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Grenada

Grenada US Consular Information Sheet
March 30, 2007
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Grenada is a developing Caribbean island nation.
The capital is St. George’s. Tourism facilities vary, according to price and area. Read the Department of Sta
e Background Notes on Grenada for additional information.
ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: Although Grenada has its own entry requirements, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 requires all U.S. citizen travelers to and from the Caribbean to have a valid, unexpired passport to depart or enter the United States by air. Effective January 23, 2007, U.S. citizens, including infants and children, must have a valid, unexpired U.S. passport, or a “passport card” (which is now under development) when departing or entering the U.S. by air.
IMPORTANT NEW INFORMATION:The new passport requirement will be extended to all land border crossings as well as sea travel no later than June 1, 2009.
We strongly encourage all American citizen travelers to apply for a U.S. passport or “passport card” well in advance of anticipated travel.
American citizens can visit travel.state.gov or call 1-877-4USA-PPT (1-877-487-2778) for information on how to apply for their passports. Until the passport requirement is in place for sea travel, U.S. citizens traveling by ship to Grenada may refer to our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for documentation that is acceptable for travel to and from Grenada.
There is no visa requirement for stays up to three months. There is an airport departure fee of US$20 for adults and US$10 for children between the ages of five and twelve.
See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on Grenada and other countries.

For additional information concerning entry/exit requirements, travelers may contact the Embassy of Grenada, 1701 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20009, telephone: (202) 265-2561, Fax: (202) 265-2468: e-mail: grenada@oas.org, or the Consulate of Grenada in New York.
Read our information on dual Nationality and the prevention of international child abduction. Also, please see our Customs Information.
SAFETY AND SECURITY:
For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s Internet web site, where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found.
Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.
These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.
For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.
CRIME:
Street crime occurs in Grenada.
Tourists have been victims of armed robbery especially in isolated areas and thieves frequently steal credit cards, jewelry, U.S. passports and money.
Mugging, purse snatching and other robberies may occur in areas near hotels, beaches and restaurants, particularly after dark.
Visitors should exercise appropriate caution when walking after dark or when using the local bus system or taxis hired on the road.
It is advisable to hire taxis to and from restaurants.
INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:
The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.
If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.
Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:
Medical care is limited.
U.S. citizens requiring medical treatment may contact the U.S Embassy in St. George’s for a list of local doctors, dentists, pharmacies and hospitals.
Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the U.S. can cost thousands of dollars.
Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services.
Pharmacies are usually well stocked, and prescription medicine is available, but travelers are advised to bring with them sufficient prescription medicine for the length of their stay as occasionally there are temporary shortages of medicines; most pharmacies will check with others in the area to see if they can get what is needed.

Grenada chlorinates its water, making it generally safe to drink.
However, during especially heavy rains, quality control can slip, particularly in the city of St. George’s.
It is recommended that visitors to Grenada request bottled water, which is widely available and relatively inexpensive.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s Internet site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel.
For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at http://www.who.int/en.
Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.
MEDICAL INSURANCE:
The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.
Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.
TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:
While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.
The information below concerning Grenada is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.
Traffic moves on the left in Grenada; the majority of vehicles are right hand drive. Grenada’s roads, paved and unpaved, are mostly narrow and winding, with many blind corners and narrow or no shoulders.
Road surfaces often deteriorate; especially in the rainy season (June –November) before maintenance work begins.
Driving conditions in Grenada, including road conditions, increasing numbers of vehicles, and sometimes undisciplined minibus drivers all require caution and reduced speed for safety.
The Government of Grenada has a seat belt law; drivers and passengers found not wearing seat belts are subject to a fine of EC$1,000 (US$400).
Getting a local temporary drivers license, based on valid U.S. drivers license plus EC$30 (US$12), is highly recommended.
In the event of an accident, not having a valid local driver’s license may result in a fine, regardless of who is at fault.
Rental vehicle companies are widely available; most of them will assist in applying for temporary driving licenses.
The adequacy of road signage varies, but is generally poor to nonexistent.
For specific information concerning Grenada driver’s permits, road safety, vehicle inspection, road tax and mandatory insurance, please contact the Grenada Board of Tourism in New York at 317 Madison Avenue, Suite 1704, New York, N.Y. 10017, telephone 1-800-927-9554, (212) 599 0301; Fax: 212-573-9731; e-mail: gbt@caribsurf.com or www.grenadagrenadines.com
Please refer to our Road Safety Page for more information.
Visit the website of the country’s national tourist office at www.grenadagrenadines.com.
Additional general information can be found on Grenada’s Internet website at: http://www.grenadaconsulate.org.
AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Grenada’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for the oversight of Grenada’s air carrier operations.
For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s internet website at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Recovery efforts have been made from the damage caused by Hurricane Ivan in September 2004 and Hurricane Emily in July 2005.
All utilities have been restored.
Cruise ships have returned and all the main shopping areas are open.
While the majority of hotels are up and running, there is still one major resort (Le Source), which remain closed.
The resort’s management hopes to have the hotel open by the time Cricket World Cup 2007 Super Eight games take place in Grenada (alternate days April 10-21).

