced over possible infections.
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:41:54 +0100 (MET)

Frankfurt am Main, Feb 10, 2020 (AFP) - Three people were seriously injured as Storm Ciara battered Germany on Sunday and Monday, lashing the country with high winds that forced the rail operator to suspend intercity trains.   Two women were badly hurt by a falling tree in Saarbruecken on the French border, with one of them receiving life-threatening injuries, police said overnight.   Further north in Paderborn, a 16-year-old boy was hit on the head by a falling branch.

Weather forecasters said winds of up to 170 kilometres per hour (105 miles per hour) had hit mountainous areas.   State-owned rail operator Deutsche Bahn (DB) shut down intercity trains on Sunday evening and warned there would be more disruption as the storm heads south.   "Several hundred" travellers slept overnight in trains set up for those stranded in stations, DB said.   Hundreds of flights were cancelled at the largest airports, including 190 in Frankfurt and 420 in Munich, news agency DPA reported.

In the financial capital Frankfurt, police said a construction crane had struck the roof of the cathedral, but could not immediately detail the extent of the damage.   Storm Ciara mostly struck northern and western Germany as it swept Europe with powerful winds overnight between Sunday and Monday.   On Monday, the German Weather Service (DWD) declared the second-highest storm warning in effect across southern Germany, with parts of Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg states even labelled with the highest.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 12:37:54 +0100 (MET)

London, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - British police faced criticism on Friday for using "over-the-top" methods to maintain a coronavirus lockdown, after officers armed with sweeping new powers deployed drones to detect walkers far from home.   Civil liberties group Big Brother Watch said the police must behave within the rule of law after it also emerged that road checkpoints had been set up to quiz drivers about their journeys.   "It's understandable why police are dispersing parties and barbecues but demanding drivers give journey details at road checkpoints is over-the-top," said director Silkie Carlo.     "It's critical we protect public health and critical we protect basic democratic norms too. Arbitrary policing will not help the country to fight this pandemic."

The drone incident happened in the Peak District National Park in Derbyshire, central England, while roadblocks were used in other parts of the country.   Social media users compared their actions to "the Stasi", East Germany's notorious state police.    Another civil liberties group, Liberty, said in a statement: "We need a response in terms of public health rather than a response in terms of criminal justice to this epidemic."   Britons have been told since the beginning of the week that they are only allowed to leave their homes for limited reasons such as going to work, essential food shopping, or for exercise once a day.   But they are not allowed to travel for recreational purposes.

To enforce the new rules, police were officially handed powers which prevents people leaving their home "without reasonable excuse".   Those ignoring the tougher restrictions on movement could be hit with a £60 fine doubled to £120 (133 euros,$147) for any second offence.   The measures will be in place for at least six months, with a review every three weeks.   Derbyshire police defended their actions, claiming in a tweet that "we will not be apologetic for using any legal and appropriate methods to keep people safe".   It added: "Our actions and the government's advice are there to keep you and others safe."   A total of 11,658 coronavirus cases have so far been confirmed in Britain, and 578 deaths.
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 11:59:09 +0100 (MET)

Madrid, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - The death toll in Spain soared over 4,800 Friday after 769 people died in 24 hours, in what was a record one-day figure for fatalities, the government said.    Health ministry figures showed the number of deaths reaching 4,858, while cases jumped to 64,059, although the rate of new infections appeared to be slowing, registering a 14 percent increase compared with 18 percent a day earlier.
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 11:53:09 +0100 (MET)

Jakarta, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - Indonesia's coronavirus crisis is far worse than being officially reported and the government's response is "in tatters", the country's doctors association warned Friday as the death toll climbed to 87.   The world's fourth-most populous country only reported its first confirmed infection this month but by Thursday, that had ballooned to over 1,000.

Indonesia's 87 confirmed coronavirus deaths are the highest toll in Southeast Asia, with public health and diplomatic officials warning that its weak health system is being rapidly overwhelmed.   "The government's plans are in tatters and they appear to be avoiding a lockdown," said Indonesian Doctors' Association spokesman Halik Malik.   "Our health system is not as strong as other countries."

