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Thailand



*****
Travel in Health in Thailand
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General Introduction:
Irish travellers are going to Thailand in great numbers. The relatively cheap cost and also the contrast in culture has captured many hearts. Some are travelli
g for a once off 2 week trip and for others the exploration of Thailand will take longer. It is truly a beautiful country and the people have a charm all of their own but nevertheless your journey can be so very easily ruined by taking health risks.
Water-Borne Disease:
In most of the major cities of Thailand the water supply is well chlorinated and so the risks associated with drinking mains tap water are limited. However many of the bedrooms will not be supplied with mains water so take care. Smell the water and if there is a distinct chlorine odour then it should be safe. Also remember that when you travel around the country, especially around the northern regions, the water supply may be grossly contaminated and so never drink the water or use it for brushing your teeth. Also no ice in your drinks under these circumstances.
Food-Borne Disease:
There is a good selection of food in Thailand and you should have no great difficulty in finding food to suit your taste. In the majority of the restaurants the food is well cooked and maintained in a healthy sterile fashion. These are the places to eat. As you walk around the cities you will see many street traders selling food stuffs from their carts. The level of hygiene is very low and frequently the food will be contaminated. Never indulge yourself by eating from street vendors.
Mosquito-Borne Disease:
Under this title most travellers will only consider the possibility of developing malaria. This is of course one of the most important illnesses transmitted via mosquitoes but by no means the only one in Thailand. For most travellers to Thailand there will be no need to take malarial prophylaxis as the cities are deemed to be free of malaria. This does not mean that you will not be bitten by mosquitoes and develop some of the other diseases such as Dengue Fever or perhaps Japanese Encephalitis. Many travellers also develop a very severe reaction to the mosquito bite and so for all these reasons it is prudent to avoid being bitten whenever possible.
Entertainment-Borne Disease:
It would be wrong not to emphasize the very high risk which travellers face if they are unwise enough to indulge in any form of sexual activity in Thailand. The percentage of street girls with the Aids virus is rising each year and is now thought to be over 80%. This figure may be an underestimate. Be especially careful if you have taken any alcohol. The cities of Bangkok and Pattaya are thought to be among the main centres of HIV transmission throughout the world and within the next few years the extent of the Aids problem in S.E. Asia will have exceeded Africa. There is limited availability of condoms.
Road-Borne Disease:
The traffic situation in Thailand is severe. The motorbikes have no insurance as they are too often involved in accidents. Use only regular taxi cabs and fix your price before you leave.
Vaccination Schedule:
There are no compulsory vaccines for entry into Thailand from Ireland. Nevertheless the usual recommended vaccines include Polio, Typhoid, Tetanus and Hepatitis A cover. For those trekking or staying for longer periods then cover against Hepatitis B and Rabies would be worth discussing.
Most travellers should start their vaccines about 4 to 5 weeks before they leave Ireland.
Note:
For the vast majority of Irish travellers a holiday in Thailand will be a time of great pleasure and, later, fond memories of the people, their customs and the countryside. Just remember that illness can occur so follow some good common sense rules and so you can enjoy yourself
and Travel in Health.

Thailand

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2020 10:59:15 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, Feb 10, 2020 (AFP) - Russian siblings aged 12 and six-years-old died Monday in a speed boat accident off the tourist island of Phuket, an official said, as two vessels collided near a pier.   The accident took place 100 metres off a privately-run pier in Phuket, after the speed boat carrying Russian tourists to an nearby island crashed into an incoming vessel.   "The cause of accident was speeding by both the drivers," a Phuket government official said, requesting anonymity.

The brother and sister died in the crash, while "21 other Russians were injured, two critically" he added.    Thailand's tourist industry has been hard hit by a combination of the sharp slump in Chinese visitors since the coronavirus outbreak and the strong Thai baht.   Accidents at popular resorts -- mainly car, motorbike and boat crashes -- are common in a kingdom with lax enforcement of safety rules.
Date: Fri 7 Feb 2020
From: Davidson Hamer <dhamer@bu.edu> [edited]

Case report: Japanese encephalitis, Belgian ex Thailand following a short tourist trip
------------------------------------------
We would like to report a case of Japanese encephalitis in a 14 year old Belgian girl who had travelled with her family (total 8 persons) to Khao Lak, Phang Nga province, Thailand, on 20 Dec 2019 for a short holiday. During the following 10 days, she undertook day trips to Krabi, Similan Islands, Phi Phi Islands, Krasom, and Amphoe Kapong.

On 30 Dec 2019, 11 days after arrival in Thailand, symptoms began with fever, headache, fatigue, and difficulty in swallowing. On 31 Dec [2019] whilst on the return flight home, she experienced progressive difficulty in walking due to a right-sided hemiparesis and became confused and lethargic.

On 1 Jan 2020, upon initial evaluation at a hospital in Frankfurt, Germany, she had marked confusion and irritability. An initial MRI scan was inconclusive, and results of a lumbar puncture revealed CSF mononuclear pleiocytosis (182 WBC), and serum PCR was negative for JEV. Sedation and mechanical ventilation were initiated, and the patient was transferred to University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium, on 4 Jan 2020. Between 3-6 Jan 2020, serum JEV IgM and IgG became positive (IIFT Flavivirus 2, Euroimmun, Lubeck, Germany); JEV plaque reduction neutralization testing (PRNT) returned greater. than 50% day 7 and greater than 90% day 21 (ATCC CCL-81); on 6 Jan [2020], CSF JEV IgM and IgG were also positive. EEG showed symmetric sedation-like curves without a clear gradient with predominant alpha rhythm superposed on delta (with isolated frontal slow waves).

Fortunately, her 7 other travel companions (including her monozygotic twin sister and her father) all tested negative for JEV IgM seroconversion.

Within a week after the start of mechanical ventilation, attempts to extubate her failed twice, as a result of hypersalivation, swallowing dysfunction, and muscle weakness (hypercapnic respiratory failure). On 10 Jan 2020, sedative medication was discontinued, and the patient could respond to questions appropriately. The strength in her legs and arms returned to normal, but muscle tone and strength in the neck remained weak, and there is residual respiratory muscle weakness and dysphagia, with gastroparesis and vomiting. She had limited enteral intake and, in part, continues to receive parenteral nutrition. On 17 Jan 2020, tracheal cannulation and G-tube placement were performed to assist with breathing and provision of nutritional support.

By 29 Jan 2020, she was breathing independently, slowly recovering, and was able to be transferred from the PICU to a ward. She will be transferred to a long-term rehabilitation hospital in the coming days.

