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Faroe Islands

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroe_Islands
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The early history of the Faroe Islands is not very clear. According to Færeyinga Saga emigrants who left Norway to escape the tyranny of Harald I of Norway settled in the isla
ds about the beginning of the 9th century. There is also evidence that Irish monks settled the islands, introducing sheep in the process. Early in the 11th century Sigmund, whose family had flourished in the southern islands but had been almost exterminated by invaders from the northern islands, was sent from Norway, from which he had escaped, to take possession of the islands for Olaf Tryggvason, king of Norway. He introduced Christianity and, though he was subsequently murdered, Norwegian supremacy was upheld. Norwegian control of the islands continued until 1380, when Norway entered into a union with Denmark, which gradually evolved into the double monarchy Denmark/Norway. The reformation reached the Faroes in 1538. When Norway was taken away from Denmark at the Treaty of Kiel in 1814, Denmark retained possession of the Faroe Islands.
The monopoly trade over the Faroe Islands was abolished in 1856. Since then, the country developed towards a modern fishery nation with its own fleet. The national awakening since 1888 was first based on a struggle for the Faroese language, and thus more culturally oriented, but after 1906 was more and more politically oriented after the foundation of the political parties of the Faroe Islands.
On April 12, 1940, the Faroes were invaded and occupied by British troops. The move followed the invasion of Denmark by Nazi Germany and had the objective of strengthening British control of the North Atlantic (see Second Battle of the Atlantic). In 1942–43 the British Royal Engineers built the only airport in the Faroes, the Vágar Airport. Control of the islands reverted to Denmark following the war, but in 1948 a home rule regime was implemented granting a high degree of local autonomy. The Faroes declined to join Denmark in entering the European Community (now European Union) in 1973. The islands experienced considerable economic difficulties following the collapse of the fishing industry in the early 1990s, but have since made efforts to diversify the economy. Support for independence has grown and is the objective of the government.
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Denmark, Greenland and the Faeroe Islands US Consular Information Sheet
August 15, 2006
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Denmark is a highly developed stable democracy with a modern economy. Greenland is a self-governing dependency of Denmark. The Faroe Islands are a self-governing overseas administrative division of Denmark. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Denmark for additional information.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS: Passport and visa regulations are similar for Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroes. A valid passport is required. U.S. citizen tourist and business travelers do not need visas for visits of up to 90 days. That period begins when entering any of the following countries which are parties to the Schengen agreement: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden. See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on Denmark and other countries. Contact the Royal Danish Embassy at 3200 Whitehaven Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20008, telephone (202) 234-4300 or visit its website at for the most current visa information.

Note: Although European Union regulations require that non-EU visitors obtain a stamp in their passports upon initial entry to a Schengen country, many borders are not staffed with officers carrying out this function. If an American citizen wishes to ensure that his or her entry is properly documented, it may be necessary to request a stamp at an official point of entry. Under local law, travelers without a stamp in their passports may be questioned and asked to document the length of their stay in Schengen countries at the time of departure or at any other point during their visit, and could face possible fines or other repercussions if unable to do so.

Find more information about Entry and Exit Requirements pertaining to dual nationality and the prevention of international child abduction .
SAFETY AND SECURITY: Denmark remains largely free of terrorist incidents, however the country shares, with the rest of Western Europe, an increased threat of Islamic terrorism. Like other countries in the Schengen area, Denmark's open borders with its Western European neighbors allow the possibility of terrorist groups entering and exiting the country with anonymity. Americans are reminded to remain vigilant with regard to their personal security and to exercise caution.

Public demonstrations occasionally occur in Copenhagen and other Danish cities and are generally peaceful events. Prior police approval is required for public demonstrations, and police oversight is routinely provided to ensure adequate security for participants and passers-by. Nonetheless, as with any large crowd comprised of diverse groups, situations may develop which could pose a threat to public safety. U.S. citizens are advised to avoid areas where public demonstrations are taking place.
For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State's web site , where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement , Travel Warnings, and Public Announcements can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States, or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State's pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad .
CRIME: Denmark, Greenland, and the Faroes all have very low violent crime rates, however, non-violent crimes of opportunity have slightly increased over the last few years, especially in Copenhagen and other major Danish cities, where tourists can become targets for pickpockets and sophisticated thieves. Criminals frequent airports, train stations, and cruise ship quays to take advantage of weary, luggage-burdened travelers. Thieves also operate at popular tourist attractions, shopping streets, and restaurants. In hotel lobbies and breakfast areas, thieves take advantage of even a brief lapse in attention to snatch jackets, purses, and backpacks. Women's purses placed either on the backs of chairs or on the floor are typical targets for thieves. Car and home break-ins are also on the rise.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends, and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

Denmark has a program to provide financial compensation to victims who suffer serious criminal injuries. According to existing regulations, the victim must report the incident to the police within 24 hours. Danish police routinely inform victims of serious crime of their rights to seek compensation. The relevant forms can be obtained from the police or the Danish Victims' Compensation Board: Civilstyrelsen, Erstatningsnaevnet, Gyldenløvesgade 11, 1600 Copenhagen V, TEL: (45) 33-92- 3334; FAX: (45) 39-20-45-05; www.erstatningsnaevnet.dk ; Email: erstatningsnaevnet@erstatningsnaevnet.dk . Claim processing time is a minimum of 4 weeks. There is no maximum award limit.

See our information for Victims of Crime .
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Excellent medical facilities are widely available in Denmark. In Greenland and the Faroe Islands, medical facilities are limited and evacuation is required for serious illness or injury. Although emergency medical treatment is free of charge, the patient is charged for follow-up care.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC's website at . For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization's (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int.en. Further health information for travelers is available at .

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas .

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Denmark is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

A valid U.S. driver's license may be used while visiting Denmark, but the driver must be at least 18 years old. Driving in Denmark is on the right side of the road. Road signs use standard international symbols. Many urban streets have traffic lanes reserved for public transport only. Unless otherwise noted on traffic signs, the speed limit is 50 km/h in urban areas, 80 km/h on open roads, and 130 km/h on expressways.

Use of seat belts is mandatory for drivers and all passengers. Children under three years of age must be secured with approved safety equipment appropriate to the child's age, size, and weight. Children from three to six years of age may use approved child or booster seats instead of seat belts.

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is considered a very serious offense. The rules are stringently enforced, and violations can result in stiff fines and possible jail sentences.

Copenhagen, the capital and largest city in Denmark, has an extensive and efficient public transportation system. Trains and buses connect Copenhagen with other major cities in Denmark and to Norway, Sweden, and Germany. Bicycles are also a common mode of transportation in Denmark. Passengers exiting public or tourist buses, as well as tourists driving rental cars, should watch for bicycles on their designated paths, which are usually located between the pedestrian sidewalks and the traffic lanes.