The February 1 merger of Liat and Caribbean Star airlines has reduced the number of daily flights between Grenada and the other Eastern Caribbean islands from six to three.
Travelers coming into the region from the U.S. and elsewhere should verify in advance directly with Liat that they have a valid reservation.
Some travelers making reservations from outside the region have arrived in the Eastern Caribbean and discovered that the reservation they thought they had on Liat, is not recognized by the airline, resulting in delayed travel as well as additional hotel costs.

Grenada experiences tropical storms during the hurricane season, from June through November. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available via the Internet from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at http://www.fema.gov.
It is difficult to cash personal U.S. checks in Grenada.
If accepted, they will take approximately six weeks to clear by a local bank. Major credit cards are widely accepted, and ATM facilities are available at most banks.
Most hotels and restaurants take U.S. currency; however, change will be in local currency.
CRIMINAL PENALTIES:
While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.
Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.
Persons violating Grenada laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.
Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Grenada are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.
For more information, please see our information on criminal penalties.
CHILDREN'S ISSUES:
For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children’s Issues website.
REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Grenada are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration website , and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Grenada.
Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy.
By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.
The U.S. Embassy is located on the main road to Lance Aux Epines after the Christian Scientist Church, and is approximately 15 minutes from the Point Salines International Airport. Telephone: 1-(473) 444-1173/4/5/6; Fax: 1-(473) 444-4820; Internet e-mail: usemb_gd@caribsurf.com. Embassy hours are 8:00 am to 12:30 pm, Monday to Friday except local and American holidays.
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This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated October 13, 2006, to update all sections.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Mon 7 Mar 2016
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

Two weeks ago, health officials in Grenada reported on a chickenpox outbreak that affected 17 students at St. George's Anglican Junior School. The school was closed for the week to monitor and treat affected students.

This pustulovesicular rash represents a generalized herpes outbreak due to the Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathogen/CDC.

Last week, the Ministry of Health screened over 400 students from the St. George's Anglican School. The exercise saw a team of qualified nursing personnel conducting screening and evaluation of students at the St. George's Anglican Junior and Senior Schools.

A total of 255 and 183 students from the junior and senior schools respectively were examined on the compound as the institution reopened its doors following the completion of sanitation and cleaning operations.

During the screening/examination at the school, several students with skin lesions, fever, cold, headaches and skin rashes were identified and were not given clearance for a return to the classroom. Some of the students were referred to the doctor, and others were requested to be observed at home.

Meanwhile, the ministry will undertake a daily monitoring of the school, conduct education sessions with teachers and undertake another medical evaluation of students, in particular the ones that are to be observed at home and referred.

Chickenpox is a common, usually benign childhood disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a member of the herpes family. This virus causes 2 distinct diseases; varicella (chickenpox) is the primary infection, and later when VSV reactivates, herpes zoster (shingles).

Chickenpox is highly contagious and is spread by coughing and sneezing, by direct contact and by aerosolization of the virus from skin lesions. You can also get it by contact with the vesicle secretions from shingles.

The disease is characterized by fever and a red, itchy skin rash that usually starts on the abdomen, back or face and then spreads to nearly all parts of the body. The rash begins as small red bumps that appear as pimples or insect bites. They then develop into thin-walled blisters that are filled with clear fluid which collapse on puncture. The blisters then break, crust over, and leave dry brown scabs.

The chickenpox lesions may be present in several stages of maturity and are more abundant on covered skin rather than exposed. Lesions may also be found in the mouth, upper respiratory tract and genitals.

Chickenpox is contagious from 1-2 days before the rash forms and continues until all the lesions are crusted over (usually about 5 days).

This disease is more serious in adults than in children. Complications of chickenpox are rare, but include pneumonia, encephalitis and secondary bacterial infections.

Infection with this virus usually gives lifelong immunity, although 2nd attacks have been documented in immunocompromised people. The viral infection remains latent, and disease may recur years later as shingles.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the chickenpox vaccine is the best protection against chickenpox. The vaccine is made from weakened varicella virus that produces an immune response in your body that protects you against chickenpox. The chickenpox vaccine was licensed for use in the United States in 1995.  [Byline: Robert Herriman]
===================
[A map of Grenada can be found at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/34>. - ProMED Mod.LK]
Date: Sat 28 Aug 2010
Source: Spice Grenada.com, The New Today [edited]
<http://www.spicegrenada.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2505:dengue-fever-is-present&catid=546:august-28th-2010&Itemid=143>

After weeks of speculation among the population that there are dengue cases on the island, the officials within the Ministry of Health confirmed last week that 39 people in Grenada had come down with the fever. Head of the Epidemiology Unit within the Ministry of Health, Dr Alister Antoine, told reorters last week Tuesday [24 Aug 2010] that every parish, including Carriacou, has been affected by dengue fever, with the youngest case being a 2 year old and the oldest being 72.