This sad case report highlights the potentially devastating impact of Japanese encephalitis in travelers and how this may arise even after relatively short-term exposure (in this case less than 2 weeks) in major touristic areas. Although major debates persist about the role of vaccination, given the rarity of the disease, the duration of potential exposure in deciding whether to vaccinate, and the cost of the vaccine, travel-medicine providers should continue to describe the potential risk of infection (low) and complications and mortality if infection occurs (high) to travelers to south and south east Asia.
-----------------------------------
communicated by:
Dr Ralph Huits
GeoSentinel co-site director
Department of Clinical Sciences at the Institute of Tropical Medicine
Antwerp, Belgium
and
Vanessa Field
GeoSentinel tracking and communication working group chair
====================
[Thailand is endemic for Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, and Phang Nga province, located in the southern part of the country, can susta inyear-round JE virus transmission. The girl was very unfortunate to have become infected despite a short visit there. Her situation raises the question about the advisability of vaccination of visitors to areas endemic for JE. The USA CDC Advisory Committee of Vaccination Practices states, "JE vaccine is recommended for persons moving to a JE-endemic country to take up residence, longer-term (for example, greater than or equal to one month) travelers to JE-endemic areas, and frequent travelers to JE-endemic areas. JE vaccine also should be considered for shorter-term (for example, less than one month) travelers with an increased risk for JE on the basis of planned travel duration, season, location, activities, and accommodations and for travelers to JE-endemic areas who are uncertain about their specific travel duration, destinations, or activities. JE vaccine is not recommended for travelers with very low-risk itineraries, such as shorter-term travel limited to urban areas or outside of a well-defined JE virus transmission season." The girl and her family would normally not be considered at significant risk for such a short stay in Thailand. About one in 4 people with JE clinical encephalitis die, and about 50% of survivors have permanent neurological sequelae. One hopes that the girl will be one of the remaining 50% that recover completely. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Phang Nga, Phang Nga province, Thailand:
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2020 09:21:31 +0100 (MET)

Bangkok, Feb 7, 2020 (AFP) - Thailand's health minister lashed out at "Western" tourists on Friday for not wearing face masks and suggested they be expelled from the country for putting others at risk during the coronavirus outbreak.

The outburst came as the kingdom faced steep losses over a drop in visitors from China, where the virus has killed more than 600 people and prompted sweeping travel restrictions.   Tourism accounts for 18 percent of the country's gross domestic product and Chinese holidaymakers make up a quarter of total arrivals.   Thailand has detected 25 coronavirus cases and nine of those patients have recovered, while streets, public transport and shopping centres have filled with people wearing face masks.

Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul was distributing masks at a busy Bangkok skytrain entrance when he complained that "farang" tourists didn't take them and acted as if they "don't care".   Farang is a commonly used Thai word to describe Westerners and is sometimes used dismissively.   "These kinds of people, we should kick them out of Thailand," he told reporters, waving a handful of masks in the air.

Anutin did not respond to additional requests for comment but posted an apology on his Facebook page for "losing it" after "some foreigners from Europe" were uncooperative in the mask campaign.   More than 10 million Chinese tourists visited Thailand last year but the industry projects about two million fewer arrivals in 2020 because of the coronavirus, making US, European and other markets more vital.   Debates over the efficacy of masks have bounced around the internet since the contagion first emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan last month.

Since then it has spread to more than two dozen countries and infected tens of thousands, mostly within mainland China.   Health experts generally agree masks are useful if you have respiratory symptoms or are caring for patients.   But the World Health Organization's own Thailand office tweeted a graphic on February 4 stating masks are "not needed for general public who do not have respiratory symptoms".   The WHO has advised people to wash their hands regularly and avoid touching their face.
Date: Fri 31 Jan 2020
From: Claudia Wallrauch <Claudia.Wallrauch@lrz.uni-muenchen.de>
[edited]

A male German tourist visited Little Koh Chang Island (Andaman Sea, Thailand) from 25 Dec 2019 to 20 Jan 2020.

Starting 21 Jan 2020 onwards he complained about intermittent fever and headache. On 24 Jan 2020, he presented at the Division for Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases in Munich, Germany. At presentation, the patient was afebrile, and the commercial malaria rapid test was negative.

However, malaria was diagnosed using thin smear microscopy. Parasitaemia was below 0.1%; a species diagnoses could not be made by microscopy. A differential malaria PCR revealed _Plasmodium knowlesi_ infection. The further clinical course was uncomplicated; the patient was treated successfully with atovaquone and proguanil.

We have seen and reported a similar case of _P. knowlesi_ malaria acquired on that same island before (see reference below), an island that is currently defined as a low-risk area.

We'd like to emphasize this specific part of Thailand as an area of potential _P. knowlesi_ infections and want to stress the importance of smear microscopy and differential PCR in diagnosing this type of malaria, as rapid tests are negative in _P. knowlesi_ infection.

Reference:
Froeschl G, Beissner M, Huber K, et al. _Plasmodium knowlesi_ infection in a returning German traveller from Thailand: a case report on an emerging malaria pathogen in a popular low-risk travel destination. BMC Infect Dis 2018;18:148.  <https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-018-3059-z>
---------------------------------------------
Claudia Wallrauch
Division for Tropical Medicine and infectious Diseases
Munich, Germany
==========================
[ProMED-mail thanks Dr. Claudia Wallrauch for reporting this case. Infection with _Plasmodium knowlesi_ is a problem in southeast Asia. The infection evolves rapidly with the parasite having a 24-h asexual life-cycle in the human host.

As pointed out by Dr. Wallrauch, the rapid test was negative, and it is important to know that the rapid tests are validated only for _P. falciparum_ and _P. vivax_ infections. Most rapid tests also include a test for a "pan-malaria antigen" supposed to catch _P. ovale_, _P. malariae_ and _P. knowlesi_, but the tests are not validated for these infections; thus, the detection level, i.e., the parasite counts where the tests become positive, are not known. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Rayong Province, Thailand: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/10728>]
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2020 16:12:29 +0100 (MET)
By Nina LARSON

Geneva, Jan 13, 2020 (AFP) - A new virus from the same family as the deadly SARS disease has spread beyond China's borders for the first time with a case emerging in Thailand, UN and Thai officials said on Monday.   Thai doctors diagnosed a Chinese traveller with mild pneumonia on January 8 later confirmed to have been caused by the so-called novel coronavirus -- which has already given rise to 41 pneumonia-like cases and one death in China.   The outbreak has caused alarm because of the link with SARS (Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed 349 people in mainland China and another 299 in Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

The UN health agency (WHO) confirmed that the outbreak in the city of Wuhan was caused by a previously unknown type of corona virus, a broad family ranging from the common cold to more serious illnesses like SARS.   "Laboratory testing subsequently confirmed that the novel coronavirus was the cause," WHO spokesman Tarik Jasarevic told AFP in an email, referring to the case in Thailand.   WHO said it might soon host an emergency meeting on the spread of the new virus.   Thai Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul stressed to reporters in Bangkok Monday that a 61-year-old Chinese woman who had travelled from Wuhan "was infected with the virus from outside Thailand".   Thai health officials said on Monday she was recovering.   Authorities in Wuhan said a seafood market in the city was the centre of the outbreak. It was closed on January 1.   There is so far no indication of human-to-human transmission of the virus.

- 'Not unexpected' -
Scientists in Hong Kong's Department of Health said on Saturday that genetic sequencing of the virus from a Wuhan patient, published online by a Chinese expert, indicated it was 80 percent similar to SARS found in bats.   WHO said on Monday it was not surprising that the virus had spread beyond China.   "The possibility of cases being identified in other countries was not unexpected, and reinforces why WHO calls for ongoing active monitoring and preparedness in other countries," it said in a statement.   Thai authorities have been on high alert, with airport officials checking all passengers coming from Wuhan to the kingdom's major airports.   An official from the Public Health Emergency Operation Center told AFP the infected woman travelling from Wuhan had been intercepted on arrival in Thailand, after airport officials determined she had a fever.

WHO said it had issued guidance on how to detect and treat people with the new virus and stressed that China's decision to rapidly share the genetic sequencing of the virus made it possible to quickly diagnose patients.   WHO has not recommended any specific measures for travellers or restrictions on trade with China, but stressed on Monday it was taking the situation seriously.   "Given developments, WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will consult with Emergency Committee members and could call for a meeting of the committee on short notice," it said in a statement.   During such meetings, experts determine whether the UN health agency should declare an international health emergency -- a designation used only for the gravest epidemics.
More ...

