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Chad

Chad - US Consular Information Sheet
March 29, 2007
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Chad is a developing country in north central Africa with one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world. Chad faces challenges in the areas of political stability and
conomic development. Years of war, drought, and lack of economic growth have severely damaged the country's institutions and its infrastructure. Facilities for tourism are limited. The capital is N'Djamena. French and Arabic are the primary languages. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Chad for additional information.
ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: A valid passport and visa are required. Visitors must check in with the National Police and obtain a registration stamp within 72 hours of arrival. Further entry information may be obtained from the Embassy of the Republic of Chad, 2002 R St. N.W., Washington D.C. 20009, telephone (202) 462-4009. Overseas, inquiries should be made at the nearest Chadian embassy or consulate. Some travelers originating in countries with no Chadian embassy or consulate can arrange for airport entry visas. This process is generally limited to business or official travelers, and arrangements must be made by the traveler’s local contact in Chad several days in advance of arrival. The U.S. Embassy is not in a position to assist private U.S. citizens with their visa application for travel to Chad.

See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on Chad and other countries.

See Entry and Exit Requirements for more information pertaining to dual nationality and the prevention of international child abduction. Please refer to our Customs Information to learn more about customs regulations.

SAFETY AND SECURITY: See the Department of State’s Travel Warning for Chad.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s website where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, including the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME: Americans and Europeans are perceived to be wealthy and certain precautions should be taken. Travelers are advised not to leave cash or valuables unsecured in their hotel room and not to wear expensive jewelry or show large amounts of cash. Travelers are also advised to dress modestly, not to walk outside after dark, and to lock their car doors. Petty crimes such as purse snatching, pick-pocketing and theft from vehicles do occur, particularly in areas frequented by expatriates. Violent crime is somewhat rare, but does occur. Burglary and vehicle thefts increase during times of political instability. Expatriate residences have been targeted for armed robbery, and some foreigners have been assaulted in the process. Travelers to northern Cameroon should contact the U.S. Embassy’s Regional Security Officer in N'Djamena prior to crossing the Chad/Cameroon border because of a high incidence of road attacks there.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime.
MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Medical facilities in Chad are extremely limited. Medicines are in short supply or unavailable, including many over-the-counter preparations sold in the United States. Travelers should carry any needed, properly labeled, medicines with them. In the event of major injury or illness, visitors generally will require medical evacuation.

There are two medical clinics in the capital of N’Djamena, International SOS and the Centre Medico-social de l’Ambassade de France. Advance membership is required to access these two clinics.

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease.
Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the type that predominates in Chad, is resistant to the antimalarial drug chloroquine.
Because travelers to Chad are at high risk for contracting malaria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises that travelers should take one of the following antimalarial drugs: mefloquine (Lariam - TM), doxycycline, or atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone -TM).
Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area and up to one year after returning home should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what antimalarials they have been taking.
For additional information on malaria, including protective measures, visit the CDC Travelers’ Health web site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel/malinfo.htm.

Other widespread diseases in Chad include diarrhea and upper respiratory infections. AIDS is becoming an increasingly serious problem as infection rates have risen to alarming levels (up to 25 percent in high-risk groups). Meningitis outbreaks usually occur annually and several other diseases (cholera, diphtheria, chicken pox, typhoid) periodically appear.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s internet site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Chad is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Roads are in poor condition and dangerous. In the capital city of N'Djamena, only the main roads are paved; the rest of the roads are either hard-packed dirt or looser dirt and sand. During the summer rainy season (mid-June to mid-September) many roads become impassable or are restricted by rain barriers, while during the drier season, clouds of dust rising from the roads reduce visibility.

Visitors should take great care while driving. Both paved and unpaved roads are poorly maintained, and often have large ruts and potholes. All drivers should adjust their speed accordingly. At night, streets are not lit; it is imperative to watch for pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists, and livestock, as they may not become visible until they are in very close proximity.

Driving in Chad tends to be erratic both in cities and in rural areas. In cities, particularly N'Djamena, motorists share the roads with bicycles, motor scooters, pedestrians, and non-motorized wheelchairs. Lanes are not marked, and it is not uncommon for a normally two-lane thoroughfare to become a four-lane road during rush hours (generally 7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 7:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on Friday). Drivers are urged to be particularly observant at these times because motorists often attempt to overtake slower traffic by moving into oncoming lanes, usually at high speeds.There are only a few traffic lights in N'Djamena, and these are often out of service. Drivers yield to traffic on their right, particularly when entering the many traffic circles.

In rural areas, drivers should watch for livestock crossing the roads, and for large hawks that rest on the roads. These birds can be fearless, and cause damage by smashing into drivers' windshields; drivers may avoid this by slowing down when approaching the hawks, and allowing them sufficient time to fly away. Finally, drivers should be alert to older transport trucks traveling between cities, which do not always have functioning headlights.

No emergency services exist, so drivers should exercise extreme caution. Travelers should always wear seat belts. When traveling by car, be sure to carry a spare tire. Roadside service is limited to good Samaritans and children who will help push cars to the side or out of holes. When traveling outside the capital, it is imperative to carry sufficient quantities of drinking water. Drivers should ensure that their gas tanks are at least half-full at all times, as gas stations are not widely available. Gas may be purchased in an emergency in bottles from roadside stands, but it is generally of poor quality.