He said: "In total, we have 20 males and 19 females. The figures we have now are what we have just confirmed with the lab, meaning that there were 17 new cases diagnosed during the 1st week in August [2010]." According to Dr Antoine, there was a noted increase in infection during the months of July and August. As compared to only one case in February, 6 by June, and with the number jumping to 15 in July.

"People should be making it difficult for the mosquitoes to breed, just make it difficult by cleaning up the place," he said. Presently there are 2 types of [dengue virus] strains recorded in Grenada -- type 1 and type 2, and there have been 2 cases of DHF both of which were mild and were treated successfully.
========================
[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map showing the location of Grenada in the southern Caribbean can be accessed at <http://healthmap.org/r/05Pe>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
Date: Mon, 3 Sep 2007 11:53:29 +0200 (METDST) MIAMI, Sept 3, 2007 (AFP) - A potentially catastrophic class-five Hurricane Felix ripped across the warm waters of the Caribbean early Monday towards Honduras and Belize after damaging homes and power lines in Grenada. The storm was so powerful that it tossed around a US 'hurricane hunter' data gathering airplane and forced it to abort its mission, the Miami Herald reported. At 0900 GMT the center of Felix was located some 445 kilometers (275 miles) south-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, packing winds of 270 kilometers (165 miles) per hour, with higher gusts, the Florida-based National Hurricane Center said in its latest advisory. The hurricane was moving west at around 33 kilometers (21 miles) per hour, and "on this track the center of Felix will be near the coasts of extreme northeastern Nicaragua and northeastern Honduras early on Tuesday morning," the Hurricane Center said. Felix is then forecast to head for Belize and Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, where it could make landfall on Wednesday. No casualties were reported since Felix became the second hurricane of the Atlantic storm season on Saturday, though one person was reported missing in northern Venezuela. In just 15 hours on Sunday, Felix jumped from a Category Two storm with winds at 160 kilometers (100 miles) per hour to a rare Category Five hurricane, the most powerful on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The speed at which Felix reached maximum strength was one of the fastest ever recorded, Hurricane Center specialists said. Felix was so powerful that one of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 'hurricane hunter' airplanes was caught in a rapid updraft-downdraft cycle as it gathered data, the Miami Herald reported. The violent cycle placed four times the weight of gravity on those aboard the plane. "Four Gs can put a fair strain on the aircraft, and it also got some very heavy hail that can rip the paint off the plane," Hurricane Center forecaster James Franklin told the newspaper. The airplane, a modified Orion P-3 that normally carries 14 people, was ordered backto its base at Saint Croix, one of the US Virgin Islands, Franklin said. The storm, nourished by the warm Caribbean ocean, was expected to maintain its strength as it followed the general path that another Category Five storm, Hurricane Dean, took just last week. Though extremely powerful, Felix "has a very small wind field," the Hurricane Center said. "Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 45 kilometers (30 miles) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 kilometers (115 miles)," the Hurricane Center said. The Honduran government early Monday warned officials along its Caribbean coast to prepare for the hurricane. Hurricane conditions "are also possible over extreme northeastern Nicaragua," the Hurricane Center said. In Venezuela civil defense officials said a person went missing as beaches were evacuated in Puerto Cabello, 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Caracas, where Felix generated high winds, heavy rains and up to three meter (10 foot) swells. There were no immediate reports of damage as the storm skimmed just north of the Paraguana peninsula, site of Venezuela's main oil refineries. Meanwhile Jamaica, which lay well to the north of Felix's track, was under a tropical storm watch as it prepared to hold elections Monday, already postponed from one week ago by Hurricane Dean. Warnings for Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao were discontinued as Felix swiped the popular tourist destinations in the Netherlands Antilles after wreaking some damage in Grenada, ripping roofs, downing power lines and knocking radio and TV stations off the air. Last week, Dean, also reaching category five, swept through the Caribbean with severe winds and rains, leaving a wide swathe of damage and a death toll of 30 from Martinique to Mexico.