Danish expressways, highways, and secondary roads are of high quality and connect all areas of the country. It is possible to drive from the northern tip of Denmark to the German border in the south in just four hours. Greenland has no established road system, and domestic travel is performed by foot, boat, or by air. The majority of the Faroe Islands are connected by bridges or serviced by boat. Although the largest islands have roads, most domestic travel is done on foot, horseback, boat, or by air.

The emergency telephone number for police/fire/ambulance in Denmark and the Faroe Islands is 112. In Greenland contact the local police.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of the country's national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety at . See also additional information on driving in Denmark at .

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Denmark's Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for the oversight of Denmark's air carrier operations. This rating applies to Greenland and the Faroe Islands as well. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA's Internet website at www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa .

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: The official unit of currency in Denmark is the Danish krone. ATM machines are widely available throughout Denmark. Please see our information on customs regulations .

For information concerning the importation of pets into Denmark, please visit the following website:
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CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protection available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Denmark's laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Denmark are severe and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties .

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children's Issues website.

REGISTRATION/EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Denmark are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department's travel registration website , and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Denmark. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located at Dag Hammarskjolds Alle 24; 2100 Copenhagen, telephone: (45) 33-41-71-00; Embassy fax: (45) 35-43-02-23; Consular Section fax: (45) 35-38-96-16; After-hours emergency telephone: (45) 35-55-92-70. Information is also available via the U.S. Embassy's website at http://www.usembassy.dk. The United States has no consular presence in Greenland or the Faroe Islands.
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This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated February 10, 2006, to update the section on Entry Requirements and Traffic Safety and Road Conditions.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2019 12:51:34 +0100 (MET)

Copenhagen, Nov 14, 2019 (AFP) - Authorities in the Faroe Islands have announced the archipelago in the North Atlantic will be "closed for maintenance" for two days in April when tourists won't be welcome, instead opening the doors to volunteer caretakers.   In practice, the self-governing Danish islands will keep hotels open and international flights running, but popular tourist sites will be temporarily closed on April 16 and 17 next year.   The event is a continuation of a pilot project run in the spring of 2019, when 100 volunteers from 25 countries were invited to the islands.

Registrations for eager volunteers opened on Wednesday at 1500 GMT and were to remain open for 24 hours, the Faroese tourism office said on its website.   One hundred people will then be randomly selected to be part of the maintenance crew, who will be offered housing and food during their stay although they will still need to pay for their own plane tickets.   "The fragile natural environment in some popular tourist locations has felt the effects of an increase of visitors," the head of the tourism office, Guri Hojgaard, told AFP in March shortly after the pilot project was launched.   "These areas need a helping hand to ensure they remain pristine".

For the first edition of the event they received about 3,500 applications and the selected volunteers helped with projects like creating walking paths, constructing viewpoints to help preserve nature and protect birdlife sanctuaries and re-building rock cairns.   A popular destination for its fascinating landscapes with 30-metre cliffs, the archipelago covers 1,400 square kilometres (540 square miles) and has 50,000 inhabitants and 80,000 sheep spread over 18 islands.   In 2018, 110,000 tourists visited the Faroe Islands and the number of tourists has increased by about 10 percent annually for the past five years.    According to Hojgaard, the "closed for maintenance, open for voluntourism" weekend can "contribute to the international discussion about overtourism by showing that tourists can actually be a part of the solution."
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 12:19:28 +0100 (MET)

COPENHAGEN, Nov 25, 2011 (AFP) - A hurricane packing winds of almost 200 kilometres (125 miles) an hour tore through the Faroe Islands overnight, causing major damage and evacuations but no deaths, police said Friday.  "There was a hurricane... a lot of material damage has been reported but no deaths so far," said Rani Wardum, a police officer in Torshavn, the capital of the North Atlantic archipelago. "Winds reach up to 55 metres per second," or 198 kilometres per hour, in some places, meteorologist Mogens Roenebek of the Danish Meteorological Institute told AFP.

The Faroe Islands, an autonomous Danish province, are home to around 48,000 people. The extent of the damage was not immediately known. "Many roofs were blown off and we had to evacuate a retirement home. The seniors were moved into a hospital," Wardum said.

Some residents were also evacuated from their homes during the night and a number of boats came loose from their moorings and ended up on land, he added. "The winds are still raging, but it was particularly violent last night and overnight," Wardum said, noting that the southern coastal regions of the Faroes Islands were hardest hit. The storm was heading towards the west coast of Norway on Friday, with strong winds and heavy seas, according to Roenebek.
Date: Thu, 6 May 2010 16:55:58 +0200 (METDST)

REYKJAVIK, May 6, 2010 (AFP) - The quantity of ash spewed by Iceland's Eyjafjoell volcano increased overnight and the higher ash cloud could make it to the Faroe Islands Friday, Icelandic authorities said Thursday.   "Ash production did increase last night and the ash plume is going higher now than the last couple of days," Agust Gunnar Gylfason, who monitors the eruption's progress at Iceland's Civil Protection Department, told AFP.

The ash cloud "might reach the Faroe Islands around midnight (GMT Thursday) under 20,000 feet (6,000 meters)" and continue on south towards Ireland on Friday, he added.   "The plume went up to 30,000 feet (9,000 meters) for some time last night, and again this morning, due to an increase in explosive activity, but otherwise it's been around 18,000 and 20,000 feet" high, he said.

At the strongest period of the eruption, Eyjafjoell sent a plume around 30,000 feet into the air, but scientists have stressed that the height of the plume does not necessarily reflect a particular quantity of ash.   On Tuesday, the plume contained about only 10 percent of the ash it held at the beginning of the eruption.   European airspace and airports across the continent were open on Thursday, but intergovernmental air traffic controller Eurocontrol said the ash cloud could mean transatlantic flights might need to be re-routed.