Travelers on roads in all areas of the country are subject to attack by armed bandits.
Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service between the United States and Chad, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Chad’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s internet website at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: All photography requires a government permit. Taking photos of military sites, official buildings, and airports is strictly prohibited, even with a permit. Such sites are not always clearly marked. Film and cameras may be confiscated, often by undercover police.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Chadian laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Chad are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information onCriminal Penalties.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: Embassy N’Djamena does not issue immigrant visas. Therefore, American citizens who adopt children in Chad are required to travel to the U.S. Embassy in Yaounde, Cameroon, or another Embassy for visa processing before return to the United States.

For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children’s Issues website.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Chad are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy in Chad through the State Department’s travel registration website , Americans withoutInternet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy in Chad is located in N'Djamena on Avenue Felix Eboue; mailing address is B.P. 413; telephone (235) 51-62-11, 51-70-09, 51-77-59, 51-90-52, 51-92-18 and 51-92-33, fax (235) 51-56-54.
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information dated July 10, 2006 with no updates.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 15:14:41 +0200 (METDST)

N'Djamena, Aug 14, 2019 (AFP) - A female suicide bomber killed six people after blowing herself up in western Chad early Wednesday, a senior army officer said, in an attack attributed to Nigeria's Boko Haram jihadists.   "Six people died, including a soldier," in the attack in Kaiga-Kindjiria district, said the source, speaking on condition of anonymity.    A number of people were also injured, the officer said, without giving figures.   A provincial security official said a woman wearing an explosives-laden belt "blew herself up near the home of a traditional chief".   Four guards as well as a soldier were among the dead, and five people were wounded, the official said.   The death toll of six was confirmed by Chadian army spokesman Colonel Azem Bermandoa, and by a local NGO.   There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

Kaiga-Kindjiria lies in Lac province, which abuts the vast Lake Chad -- a region shared by Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria.   Boko Haram launched an insurgency in northeastern Nigeria a decade ago that has since spilled over into neighbouring countries.   It has carried out at least 10 cross-border attacks in Chad since 2018, mainly targeting army positions.   In March, 23 troops were killed when their forward position on the northeastern side of the lake came under attack.   In June, 11 soldiers were killed and six were wounded in clashes at Tchoukoutalia, according to the authorities, who said 26 jihadists were killed.   Boko Haram's campaign has left some 27,000 people dead and displaced around two million in Nigeria alone, according to some estimates.   In 2015, the four Lake Chad countries, together with Benin, set up a combined force to fight Boko Haram with the help of local groups of armed citizens.
Date: Sun, 26 May 2019 12:12:06 +0200

N'Djamena, May 26, 2019 (AFP) - Four Chadian soldiers and a television reporter were killed when their vehicle hit a mine on a road in eastern Chad, security sources said Sunday.   The victims were headed towards an army position that had been attacked by elements of the Boko Haram Islamist group overnight Friday, the sources said.   "This delegation of the Chadian army was headed to Ngounboua (on Lake Chad), where elements of Boko Haram had attacked an army position overnight, illing at least one on our side," a security source told AFP. 

The source said 23 Boko Haram fighters were killed, confirming a toll given by Chadian army spokesman Azem Bermandoa on national television.   Dimouya Soiapebe, the head of Lake Chad Province, said soldiers and a journalist for the national broadcaster had gone to the scene to "raise the morale of the troops" when the bomb went off.   "Terrorists often lay explosive devices on the roads leading to positions they have attacked," Soiapebe said.

In March, 23 soldiers were killed in the Lake Chad region in the deadliest attack yet on the Chadian army by Boko Haram, which launched an insurgency in Nigeria a decade ago.   The revolt has claimed more than 27,000 lives and uprooted some 1.8 million people.
Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2019 05:29:58 +0200
By Amaury HAUCHARD

Adré, Chad, April 11, 2019 (AFP) - Dinar Tchere is fighting time and the sun, and he fears he may be losing.   This morning, the health worker is expected in a remote village of eastern Chad, where he will administer the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine to poor children.   But he's behind schedule -- and there is limited time before his enemy, the blistering Sahelian heat, will destroy his precious drugs.  Tchere takes his gear and the ice-packed cooler that shields the vaccines, puts them in an NGO pickup and heads out from his clinic in Hilouta, in Ouaddai province, on the dusty untarmacked road.

Twenty minutes later he is in Agang, a village of 400 people, and there, another private dread has turned to reality. No-one is there to be vaccinated.   "It's just what I feared -- most of the mums have gone off to the market to do their shopping," groans Tchere, a stocky, shaven-headed man in his fifties.    There is nothing to do but hope that the mothers and their children will return. He stretches out a mat on the soil, under a mango tree.   His luck starts to turn. One by one, mothers with their children make their way to the spot, and soon there is no room on his mat for youngsters waiting for their jab.