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2005 17:59:59 +0200 (METDST) MIAMI, July 14 (AFP) - Hurricane Emily, the Atlantic's second big storm of the season, headed west, gathering strength Thursday, the National Hurricane Center said, just after its predecessor Dennis carved a trail of death and destruction across the region. Packing 100-mile-per-hour (160-kilometer-per-hour) winds and growing stronger, Emily -- now a Category Two hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson intensity scale, on which five is the top-force storm -- lashed Grenada and headed toward Hispaniola island. Shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti, Hispaniola's southern coast was grazed last week by Dennis, leaving at least 40 people dead in Haiti. Dennis went on to kill 16 in Cuba and one man in Jamaica. Emily was expected to produce heavy rain across much of the southern Caribbean and northern Venezuela, as well as the Netherlands Antilles. "These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides," the center warned. In Grenada, where 30,000 people -- one-third of the permanent population -- remain homeless 10 months after Hurricane Ivan, there were widespread fears about the new storm. There were no immediate reports of fatalities in Grenada Thursday, though authorities said they were inspecting damage. At 1500 GMT, the storm's center was about 560 miles (905 kilometers) southeast of Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic, moving west-northwest near 18 miles (30 kilometers) per hour, the US center said. "Additional strengthening is forecast during the next 24 hours," the center added. The government of the Dominican Republic has issued a tropical storm watch from Punta Salinas westward to the Haitian border. And the government of Haiti has issued a tropical storm watch from the border with the Dominican Republic to Port-au-Prince. In Haiti, civil protection agency spokesman Jeffe Delorges said after Dennis roared past last Thursday that 23 bodies were found in the southwestern town of Grand-Goave. Most were killed when a bridge collapsed. Another 10 were killed in the Grande-Anse region, also in the southwest, along with five in the southeast and two in the southern city of Cayes. The agency estimates that about 15,000 people are without homes or means to feed themselves, with hundreds of houses completely destroyed. It said there had been widespread flooding and damage to plantations. The Haitian government announced emergency aid totaling the equivalent of 30,000 dollars. Cuban President Fidel Castro said in a televised address late Monday that the toll from Dennis had climbed to 16 and that Dennis destroyed or damaged 120,000 homes and caused more than 1.4 billion dollars in damage. Castro also read from a lengthy list of agricultural devastation: "The entire crop of citrus fruits was lost -- 200,000 tonnes of grapefruit fell from the trees, as did 160,000 tonnes of oranges. "At hundreds of dollars per tonne, that's a huge loss for our exports," he said. Dennis, the first hurricane of the season, was estimated to have caused a further one billion to five billion dollars in insured losses in the United States, according to Risk Management Solutions.
Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 03:19:49 +0200 (METDST) by Laura Bonilla POINT SALINES, Grenada, Oct 6 (AFP) - US Secretaty of State Colin Powell flew over the Caribbean island state of Grenada on Wednesday to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Ivan and vowed to bring more help to this devastated spice island. The hurricane killed 39 people and destroyed 90 percent of the tiny island's buildings when it blasted across the Caribbean on September 7, causing an estimated 800 million dollars in damage. This island of 90,000 people is heavily dependent on tourism and nutmeg production, which together account for 40 percent of the economy. The United States has given one million dollars in aid to Grenada and pledged an additional 3.6 million, US officials said. The island will receive additional help in a 100-million-dollar emergency aid package that US President George W. Bush has requested from Congress for Caribbean nations hit by a wave of hurricanes this storm season, Powell said. "We'll do everything we can to expedite the flow of that money," Powell said in a news conference at the airport in Point Salines, the island's southernmost point, after surveying the destruction from his plane's cockpit. "There's an urgent need to reconstruct the economy as well as rebuilding houses and rebuilding schools," Powell said, noting that Grenada's schools, homes, farms and power system were hit by the hurricane. Residents are receiving food and water, "but it'll be a continuing challenge," he said. Shelters need to be built for people who remain homeless, the infrastructure needs to be repaired and power needs to be restored, he said. Only one-third of the island has electricity. Grenada's Prime Minister Keith Mitchell said his government's priority is to reopen schools, which remain closed. "After the devastation arrived we've gone through quite a lot in every respect," Mitchell said. He told Powell: "You understood what was happening, you had a good grasp of the problems that we've faced." From an airplane, much of the island appeared still in ruins. Some areas appeared deserted, while some buildings looked as if they had been eaten up by a raging blaze and palm trees stood leafless. "When those roofs went away, there was water damage done in all of these homes, in some cases destroying a family's entire possessions, all that they owned," Powell said. "What makes this situation so difficult for Grenada is that not only was their infrastructure hit -- schools, housing, roads, the power system -- but their means of production and the economic base of the country," he said. The nutmeg industry -- Grenada is world's second producer of the aromatic seed -- was devastated, and it takes five to 10 years for its evergreen trees to regrow, Powell said. "We want to see if there are things we can do to help with that or perhaps diversify the agricultural sector," he said.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Tue 17 Sep 2019, 10:07 AM
Source: AKIpress [edited]