Pakistan

Pakistan - US Consular Information Sheet
October 02, 2008
COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:
Pakistan is a parliamentary federal republic in South Asia, with a population of nearly 170 million people. Following successful elections in February 2008, Pak
stan has a coalition government led by Prime Minister Yousef Gilani. Pakistan is a developing country, with some tourist facilities in major cities but limited in outlying areas. The infrastructure of areas of Kashmir and the Northwest Frontier Province was devastated as a result of the October 8, 2005 earthquake and is not yet recovered. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Pakistan for additional information.

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ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: All U.S. citizens traveling to Pakistan for any purpose are required to have valid U.S. passports and Pakistani-issued visas. Further information on entry requirements can be obtained from the Embassy of Pakistan at 3517 International Court Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008; telephone: 202-243-6500; e-mail: info@pakistan-embassy.org; web site: http://www.pakistan-embassy.org/.

Travelers may also contact one of the Consulates General of Pakistan in:
Boston: 20 Chestnut Street, Needham, MA 02492; telephone: (781) 455-8000; fax: (617) 266-6666; email: pakistan@tiac.net
Chicago: 333 North Michigan Ave., Suite 728, Chicago, IL, 60601; telephone: (312) 781-1831; fax: (312) 781-1839; email: parepchicago@yahoo.com
Houston: 11850 Jones Road, Houston, TX, 77070; telephone: (281) 890-2223; fax: (281) 890-1433; email: parephouston@sbcglobal.net
Los Angeles: 10850 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1100, Los Angeles, CA 90024; telephone: (310) 441-5114; fax: (310) 441-9256; email: info@pakconsulatela.org
New York: 12 East 65th St., New York, NY 10021; telephone: (212) 879-5800; fax: (212) 517-6987; web site: www.pakistanconsulateny.org
If a traveler plans to stay longer than the time listed on the visa, he or she must extend the stay with the local passport office of the Ministry of Interior. Visit the Embassy of Pakistan web site at http://www.pakistan-embassy.org/ for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:
A number of extremist groups within Pakistan continue to target American and other Western interests and high-level Pakistani government officials. Terrorists and their sympathizers have demonstrated willingness and capability to attack targets where Americans are known to congregate or visit. Terrorist actions may include, but are not limited to, suicide operations, bombing -- including vehicle-borne explosives and improvised explosive devices -- assassinations, carjacking, assault or kidnapping. U.S. Government personnel are not permitted to stay at or frequent major hotels in Islamabad, Karachi, Lahore and Peshawar.

Government personnel have also been advised to restrict the number and frequency of trips to public markets, and to avoid public restaurants in Islamabad, Karachi, and Peshawar.

In September 2008, over fifty people, including three Americans, were killed and hundreds were injured when a suicide bomber set off a truck filled with explosives outside a major international hotel in Islamabad. In August 2008 gunmen stopped and shot at the vehicle of an American diplomat in Peshawar. In March 2008, a restaurant frequented by westerners in Islamabad was bombed, killing one patron and seriously injuring several others, including four American diplomats. On March 2, 2006, an American diplomat, his locally employed driver, and three others were killed when a suicide bomber detonated a car packed with explosives in front of the U.S. Consulate General in Karachi. Fifty-two others were wounded in the attack.

Sectarian and extremist violence has resulted in fatal bomb attacks in Islamabad, Rawalpindi, Karachi, Peshawar, Quetta, Lahore, and other Pakistani cities since 2006. Since 2007, over 1,000 bombings have killed more than 1,000 people throughout Pakistan and injured many more. Rallies, demonstrations, and processions occur from time to time throughout Pakistan on very short notice and have often taken on an anti-American or anti-Western character. Because of the possibility of violence, Americans are urged to avoid all public places of worship and areas where Westerners are known to congregate.

During the Islamic (Shi’a) religious observance of Moharram, rivalries and hostilities often increase.

In 2007 and 2008, several American citizens throughout Pakistan were kidnapped for ransom or for personal reasons. Kidnappings for ransom are particularly common in some parts of Pakistan, such as the Northwest Frontier Province and Sindh Province.

It is best to avoid public transportation. For security reasons, U.S. Mission personnel are prohibited from using taxis or buses. (See the Traffic Safety and Road Conditions section below.)

Women are advised to dress conservatively, with arms and legs covered, and avoid walking around alone. It is unwise for anyone to travel on the streets late at night. Visitors to Pakistan should attempt to maintain a low profile, blend in, be aware of their surroundings, and seek security with their family or sponsoring organization.

Northern Areas – While we continue to discourage non-essential travel to Pakistan, we advise Americans wishing to trek in Gilgit, Hunza or Chitral to use only licensed guides and tourist agencies. While overall crime is low, there have been occasional assaults on foreign visitors.

Northwest Frontier Province - The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) along the Afghan border, and certain areas within the Northwest Frontier Province (NWFP), are designated as tribal areas and are not subject to normal government jurisdiction. The Government of Pakistan requires all citizens of countries other than Pakistan and Afghanistan to obtain permission from the Home and Tribal Affairs Department prior to visiting these locations. The permit may stipulate that an armed escort must accompany the visitor. Even in the settled areas of the NWFP there is occasional ethnic, sectarian, and political violence. There have been dozens of bombings in Peshawar of varying sophistication since September 2006. Members of the Taliban and Al-Qaida are known to be in the FATA, and may also be in the settled areas.

Kashmir - While direct military hostilities between India and Pakistan across the Line of Control (LOC) are infrequent, militant groups engaged in a long-running insurgency on the Indian side of the LOC are reported to have bases and supporters operating from the Pakistani side. Most of these groups are anti-American, and some have attacked Americans and other Westerners. The Government of Pakistan restricts access to many parts of this region and requires that visitors obtain a permit from the Ministry of Interior before traveling.

Punjab Province - Violence has increased in Punjab Province. Since September 2007, several suicide operations have taken place, including attacks in Rawalpindi and Lahore. As a precaution against these possible dangers, U.S. citizens are cautioned to avoid public transportation and crowded areas. The Wagah border crossing into India near Lahore remains open daily (from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.) for travel to and from India if the passport holder has a valid visa for both countries. Visitors are advised to confirm the current status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel.

Sindh Province - In Karachi and Hyderabad, there has been recurring violence characterized by bombings, violent demonstrations and shootings. An October 2007 suicide attack on former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto killed more than 130 and injured approximately 375 people in Karachi. In the aftermath of her December 2007 death, rioting in Karachi led to multiple deaths and injuries, as well as widespread property damage. In May 2008, clashing groups of lawyers burned buildings and vehicles in several areas of the city, resulting in at least 11 fatalities. Americans and other westerners continue to be a particular target of hostility and occasional anti-Western mob violence. The Consulate General in particular has been the target of several major terrorist attacks or plots in recent years, including the deadly March 2006 suicide attack described above. Non-essential travel to these cities is strongly discouraged. In rural Sindh Province, the security situation is hazardous, especially for those engaged in overland travel. The Government of Pakistan recommends that travelers limit their movements in Sindh Province.