- Cold chain -
Always worried by the heat -- the thermometer now reads 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) -- Tchere dips his finger into the cooler to check that the ice has not melted, and starts the vaccination.   "Our biggest headache is ensuring that the vaccines are always kept cold," says Tchere, who heads one of 21 health centres in the region.   "Since the troubles of 2007, we no longer have a solar panel or fridge."   The "troubles" refer to years-long violence by armed groups on the tense border between Sudan and Chad.   Hilouta, which lies less than two kilometres (one mile) from the border, became a combat zone.   With no power, how does Tchere keep his vaccines cool?   "I stock them in Sudan, in a clinic on the other side of the border. They've got a fridge," he explains.

But there's a problem: because of security concerns, Sudan refuses to let people cross the border by motorbike -- Tchere's only form of transport when he cannot use the pickup.   So on the eve of every immunisation session, Tchere walks into Sudan, carrying his cooler, fills it up with vaccines, and walks back into Chad.   His clinic administers to about 60 villages. He says e does four vaccination sessions per month -- two in the clinic, and two in the villages.   Most often, he does the outside trips on his motorbike, always taking care never to take the same route back home, in order to avoid holdups.

The state no longer pays the running costs of his health centre -- a French NGO, Premiere Urgence Internationale (PUI), has stepped in, using financial help provided by the European Union.   In Arkoum, about 50 kilometres (30 miles) from Hilouta, Felix Djembonoudji, a nurse who runs the health centre, says that the stockpile of vaccines -- held in the district's main town of Adre, several hours away by road -- has run out.   "The people (in Adre) sometimes don't receive any -- we've been without MMR (vaccine) for five days," he says.

- Measles threat -
Measles is often dismissed by so-called anti-vaxxers who oppose immunisation as a disease of the past or non-threatening.   Experts say that it is neither -- measles is on the comeback trail.    And out of every 20 children who catch measles, as many as one will suffer from pneumonia, according to the US Centers of Disease Control (CDC). Blindness, encephalitis and severe diarrhoea are also serious complications.   Only one child in five in Chad is fully vaccinated against measles, according to a 2017 survey.   "Measles can also cause malnutrition in non-vaccinated children, which in itself is a cause of premature death," said PUI's mission chief in Chad, Fabienne Mially.

According to UN figures, more than one child in 10 in Chad will die before their fifth birthday.   In Agang, the measles vaccination session comes to an end, and Tchere is packing up his gear when a horse appears on the horizon, its hooves kicking up dust, bearing a man and his six-month-old baby.   The infant needs his second MMR vaccine. "It's important!" pleads the father. The child will get his jab.   Tchere returns to his clinic in Hilouta. There is no water or electricity. Two local people are awaiting him in the gloom, desperate for a medical consultation.    "The working day is long," he sighs, as he welcomes them in.
Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 04:47:15 +0200
By Amaury HAUCHARD

Hadjer Hadid, Chad, April 9, 2019 (AFP) - "I've already earmarked a customer for this drum -- I need to get a move on!"   Ali Ahmat,12, flicks his whip to persuade a hard-driven horse to press on with his cart, laden with 200 litres (44 imperial gallons) of freshly-fetched water.   The young entrepreneur is one of the informal but indispensable links in a chain to supply people in Ouaddai, eastern Chad, with water, the stuff of life.

Scorching temperatures, an open sky, a shortage of deep wells and lack of water purification system make this a thirsty part of the world indeed.   "After the rainy season, water becomes scarce," says Mahamat Adoum Doutoum, chief of the Guerri region, where only two deep wells exist for 86,000 inhabitants. "So people go to look for water in the wadi."   Wadis -- "riverbeds" in Arabic -- are watercourses that run strong and fast during the rains and are often dangerous to cross, but largely dry up for the rest of the year. When there is no more rain, people dig wells in the wadis and install pumps to extract groundwater.

Ali and dozens of other water carriers flock to the pumps to collect supplies they plan to sell to people who have no access to the source, often in dusty settlements.   Each refill of his 200-litre drum costs Ali 100 CFA francs (0.15 euros / $0.17), but he can sell the water for five times as much in town. "We do between seven or eight return trips each day, roughly," he says.     Towards the end of a hot Sunday, the blazing sun has set and Ali's cart is heading towards Hadjer Hadid.

The town harbours a refugee camp for people who fled conflict and mass killings in the Darfur region of western Sudan, the far side of the border.   Pascal, a Sudanese refugee and father of five in his 50s, is also used to the return trips between the town, the bed of the wadi and the muddy wells.    He first came to Chad about 15 years ago and says that he "suffered" to be able to buy his own donkey.   The beast of burden was an investment that has paid off, however, enabling Pascal to deliver water to the townsfolk over the past two years and bring a small sum home to his family.

- Add bleach -
But he remains concerned about the quality of the water.   "To drink the water, you also have to add bleach," Pascal says.   While water has become as rare as it is valuable, the kind to be found around wadis is unsafe. Traditional wells dug into the earth at the wadis provide water that is often the same colour as the soil.   "The water can be contaminated at various points, either at the source, which may be unprotected, or during transport, using receptacles which are inappropriate, dirty or uncovered, and during storage and distribution," says Fabienne Mially, mission chief in Chad for the French aid group Premiere Urgence Internationale (PUI).