A total of 4 shepherds were hospitalized with anthrax in Zhambyl region, Informbureau reports. The diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory examination. Patients came to the hospital with eruptions on their bodies.

"The patients work on one of the farms and have direct contact with animals. All of them were took part in the slaughtering of a cow, and 7-10 days after that they started complaining of these signs," said Gulfaira Mirzabekova, an employee of the Zhambyl regional infectious hospital. According to doctors, those infected sought medical aid in time. Anthrax just started damaging the organs. They will be treated for at least 10 days, they said.

Local authorities are not going to quarantine in the village of Shakpak, where the patients were infected. No anthrax cases were registered among cattle, they claim.
Date: Fri 30 Aug 2019
Source: Jamestown Sun [edited]

A puppy testing positive for rabies on [Thu 29 Aug 2019] has state health departments in the Dakotas seeking individuals possibly exposed to the fatal virus.

On 29 Aug 2019, a puppy tested positive for rabies in South Dakota. While very little is known about the puppy, it last resided in Agency Village, south of Sisseton, [Roberts County], SD. The puppy had at least 3 littermates.  "Our concern is the littermates have been exposed to rabies and may develop rabies and expose their new owners," said Alicia Torfin, epidemiologist with the North Dakota Department of Health [NDDoH]. "It's possible some of the new owners may be North Dakota residents."

[A photo of the puppy that tested positive for rabies is available at the source URL. Littermates will most likely resemble this puppy, which looks a bit like a dachshund. - ProMED Mod.TG]

Rabies is a viral infection that affects the central nervous system, a NDDoH release said. It is almost always fatal for animals and people. People who are exposed to rabies need to begin a series of rabies vaccinations as soon as possible after the exposure.

The following recommendations can reduce the risk of rabies to people:
- Routinely vaccinating pets
- Avoiding contact with wild animals
- Washing bite wounds thoroughly with soap and water
- Beginning the series of rabies vaccinations as soon as possible after an exposure
Date: Sun 15 Sep 2019
Source: This Day [edited]

The Bauchi State Government yesterday [Sat 14 Sep 2019] unveiled anti-yellow fever campaign to immunise 500,000 people in Alkaleri and Tafawa Balewa Local Government Areas to curtail the spread of the acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes.

The state governor, Senator Bala Mohammed disclosed the plan at the unveiling of aerial spray of Quella birds, mosquitoes and reactive vaccination in response to yellow fever at the Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa International Airport, Bauchi.

Mohammed explained that the exercise, which involved spray of affected areas and vaccination against yellow fever, was a testimony of the commitment of the administration to health issues and response to emergency.

The governor stated that the vaccination would be conducted for people in high risks areas of Alkaleri and Tafawa Balewa LGAs, thereby urging people living there to come forward for the vaccination.

He commended traditional rulers in the state particularly the Emir of Dass, Alhaji Bilyaminu Othman for creating awareness among their subjects regarding the outbreak of yellow fever in parts of the state. He also commended the development partners including the World Health Organisation (WHO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the Federal Ministry of Health, among others for supporting the state.

On the aerial spray of Quella birds, the governor lamented the menace of the birds on farm produce. He, however, commended the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development for providing aircraft needed to spray 38 rusty[?] sites. [The Quella birds mentioned are probably red-billed quela, _Quela quela_ that have nothing to do with yellow fever virus maintenance, movement or transmission].

He said: "The aircraft came at the needed time. We are leveraging on the federal government's gesture to use the aircraft to spray the areas where the vector carrying yellow fever are believed to be."

He added that his administration "will continue to give priority to health and preventive medicine, hence the declaration of state of emergency in the health sector and increase of the health budget to 16 % in the 2019 budget.

He said as a demonstration of the commitment of his administration to the sector, the state government had paid N200 million [USD 554,017] as counterpart funds to the Melinda and Bill Gates and the Dangote Foundation, UNICEF and USAID.  "Despite the state of emergency to reposition the health sector, indices such as the rates of infant and maternal mortality are worrisome. I have therefore given marching order to the Commissioner for Health to convene a health summit to enable us to know the gaps."

Earlier in his remarks, the Director of the state Primary Health Care Developments, Dr. Rilwanu Mohammed praised the state government for the prompt response to address the acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes.  [Byline: Segun Awofadeji]
==========================
[The above report does not mention if there were more than the one confirmed and one suspected YF cases that were acquired in the Yankari Game Reserve, Bauchi state [see Undiagnosed illness - Nigeria (02): (BO) fatal, poss. link to game reserve, RFI http://promedmail.org/post/20190906.6660123]. There were 16 college girls who also visited this game reserve and became ill, 4 of whom died. Samples were sent for laboratory diagnosis of these girl's illnesses but no results have been announced so it is still not known if YF was involved. However, the occurrence of a YF case and possibly another in the Yankari Game Reserve that the students also visited, indicates that YF virus was circulating there and there were additional YF cases in the state. Vaccination of 500,000 people in the state will provide [better] longer-term protection against YF than spraying will. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Maps of Nigeria:
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/62>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Bauchi State, Nigeria: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/3741>]
Date: Fri 13 Sep 2019, 4:30 PM
Source: 4 CBS Boston [edited]

Massachusetts public health officials say laboratory testing has confirmed the state's 8th human case of eastern equine encephalitis [EEE] this season.

The state Department of Public Health said on [Fri 13 Sep 2019] that the latest case of the mosquito-borne disease is in a man in his 50s from north-eastern Bristol County. Of the previous 7 cases, one was in a 5-year-old girl, and another in adult woman was fatal.