Balochistan Province - The Province of Balochistan, which borders both Iran and Afghanistan, is notorious for narcotics and other forms of cross-border smuggling. Members of the Taliban and Al-Qaida are also believed to be present there. Tribal unrest sometimes turns violent. Because provincial police presence is limited, travelers wishing to visit the interior of Balochistan should consult with the province’s Home Secretary. Advance permission from provincial authorities is required for travel into many areas. Local authorities have detained travelers who lacked proper permission. Quetta, the provincial capital, has experienced an increase in bombings, occasional gun battles in the streets, and the imposition of curfews. Terrorist attacks against Pakistani government installations and infrastructure have been reported throughout 2005 and 2006.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Travel Warnings, including the Travel Warning for Pakistan, Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada, or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME: Crime is a serious concern for foreigners throughout Pakistan. Carjacking, armed robberies, house invasions, and other violent crimes occur in many major urban areas. Petty crime, especially theft of personal property, is common. American travelers to Pakistan are strongly advised to avoid traveling by taxi and other forms of public transportation, and have members of their host organizations or families meet them at the airport.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Transactions involving such products may be illegal under local law. In addition, bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines. More information on this serious problem is available at http://www.cybercrime.gov/18usc2320.htm
INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Pakistan is: 15
See our information on Victims of Crime.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Adequate basic non-emergency medical care is available in major Pakistani cities, but is limited in rural areas. Facilities in the cities vary in level and range of services, resources, and cleanliness, and Americans may find them below U.S. standards; facilities in rural areas are consistently below U.S. standards. Medical facilities require prepayment and do not accept credit cards.

Water is not potable anywhere in Pakistan and sanitation in many restaurants is inadequate. Stomach illnesses are common.

Effective emergency response to personal injury and illness is virtually non-existent in Pakistan. Ambulances are few and are not necessarily staffed by medical personnel. Any emergency case should be transported immediately to a recommended emergency receiving room. Many American-brand medications are not widely available, but generic brands from well-known pharmaceuticals usually are. The quality of the locally-produced medications is uneven.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Pakistan.
Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s web site at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) web site at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith/en.

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. As noted above, emergency medical care in Pakistan is very limited. Medical evacuations from Pakistan may cost in excess of $45,000 for uninsured travelers requiring emergency assistance. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Pakistan is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Traffic in Pakistan moves on the left, opposite of U.S. traffic. In addition to this source of potential confusion, travel by road in Pakistan has a variety of other risks. Roads are crowded, drivers are often aggressive and poorly trained, and many vehicles, particularly large trucks and buses, are badly maintained. Donkeys, cattle, horse carts, and even the occasional camel can pose roadside hazards in some areas. Roads, including most major highways, also suffer from poor maintenance and often have numerous potholes, sharp drop-offs and barriers that are not sign-posted. Drivers should exercise extreme caution when traveling at night by road, as many vehicles do not have proper illumination or dimmers nor are most roads properly illuminated or signed. Driving without experienced local drivers or guides is not recommended.

It is best to avoid public transportation. For security reasons, U.S. Mission personnel are prohibited from using taxis or buses. (See Safety and Security section above.)

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of Pakistan’s national tourist office at http://www.tourism.gov.pk/ and the national authority responsible for road safety at http://www.nha.gov.pk/.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Pakistan’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Pakistan’s air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s web site at http://www.faa.gov/safety/programs_initiatives/oversight/iasa.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:
Pakistan is largely a cash economy. Personal checks are not commonly accepted. Most Pakistanis do not use checking accounts for routine transactions. Outside major cities, even credit cards and travelers’ checks are generally not accepted, and there have been numerous reports of credit card fraud. There are bank branches as well as registered moneychangers in all international airports. ATMs can also be found in major airports. English is widely spoken by professional-level airport staff.

Please see our Customs Information.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country’s laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Pakistani laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Pakistan are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.

Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.
CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:
Americans living or traveling in Pakistan are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Pakistan. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy in Islamabad is located at Diplomatic Enclave, Ramna 5; telephone: (92-51) 208-0000; Consular Section telephone: (92-51) 208-2700; fax: (92-51) 282-2632; website: http://islamabad.usembassy.gov/
The U.S. Consulate General in Karachi, located at 8 Abdullah Haroon Road, closed its public operations indefinitely due to security concerns. U.S. citizens requiring emergency assistance should call the Consular Section in Karachi; telephone: (92-21) 520-4200; fax: (92-21) 568-0496; web site: http://karachi.usconsulate.gov/
The U.S. Consulate in Lahore is located on 50 Sharah-E-Abdul Hamid Bin Badees (Old Empress Road), near Shimla Hill Rotary; telephone: (92-42) 603-4000; fax: (92-42) 603-4200; web site: http://lahore.usconsulate.gov/; email: amconsul@brain.net.pk
The U.S. Consulate in Peshawar is located at 11 Hospital Road, Cantonment, Peshawar; telephone: (92-91) 526-8800; fax: (92-91) 528-4171; web site: http://peshawar.usconsulate.gov/
* * *
This replaces the Country Specific Information dated August 7, 2008 to update the section on Safety and Security.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 5 Feb 2020
Source: Urdu Point [edited]

The Emergency Operation Centre (EOC) for polio in Sindh here on Wednesday [5 Feb 2020] confirmed one new polio case for the year 2020 from UC Jamal in Kashmore District.

This takes the total tally of Sindh to 3 and Pakistan to 8 for the year 2020, said the EOC spokesperson, mentioning that a 40 month old girl has been affected by polio with weakness in both lower limbs with date of onset being [16 Jan 2020]. According to her parents, the child had received 7 doses of oral polio vaccination (OPV); however, an investigation is ongoing into this claim.

The spokesperson said the National EOC and Sindh EOC have started to fight back to get polio eradication on track and reverse this trend. The 1st step was claimed to be the successful [December 2019] NID [National Immunization Day], followed by a case response in January [2020], while another campaign is scheduled to be conducted during the current month [February 2020].

Efforts and delivery of quality campaigns over the next few months, the spokesperson said, will bridge the immunity gap and lead to a significant decrease in the intensity of virus transmission in the 2nd half of 2020. "The current risk to our children is very real, and while it is our job to deliver these vaccines at the doorstep, caregivers must also step up and protect their children through vaccinations," said the official. The National EOC and Sindh EOC urge parents to ensure immunization of their children both in routine as well as the special campaigns planned by the programme during next few months.  [byline: Muhammad Irfan]
===================
[According to the End Polio Pakistan website, this is the 8th case of polio confirmed with a date of onset in 2020. There have been 3 cases reported from Sindh province, 4 from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and 1 from Balochistan with dates of onset in 2020 (see  <https://www.endpolio.com.pk/polioin-pakistan/polio-cases-in-provinces>).

The districts reporting cases with onset during 2020 are as follows:

Sindh:
- Sujawal (1 case)
- Tando Allahyar (1 case)
- Kashmore (1 case)

Khyber Pakhtunkwa:
- Lakki Marwat (3 cases)
- Tank (1 case)

Balochistan:
- Nasirabad (1 case)

A good map of Pakistan showing districts and provinces can be found at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Sindh, Pakistan:
Date: 26 Jan 2020
Source: MENAFN [edited]

Two more polio cases have surfaced from Landikotal tehsil in Khyber tribal district, after which the number of reported cases in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has reached 4 this year [2020].

According to the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC), a 2-year-old [male child] from Nekikhel and another child from Torwela have been diagnosed with polio. The samples of these 2 children were sent for laboratory tests in 2019, so these cases will be counted in the tally of 2019, which stands at 141 now.

The 2 cases in Landiktoal were reported 2 days after the emergence of 3 new polio cases in Qambar, Dadu and Sajawal districts of Sindh. Among them, 2 children contracted the crippling disease in 2019, but the cases were confirmed on Friday [24 Jan 2020].