The NGO supports 11 health centres in the Ouaddai region, where awareness sessions on the importance of proper drinking water are regularly organised.   In Borota, a village several hours' drive from Hadjer Hadid, the head of the local health centre has no illusions. Of the six standpipes in the village, none is working any more.   "They were installed by NGOs," says the official, Koditog Bokassa, who says that wadi water is the only available source of water locally.   He hands out sachets of bleach to dilute in untreated water.   But Bokassa lacks the means to satisfy everybody and PUI has become the sole supplier of bleach in central parts.    The state used to deliver some, but has not done so for more than a year, he says. It is quite common to see young people at the wadis drink directly from their cans.

- 'Barely enough' -
The town has holding basins and water towers designed to retain water during the rainy season.   "But the holding basins are insufficient and the two water towers broke down several years ago," says local resident Hassan.   One trader has bought two barrels of 200 litres apiece, which he leaves in the courtyard of his house. "It's barely enough for the children, but it's better than nothing."   The water deliverer Pascal does not have the money to buy a drum of such munificence. For the seven members of his household, there are seven 20-litre cans on the stoop.    "I haul water every day, but I have the same problem as everyone else," he said.
Date: Sun, 7 Apr 2019 06:19:43 +0200
By Amaury HAUCHARD

Abeche, Chad, April 7, 2019 (AFP) - The chief medical officer at Adre hospital takes a routine phone call: a patient has been admitted with gunshot wounds and needs emergency surgery.   A dusty town in eastern Chad, once part of the proud Ouaddai empire, Adre is caught up in a mounting conflict between local farmers and nomadic camel herders from the north of the sprawling country.   Last year, the hospital treated more than 100 patients with bullet wounds.

In a territory where almost everyone seems to have a gun -- a legacy of rebellions launched from eastern Chad and of the brutal conflict in Sudan's Darfur -- squabbles over grazing land and trampled crops swiftly lead to violence.   Such disputes are tragically familiar in many parts of Africa.    But in arid eastern Chad, near the border with Sudan, the bloodshed is particularly acute, rooted in a bitter drought and population pressure sharpening rivalry over access to land.   The vicious circle of attack and retribution is running full tilt.

- Seasonal -
Admissions in Adre rise sharply during "times of tension", a source at the local hospital said.   Those times mirror the seasons. At the end of the rainy season, in December and January, herders drive their beasts northwards into the Sahel. When water sources start running low, they return south, from about the end of June.   Local chief Abderahim Dahab, who supervises 136 villages in his traditional leadership role, said the modern-day bloodshed contrasted with long-established cohabitation.   "Movement of livestock has always happened peacefully, for decades," he said.   Migratory herders benefit from pasture on which to feed their animals, and farmers benefit from the animals, whose droppings fertilise the soil. And farmers and herders mutually benefit from trading with each other for food.

Historian Mahamat Saleh Yacoub said two factors explained the breakdown between the two communities.   The first is a drought that has gripped the Sahel since the 1970s and seems to be worsening. Everyone who spoke to AFP agreed that the key issue is a lack of water.   "The herders are now coming earlier in the year and going back later. The established ways have broken down," said another district chief.   Saleh Yacoub, who is head of the ENS college of higher education in Abeche, near Adre, said the second cause was a population increase -- "as much among people as among livestock".   Herds are getting larger, straining the fragile ecological resources of the Ouaddai.

- Ethnic friction -
The rivalry has "become intertwined with ethnic problems", added Yacoub.   "The herds all belong to the same people: colonels, generals, people in politics," explained a village elder sitting on his mat with a glass of tea.   "We have had meetings, we write letters to the deputy prefect (district administrator), the prefect himself, but get nothing back," he protested. "The population has no power against them."

Many cattlemen are members of the Zaghawa ethnic group, who come from the northeast of the giant country.    The Zaghawa include President Idriss Deby Itno, who came to power in 1990.    Members of their ethnicity have entered every rank of the Chadian state, although Ouaddai's governor, Ramadan Erdebou, dismisses any suggestion that tribalism is to blame for the region's problems.   "This ethnic question is a false debate. There are Chadian women and Chadian men and one single unity, Chad," said Erdebou, who was formerly the chief of the regime's powerful intelligence services.

- Disarmament -
Erdebou's predecessor was sacked after an explosion of communal violence last October claimed eight lives.   One of his first moves in office was to announce a massive disarmament campaign among the population.   He also warned that a mission would be coming from the capital N'Djamena to chase away "those farmers who have cultivated crops along the corridors (set aside) for livestock movement."

These designated corridors were established by law in 1959, to give nomads and their herds passage of up to one kilometre (more than half a mile) wide for their seasonal migrations.   "But Zaghawa herders feel they can do what they like and don't respect them," said a farmer, who maintains he lost his entire peanut crop in 2016 when hundreds of dromedaries trampled his field.   "How do you expect Ouaddians to agree to be disarmed when you see that the herdsmen have more and more weapons?" asked a local official.