Airspace above Ireland, Northern Ireland and Scotland was partly shut Wednesday for the second time in two days, causing the cancellation of hundreds of flights.   The fresh disruption came after Europe's skies were closed for up to a week last month by the eruption of the Eyjafjoell volcano. It was the biggest aerial shutdown in Europe since World War II, with more than 100,000 flights cancelled and eight million passengers affected.
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Thailand



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Travel in Health in Thailand
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General Introduction:
Irish travellers are going to Thailand in great numbers. The relatively cheap cost and also the contrast in culture has captured many hearts. Some are travelli
g for a once off 2 week trip and for others the exploration of Thailand will take longer. It is truly a beautiful country and the people have a charm all of their own but nevertheless your journey can be so very easily ruined by taking health risks.
Water-Borne Disease:
In most of the major cities of Thailand the water supply is well chlorinated and so the risks associated with drinking mains tap water are limited. However many of the bedrooms will not be supplied with mains water so take care. Smell the water and if there is a distinct chlorine odour then it should be safe. Also remember that when you travel around the country, especially around the northern regions, the water supply may be grossly contaminated and so never drink the water or use it for brushing your teeth. Also no ice in your drinks under these circumstances.
Food-Borne Disease:
There is a good selection of food in Thailand and you should have no great difficulty in finding food to suit your taste. In the majority of the restaurants the food is well cooked and maintained in a healthy sterile fashion. These are the places to eat. As you walk around the cities you will see many street traders selling food stuffs from their carts. The level of hygiene is very low and frequently the food will be contaminated. Never indulge yourself by eating from street vendors.
Mosquito-Borne Disease:
Under this title most travellers will only consider the possibility of developing malaria. This is of course one of the most important illnesses transmitted via mosquitoes but by no means the only one in Thailand. For most travellers to Thailand there will be no need to take malarial prophylaxis as the cities are deemed to be free of malaria. This does not mean that you will not be bitten by mosquitoes and develop some of the other diseases such as Dengue Fever or perhaps Japanese Encephalitis. Many travellers also develop a very severe reaction to the mosquito bite and so for all these reasons it is prudent to avoid being bitten whenever possible.
Entertainment-Borne Disease:
It would be wrong not to emphasize the very high risk which travellers face if they are unwise enough to indulge in any form of sexual activity in Thailand. The percentage of street girls with the Aids virus is rising each year and is now thought to be over 80%. This figure may be an underestimate. Be especially careful if you have taken any alcohol. The cities of Bangkok and Pattaya are thought to be among the main centres of HIV transmission throughout the world and within the next few years the extent of the Aids problem in S.E. Asia will have exceeded Africa. There is limited availability of condoms.
Road-Borne Disease:
The traffic situation in Thailand is severe. The motorbikes have no insurance as they are too often involved in accidents. Use only regular taxi cabs and fix your price before you leave.
Vaccination Schedule:
There are no compulsory vaccines for entry into Thailand from Ireland. Nevertheless the usual recommended vaccines include Polio, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A cover. For those trekking or staying for longer periods then cover against Hepatitis B and Rabies would be worth discussing.
Most travellers should start their vaccines about 4 to 5 weeks before they leave Ireland.
Note:
For the vast majority of Irish travellers a holiday in Thailand will be a time of great pleasure and, later, fond memories of the people, their customs and the countryside. Just remember that illness can occur so follow some good common sense rules and so you can enjoy yourself
and Travel in Health.

Thailand

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2020 15:40:59 +0200 (METDST)

Bangkok, April 2, 2020 (AFP) - Thailand will introduce a six-hour night curfew in a bid to control the spread of coronavirus, authorities said Thursday, warning anyone who breached the order faced a two-year jail term.   The curfew from 10 pm to 4 am (1500 to 2100 GMT) will begin on Friday and bars everyone in the country from leaving their homes.    Exemptions will be made for essential staff, including medical workers, food and fuel transport staff, and postal services.    The number of infections in Thailand has soared past 1,800 -- up more than 80 percent from a week ago -- and the death toll has nearly quadrupled to 15 as of Thursday.

The government has come under criticism for not acting soon enough to curb the spread of the virus -- introducing incremental measures despite being the first country outside China to confirm a case, which happened in January.   In an address to the nation, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-O-Cha urged citizens not to panic.   "You can buy things in the daytime," he said.   Penalties for hoarding essential supplies such as face masks carry penalties of up to seven years in prison and a 140,000 baht ($4,200) fine, he said.

The stepped-up measures also include an entry ban on all arrivals -- including Thais -- for two weeks.   Thais who insist on returning will be placed under state quarantine, though Prayut implored them to defer travel plans.    On Thursday, Bangkok's popular markets were shuttered, while parks that were ordered to close were empty of joggers.   Thailand's economy has been hit hard by the coronavirus, especially those employed in the informal sector.   The Bank of Thailand expects the economy to shrink by 5.3 percent this year -- a 22-year low -- and nearly 22 million people have registered for cash handouts.
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:50:04 +0200 (METDST)
By Sophie DEVILLER with Dene-Hern CHEN

Bangkok, March 31, 2020 (AFP) - Underfed and chained up for endless hours, many elephants working in Thailand's tourism sector may starve, be sold to zoos or be shifted into the illegal logging trade, campaigners warn, as the coronavirus decimates visitor numbers. Before the virus, life for the kingdom's estimated 2,000 elephants working in tourism was already stressful, with abusive methods often used to 'break them' into giving rides and performing tricks at money-spinning animal shows.   With global travel paralysed the animals are unable to pay their way, including the 300 kilograms (660 pounds) of food a day a captive elephant needs to survive.

Elephant camps and conservationists warn hunger and the threat of renewed exploitation lie ahead, without an urgent bailout. "My boss is doing what he can but we have no money," Kosin, a mahout -- or elephant handler -- says of the Chiang Mai camp where his elephant Ekkasit is living on a restricted diet.   Chiang Mai is Thailand's northern tourist hub, an area of rolling hills dotted by elephant camps and sanctuaries ranging from the exploitative to the humane.   Footage sent to AFP from another camp in the area shows lines of elephants tethered by a foot to wooden poles, some visibly distressed, rocking their heads back and forth.

Around 2,000 elephants are currently "unemployed" as the virus eviscerates Thailand's tourist industry, says Theerapat Trungprakan, president of the Thai Elephant Alliance Association. The lack of cash is limiting the fibrous food available to the elephants "which will have a physical effect", he added.  Wages for the mahouts who look after them have dropped by 70 percent.   Theerapat fears the creatures could soon be used in illegal logging activities along the Thai-Myanmar border -- in breach of a 30-year-old law banning the use of elephants to transport wood.  Others "could be forced (to beg) on the streets," he said. It is yet another twist in the saga of the exploitation of elephants, which animal rights campaigners have long been fighting to protect from the abusive tourism industry.

- 'Crisis point' -
For those hawking a once-in-a-lifetime experience with the giant creatures -- whether from afar or up close -- the slump began in late January.   Chinese visitors, who make up the majority of Thailand's 40 million tourists, plunged by more than 80 percent in February as China locked down cities hard-hit by the virus and banned external travel. By March, the travel restrictions into Thailand -- which has 1,388 confirmed cases of the virus -- had extended to Western countries.