In addition to the 8 human cases of EEE, there have also been 8 confirmed cases of EEE in animals and one human case of West Nile virus.

There are 35 communities in the state now at critical risk for EEE, 38 at high risk, and 120 at moderate risk.

Health officials urge residents to use insect repellent when mosquitoes are at their most active.
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[The number of human EEE cases in Massachusetts has increased from 4 on 25 Aug 2019 (see Eastern equine encephalitis - North America (11): USA (MA) human, fatal http://promedmail.org/post/20190826.6640548) to 8 reported above, with 38 communities of high risk for this disease. The number of EEE cases in horses has remained at 8 since 11 Sep 2019 (see Eastern equine encephalitis - North America (19): USA (MA, NJ, WI) horses http://promedmail.org/post/20190913.6671753). It is curious that the report above does not mention the need for people, especially in the communities at high risk to avoid mosquito bites nor caution horse owner to vaccinate their animals. There is no vaccine for humans. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Massachusetts, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/224>]
Date: Wed 11 Sep 2019
Source: Stuff [edited]

People who attended a football tournament in Hamilton and some businesses are being warned they could have been exposed to measles. On [Wed 11 Sep 2019] the Waikato District Health Board confirmed there are 13 measles cases in the Waikato including Hamilton, Paeroa and Morrinsville.

The District Health Board is urging people who attended the New Zealand Secondary School Girls Football tournament in Hamilton to be aware they may have been exposed to measles.

The tournament ran from [3 Sep 2019] and organisers have been asked to alert all participating teams.   [Byline: Libby Wilson]
Date: Thu 12 Sep 2019, 7:54 PM
Source: Ekathimerini [edited]

The death toll from the West Nile virus since June this year has risen to 20, according to this week's report by the National Health Organization (EODY).

Up until [12 Sep 2019], authorities had diagnosed a total of 176 cases of the mosquito-borne virus. Of these, 109 developed illnesses affecting the central nervous system such as encephalitis or meningitis.

EODY is urging the public to spray insect repellent on bare skin and clothing, to install mosquito nets and screens, to remove stagnant water from basins, vases and gutters, to regularly mow lawns and to water plants in the morning.
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[The first report mentions 20 fatal human cases as compared to the latest ECDC update that mentions 19 and the total case number is 176 versus 171 (ECDC report).

West Nile fever is a disease caused by West Nile Virus (WNV), which is a _Flavivirus_ related to the viruses that cause St. Louis encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. It causes disease in humans, horses, and several species of birds. Most infected individuals show few signs of illness, but some develop severe neurological illness which can be fatal. West Nile Virus has an extremely broad host range. It replicates in birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals, mosquitoes and ticks <https://www.oie.int/doc/ged/D14013.PDF>.

The reservoir of the virus is in birds. Mosquitoes become infected when they bite an infected bird ingesting the virus in the blood. The mosquitoes act as carriers (vectors) spreading the virus from an infected bird to other birds and to other animals. Infection of other animals (e.g. horses, and also humans) is incidental to the cycle [as also evident in the ECDC update above] in birds since most mammals do not develop enough virus in the bloodstream to spread the disease.

Key to preventing the spread of West Nile fever is to control mosquito populations. Horses should be protected from exposure to mosquitoes. Likewise, people should avoid exposure to mosquitoes especially at dusk and dawn when they are most active, use insect screens and insect repellents, and limit places for mosquitoes to breed. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
Date: Sat 14 Sep 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

Officials with the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC) report another fatality due to primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) from infection with the brain-eating amoeba, _Naegleria fowleri_. The 20-year-old, Malir man is the thirteenth death due to this parasite in Karachi to date this year [2019].

According to the Pakistani news source, The News, Director General Health Sindh Dr. Masood Solangi said their teams of experts had started investigating the case and visited the residence of the deceased to interview his family, who informed that he had gone to a local pool for swimming. He said the swimming pool without having any chlorination could have been a place where he contracted the deadly brain infection. According to the CDC, _Naegleria fowleri_ is a free-living microscopic amoeba, (single-celled living organism). It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM).

The ameba is commonly found in warm freshwater (e.g. lakes, rivers, and hot springs) and soil. _Naegleria fowleri usually_ infects people when contaminated water enters the body through the nose. Once the ameba enters the nose, it travels to the brain where it causes PAM, which is usually fatal. Infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers.

In very rare instances, _Naegleria_ infections may also occur when contaminated water from other sources (such as inadequately chlorinated swimming pool water or heated and contaminated tap water) enters the nose. You cannot get infected from swallowing water contaminated with _Naegleria_.
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[According to the above report there have been 13 fatal cases of PAM in 2019. The sub-optimal chlorination of the water sources has been highlighted as a contributing factor which coupled with hot, humid climate in Sindh provides an environment for proliferation of _Naegleria fowleri_ amoebae.