In 2015, the National Assembly in the distant western capital passed a Pastoral Code that led to an outcry from people who found it heavily biased in favour of the cattle breeders. Deby overturned the law.   "It's hard to want national unity when those in power only favour their own," said the local official, who asked not to be named, saying he feared reprisals.   But, Saleh Yacoub observed, when quarrels turn violent, "the Zaghawa become the target for all the grievances, regardless of whether they are legitimate or not."   In a visit to Abeche in February, Deby named no names but acknowledged there was a "serious problem."   He vowed to "take matters in hand".   "The hour for vendettas is past," he declared.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2019 22:35:51 +0100 (MET)

Manila, Nov 20, 2019 (AFP) - Philippine police were ordered Wednesday to arrest anyone caught vaping in public, just hours after Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte announced he would ban e-cigarettes.   The abrupt prohibition, revealed by Duterte late Tuesday adds to a growing global backlash against a product once promoted as less harmful than tobacco smoking.

Duterte, a former smoker, called the devices "toxic" and said vaping introduced "chemicals" into the user's body.   He ordered the arrest of anyone vaping publicly in a country that already has some of Asia's toughest anti-smoking rules.    No formal, written order has been made public that spells out the scope of the ban or penalties for violations.   Duterte is notorious internationally for his deadly anti-narcotics crackdown, but he has also targeted tobacco with a wide-ranging ban on smoking in public.   Citing "the order of the president", on Wednesday a statement from the head of the Philippine police ordered "effective today, all police units nationwide to enforce the ban on use of vapes; ensure that all violators will be arrested".

The ban came days after Philippine health authorities reported the nation's first vaping-related lung injury, which resulted in a 16-year-old girl being hospitalised.   Vaping has taken off in the Philippines, with speciality shops and vapers puffing away in public a common sight.     E-cigarette users were caught off guard by the ban and questioned the utility of arresting people who, at worst, were hurting themselves.   "It's inappropriate. In any case, we don't hurt people, the environment or animals," said 22-year-old student Alexis Martin.   "Why are vapers being targeted?"

E-cigarettes warm flavoured liquid to produce vapour that is free of the estimated 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, but does contain a number of substances that could potentially be harmful.  Critics say that apart from being harmful in themselves, the multiple exotic flavours of e-cigarette liquids appeal particularly to youngsters and risk getting them addicted to nicotine.

The devices have become hugely popular in the past decade but a rash of vaping-linked deaths and illnesses in the United States is feeding caution about the product, already banned in some places.   In September 2019 India became the latest country to ban the import, sale, production and advertising of e-cigarettes, citing in particular concerns for its youth.   The devices are already banned in several places such as Brazil, Singapore, Thailand and the US state of Massachusetts.
Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2019 17:17:39 +0100 (MET)

Lagos, Nov 20, 2019 (AFP) - Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari on Wednesday announced a campaign to end defecation in public, in a country where tens of millions of people going to the toilet outside poses a major health risk.    "Nigeria has committed to end open defecation throughout the country by 2025," a statement by the presidency said a day after the United Nations marked World Toilet Day.     The decree set up a new body called the Clean Nigeria Campaign Secretariat to ensure "that all public places including schools, hotels, fuel stations, places of worship, market places, hospitals and offices have accessible toilets and latrines within their premises". 

According to the United Nations children agency, UNICEF, Nigeria has amongst the highest number of people practising open defecation in the world, estimated at over 46 million people -- almost a quarter of the population.   Around Nigeria each year 87,000 children die from diarrhoea, with more than 90 per cent of deaths caused by a lack of water, sanitation and hygiene, according to the World Bank.   The new agency will be disbanded when the goal of ending open defecation has been met, the presidency said.
Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2019 12:59:15 +0100 (MET)

Kampala, Nov 20, 2019 (AFP) - Global health charity Marie Stopes said Wednesday it had recalled hundreds of thousands of faulty condoms on sale in Uganda, where HIV rates are among the highest in the world.   The recall followed a warning from Uganda's National Drug Authority (NDA) that the Life Guard brand condoms had failed manufacturing "quality tests" because they contained holes and may burst.   The affected condoms were manufactured by India-based MHL Healthcare in April 2019 and have an expiry date of April 2024, the government regulator said.   Marie Stopes Uganda spokesman David Kamu told AFP on Wednesday that the two affected batches each contained "around 400,000" condoms.

Earlier reports had suggested millions of condoms could have been involved but NDA spokesman Fred Ssekyana told AFP the figure was below one million.   Marie Stopes Uganda said more than half of the condoms of concern had been recalled.   "While the LifeGuard brand follows strict quality controls, unfortunately two recent batches have fallen short of the quality we demand," the charity's country director, Carole Sekimpi, said in a statement Tuesday.   Marie Stopes is the largest and most specialised sexual reproductive health organisation in Uganda, the charity says on its website.   According to UNAIDS, 1.4 million Ugandans are living with HIV.   Last year 53,000 people were newly infected with the disease in the East African country, the UN agency said.
Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2019 15:08:18 +0100 (MET)

Luanda, Nov 20, 2019 (AFP) - Angola recorded an outbreak of polio this week after almost a decade without cases of the paralysing viral disease, the government said.   The highly infectious condition mainly affects children under the age of five. It attacks the nervous system and can lead to total paralysis, or in some cases death.   "After seven years without polio we are unfortunately confronted with a difficult situation," Angola's health minister Sante Silvia Lutucuta said on Monday, at the launch of a new vaccination campaign in the capital Luanda.   "We have recorded 44 new cases in ten of the country's 18 provinces," she added.