With elephants increasingly malnourished due to the loss of income, the situation is "at a crisis point," says Saengduean Chailert, owner of Elephant Nature Park.   Her sanctuary for around 80 rescued pachyderms only allows visitors to observe the creatures, a philosophy at odds with venues that have them performing tricks and offering rides.   She has organised a fund to feed elephants and help mahouts in almost 50 camps nationwide, fearing the only options will soon be limited to zoos, starvation or logging work.  For those restrained by short chains all day, the stress could lead to fights breaking out, says Saengduean, of camps that can no longer afford medical treatment for the creatures.

Calls are mounting for the government to fund stricken camps to ensure the welfare of elephants. "We need 1,000 baht a day (about $30) for each elephant," says Apichet Duangdee, who runs the Elephant Rescue Park. Freeing his eight mammals rescued from circuses and loggers into the forests is out of the question as they would likely be killed in territorial fights with wild elephants. He is planning to take out a two million baht ($61,000) loan soon to keep his elephants fed.   "I will not abandon them," he added.
Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2020 16:18:17 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, March 25, 2020 (AFP) - Thailand barred entry into the kingdom late on Wednesday, enacting sweeping emergency powers in a bid to stem the local spread of the coronavirus outbreak.    The measures, which stopped short of a full lockdown after days of vacillation by the government, are a hammer blow to the country's vital tourism sector.   Tens of thousands of travellers remain in the kingdom, facing uncertainty with airlines in chaos and restrictions on return to their countries.

Bangkok, a city of 10 million, was hushed Wednesday as shops and restaurants shuttered, and Buddhist monks seated a metre apart led an anti-virus prayer session televised nationwide.   But social media showed thousands of foreigners jammed in chaotic lines at the capital's immigration office to file for visa extensions.    The Royal Gazette announced Wednesday night that authorities would "close all checkpoints and gates" for its land borders, while entry by air and ship will also be halted.   Diplomats and returning Thais who have health certificates will still be allowed to return.

All gatherings are also outlawed, and authorities have asked vulnerable people -- like the elderly -- stay home.   But festive ceremonies, like weddings or family activities, may continue under rules issued by the government.    Authorities also banned "reports of untrue news which could lead to fear", under penalty of up to two years in prison.    The state of emergency will continue until April 30.    Thailand currently has 934 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including four deaths.    The highly infectious virus has killed more 18,000 globally, spurring governments to introduce harsh measures forbidding citizens from leaving their homes.

The kingdom was the first country to confirm a case outside China in January, but incremental measures were taken due to its flagging economy's reliance on tourism.    The tripling in cases over the past week has sent Thais in a panic, and many have taken to social media to criticise the government's spotty containment measures.    Premier Prayut Chan-O-Cha warned earlier Wednesday against sharing "fake news" -- a rebuke coming days after a man was arrested for a Facebook post complaining of lax airport checks.   Thailand has in the past enacted emergency laws to quell political riots, which critics say could be used to muzzle the press.
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2020 11:36:13 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, March 6, 2020 (AFP) - Thai health authorities on Friday said they would not order the compulsory quarantine of visitors from four countries hit hard by coronavirus, as the kingdom struggles to balance health fears with the needs of its flatlining economy.   The holidays of possibly tens of thousands of people were cast into doubt on Tuesday when the health minister insisted a quarantine of all entrants from nine countries including China -- its territories of Hong Kong and Macau -- Italy, Iran, South Korea and Japan, would be imposed.   On Friday health authorities spiked the plan, instead "recommending" arrivals from just four countries -- China, Iran, Italy and South Korea -- stay indoors and report to authorities for monitoring.   "We recommend home quarantine," Sukhum Kanchanapimai, from the health ministry told reporters, adding those who register with authorities will receive free food from Thailand's biggest grocery group.

All other travellers from the four countries will have to "report on their health status daily", said Tanarak Plipat of the Disease Control Department, or risk "punishment" under the law.   A British man who entered the kingdom from Hong Kong became the country's 48th confirmed case of the virus, health authorities added.   The kingdom has reported one death so far, but the number of cases detected has remained surprisingly low in a country that attracts some 40 million foreigners a year.   Speculation is pointing to a limited testing regime at a time when Thailand is determined not to frighten off tourists.

Friday's announcement, for now, ends a week-long barrage of conflicting information, which baffled holidaymakers hunting winter sun.    But the Tourism Authority of Thailand confirmed Thursday the country could see a loss of six million visitors in 2020.   As a result the country's tourist-reliant economy has hit the skids, with the impact of COVID-19 crisis hacking back at already sluggish growth forecasts to as low as two percent this year.   With exports seizing up to China and other COVID-19 hit nations, experts warn Thailand is facing a hammer blow to its economy.

The COVID-19 crisis has forced Thailand to cancel full moon beach parties, pare back its celebrations of the annual water festival next month and postpone its leg of the MotoGP until October.   While the number of detected virus cases is yet to spike, Thailand's social media is bubbling with coronavirus rumours and health safety advice.   In a Thai-style antidote to the grim warnings over a deadly virus, the BTS - Bangkok's overground train service - on Friday released a jaunty 'COVID-19: Dance Against The Virus' track.   It drew tens of thousands of likes on Facebook hours after making its debut.
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2020 13:57:14 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, March 5, 2020 (AFP) - A popular full-moon party in southern Thailand known for its raucous revelry has been cancelled because of the coronavirus, an official said Thursday, the latest hit to a tourism industry which foresees a loss of six million visitors this year.   Tourism is a cornerstone of Thailand's economy, and the virus has wreaked havoc as visitor numbers have dwindled in the wake of the epidemic.

Attracting some 40 million foreigners a year, the Tourism Authority of Thailand confirmed Thursday the country could see a loss of six million visitors in 2020.    Their absence, particularly the Chinese, has turned once-popular tourist attractions -- such as animal-themed parks in Pattaya and the sandy beaches of Phuket -- into near-ghost towns.

The full moon party on southern island Koh Phangan -- which draws some 10,000 partiers each month -- will be the latest casualty, according to a local official.    "To prevent the spread of COVID-19, (the business association) has voted to suspend the party," Somchai Somwong, Koh Phangan's acting district chief, announced Thursday.

The cancellation comes the week the Thai government plunged tens of thousands of holiday plans in doubt.   Its health minister announced -- and then swiftly rescinded -- an order for all inbound travellers from 11 countries and territories to undergo quarantine, sending waves of concern on Twitter among Thais and foreigner visitors.