Amoebic meningoencephalitis is an extremely rare and sporadic central nervous system (CNS) infection caused by free-living amoebae, mostly found in freshwater lakes and rivers. The initial symptoms of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) are indistinguishable from bacterial meningitis, while the symptoms of granulomatous amoebic meningoencephalitis (GAE) can mimic a brain abscess or meningitis. Diagnosis can be made by observing motile amoebae in a wet mount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or visualization on CSF Wright or Giemsa stain. Treatment consists of a combination of systemic and intrathecal antibiotics. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Thu 12 Sept 2019
Source: News 18 [edited]

Two people have died due to Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Jodhpur and Jaisalmer. Blood samples of people who came in contact with them are being sent to National Institute of Virology in Pune for examination, Rajasthan Health Minister Raghu Sharma said on [Wed 11 Sept 2019].  He said that blood samples of a total of 136 people were taken for the investigation of Congo Fever, out of which 2 people were found positive and they eventually died in Jodhpur and Jaisalmer. A team formed by the medical department is surveying the affected areas and distributing kits for prevention, the minister said in a statement. The department has issued guidelines to medical officers across the state to tackle the disease.

The minister said that the staff has been trained for blood sample collection and all the Chief Medical and Health Officers of Jodhpur Division, Medical Officers of Medical College and AIIMS and all Medical Officers of Jodhpur District have been oriented.  Also, through video conferencing on [9 Sep 2019], the officials have also been instructed to remain alert and take immediate action. He said that people coming into contact with positive patients will be monitored for 14 days and their blood samples are being sent to NIV, Pune, for examination. He added that in order to provide better medical facilities to the people in the state, the government will soon bring the 'Right to Health' law. In its election manifesto, Congress had promised to provide the right to health to the people.

Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is transmitted to people either by tick bite or through contact with infected animal blood or tissue during and immediately after slaughter. Human to human transmission could occur due to close contact with body fluids of an infected person. It has symptoms like high fever, headache, vomiting, diarrhoea, body pain and stiff neck.
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[Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widespread disease caused by a tick-borne virus (Nairovirus) of the _Bunyaviridae_ family. The CCHF virus causes severe viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks, with a case fatality rate of 10-40 percent.

CCHF is endemic in Africa, the Balkans, the Middle East and Asian countries south of the 50th parallel north - the geographical limit of the principal tick vector.

It is difficult to prevent or control CCHF infection in animals and ticks as the tick-animal-tick cycle usually goes unnoticed and the infection in domestic animals is usually not apparent. Furthermore, the tick vectors are numerous and widespread, so tick control with acaricides (chemicals intended to kill ticks) is only a realistic option for well-managed livestock production facilities  <https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/crimean-congo-haemorrhagic-fever>.

In the absence of a vaccine, the only way to reduce infection in people is by raising awareness of the risk factors and educating people about the measures they can take to reduce exposure to the virus.

Public health advice should focus on several aspects.
1. Reducing the risk of tick-to-human transmission:
- wear protective clothing (long sleeves, long trousers);
- wear light coloured clothing to allow easy detection of ticks on the clothes;
- use approved acaricides (chemicals intended to kill ticks) on clothing;
- use approved repellent on the skin and clothing;
- regularly examine clothing and skin for ticks; if found, remove them safely;
- seek to eliminate or control tick infestations on animals or in stables and barns; and
- avoid areas where ticks are abundant and seasons when they are most active.

2. Reducing the risk of animal-to-human transmission:
- wear gloves and other protective clothing while handling animals or their tissues in endemic areas, notably during slaughtering, butchering and culling procedures in slaughterhouses or at home;
- quarantine animals before they enter slaughterhouses or routinely treat animals with pesticides 2 weeks prior to slaughter.

3. Reducing the risk of human-to-human transmission in the community:
- avoid close physical contact with CCHF-infected people;
- wear gloves and protective equipment when taking care of ill people;
- wash hands regularly after caring for or visiting ill people.

4. Controlling infection in health-care settings
- Health-care workers caring for patients with suspected or confirmed CCHF, or handling specimens from them, should implement standard infection control precautions. These include basic hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment, safe injection practices and safe burial practices.
- As a precautionary measure, health-care workers caring for patients immediately outside the CCHF outbreak area should also implement standard infection control precautions.
- Samples taken from people with suspected CCHF should be handled by trained staff working in suitably equipped laboratories.

Recommendations for infection control while providing care to patients with suspected or confirmed CCHF should follow those developed by WHO for Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fevers. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
Rajasthan State, India: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/317>]
Date: Sun 15 Sep 2019
Source: Pakistan Today [edited]

A Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) patient died in a private hospital of Karachi. The death toll from the tick-born viral disease has climbed to 17 in the megacity this year (2019). Sindh Health Department confirmed the death of a 52-year old man, [HK], a resident of Lyari area of Karachi who died in private hospital of the city due to CCHF. The patient was brought to hospital a few days ago with fever where he was diagnosed.