The vaccination campaign is expected to reach 2.5 million children aged five and under.   "All children must be protected by three doses of the oral anti-poliomyelitis vaccine," said Lutucuta, adding that the campaign would span over two weeks to "control the epidemic".   Two out of three strains of the wild polio virus have been eradicated so far, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).           While only 33 wild polio cases were reported globally last year, vaccine-derived polio still breaks out sporadically in some parts of Africa and Asia.    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that all travellers to Angola be fully vaccinated against the virus.
Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2019 01:34:32 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, Nov 21, 2019 (AFP) - A 6.1-magnitude earthquake hit north-western Laos near the Thai border early Thursday, the United States Geological Survey reported.    The shallow quake hit at 6:50 am local time (2350 Wednesday GMT), USGS said. 
Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2019 01:25:15 +0100 (MET)

Sydney, Nov 21, 2019 (AFP) - The fire danger was elevated across wider swathes of southern Australia on Thursday, with residents warned to avoid at-risk areas as smoke from bushfires choked Sydney and other major cities.   Devastating fires along the country's east coast have claimed six lives and destroyed more than 500 homes since mid-October, with climate change and unseasonably hot, dry conditions fuelling the unprecedented blazes.   Now the fire danger has moved into states further south, with a so-called "Code Red" -- the highest possible fire risk in Victoria -- being declared in the state's northwest for the first time in a decade.   "What that means is that if we see fires in those areas they will be fast moving, they will be unpredictable, they will be uncontrollable," emergency management commissioner Andrew Crisp told reporters.

Country Fire Authority chief Steve Warrington told people living in rural areas to leave for the safety of cities.   "We are saying, 'do not be there, do not be there when a fire occurs, because you will not survive if you are there'," he said.   "There is a good chance if a fire occurs that your home will be destroyed."   The fire danger was also elevated to "severe" in the island state of Tasmania off mainland Australia's southeastern coast,  where a total fire ban was declared.   Two bushfires in the state's northeast did not pose an immediate threat to residents, the Tasmania Fire Service said.

For the second time in two days, smoke from bushfires blanketed Sydney, Australia's biggest city and home to more than five million people, sending air quality plummeting to hazardous levels.   More than 110 fires are still burning in worst-hit New South Wales and neighbouring Queensland, while in South Australia more than 40 fires broke out during catastrophic fire conditions Wednesday.    A South Australia Country Fire Service spokeswoman said all of those blazes had been brought under control or extinguished by Thursday, with the exception of a major fire on the Yorke Peninsula that had come perilously close to a small town.

Conditions were expected to ease in the coming days in South Australia, where the state capital Adelaide was also shrouded in bushfire smoke and residents were being told to stay indoors for health reasons.   Bushfire-prone Australia has experienced a horror start to its fire season, which scientists say is beginning earlier and becoming more extreme as climate change pushes temperatures higher and saps moisture from the environment after months of severe drought.   Growing calls to curb fossil fuels and drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions are being ignored by the country's conservative government, which is eager to protect its lucrative mining industry.   The country is bracing for challenging fire conditions to continue throughout the Southern Hemisphere summer.
Date: Mon 18 Nov 2019
Source: 112.UA [edited]

Eight school classes in Odesa [Odessa] have been closed for quarantine. More than 30% of school students in these classes are sick with Coxsackie virus, a highly contagious respiratory disease, said Olena Buynevych, the director of the city hall's department for science and education, as quoted by UNN news agency.

"More than 30% of students in these classes are sick wi h acute
respiratory diseases, which include cases of cases and Coxsackievirus," the official said. She urged the parents to keep the children away from schools in case they have any symptoms of acute respiratory diseases.

The symptoms are basically the same as flu; the key difference is the rash on the palms, in case of the Coxsackievirus.

Coxsackievirus is a member of a family of viruses called enteroviruses. Enteroviruses are made up of a single strand of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The enteroviruses are also referred to as picornaviruses ("pico" means "small," so, "small RNA viruses"). They are present all over the world and spread by fecal-oral route. About 90% of infections don't cause symptoms or present with a fever only. Infants and young kids are particularly susceptible to symptomatic coxsackie.
======================
[Coxsackievirus belongs to a family of nonenveloped, linear, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses, Picornaviridae and the genus _Enterovirus_, which also includes poliovirus and echovirus. Enteroviruses are among the most common and important human pathogens, and ordinarily its members are transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Coxsackieviruses share many characteristics with poliovirus. With control of poliovirus infections in much of the world, more attention has been focused on understanding the nonpolio enteroviruses such as coxsackievirus.

Coxsackieviruses are divided into group A and group B viruses based on early observations of their pathogenicity in neonatal mice. In general, group A coxsackieviruses tend to infect the skin and mucous membranes, causing herpangina, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, and hand, foot, and mouth (HFM) disease. Both group A and group B coxsackieviruses can cause nonspecific febrile illnesses, rashes, upper respiratory tract disease, and aseptic meningitis.

Group B coxsackieviruses tend to infect the heart, pleura, pancreas, and liver, causing pleurodynia, myocarditis, pericarditis, and hepatitis (inflammation of the liver not related to the hepatotropic viruses). Coxsackie B infection of the heart can lead to pericardial effusion.