On [21 Jan 2020], the 1st case of polio in Pakistan in 2020 surfaced in Lakki Marwat, the district with the highest number of cases in 2019.

The year 2019 was worse for Pakistan in polio eradication efforts, as 141 cases surfaced in Pakistan, including 96 cases in KP. Most cases in KP surfaced in Lakki Marwat, where 32 children were diagnosed with the crippling disease. In 2018, only 12 cases were reported, while in 2017, 8 cases were reported.

Currently, Pakistan and Afghanistan are the only 2 countries in the world which have not fully eradicated polio. The main cause behind the emergence of so many polio cases is refusal of parents to cooperate with the vaccination teams. According to media reports citing Health Ministry data, over a million parents refused to cooperate with vaccination teams in 2019. Most of the refusal cases were reported in April last year [2019] when rumours spread in Peshawar that many children had fainted after consuming vaccination drops. A total of 1 089 087 parents refused to give vaccination drops to their children in 2019.

The emergence of so many polio cases in Pakistan, particularly in KP, has brought the federal and provincial governments under pressure over their performance and strategy to control the spread of disease.

Experts believe that polio vaccination efforts cannot succeed completely until the refusing parents are convinced to cooperate with vaccination teams.
==================
[The End Polio Pakistan website has not added all of the media reported cases as yet, so it's a bit difficult to follow at times and know which cases were 2019 onset and which were 2020 onset. The above media report clearly states 2019 onset and puts the tally for 2019 as 141 cases, but the media reports from Friday's [24 Jan 2020] report is less clear (see Poliomyelitis update (10): global, Pakistan (BA, SD) http://promedmail.org/post/20200124.6911971).

A good map of Pakistan showing districts and provinces can be found at:
Date: Sat 11 Jan 2020
Source: Samaa TV [edited]

A 3-year-old boy in Thatta's Mirpur Sakhro has been diagnosed with polio in Sindh, bringing the total for 2019 to 25 cases and Pakistan's tally to 135. The Emergency Operation Centre (EOC) for polio in Sindh confirmed the case.

This is not a case from 2020, as the 34-month boy was affected by polio with weakness in the left upper and lower limbs on [26 Dec 2019]. According to his parents, he had received 7 doses of the oral polio vaccine and 3 routine doses plus the IPV were verified by card. An investigation has been opened into these claims.

EOC Sindh's spokesperson said that the long gap in door-to-door campaigns during 2019 created a large pool of vulnerable children. The National EOC and Sindh EOC have started to fight back to eradicate polio and reverse this trend. The 1st step was the successful December [2019] NID, and now areas with recent detections are being targeted in a special response round starting from [13 Jan 2020].

"We will follow this up with 2 NIDs in February and April [2020) with another targeted case response in between," the spokesperson said. Efforts from December [2019] to April [2020] will bridge the immunity gap and lead to a significant decrease in the intensity of virus transmission in the 2nd half of 2020, they said.

Up until this case was detected, Sindh had 24 polio cases in 2019, out of which 6 came from Karachi. There were 134 cases that emerged from all over Pakistan:
- 91 in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
- 24 in Sindh
- 11 in Balochistan
- 8 in Punjab

Sindh Chief Minister Murad Ali Shah met the Provincial Task Force on Polio Eradication on Saturday [11 Jan 2020]. The meeting was attended by ministers Dr. Azra Pechuho, Syed Nasir Shah, PSCM Sajid Jamal Abro, Karachi Commissioner Iftikhar Shahalwani, LG Secretary Roshan Shaikh, Health Secretary Zahid Abbasi, all deputy commissioners of the city, all commissioners and deputy commissioners of other divisions and districts via video link.

The details of the 6 polio cases detected in Karachi in 2019:
- 25 Feb: A 3-year-old from Lyari's Shahbaig Lane; she is Baloch and hails from Quetta
- 20 Apr: An 8-month-old in Orangi from a Pashtun family
- 26 Aug: A 16-month-old in Orangi from a Punjabi family from Multan
- 29 Apr: A 6-month-old from Gulzar-e-Hijri from a Pashtun family
- 24 Oct: A 2-year-old at Jacob Lines from a Sindhi family and from Hyderabad
- 29 Oct: A 12-month-old in Keamari from a Baloch family

The polio cases detected from other divisions of the province are:
- 17 Apr: A 3-year-old in Dokri, Larkana from a Seraiki family; she originally belonged to Gadap, Karachi
- 20 Jul: A 1-year-old in Halanaka, Hyderabad, from a Pashtun family who originally hails from Gadap, Karachi
- 23 Aug: A 10-year-old in Latifabad, Hyderabad from a Mohajir family
- 23 Aug: A 3-year-old in Kotri, Hyderabad from a Pashtun family
- 25 Sep: A 3.6-year-old from Sujawal, Thatta-Hyderabad, from a Sindhi family
- 9 Oct: A 1-month-old in Kotri, Jamshoro from a Sindhi family
- 19 Oct: A 3-year-old from Sakrand-Shaheed Benazirabad from a Baloch family who originally belongs to SITE, Karachi
- 27 Oct: An 8.4-year-old from a Sindhi family detected in Rahooja, Sukkur and who hails from Landhi, Karachi
- 2 Nov: A 2-year-old from Wareh, Kambar Shahdadkot
- 9 Nov: A 9-month-old in Dokri, Larkana from a Seraiki family that hails from SITE, Karachi
- 10 Nov: A 2.4-year-old from a Sindhi family detected in Chambar, Tando Allahayar and originally hails from Landhi, Karachi
- 17 Nov: A 3.6-year-old from Digri, Mirpurkhas from a Mohajir family
- 20 Nov: A 6-year-old from a Sindhi family detected in Mirpurkhas and that originally belongs to SITE, Karachi
- 28 Nov: A 6-year-old from a Seraiki family, detected in Matli, Badin
- 1 Dec: A 4-year-old from a Sindhi family in Sindhri, Mirpurkhas
- 1 Dec: A 12-year-old from a Sindhi family detected in Sehwan, Jamshoro
- 6 Dec: A 5-month-old from a Sindhi family detected in Patt, Dadu
- 14 Dec: A 3-year-old from Wareh, Kambar-Shahdadkot from a Sindhi family

The chief minister said that most of the polio cases have links with Karachi; therefore, the health department and its other wings have to focus on Karachi by segregating the areas so that their environmental samples could be made negative. Gulshan, Baldia, SITE, Korangi, Liaquatabad and Saddar have had positive environmental samples throughout 2019. Sukkur, Jacobabad, Hyderabad, Dadu and Kambar-Shahdadkot have also been positive.

Polio vaccine coverage: EOC In-charge Rehan Baloch told the chief minister that there was target of 9 076 523 children:
- 2 293 687 in Karachi
- 2 160 552 in Hyderabad
- 1 514 246 in Larkana
- 785 475 in Mirpurkhas
- 1 093 139 in Nawabshah
- 1 229 424 in Sukkur

He said that 82.1% missed children were also covered and yet 295,704 children were missed. The chief minister was told that 95% coverage has been achieved in 7 days of December 2019 in Karachi and 100% in other divisions.

There are 782 union councils where environmental samples are positive for polio viruses.
========================
[Yet another case of polio confirmed in Sindh, Pakistan with date of onset in 2019, bringing the total to 135 cases in Pakistan. Presumably this is associated with a wild poliovirus or it would not have been grouped with the 134 other WPV1-associated cases.