A London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine study warned this week that cases in Indonesia -- with a population of more than 260 million people -- could be vastly underreported.   The government's virus task force has estimated as many as 700,000 people were at risk of infection nationwide.   But the rate of testing has been low compared with many other countries -- only 2,300 tests were conducted before the government stopped announcing nationwide figures.

Authorities have come under heavy criticism for not imposing lockdowns in major cities, including the capital Jakarta, a vast city home to about 30 million where most of the deaths have been reported.   "The COVID-19 situation in Indonesia is very serious and getting worse quickly," the Canadian embassy in Jakarta said Thursday, saying it was urgently advising citizens to leave.    "The health care system in Indonesia will soon be overwhelmed. The ultimate number of fatalities will be very high."   Indonesia had fewer than four doctors for every 10,000 people, according to World Health Organization data from 2017.

In comparison, neighbouring Malaysia had about 15 doctors and Australia had 35 per 10,000 people.   Images shared on social media have shown Indonesian doctors threatening to go on strike if resources aren't beefed up, with concerns about a lack of ventilators, protective gear and other equipment needed to handle coronavirus cases.   At least seven doctors have died of the virus, according to the official figures.

In a tweet that went viral, the brother-in-law of one of those doctors slammed the Indonesian government's handling of the crisis.   "You were infected as you actively served people. Many health workers have been infected and left. The limited amount of protective equipment is hard to forgive," wrote Pandu Riono, a University of Indonesia public health expert.   The government has pledged to boost testing to upwards of one million checks as extra equipment and test kits are flown in from China.   It has also turned an athletes village built for the 2018 Asian Games into an emergency treatment centre to help ease the pressure on hospitals.
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 10:46:26 +0100 (MET)

Budapest, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban on Friday ordered a nationwide lockdown for two weeks to fight the spread of the new coronavirus.   "We are introducing curfew restrictions throughout Hungary between March 28 and April 11," he told public radio.   "For two weeks we can all leave our homes or places of residence only for work or for managing basic needs."

Exemptions include trips to shops and pharmacies for necessities, with infringements liable to police fines of up to 500,000 forints (1,400 euros, $1,550).   Shops will be open exclusively for those aged over 65 between 9 am and 12 noon to "separate youth from elderly in a bearable way," said Orban.   The move is the latest in a series of government decrees including school closures introduced after a state of emergency was announced March 11.

Hungary closed its borders to non-nationals from March 17, which led to chaos for travellers and freight hauliers at border crossings and Budapest airport.   Parliament is set Tuesday to grant Orban sweeping powers of decree until the government declares an end to the state of emergency.   Hungary, which has a population of almost 10 million, has so far recorded 300 infections from the virus and 10 deaths.
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 09:24:46 +0100 (MET)

Jakarta, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - Indonesia's most active volcano Mount Merapi erupted Friday, shooting a column of ash some 5,000 metres (16,000 feet) into the air in its second major eruption this month.   Ash and sand covered areas several kilometres (miles) away from the peak of the rumbling crater near Indonesia's cultural capital Yogyakarta.   But authorities did not raise Merapi's alert level.   "There has been no reports of damage from the  eruption. We urge people to stay calm and not panic," national disaster mitigation agency spokesman Agus Wibowo said.   Merapi erupted earlier this month, shooting a massive ash cloud some 6,000 metres in the air.    That eruption coated Yogyakarta and neighbouring city Solo with grey dust and forced an airport closure.

Mount Merapi's last major eruption in 2010 killed more than 300 people and forced the evacuation of 280,000 residents.  That was Merapi's most powerful eruption since 1930, which killed around 1,300 people, while another explosion in 1994 took about 60 lives.    The Southeast Asian nation -- an archipelago of more than 17,000 islands and islets -- has nearly 130 active volcanoes.    It sits on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", a vast zone of geological instability where the collision of tectonic plates causes frequent quakes and major volcanic activity
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 06:34:10 +0100 (MET)

Sydney, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - The Australian military will help enforce the quarantine of travellers returning to the country, with the prime minister unveiling strict new measures and door-to-door checks Friday to rein in the spread of COVID-19.   With some two-thirds of Australia's 3,000 COVID-19 cases still linked to overseas travel, Scott Morrison said 14-day home quarantines would now be actively policed with the help of the military.