The development of insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) has recently been associated with recent enteroviral infection, particularly coxsackievirus B pancreatitis.

It is common for the coxsackievirus to cause a febrile upper respiratory tract infection with sore throat and/or a runny nose. Some patients have a cough resembling bronchitis. Less commonly, coxsackievirus may cause pneumonia. Some people with coxsackievirus have a rash. In many, this is a nonspecific generalized red rash or clusters of fine red spots. The rash may not appear until the infection has started to get better.

Coxsackievirus is spread from person to person. The virus is present in the secretions and bodily fluids of infected people. The virus may be spread by coming into contact with respiratory secretions from infected patients. If infected people rub their runny noses and then touch a surface, that surface can harbor the virus and become a source of infection. People who have infected eyes (conjunctivitis) can spread the virus by touching their eyes and touching other people or surfaces. Conjunctivitis may spread rapidly and appear within one day of exposure to the virus. Coxsackieviruses are also shed in stool, which may be a source of transmission among young children. The virus can be spread if unwashed hands get contaminated with fecal matter and then touch the face. This is particularly important for spread within  day-care centers or nurseries where diapers are handled. Diarrhoea is the most common sign of coxsackievirus intestinal infection.

Most infections are self-limiting, and no specific treatment is required or available. Some options include intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), which contains antibodies and may be somewhat effective.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Odesa oblast, Ukraine: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/51897>]
Date: Tue 19 Nov 2019 6:07 AM GMT
Source: 3 FM [edited]

There's been an outbreak of a highly contagious disease among wood pigeons on [Isle of Man]. That's according to Manx Wild Bird Aid (MWBA) which says its already taken in a number of the animals from Douglas, Groudle, and Crosby which are suffering with 'canker'.

The infection isn't harmful to humans or mammals but the organisation says it can cause growths in the birds' mouths which can lead them to starve to death.

MWBA is offering advice to people about how to help stop it spreading, including strict hygiene on bird-feeding tables and if you come across a sick pigeon to take it to the nearest vet as soon as possible.  [Byline: Rob Pitchard]
========================
[_Trichomonas gallinae_ is a common protozoan parasite of pigeons (Columbiformes) which principally infects the upper alimentary tract where it can cause necrotic ingluvitis. Epidemic mortalities in columbiform species are sporadically reported, and the parasite may infect other avian taxa such as birds of prey and songbirds. (<http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0012215>). - ProMED Mod.PMB]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of the Isle of Man:

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Date: Tue 19 Nov 2019
Source: Caracas Chronicles [edited]

The Venezuelan Public Health Society and the Let's Defend The National Epidemiology Network issued an alert after a case of yellow fever was confirmed in the state of Bolivar, after 14 years without the disease. The Health Ministry hasn't published information about the case or issued an alert, but Venezuela must formally report it to international institutions, due to the risk to a population that isn't vaccinated, having the vector (mosquitoes) in all of the territory (increasing the odds of an epidemic), and the poor access to an epidemiologic report [about the case]. Doctor Julio Castro wrote about the case for Prodavinci.  [Byline: Naky Soto]
======================
[There is little information about this case: where and when it occurred in Bolivar state, tests used to diagnose the case, condition of the patient, and any follow-up measures taken by public health authorities. Yellow fever (YF) virus is endemic in Venezuela as it is in many South American countries.

The most recent ProMED-mail report of YF in Venezuela was in 2010, in Anzoategui state, where there were 3 probable YF cases in monkeys. This outbreak was enzootic, as determined by the Ministry of Health (see Yellow fever - South America: Venezuela (AN) monkey, susp http://promedmail.org/post/20101112.4114).

Presumably, this current case is one of spill-over from the sylvan (forest) transmission cycle. Maintenance of a high level (80-90%) of coverage is essential to prevent cases and avoid outbreaks involving the urban cycle with _Aedes aegypti_ transmission. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Venezuela:
Date: Thu 14 Nov 2019
Source: WHO Emergencies preparedness, response, Disease Outbreak News (DONs) [edited]

On 10 Oct 2019, the National IHR Focal Point for Sudan notified WHO of 47 suspected [human] cases of Rift Valley fever (RVF), including 2 deaths in Arb'aat Area, Towashan Village, in El Qaneb locality, Red Sea State. The suspected cases presented with high-grade fever, headaches, joint pain, vomiting. There were no hemorrhagic signs or symptoms observed. The 1st case presented to the health facility on 19 Sep 2019.

On 28 Sep 2019, a total of 14 samples were sent to the National Public Health Laboratory in Khartoum, and 5 tested positive for RVF by immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These samples were also tested for malaria and were found negative.

On 13 Oct 2019, a total of 10 suspected RVF cases were recorded in Barbar and Abu Hamed localities, of River Nile State. Of the 10 suspected RVF cases, 5 samples were tested and 4 were found positive for RVF. From 19 Sep 2019 until 11 Nov 2019, a total of 293 suspected human RVF cases, including 11 associated deaths have been reported from 6 states; including the Red Sea (120), River Nile (168), Kassala (2), White Nile (1), Khartoum (1), and Al Qadarif (1) States. The most affected age group is 15-45 years old, which accounts for 83% of the total suspected cases. The male to female ratio is 2.6, with a high proportion of the cases being farmers (37.5%).