One disturbing fact is that this child had documented receipt of 7 doses of campaign vaccine, 3 doses of routine vaccination and 1 dose of IPV. Hence, this child should have been protected. This warrants further investigation.

A good map of Pakistan showing districts and provinces can be found at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Sat 4 Jan 2020
Source: Menafn <edited>

Hepatitis E is spreading rapidly in the Almas area of Ashiri Darra in Upper Dir, and over 60 patients have been diagnosed with the disease during the last one month. Those diagnosed with hepatitis E also include women and children. The local people have expressed grave concern over the outbreak of the epidemic and called upon the government to send health teams to the area to stop the disease from further spreading.

The area people said hepatitis E has affected almost every home in the area, and most of the patients are women. They said the area residents have stopped the use of water available from pipelines, and they are now using water from streams, but still the disease is spreading rapidly.

A local person said while talking to TNN that 5 members of his family have been infected. He said he has no idea how and from what source the disease is spreading so quickly. He said most people in Almas are poor and cannot afford expensive treatment. He said an infected patient needs to be shifted to Timergara, where the treatment cost ranges from INR 10,000 [USD 139] to INR 15,000 [USD 209]. He called upon the government to take immediate steps to stop the spread of disease in the area.

Regional Health Centre (RHC) Incharge Dr Riazullah said hepatitis spreads from polluted water and stool of infected patients. He said the water of the whole area is polluted due to lack of a proper sewerage system, and as a result, the disease is spreading quickly. He advised the area people to use boiled water for consumption.

Hepatitis E is a virus infection that infects a patient's liver, causing it to swell up. According to WebMD, a leading health information website, hepatitis E doesn't usually lead to long-term illness or liver damage like some other forms of hepatitis. However, it can be dangerous for pregnant women or anyone with weak immune systems, including the elderly or people who are ill.

Hepatitis E is more common in areas with poor handwashing habits and lack of clean water. Main symptoms include fever, low appetite, belly pain, skin rash, joint pain, and yellowish skin or eyes. An infected patient must consume more water, eat healthy foods, and rest.
====================
[Hepatitis E is found worldwide, and different genotypes of the hepatitis E virus determine differences in epidemiology. For example, genotype 1 is usually seen in developing countries and causes community-level outbreaks, whereas genotype 3 is usually seen in developed countries and does not cause outbreaks. Acute epidemic hepatitis E is attributable to infection with hepatitis E virus genotypes 1 and 2. Many of the deaths are in pregnant women, characteristic of genotype 1.

The highest seroprevalence rates (number of persons in a population who test positive for the disease) are observed in regions where low standards of sanitation increase the risk for transmission of the virus. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan:
Date: Fri 27 Dec 2019
Source: Pakistan Today [edited]

A total of 4 new polio cases were detected in Pakistan Friday [27 Dec 2019]; 2 of these were from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and 2 from Sindh.

With the new cases, the tally for this year [2019] has risen to 115, said the National Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) for polio. If the vaccine-derived polio cases are also taken into account, the total comes to 127.

The 1st case was a 15-month-old boy from KP's Tank district. He had received no routine dose of the polio vaccine and 7 doses of supplemental immunisation, according to his parents.

The 2nd case was a 17-month-old girl from KP's Bannu district. Her parents said she received 3 routine doses of the polio vaccine and no supplementary dose.

In Sindh, the poliovirus was found in a 7-year-old girl from Sukkur and a 22-month [-old boy] from Tando Allah Yar, confirmed the EOC Sindh. The girl had received one routine dose and 7 supplementary doses. The affected boy has passed away due to severe prior illnesses, which had lasted 2 weeks before the polio diagnosis, said the officials.

"We have just started our battle afresh with the successful December [2019] nationwide campaign -- [the] 1st since January [2019], as the April [2019] attempt was affected by unfortunate Peshawar drama," the National EOC stated.

"Two follow-up national campaigns are planned in February [2020] and April [2020] that, along with efforts for improving routine immunisation coverage, can turn the tide."

They have urged parents to get their children vaccinated in light of the rampant spread of the virus this year [2019]. The December polio campaign was last week, and further campaigns are planned next year [2020] to strengthen coverage.
===================
[The 4 newly reported cases are confirmed on the End Polio Pakistan website (<https://www.endpolio.com.pk/polioin-pakistan/polio-cases-in-provinces>). As mentioned in the above media report, if you add the 12 AFP cases associated with cVDPV2 infection, the total number of poliovirus-associated AFP for 2019 to date (27 Dec 2019) in Pakistan is now at 127 cases. The sobering information is the reminder that there hasn't been a successful national campaign since January 2019 -- clearly a contributing factor in the current polio epidemic.

On the global level, the addition of these 4 cases will raise the global total of WPV1-associated AFP cases to 141 cases.

A good map of Pakistan showing districts and provinces can be found at

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 11:56:28 +0100 (MET)

Tokyo, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - Organisers said Monday they are cancelling the amateur portion of the Tokyo marathon, affecting around 38,000 runners, on fears about the spread of the new coronavirus in Japan.   "We reached the conclusion that unfortunately it is difficult to organise the event... after several cases (of the virus) were confirmed in Tokyo," the Tokyo Marathon Foundation said in a statement.
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 10:59:27 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - Egypt's Sharm el-Sheikh has welcomed the first British charter flights since 2015, when the Islamic State group's bombing of a Russian airliner dealt a devastating blow to the Red Sea resort.   Britain halted flights to Sharm el-Sheikh following the attack, which killed all 224 people on board the plane that took off from the resort, long popular with British tourists.

After multiple airport inspections and visits by aviation security experts, Britain announced in October that it was lifting the flight restrictions.   "Sharm el-Sheikh airport received the first two direct charter flights... from London's Gatwick airport carrying 184 passengers and Manchester airport carrying 190 passengers," Egypt's civil aviation ministry said in a statement late Sunday.    The flights were operated by Britain's biggest travel agency, TUI.

The company has scheduled three flights a week between London's Gatwick Airport and Sharm el-Sheikh until late March, the statement said.   British budget airline easyJet said in January it would restart flights to the resort town in June.   On Sunday, flag carrier EgyptAir said it would start operating a weekly flight between London and Sharm el-Sheikh later this month.   British tourists have long been vital to the tourism industry in Sharm el-Sheikh, which was left reeling after the airliner bombing.

Egypt has since sought to lure tourists back, boosting airport security and allowing international inspections of security procedures there.   Russia, another major source of tourists to Egypt, initially suspended all direct flights to the North African country following the attack.   It resumed direct flights to Cairo in 2018 but has yet to restart them to popular Red Sea resorts.   Egypt's tourism industry has shown signs of recovery in recent years with arrivals reaching 11.3 million in 2018, compared with 5.3 million in 2016.
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 10:43:58 +0100 (MET)

Hong Kong, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - A gang of knife-wielding men jumped a delivery driver in Hong Kong and stole hundreds of toilet rolls, police said Monday, in a city wracked by shortages caused by coronavirus panic-buying.   Toilet rolls have become hot property in the densely packed business hub, despite government assurances that supplies remain unaffected by the virus outbreak.   Supermarkets have found themselves unable to restock quickly enough, leading to sometimes lengthy queues and shelves wiped clean within moments of opening.