Thousands of citizens and residents are still arriving in Australia every day and there have been instances of return travellers repeatedly breaking a promise to stay at home.   Morrison said all returnees arriving after midnight Saturday would now be kept in hotels in the city of arrival for the duration of their quarantine.   Those already on Australian soil and under orders to self-quarantine for two weeks will face active checks, he said.

Quarantine measures will be getting "a lot tougher and a lot stricter," Morrison said, adding the Australian Defence Force would "assist in the compliance with these arrangements."   Police in New South Wales this week said they found a 65-year-old woman breaking quarantine twice after returning from Bali. She was slapped with two $1,000 (US$610) fines.

Australia has struggled in particular to deal with returning cruise ship passengers.   Around 200 of the 2,700 passengers who were allowed to disembark one ship in central Sydney without testing have subsequently tested positive for COVID-19. The presence of three other cruise ships off the coast of Western Australia has sparked an intense debate about whether they should be allowed to dock.

Tens of thousands of Australians are still believed to be overseas and Morrison said it would become harder for them to come home.   He indicated efforts would be made to return some trapped in locations like Peru, but those who departed after the government advised against all foreign travel may be on their own.
Date: Fri, 27 Mar 2020 05:52:43 +0100 (MET)

Singapore, March 27, 2020 (AFP) - Singaporeans could be jailed for up to six months if they intentionally stand close to someone else, under tough new rules announced Friday to halt the spread of the coronavirus.   The city-state has introduced a series of new measures to tackle the virus, including closing bars and cinemas as well as banning large events.   One step aimed at ensuring "social-distancing" -- a key approach being used worldwide to halt the spread of the contagious disease -- is a ban on individuals standing less than one metre (three feet) apart in certain settings.

People are barred from intentionally standing too close to someone else in a queue, or sitting on a seat less than one metre from another individual in a public place, according to the regulations.    Those found guilty of breaking the rules face a jail term of up to six months and a maximum fine of Sg$10,000 (US$7,000).    Business owners are also required to take steps such as putting seats not fixed to the ground at least one metre apart, and making sure that people keep their distance when queueing.   They face the same punishments if found to have broken the rules.

Singapore, known for having a low crime rate and a tough approach to law and order, introduced stricter curbs after a spike in infections being brought in from overseas.   The health ministry said earlier this week that "we must implement tighter safe distancing measures now to minimise activities and exposure".   The city-state has reported 683 virus infections and two deaths, but has won praise for its approach and has so far avoided going into a total lockdown.   The rapidly spreading pandemic has infected over half a million people worldwide and killed more than 23,000.
Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2020 20:22:40 +0100 (MET)

Abidjan, March 26, 2020 (AFP) - Almost all of Africa's airlines are currently grounded because of the coronavirus pandemic and several could go bankrupt, the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) warned Thursday.   "Today, 95 percent of African planes are grounded owing to the pandemic, save for cargo flights," AFRAA secretary general Abderrahmane Berthe told AFP.

A large number of African states have closed their airports and borders because of the virus, forcing carriers to scrap inter-African as well as inter-continental flights.   "If the African carriers do not receive support they will find themselves insolvent come the end of June," warned Berthe, who calculated that the sector would require a bailout of between $2.5 to 3 billion (2.3 to 2.8 billion euros) in emergency aid or tax concessions.

"African carriers were already in a precarious state well before the COVID-19 pandemic. They have been making losses for a decade while other companies elsewhere were making money," Berthe said.   "The past fortnight has been catastrophic for African carriers whose planes are grounded. They have no revenue while at the same time they face costs they cannot squeeze" such as plane hire, maintenance, insurance and parking fees.   AFRAA's 45 member carriers account for 85 percent of inter-African traffic totalling 93 million passengers a year.   Although Africa accounts for just a two percent share of global air traffic, passenger numbers on the continent have been doubling every 15 to 20 years.
Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2020 20:08:34 +0100 (MET)

Kinshasa, March 26, 2020 (AFP) - The Democratic Republic of Congo capital Kinshasa will go into "total confinement" for four days from Saturday to help contain the spread of coronavirus, authorities said on Thursday.   Governor Gentiny Ngobila on Thursday decreed intermittent four-day confinements over three weeks, according to a speech seen by AFP. The city will be on lockdown for four days followed by two days to allow residents to shop followed by another four-day lockdown, in a rotation continued for the three-week period.
Date: Wed 25 Mar 2020
Source: UPI [edited]

A man in China has died after testing positive for the hantavirus, according to Chinese state media. Global Times reported the patient, a migrant worker from southwestern Yunnan Province, died while travelling on a chartered bus to Shandong Province for work on Monday [23 Mar 2020].