On Thursday, the palace mouthpiece Royal Gazette said four countries -- South Korea, Italy, Iran, and China, including Macau and Hong Kong -- would be classified as "high-risk areas".    But details on whether foreign travellers from the four countries would be subjected to a two-week quarantine were not immediately announced.

Thailand currently has 47 confirmed cases of the coronavirus.    The latest announced Thursday include a 42-year-old Thai man and a 29-year-old Italian man, who is currently hospitalised in Chonburi province.    Both had returned from Italy, where there are more than 100 fatalities from the coronavirus.

Despite Bangkok being a major flight hub, Thailand's response to controlling the coronavirus spread has appeared ad hoc.   Conflicting information given by ministries has added to public mistrust, fuelling panic buying of hand sanitisers and face masks across the country.    The Commerce Ministry on Thursday sent out more than 100 "caravans" throughout the country to sell packs of face masks -- drawing lines of retail workers when they stopped at shopping malls.
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Cape Verde

General
The Cape Verde islands are situated off the west coast of Africa (adjacent to Senegal) and are becoming a more popular destination for European travellers aiming to avoid the major busy tourist destinations of the world. There are nine inhabi
ed islands within the group and also some uninhabited volcanic ones. The capital is Praia (on Santiago) and Portugese is the official language. The major port is Mindelo on the island of Sao Vicente.

Travelling to Cape Verde
There is a recently opened international airport in Praia and a second international airport (Amilcar Cabral) located on Sal Island which is about 150 kms northeast of the capital. Generally the facilities for tourists are still quite limited though improving and most developed on Sal.
Arriving in Cape Verde
The climate is oceanic tropical with temperatures varying from 20oC to 30oC throughout the year. The light rainfall tends to occur in Aug to November. During this time humidity can be higher but this is not usually a significant factor.
Food & Water
In line with many hotter regions of the world the level of food and water hygiene varies greatly from area to area and depending on the establishment. Travellers are advised to eat freshly cooked hot food, to avoid cold meals (salads etc) and particularly to avoid any undercooked bivalve shellfish meals (clams, mussels, oysters etc). Fresh milk may be unpasteurised and should be avoided.
Travelling around the islands
As with many archipelago destinations there is a way of moving from island to island if you wish to explore. This can be by boat or plane in many but not all cases. However if travelling by plane be aware that the limited baggage handling capacity of the small planes may lead to some delay in eventually receiving your luggage. During the dry dusty season (December to April) flights may be cancelled due to poor visibility. The road traffic moves on the right and seatbelts are compulsory for all in the front seat. Motorcyclists must wear helmets and have their lights on at all times.

Accidents
The majority of accidents occur because of unlit narrow winding roads, aggressive driving and alcohol impairing the senses. There are a large number of festivals and around these times alcohol intake increases considerably with the resultant increase in danger for all road users.
Emergency numbers
The emergency numbers are 130 for medical assistance, 131 for fire assistance and 132 for the police. There is no organised roadside assistance and travellers are strongly advised to avoid hiring cars or motorbikes. Taxis and buses provide a reasonable service and are a much safer option.
Sun Exposure & Dehydration
Many travellers from Europe will enjoy the beautiful climate to excess and run the risk of severe sunburn and dehydration. This is particularly true for the first 24 to 48 hours after arrival (when the traveller may fall asleep under the glaring sun) and also for young children. Sensible covering, avoiding the midday sun and replacing lost fluids and salt are essential to maintain your health.
Swimming and Water Sports
Island life in the tropics tends to increase the amount of water exposure for many tourists. It is important to check out the facilities (both the professionalism of their personnel and the equipment) before undertaking any water sports. Talk to others who have already taken part or your holiday representative and listen to their experiences. This will help you make the right choices. Remember the tides and currents around the various islands can be very strong so always follow local advice and never swim alone. Watch children carefully.
Mosquitoes and Malaria
This island chain has only a few species of mosquitoes and the risk of malaria is thought to be negligible. WHO (2006) does not recommend prophylaxis for travellers but comments that there is a mild risk on Santiago mainly between August and November during the rainy season. Good repellents should be used by all travellers - especially at dusk and dawn.
Safety & Security
Unfortunately there is no idyllic destination throughout the world and petty crime occurs in Cape Verde as elsewhere. Take special care at festivals and in market places. Don't flaunt your personal wealth while out and about. Gangs of children have been involved in attacks against tourists so avoid any potential confrontation.
Contacts
U.S. Embassy: Rua Abilio m. Macedo 81, Praia Tel.: 238-61-56-16/17; Fax: 238-61-13-55; Web: usembassy.state.gov/praia
U.K. Embassy: Shell Cabo Verde, Sarl, Av Amilcar Cabral CP4, Sao Vincente
Tel.: 238-32-66-25/26/27; Fax: 238-32-66-29; E-mail: antonio.a.canuto@scv.sims.com
Vaccines
Travelling directly from Europe there are no essential vaccines for entering Cape Verde. It is a Yellow fever risk region but there have been no cases for many years. Other vaccines need to be considered against food and water borne diseases such as Hepatitis A & Typhoid.
Healthcare
This is a beautiful destination and direct flight will increase the numbers travelling. However all travellers to Cape Verde will need to be seen for a detailed medical consultation to ensure that they have appropriate advice and protection for their individual trip. Further information on health issues and all the latest world travel news reports are available at www.tmb.ie

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:16:53 +0100 (MET)

Praia, Cape Verde, March 24, 2020 (AFP) - A 62-year-old British man has died in Cape Verde after contracting COVID-19, the government said Tuesday, marking the West African archipelago's first fatality from the disease.   The man arrived on the island of Boavista -- a tourist hotspot and one of Cape Verde's 10 islands -- on March 9, and began showing symptoms a week later.     His condition "began to worsen, and unfortunately he died on Monday evening," Health Minister Arlindo do Rosario said Tuesday.

All staff at the hotel where the man was staying are now in confinement, according to the authorities.   The British tourist was the first coronavirus case to be detected in the former Portuguese colony.    Authorities have detected two other cases on Boavista: one in a friend of the British tourist, the other in a 60-year-old Dutch tourist, whose case is considered worrying.
Date: Fri, 3 May 2019 12:24:17 +0200
By Anne-Sophie FAIVRE LE CADRE

Cha das Caldeiras, Cape Verde, May 3, 2019 (AFP) - Four years after the volcano erupted -- razing everything in its path in Cape Verde's Cha das Caldeiras valley -- the floor tiles of the small, rebuilt inn are warm to the touch.    "We constructed too quickly on lava that had not yet cooled down," says hotel owner Marisa Lopes, in her early 30s.   "For the first months, the floors in the rooms were so hot that you couldn't walk on them with bare feet."