There has also been a run on staples such as rice and pasta, as well as hand sanitiser and other cleaning items.     Police said a truck driver was held up early Monday by three men outside a supermarket in Mong Kok, a working-class district with a history of "triad" organised crime gangs.   "A delivery man was threatened by three knife-wielding men who took toilet paper worth more than HK$1,000 ($130)," a police spokesman told AFP.   A police source told AFP the missing rolls were later recovered and two suspects were arrested on scene although it was not clear if they were directly involved in the armed robbery.

Footage from Now TV showed police investigators standing around multiple crates of toilet roll outside a Wellcome supermarket. One of the crates was only half stacked.   Hong Kongers reacted with a mixture of bafflement and merriment to the heist.   One woman passing by the scene of the crime who was interviewed by local TV station iCable quipped: "I'd steal face masks, but not toilet roll."   The city, which has 58 confirmed coronavirus cases, is currently experiencing a genuine shortage of face masks.    The hysteria that has swept through Hong Kong since the coronavirus outbreak exploded on mainland China is partly fuelled by the city's tragic recent history of confronting a deadly disease.

In 2003, some 299 Hong Kongers died of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), an outbreak that began on the mainland but was initially covered up by Beijing -- action that left a lasting legacy of distrust towards the authorities on public health issues.   The new coronavirus outbreak also comes at a time when the city's pro-Beijing leadership has historic low approval ratings after refusing to bow to months of angry pro-democracy protests last year.   Authorities have blamed online rumours for the panic-buying and say supplies of food and household goods remain stable.   But the panic-buying has itself created shortages in one of the world's most densely populated cities where supermarkets and pharmacies have limited
floor space.

Photos posted online have shown some people proudly stuffing their cramped city apartments with packets of hoarded toilet rolls.    On Sunday, the head of the city's Consumer Council warned people not to stockpile toilet rolls in their flats as they were prone to mould in the notoriously humid climate.   She also reiterated that there were ample stocks of paper.    Supermarket chain Wellcome called Monday's robbery a "senseless act", and called on people not to bulk buy or hoard toilet roll.    "We want to emphasize that we have sufficient toilet roll supply to meet demand," it said in a statement. "The temporary shortage was caused by the sudden and unusual surge in demand."
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 10:11:30 +0100 (MET)

Tokyo, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - An additional 99 people have tested positive for coronavirus on a cruise ship off the Japan coast, Japanese media said Monday, citing new figures from the health ministry.   That would take the total number of positive cases on the Diamond Princess to 454. The health ministry declined to confirm the reports immediately.   It was also not clear whether the figures included 14 US citizens who tested positive for the virus but were allowed to board evacuation flights home.

The Diamond Princess vessel moored in Yokohama near Tokyo has become the second-largest cluster of coronavirus cases outside the epicentre in China.    Passengers have been largely confined to quarters since February 5 with only brief and occasional breaks to take air on deck -- with face masks.   The quarantine period is over on Wednesday but many countries have decided to repatriate their citizens after an alarming climb in cases on board.

The US was the first country to evacuate its citizens from the ship but Australia, Canada, Italy and Hong Kong have indicated they will follow suit.   On land, cases in Japan have risen to 65, with authorities warning that the outbreak is entering a "new phase" and advising people to avoid large gatherings.    A public celebration of the new emperor's birthday on Sunday has been scrapped and organisers of the Tokyo Marathon scheduled on March 1 are reportedly considering cancelling the amateur part of the race.
Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2020 15:25:00 +0100 (MET)
By Benoît Pavan à Moûtiers avec Thomas Rossi dans les Pyrénées

Moûtiers, France, Feb 15, 2020 (AFP) - French protests at planned labour reforms hit ski resorts on Saturday, with chairlift operators and other seasonal staff downing tools over fears their livelihoods could be on a slippery slope.   Hundreds of staff at a clutch of resorts in the Alps and Pyrenees walked out in response to calls for action by the CGT and FO unions, forcing some runs to be closed or partially closed.   They are concerned that reforms extending the required period of employment before people are eligible for benefits, set to take effect from April 1, could stop thousands of seasonal workers from claiming.

Some voiced their protest in song at the bottom of pistes at Serre-Chevalier close to the Italian border, chanting: "We're going down the mountain to get rid of Macron," referring to French President Emmanuel Macron.   The French leader's attempts to overhaul pensions and welfare have led to months of bitter protests and strikes.    "Our situation will become even more precarious with these reforms," explained Christophe Dupuis, who works as a ski patroller at La Plagne, one of the world's most popular ski areas.   "We will need six months instead of four before we can apply for unemployment benefit," added Dupuis, who works as a lifeguard during the summer.   "We don't have six-month seasons, not least as the winter seasons are tending to get shorter rather than longer," said Maud Goret, a seasonal worker and CGT member at Font-Romeu in the Pyrenees -- where half the workforce had downed tools.

Many relatively low altitude resorts are suffering from a lack of snow owing to climate change, compounding fears over what the future holds.   As the workers voiced their grievances, further signs of the shortage of snow increasingly hitting resorts came as local authorities at Luchon-Superbagneres in the French southwest told AFP they had decided to have extra snow helicoptered in to three areas running short.

A union official said some 50 tons were being brought in for between 5,000 and 6,000 euros ($5,500-6,500) "in the knowledge that in terms of return on the investment you need to multiply that at least by ten," for an operation lasting around two-and-a-half hours.   He added that it might not be a "particularly ecological" solution but "we had no choice" at the height of the season when many children in French are on half-term holiday.
Date: Wed 12 Feb 2020
Source: Teresina Municipal Health Foundation [in Portuguese, machine trans., edited]

Health Surveillance Directorate - Epidemiology Management
---------------------------------------------------------
Given the laboratory confirmation of 5 human cases of melioidosis (ICD-10 A24.4) that occurred in the state of Piaui in 2019 (including one death), the FMS Health Surveillance Directorate recommends Hospital Infection Control Commissions, to the Hospital Surveillance Centers, public and private microbiology laboratories, infectious disease specialists, pulmonologists, microbiologists, biochemists and physicians in general who are attentive, immediately report any case with a result of a culture of biological material (blood culture, urine culture, wound culture, tracheal secretion, cerebrospinal fluid, bronchial lavage, ascitic fluid, abscess, tissues, etc.) positive for the bacterium _Burkholderia pseudomallei_ (or _Burkholderia_ sp.). The notification must be made through the individual notification form of SINAN (available at <http://portalsinan.saude.gov.br/images/documentos/Agravos/NINDIV/Notificacao_Individual_v5.pdf>) and sent to the FMS, with the code appended ICD10: A24.4.

The positive bacterial isolate should be sent to the Central Public Health Laboratory, Dr. Costa Alvarenga (LACEN - PI) for confirmatory examination (Nested - PCR), upon registration in the GAL system (research: _Burkholderia pseudomallei_ sample: swab), in swab with Stuart's medium, at room temperature, along with a copy of the notification form.
======================
[This 2016 article (Limmathurotsakul D, Golding N, Dance DA, et al., Predicted global distribution of _Burkholderia pseudomallei_ and burden of melioidosis. Nat Microbiol. 2016;1:15008. <https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2015.8>; article available at <http://www.nature.com/articles/nmicrobiol20158.pdf>) for 2015 estimates the burden of melioidosis for the areas of major and some risk as follows:

Area / Population at risk in millions / Melioidosis cases in thousands / Melioidosis deaths in thousands
South Asia / 1525 / 73 / 42
East Asia and Pacific / 858 / 65 / 31
Sub-Saharan Africa / 602 / 24 / 15
Latin America and Caribbean / 246 / 2 / 1
Middle East and North Africa / 49 / less than 1 / less than 1

Although a classical infection in eastern Asia and northern Australia, cases have been acquired in Africa, the Caribbean basin, Central America, and, as in this case, South America. - ProMED Mod.LL]

Date: Tue 11 Feb 2020
Source: SABC News [edited]

A 56-year-old was admitted at the Klerksdorp Tshepong Hospital on Saturday [8 Feb 2020] with a history of tick bite followed by flulike symptoms including headaches and fatigue.