There is more than one strain of hantavirus, some more harmful than others, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There is no approved cure or vaccine against hantaviruses in the United States. An inoculation may be available in China.

The group of diseases is spread primarily among rodents, and from rodents to humans. Humans may become infected with hantaviruses through contact with rodent urine, saliva, or feces. The fatality rate is 36%.  "New World" hantaviruses are known to cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, or HPS. Symptoms include fatigue, fever, and muscle aches, followed by coughing and shortness of breath, according to the CDC and other health authorities.

Human-to-human transmission is extremely rare. A case of person-to-person transmission was recorded in Argentina in 1996, according to the CDC [several cases of person-to-person transmission of Andes hantavirus have been reported in Chile and Argentina. - ProMED Mod.TY].

Malaysian Chinese-language newspaper China Press reported Wednesday [25 Mar 2020] the patient, [T], was traveling on a bus with 30 migrant workers. It is unclear whether they were also infected. When [T] developed a fever, emergency staff may have suspected a case of the novel coronavirus, according to the report.

Southern Metropolis Daily, a Chinese newspaper published in the city of Guangzhou, said T's home province of Yunnan has reported a total of 1231 hantavirus cases from 2015 to 2019. China developed a vaccine against the virus 20 years ago, which may have lowered fatalities, according to reports.

The hantavirus is named after the Hantaan River in South Korea, where Lee Ho-wang, a South Korean scientist, 1st isolated the virus in 1976, according to South Korean news service News 1.  [Byline: Elizabeth Shim]
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[Although no symptoms were reported for this fatal case, a hantavirus infection was laboratory confirmed as the etiological agent. There is no indication if the 30 other passengers in the bus were tested for infection, but no additional illnesses or fatalities were mentioned, which would have likely been indicated had they occurred. The specific hantavirus involved in this case is not stated. In Asia, the 5 recognized hantaviruses, with their main rodent reservoir species, are Hantaan virus (_Apodemus agrarius_), Amur virus (_A. peninsulae_), Thailand virus (_Bandicota indica_), Seoul virus (widely distributed worldwide in _Rattus norvegicus_), and Muju virus (_Myodes regulus_). Hantaan virus and Seoul virus cause cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) frequently in China. A bunyavirus, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus, is unlikely, as during the winter season, ticks, the vectors of this virus, will not be active.

Hantaan virus has several (up to 5 have been reported) subtypes and is transmitted by the field mouse _Apodemus agrarius_, whereas Seoul virus is less variable and is transmitted by the rat _Rattus norvegicus_. A 3rd hantavirus that causes HFRS, Muju virus, has been reported from the Korean peninsula. Since Yunnan province has many rural areas, either Hantaan or Seoul virus could be involved. It has been reported that during 1990-1997, there were recorded in China nearly 400 000 cases of HFRS, of which 1.6% were fatal.

An image of _Apodemus agrarius_ can be seen at

Coincidentally, another report from northeastern India states that people in Nagrijuli and Kumarikata of Baksa district are panic-stricken after they learned that a man died in Yunnan province of China after testing positive to hantavirus (<https://nenow.in/north-east-news/fear-of-hantavirus-outbreak-sets-panic-button-along-indo-bhutan-border-in-assam.html>).  It is not clear why there is fear along the individuals in the Indo-Bhutan border in Baksa district of Assam, since this locality is about 900 km (560 mi) distant from Yunnan province in China. This additional report appears to be incorrect as it also mentions that 32 individuals who were passengers on the bus with the fatal Yunnan case were positive for hantavirus infections. This is not substantiated in the above report of the fatal case that mentions that there were 30 passengers, not 32, without any indication that they have been tested. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Yunnan Province, China: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/351>]