Lopes is one of dozens of entrepreneurs locked in a perpetual tug of war with the Pico do Fogo volcano towering over Cha das Caldeiras, whose population numbers 500.    The name means Peak of Fire in Portuguese.   The volcano generates the bulk of the crater community's gross domestic product, attracting some 5,000 tourists every year who need hotel beds, food and tour guides -- about 30 make a living as guides in this remote part of West Africa.   But on the downside, the festering giant erupts once a generation -- six times in the last 200 years -- destroying everything in its path; crops, homes, roads.   On November 23, 2014, Lopes watched helplessly as the Pico -- almost 2,900 metres (9,500 feet) high -- erupted after a 19-year slumber.

Lava engulfed her brand new tourist hostel, eponymously named Casa Marisa.   Three months later, she built a new one, again in the flow zone of the crater.   "The volcano took a house from me, but it gave me another. Without it, there would be no tourism," she told AFP, undeterred.   Despite the constant danger and government efforts to dissuade them, the inhabitants of Cha das Caldeiras keep coming back.     After the last eruption, the military evacuated those in the path of the lava and the state provided food aid for six months afterwards.   But it was the people themselves who reconstructed roads and found the materials for rebuilding homes and hotels. Again.

- 'It's home' -
Cicilio Montrond, 42, was also there in 2014, looking on as a river of molten rock spewing from the Pico do Fogo burnt his fruit trees and buried everything he owned in a thick, grey coat.   The eruption killed no one, but left 1,500 people homeless.   After a few weeks in Sao Filipe, a nearby town to where the valley inhabitants were relocated, Montrond returned to Cha das Caldeiras with his wife.   Not a bird stirred in the air still polluted with ash, not a creature moved on the still warm lava ocean that now covered the valley floor.

For weeks, Montrond and his wife lived in a tent on the roof of their destroyed house with no water, no electricity and no food apart from a few canned goods.   "We lived in makeshift shelters, it was precarious, dangerous. But we were home."   For Montrond, it is unimaginable to live anywhere else than the fertile, lava-fed valley that, between outbursts, boasts an abundance of vines, fig trees and cassava.   "It is the volcano that allows us to live," said Montrond, tourist guide-turned-hotelkeeper and restaurateur.   The Pico's eruptions are rarely deadly in terms of human life.   But what about the next time?   "The volcano is my life," Montrond shrugged, as he gazed upon the house he built with his own hands.    "I was born here, I will die here."

- Rocks were falling -
The volcano gives. The volcano takes.   First it destroys the vines, then it provides fruitful soil for the planting of new ones. These produce wines -- some of it for the export market.   Far from fearing or despising the peak's constant threatening presence, the inhabitants appear to embrace it and have made it part of their identity.   They evoke past eruptions with a smile, sometimes even a touch of nostalgia.   Margarita Lopes Dos Santos, 99, has been forced out of her home by the three last eruptions of the Pico do Fogo.

The first was in June 1951, shortly after she gave birth to her first child.   "I remember the first time like it was yesterday," she said, through a beaming, toothless smile.   "It was a lot more violent. Rocks were falling from the sky. There were tornadoes of ash and of smoke," she recounted, while husking beans.   Outside her house, Lopes Dos Santos has planted flowers -- flashes of red begonias that provide the only colour in the grey and black landscape.   "The resilience of the people of Cha is extraordinary," said Jorge Nogueira, president of the municipal council of Sao Filipe, capital of the island of Fogo, Cape Verde.   "As soon as they could, they came back -- to poor living conditions, but no matter: the only thing that counted for them was to be home."
Date: Tue 3 Oct 2017
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

In a follow-up on the locally transmitted malaria increases reported on Cabo Verde [Cape Verde] this year [2017], 254 indigenous cases were reported through [24 Sep 2017].

Most cases (75 percent) have not sought treatment until 48-96 hours after illness onset. Despite this, case fatality rates have remained low (0.4 percent), with one death reported in an indigenous case to date. 7 severe malaria cases and 2 cases of malaria in pregnancy have been reported. There are also anecdotal reports of recrudescence.

To date, the disease has been localized to the city of Praia on Santiago Island without any further spread.

A handful of cases have also been detected on neighbouring islands (Sao Vicente, Sal, and Porto Novo); however, their infections were likely all acquired during travel to Praia or overseas, with no evidence of onward local transmission.

The malaria epidemic in Cabo Verde has begun to show early signs of improvement but the situation remains tenuous, with heavy rainfall continuing between August and October, health officials said.
===================
[The last news from ProMED from 4 Sep 2017 (archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20170904.5293108) reported 116 cases of malaria in Praia. Thus, over the last month 136 new cases have been diagnosed. It is good news that the outbreak has not spread, showing that the control measures are working. Due to the present outbreak, the CDC is now recommending malaria chemoprophylaxis for travellers visiting the city of Praia on Santiago Island (<https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/new_info/2017/Cape_Verde_2017.html>). - ProMED Mod.EP]

[Maps of Cape Verde can be seen at
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6553>. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]

08 Sep 2017


Following an increase in malaria cases, additional malaria prevention advice for some UK travellers to the capital city of Praia in Cape Verde is recommended.

Since June 2017, the Ministry of Heath for Cape Verde has reported an increase in locally acquired malaria cases in the capital city of Praia on the island of Santiago. As of 5 September 2017, a total of 164 locally acquired falciparum malaria cases have been reported in the local population [2][3]. Currently, there are no reports of malaria in tourists who have visited Cape Verde in 2017.  

Those travelling to Praia who are at increased risk of malaria e.g. long term travellers, or those at risk of severe complications from malaria: pregnant women, infants and young children, the elderly and travellers who do not have a functioning spleen, should consider taking anti-malarials and seek advice about which antimalarial is suitable for them from their travel health advisor.

Date: Sun 3 Sep 2017 08:58:00 WEST
Source: The Portugal News (TPN) Online [edited]
<http://theportugalnews.com/news/portugal-health-department-issues-malaria-warning-for-cape-verde-capital/43059

The Portuguese health department has advised pregnant women not to travel to the Cape Verde island of Santiago [where the capital, Praia, is located], and if travellers cannot put their journey off, they should take anti-malaria drugs.

The health department warning comes after the World Health Organisation (WHO) said in August [2017] that there was an outbreak of malaria in Praia, the archipelago's capital. Travellers are also advised that adults and children should use insect repellent throughout the day and reapply it as often as necessary. If travellers also use sun cream, they should apply the insect repellent on top of the sun cream, not under it, the warning said. So far, there have been 116 cases of malaria in Praia, numbers never before seen in the city, where the highest number was 95 cases in the whole of 2001.
============
[The Cape Verde authorities reported 45 cases of malaria up to 30 Jul 2017 (see archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20170808.5236283).