These human RVF cases are concomitant with abortions and deaths among goats in the areas where the human suspected and confirmed cases have been reported. From 25 Sep through 3 Nov 2019, 21 goats in Red Sea State were reported as positive for RVF, including 4 deaths; and in River Nile State 16 goats, with 3 deaths, and 37 sheep, with 5 deaths, were confirmed positive for RVF by ELISA test at the Central Veterinary Research Laboratory in Khartoum.

Public health response
----------------------
Red Sea State
-------------
- Activation of RVF task force committee;
- printing and distribution of RVF guidelines;
- deployment of surveillance teams for daily reporting and active case finding in the affected areas;
- establishment of 2 health centers and one dispensary with a capacity of 11 beds, laboratory items, drugs, and supplies to provide health services in the affected villages;
- conducting household inspections and fogging: In Arb'aat area, a total of 452 households were inspected, out of which 30 were found positive for the presence of a competent vector; in Port Sudan, out of 1225 households inspected, 29 were found positive for the competent vector, and fogging was provided to 1949 households;
- the Veterinary Epidemiology Department of the Ministry of Animal Resources conducted vector control in 4 animal enclosures in the affected villages.

River Nile State
- A joint investigation conducted by the State Ministry of Health (SMoH) and WHO on 12 Oct 2019;
- initiation of an RVF Action plan by the SMoH and WHO;
- initiation of Integrated Vector Management (IVM), surveillance, case management, and Rapid Response Team (RRT) activities.

WHO risk assessment
-------------------
RVF is endemic in Sudan. There have been 3 outbreaks affecting humans previously documented in 1973, 1976, and 2008. During the outbreak in 2008, a total of 747 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported, including 230 deaths.

The recent floods, following heavy rains on 13 Aug 2019, caused flash floods in 17 of the 18 states, including Abyei area in West Kordofan State. These floods have favored vector abundance, distribution, and longevity. The current RVF outbreak started on 19 Sep 2019 and has affected states impacted by the floods.

The uncontrolled movements of animal populations within and outside the country borders may increase the spread of the disease to new areas.

RVF can cause significant economic losses due to livestock travel and trade restrictions, as well as high mortality and abortion rates among infected animals.

In a country where the export of livestock is one of the major sources of the national income, the current RVF outbreak, in the context of political unrest and a debilitated health system requires an urgent need for external assistance.

WHO advice
----------
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but also has the capacity to infect humans. The majority of human infections result from direct or indirect contact with the blood or organs of infected animals. Herders, farmers, slaughterhouse workers, and veterinarians have an increased risk of infection.

Awareness of the risk factors of RVF infection and measures to prevent mosquito bites is the only way to reduce human infection and deaths. Public health messages for risk reduction should focus on:
- reducing the risk of animal-to-human transmission resulting from unsafe animal husbandry and slaughtering practices;
- practicing hand hygiene as well as wearing gloves or other personal protective equipment when handling sick animals or their tissues and when slaughtering animals;
- reducing the risk of animal-to-human transmission arising from the unsafe consumption of raw or unpasteurized milk or animal tissue. in endemic regions, all animal products should be thoroughly cooked before eating;
- reducing the risk of mosquito bites through the implementation of vector control activities (e.g. insecticide spraying and use of larvicidal to reduce mosquito breeding sites), use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and repellents, light-coloured clothing (long-sleeved shirts and trousers);
- restricting or banning the movement of livestock to reduce the spread of the virus from infected to uninfected areas;
- routine animal vaccination is recommended to prevent RVF outbreaks. Vaccination campaigns are not recommended during an outbreak as they may intensify transmission among the herd through needle propagation of the virus;
- outbreaks of RVF in animals precede human cases, thus the establishment of an active animal health surveillance system is essential in providing early warning for veterinary and public health authorities.

WHO advises against the application of any travel or trade restrictions with the affected country based on the current information available on this event.
=====================
[The report above provides a good overview of the development of the current Rift Valley fever outbreak. Surveillance and responses require a One Health approach since both humans and animals are affected and environmental change, in this situation extensive flooding, has promoted vector abundance. Effective vector control over extensive geographical areas is difficult to achieve and is expensive. Maintenance of herd immunity through vaccination of animals can be a successful preventive measure prior to the occurrence of cases. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Neighbouring Egypt, which suffered introductions of RVF from Sudan in the past, has undertaken preventive measures. This relates initially to the 2 governorates bordering Sudan, namely the Red Sea and the New Valley governorates. In the Red Sea governorate, vaccination has already started. Reportedly, as of 18 Nov 2019, a total of 12 801 animals have been vaccinated, including 11 568 sheep and goats, 712 camels, and 421 cows and buffalo. The vaccination, which is free of charge, is being continued. In the New Valley governorate, 62 guidance seminars about RVF for animal breeders in the 5 provincial centers have been undertaken; the implementation of a "magnified immunization campaign for a month" is said to commence "next Saturday" (23 Nov 2019), "aimed at immunizing 120 000 cattle, goats, and sheep." Intensified surveillance in animals has, reportedly, been applied in both governorates; no suspected cases detected. - ProMED Mod.AS]