The tick-born viral disease had infected 36 people this year (2019) so far out of which 17 died. Currently, a 62 year old man [MD] is under treatment in a private hospital. CCHF is a fatal viral disease that spreads through a tick bite, which is a [arthropod vector and transmits the CCHF virus into the blood of animals]. The CCHF is mainly contracted by people who deal with cattle and livestock. The symptoms include backache, joints pain, pain in the abdomen, high grade fever and bleeding from any part of the body.
Date: Thu 12 Sep 2019
Source: Hindustan Times [edited]

Japanese encephalitis (JE) has killed 154 people in Assam in 2019, the highest in 5 years officials said even as they claimed that the outbreak, which peaked in July and August, was subsiding and only a few fresh cases were reported in September.  A top state government official also said a state-wide adult vaccination campaign will begin in November [2019] covering all districts after the Centre agreed to provide around 57 lakh [5.7 million] vaccines.  "From [15 Nov 2019], we plan to start an intensive adult vaccination campaign covering the whole state. We plan to conclude it by [15 Mar 2020]. The Centre has agreed to provide around 57 lakh vaccines. We will procure the rest on our own if there is a shortfall," Samir Sinha, Principal Secretary, Health and Family Welfare Department said. The campaign is likely to be announced in a week.

On Thursday [12 Sep 2019], while no fresh JE cases were reported, one person from Kamrup (Rural) succumbed to the disease that is spread by _Culex_ mosquitoes, according to the daily bulletin from the office of JVN Subramanyam, Director, National Health Mission (NHM), Assam.  The state recorded 614 JE positive cases in 2015, 427 in 2016, 605 in 2017 and 509 in 2018. In 2015, the number of deaths due to JE stood at 135; in 2016 the number came down to 92 and further decreased to 87 in 2017. In 2018, the state saw 94 deaths due to the vector-borne disease. In 2014, the state recorded 165 deaths due to JE.

The bulletin from NHM said till 12 Sep [2019], the total number of persons who have been affected by JE stood at 630, out of which 154 people have died. While 13 persons who died belonged to Goalpara, 11 came from Kamrup (Rural), the 2 neighbouring districts in lower Assam where maximum fatalities have been recorded this year [2019]. Kokrajhar, in Bodo Territorial Administrative District, has not reported any JE positive case for the 1st time in the last 6 years, even as the rest of the state has been affected in [the] 2019 outbreak.  "Since the last 4, 5 years were relatively calm and quiet, this year [2019] the peripheral workers seemed to be reluctant to perform their field duties properly. During my visit to Goalpara, I found that peripheral workers did not attend to cases of fever initially," said CR Pathak, State Programme Officer of the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme, explaining how the lax attitude of the ground staff may have added to the late detection and higher fatalities.

Pathak pointed out another reason and explained how a lot of ground staff, the multipurpose workers were involved in National Register of Citizens (NRC) duty. "I am sure the NRC authorities also did not know that the outbreak would be severe this year. We recalled the workers in July [2019]," he said.  Health officials also introduced urgent measures like fogging, blood sample collection of all cases of fever and sending all suspected JE cases for proper tests, treatment at civil hospitals and medical colleges, among others. "Post July [2019] the number of fresh cases have been on a decline," said Pathak.

Sinha said, "The last 10 deaths are all old cases." In September [2019], only 4 fresh cases have been recorded in the state. Unlike previous years when the disease was mostly confined to Upper Assam and North Assam, the whole state was affected this time, he said.  He said analysis also showed that the adults constituted almost 80% of the casualties. "The writing on the wall is clear. Vaccination of persons in the age group of 15-65 is the way forward to contain it," Sinha said.  While the entire state has been covered under the JE vaccination campaign for children, 14 have been covered under the adult vaccination campaign in a phased manner. Officials point out the coverage [of the] latter has not been satisfactory for a multitude of reasons, including rumours about the effects of the vaccine.

Records show even vaccination is not a foolproof way to stop the outbreak. "This year [2019], too, 15%-20% of the casualties would be from the section which had been given JE vaccination. We know that JE vaccine is effective in around 85% of the cases and depends on immunity of the persons among other factors," said Pathak.  [Byline: Sadiq Naqvi]
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[All the above cases are attributed to Japanese encephalitis (JE), with no mention of non-JE acute encephalitis syndrome that was mentioned in the previous Assam report (see Japanese encephalitis & other - India (23): (AS) http://promedmail.org/post/20190728.6591689). It is not stated if the vaccine used is inactivated or a live modified one. The immunity of inactivated vaccine likely is of considerably shorter duration than a live vaccine would be. It is unfortunate to learn that the rumor that the vaccine is not safe reduces coverage of the population at risk of infection. The price paid for this rumor is a population of increased susceptibility with more cases and deaths. A public information campaign is necessary to counteract the rumors. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Map of India:

HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Assam State, India: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/299>]