The outbreak continues and it is important to introduce identification and spraying of breeding sites. Also using a single dose of primaquine after treatment, which kills gametocytes, to ensure that the cases cannot transmit the infection, as recommended by the WHO (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/atoz/who_pq_policy_recommendation/en/). - ProMED Mod.EP

Maps of Cape Verde can be seen at
<http://www.nationsonline.org/maps/Cape-Verde-Map.jpg>
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/15>. - ProMED Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 13:48:38 +0200 (METDST)

Vienna, April 6, 2020 (AFP) - Austria could start easing its coronavirus lockdown measures from next week, Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Monday, but warned that this depended on citizens abiding by social distancing rules.   "The aim is that from April 14... smaller shops up to a size of 400 square metres, as well as hardware and garden stores can open again, under strict security conditions of course," Kurz said at a press conference.

He said that as of April 14, the current obligation to cover one's mouth and nose in supermarkets will be extended to other shops and on public transport.   He added that if the government's timetable goes to plan, larger shops will reopen on May 1.   From mid-May hotels, restaurants and other services could also start to open their doors again in stages, Kurz said, adding that a decision on this would be taken at the end of April.

- 'Strongest decline in EU' -
However, he said that the restrictions on movement that Austria has introduced to fight the spread of COVID-19 remained in place.   He urged Austrians not to celebrate Easter with people outside their household, adding that he would not be seeing his own parents.   Schools will remain closed until at least mid-May and public events will remain banned until the end of June.

If trends in infection begin to worsen again, the government "always has the possibility to hit the emergency brake" and re-introduce restrictions, Kurz said.   He pointed to the example of Singapore, which initially had managed to contain the spread of the virus but was now facing a second wave of infections.   Kurz also warned that international travel would continue to be severely hampered for the foreseeable future, with discussions ongoing at an EU level as to how restrictions could be eased.   Kurz was speaking alongside several cabinet colleagues who entered wearing face masks before taking them off to speak behind specially erected screens.

- Reopening parks -
Interior Minister Karl Nehammer announced that the government also hoped to re-open public parks on April 14.   He clarified that the punishment for not adhering to mask-wearing in shops and on public transport would be 50 euros ($54).   Health Minister Rudolf Anschober said he was encouraged by the downward trend in the growth rate for infections, adding: "We have the strongest coronavirus decline in the EU".   The country of 8.8 million people currently has 12,058 confirmed infections, with 204 deaths and 2,998 recoveries.   In mid-March the increase in infections was running at around 40 percent, which unchecked would have led to two million people in Austria contracting the virus by now, Anschober said.

The daily rate of increase is now at 1.6 percent with a successful flattening of the curve, Anschober said, although he emphasised the rate must be brought down yet further.   Anschober also welcomed the fact that Austria was "well ahead" of many other countries when it comes to testing, with 111,000 tests carried out so far.   He said that great progress was being made on antibody tests and that he hoped these could be used in infection "hotspots".   Also on Monday authorities in western Tyrol, Austria's worst hit region, said that the quarantine ordered for the region's 750,000 people would be lifted on Tuesday.
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 13:40:30 +0200 (METDST)

Berlin, April 6, 2020 (AFP) - Germany will put all arriving travellers in quarantine for 14 days, the interior ministry said Monday, as Berlin ramps up entry curbs to fight the coronavirus pandemic.   The measure, which will come into force on April 10, is expected to affect mostly German or EU nationals and residents, as the European Union has already banned all arrivals from outside the bloc.

Workers in the health sector living outside Germany in border regions will be exempted from the restriction, which will also not apply for business travellers entering for a short period of time.   Chancellor Angela Merkel's government had decided on the toughened rule during a cabinet meeting focus on the battle against the coronavirus pandemic.

During the same meeting, which is ongoing, ministers agreed that 100 percent of loans made by banks to small- and medium-sized firms will be guaranteed by the state.   The federal government will stand fully behind 500,000 euros ($540,000) of lending to companies with up to 50 employees and 800,000 euros for larger ones, upping its guarantee level from a previous 80 percent for large firms or 90 percent for smaller ones.
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 13:26:30 +0200 (METDST)

Madrid, April 6, 2020 (AFP) - Spain declared Monday a fourth consecutive drop in the number of coronavirus-related deaths with 637 over the past 24 hours, the lowest number in nearly two weeks.   Fatalities, which were sharply down on the record 950 on Thursday, brought the total deaths in the country to 13,055, second only to Italy.   The official figures represent an increase of 5.1 percent over the last 24 hours, compared to a 4.8 percent rise on Sunday and a 32.63 percent leap as recently as March 21.

The number of new infections also slowed, rising 3.3 percent to 135,032, down from a rise of 24.8 percent on March 21.   "These figures confirm again this downwards tendency which we have been observing," said Maria Jose Sierra of the health ministry's emergencies coordination unit.   Over 40,000 coronavirus patients have been discharged from hospital, or nearly 30 percent of all confirmed cases of the disease, she added.   With deaths and new infections falling the Spanish government is studying how to gradually ease the lockdown imposed on the country of 47 million people on March 14. It has been  extended until April 25.

The government plans to ramp up testing to be able to isolate people who are infected but not showing symptoms and is mulling requiring all people to wear face masks in public to curb the spread of the disease.   Four Spanish firms are currently producing 245,000 coronavirus tests per week, Foreign Minister Arancha Gonzalez Laya said during a television interview on Monday.   "During the coming weeks we will multiply by three the capacity of our companies to supply the market" with tests, she added.   As for face masks, the minister said "we will probably all have to learn to use them as a prophylactic, at least until there is a vaccine" against COVID-19.
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 12:53:51 +0200 (METDST)

Kinshasa, April 6, 2020 (AFP) - Kinshasa on Monday closed off its upmarket business district for two weeks and began a large-scale disinfection operation in a bid to clean up DR Congo's main suspected source of coronavirus.   Access to Gombe, which houses the country's main institutions and foreign embassies, was barricaded off to everyone except local residents with a pass, an AFP journalist saw.   "The choice of this district is linked to the fact that it's from Gombe that the virus is spreading little by little to other districts," the health authorities said in a daily statement.   "Massive disinfection has been scheduled during this period. The offices and main buildings in Gombe district are concerned. Once everything has been cleaned in Gombe, other areas will targeted," it said.   On Thursday, Kinshasa Governor Gentiny  Ngobila announced that Gombe, one of the capital's 26 districts, would be "placed in quarantine" from April 6-20.   The district "is considered to be the epicentre of the epidemic in the city," he said.

According to the Democratic Republic of Congo's official figures, the sprawling country has recorded 161 cases of coronavirus, 18 of them fatal.    Almost all have occurred in the capital, with a handful of other cases in the  volatile east.   During the partial lockdown, anti-coronavirus teams in Kinshasa will "look for sick people but also investigate risk contacts and asymptomatic cases" for testing and treatment, the authorities said.   People who go to work in Gombe -- drivers, gardeners and so on -- will be tested in their districts of residence and will be quarantined if they have the virus.
6th April 2020

Twinkling flames from candles and traditional lamps lit up India's night sky Sunday in a nine-minute show to mark the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, which has left the vast nation in lockdown.   Across major cities and towns in the world's second-most populous country of 1.3 billion people, many heeded the call of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to turn off their lights at 9:00 pm local time.
6th April 2020

South Korea reported fewer than 50 new coronavirus cases for the first time in more than six weeks, having once been the hardest-hit country outside China, where the virus first emerged.   The South confirmed 47 new cases on the previous day, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, taking its total to date to 10,284. It was the lowest increase since late February.
6th April 2020

The city-state has put nearly 20,000 migrant workers under quarantine for two weeks after a growing number of coronavirus infections were detected in their dormitories.   Authorities reported 120 new virus cases Sunday, the highest jump for the country in a single day, with many linked to foreign workers' dorms.    Many workers from less affluent countries, particularly parts of South Asia, come to Singapore to work in construction and are typically housed in large dormitory complexes.
6th April 2020

The Japanese government may declare a state of emergency this week to contain the coronavirus outbreak, media reports said.    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is reportedly set to make the declaration for parts of Japan including Tokyo, as the number of people infected with the virus continues to increase.   The news pushed up Tokyo stocks, with investors seeing the move as positive for containing the outbreak, analysts said.
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 09:16:37 +0200 (METDST)
By Philippe Carillo

Port Vila, Vanuatu, April 6, 2020 (AFP) - A deadly Pacific cyclone intensified as it hit Vanuatu on Monday, threatening a natural disaster that experts fear will undermine the impoverished nation's battle to remain coronavirus-free.   Tropical Cyclone Harold, which claimed 27 lives when it swept through the Solomon Islands last week, strengthened to a scale-topping Category 5 superstorm overnight, Vanuatu's meteorology service said.

The cyclone is now packing winds of up to 235 kilometres per hour (145 miles per hour), prompting red alerts across several provinces.   It made landfall on the remote east coast of Espiritu Santo island on Monday morning and was heading directly for Vanuatu's second-largest town Luganville, which has a population of 16,500.   The slow-moving storm is expected to pass north of the capital Port Vila early Tuesday.   "For now, we don't have any reports of injury, but lots of damage," Red Cross Vanuatu secretary general Jacqueline de Gaillande told AFP.

Another concern is the impact a large natural disaster could have on Vanuatu's attempts to remain one of the world's few countries without any reported COVID-19 infections.   The nation has sealed its international borders to avoid the virus but emergency measures including bans on public meetings have been temporarily suspended so people can gather in evacuation centres.   "There have been no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Vanuatu, but a significant disaster at this time could present serious logistical challenges to delivering life-saving aid," Oxfam's Vanuatu director Elizabeth Faerua said.

- Widespread destruction -
A major international relief effort was needed the last time a Category 5 system, Cyclone Pam, hit Vanuatu in 2015.   If a similar operation were needed in the wake of Cyclone Harold, it would run the risk of importing the virus to a nation that lacks the health infrastructure to deal with even a mild outbreak.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern raised concerns about the cyclone and said the Kiwi military was ready to deploy if needed, even though New Zealand is on COVID-19 lockdown.   "(Harold) looks like it's coming into the Pacific with considerable force," she told reporters.   "Our defence force is at the ready, that's the role they play regardless of what's going on in New Zealand."   Cyclone Pam flattened Port Vila, killed 11 people and left a swath of destruction that the World Bank estimated wiped out almost two-thirds of Vanuatu's economic capacity.

De Gaillande said Vanuatu's government could face a balancing act between helping cyclone-devastated communities and potentially importing the virus by allowing in international aid.   "We will need international aid, but we're hoping initially it will be through funding only, so we can buy supplies and help those most in need," she said.   "We have a lot of skilled people on the ground here already (to carry our disaster operations)."   Cyclone Harold has already caused widespread damage in he Solomon Islands, where an inter-island ferry ignored weather warnings and 27 people were washed off its decks.

Solomons police said Sunday that the bodies of five passengers from the MV Taimareho had been recovered and the search would resume the next day.   "I would like to thank everyone... involved in the search for the missing 27 people so far as we try as much as possible to find the bodies so their grieving relatives can give them a proper burial," chief superintendent Richard Menapi said.   The ferry set off from Honiara for Malaita island on Thursday night, packed with more than 700 people as part of a government evacuation programme in response to the virus crisis.
Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 01:32:44 +0200 (METDST)

Abidjan, April 5, 2020 (AFP) - Residents in a working-class district of the Ivory Coast city of Abidjan on Sunday destroyed a coronavirus testing centre that was under construction, police and health ministry officials said.   Videos posted on social media, showed several dozen people dismantling the building, some of them shouting: "We don't want it!"

The incident happened in Yopougon district of the city of five million inhabitants, which is the country's commercial capital.   Locals had demonstrated against the centre because they thought it was too close to their homes and right in the middle of a residential district, one police officer told AFP on condition of anonymity.   But the building, which was still under construction, had never been intended as a treatment centre for virus patients -- only as a testing centre, said a health ministry official, who also asked not to be named.

This was the first violent incident connected to the COVID-19 outbreak in the country, which so far appears to have been relatively untouched by the virus, at least according to official figures.   They put the number of cases at 261, with three deaths so far.

Nevertheless, the authorities are trying to increase their capacity to treat the outbreak.   President Alassane Ouattara declared a state of emergency on March 23.   Abidjan has already been placed under quarantine, effectively cut off from the rest of the country, and a nationwide overnight curfew is in force.

Schools, churches and non-essential shops have been closed and gatherings have been banned.   On Saturday, senior health officials recommended that people wear masks in public places to try to slow the spread of the virus.   So far however, the government has not ordered a full lockdown.   Last Tuesday, the government announced a 2.6-billion-euro plan ($2.8 billion) to tackle the economic and social effects of the pandemic, which is forecast to halve the country's growth rate to 3.6 percent in 2020.