The North West Health Department says while no active bleeding was noted, treatment was started immediately.

Crimean-Congo fever, also known as Congo fever/haemorrhagic fever, is a disease caused by a tick-borne virus with a case fatality rate of 10% to 40%.

Transmission to humans occurs through contact with infected animal blood or ticks. It can be transmitted from one infected human to another by contact with infectious blood or body fluids.

Symptoms include high fever, vomiting and abdominal pain, but as the illness progresses, large areas of severe bruising and severe nosebleeds are also common.

Clinical Manager at the Klerksdorp Hospital Dr. David Leburu says: "Crimean-Congo fever can make a person bleed. It can make people bleed just like Ebola but not as aggressive as Ebola."
===================
[Occupational groups such as herders, farmers, abattoir workers, veterinarians/animal health workers, hunters and persons informally slaughtering domestic/wild animals are at higher risk of infection. These persons often have exposure to ticks on the animals and in the animal environment, and also often have exposure to animal blood/tissues (e.g., during castration of calves, vaccination, notching/tagging of ears, slaughtering).

Humans can become infected in the following ways:
- Being bitten by infected ticks;
- Squashing infected ticks (if fluid from the ticks enters into cuts/grazes on the skin, or splashes onto mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth);
- If blood/tissue from infected animals (during the short period that the animals have virus in circulation) comes into contact with cuts/grazes on the skin, or splashes onto mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth;
- Needle-stick/sharps injuries in healthcare workers from infected patients.

The patient in the above report had a history of tick bite, but no other epidemiological information is available.

Human CCHF cases have been reported annually from South Africa since 1981, when it was first recognized in the country; between 0 and 20 cases of CCHF are reported each year. Through nearly 30 years of passive surveillance, more than 180 cases have been laboratory-confirmed. Although cases have been reported from all 9 provinces in the past 30 years, more than half of the cases originate from the semi-arid areas of Northern Cape Province (31.5% of cases) and Free State Province (23% of cases) (<http://www.nicd.ac.za/assets/files/CCHF_FAQ-General_Public.pdf>). - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
North West Province, South Africa:
Date: Wed 12 Feb 2020 05:23 PM EST
Source: ABC27/WHTM [edited]

Two Newberry Township [York County] men are getting treatments for rabies after a coyote that attacked them tested positive for the deadly virus.

One man was with his dog when the coyote attacked [Mon 10 Feb 2020] on Red Bank Road. The 2nd man was working nearby in his garage when the coyote entered and bit him.

A neighbour shot and killed the coyote the following day and gave the carcass to the Pennsylvania Game Commission. A test confirmed the animal was rabid.
=====================
[[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Pennsylvania, United States:
Pennsylvania county map:

Rabies is a serious disease, and is always fatal in animals. In humans there is post exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which must be given within a prescribed amount of time. Individuals bitten by a rabid animal who do not seek treatment within the narrow window for PEP in all likelihood will die if they develop rabies. Heroic measures have succeeded in preserving the lives of only a handful of individual, and yet their live is never a complete return to normal.

Rabies is a serious disease and should be taken seriously by all individuals, whether you are a pet owner or not. Animal owners, regardless of whether your animal is a horse, or dog, or cow, or cat, or goat, or other animal, vaccinate the animal against this fatal disease. Protect your investment in your farm animals, and protect yourself by vaccinating farm animals and pets.

Rabies can be in wildlife, as these stories note. However, we seldom get one involving an otter. While otters are cute and playful on the nature programs, they are susceptible to rabies, as is any mammal, so it is imperative we be alert to the animals around us, no matter where we are or what animal is involved. - ProMED Mod.TG]
Date: Sat 8 Feb 2020 05:16 PM EST
Source: Fox 8 [edited]

A Florida mom says she had to tackle an otter to protect her daughter and dog, WFLA reports. We don't often hear about aggressive river otters. But by fighting its way inside a home in Florida, experts say the otter was definitely not acting normal.  "My husband's like 'you just alligator wrangled an otter in the living room!'" [CE] said. The otter learned to not mess with a mother's instincts. "I think life is full of surprises, and you should just be ready for whatever," [she] said.

The story starts after 17-year old [GE] let their dog Scooter out before dawn Tuesday morning [4 Feb 2020]. Scooter had found an enemy.  "I sprinted to the backdoor, and I was like 'Scooter!' All I saw was like a big black ball just all over the place. So he stumbled in the door, and I tried to shut it as fast as possible, but then the otter got stuck," [GE] said.

By this time, the whole house is awake and her mother bursts in.  "I snatched it by the tail," [CE] said. "And then I held it up like a prize. And the otter's going crazy. It was like clawing at me and grabbing on to the backs of the furniture in my house." [CE] tossed the otter outside and discovered it had bit her daughter in the leg.

Several rabies shots later, [GE] and Scooter are on the mend. Now Florida Fish and Wildlife is trying to find the otter. It is unknown whether the otter has rabies because it has not been caught. His behaviour was definitely abnormal.  "Any time an otter's onshore going for a human, there's something not right. Usually, they see you, they're gone," said Dustin Hooper, an animal trapper, and owner of All Creatures Wildlife Control.
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Date: Tue 4 Feb 2020
Source: Robesonian [edited]

A 9-year-old boy is undergoing treatment after being bitten by a rabid fox, according to the [Robeson] County Department of Public Health.

The boy was riding his bicycle Sunday evening [2 Feb 2020] on Barnhill Road in Lumberton when he was attacked by a fox, according to the Health Department. The fox was killed at the scene and its head was submitted for testing on [Mon 3 Feb 2020]. The results came back positive for rabies on [Tue 4 Feb 2020].

The boy will undergo a series of shots to prevent the onset of rabies, according to the Health Department. Area residents have been alerted and advised to monitor their children's and pets' activities.

According to the Health Department release, Sunday's bite case was properly reported "and as such, the system responded correctly. After-hour calls go to communications who contact the Animal Control officer on call."

Sunday's attack by a rabid wild animal is the 1st confirmed case of rabies in Robeson County this year [2020], said Bill Smith, Health Department director.

"I believe we had 3 this past year," he said. Those cases were animal-on-animal attacks, Smith said. "I think they were all pets last year," he said.

County residents need to be aware there are many more rabid animals in the area, he said. But the rate of confirmed contact between rabid animals and humans or pets is low because Robeson County is a rural county with large tracts of forests.

In rural areas the most likely scenario is an animal attacking a pet or human and then running into the woods, where it will die without anyone knowing if it had rabies or not, Smith said. In urban areas, there is more contact between humans and pets and animals known to be rabid because the attacking animal has no woods into which to run and hide. Therefore, the animal is easier to catch and test.

If someone is bitten by an animal that runs into the woods and is not caught and tested then precautions have to be taken, he said.

"We would treat that as a rabid animal," Smith said.

Sunday's incident prompted the county Health Department to issue the following advisories:
- all dogs, cats, and ferrets 4 months and older are required to be vaccinated against rabies and wear a current rabies vaccination tag per North Carolina law;
- if an animal is destroyed, try not to damage the head because it jeopardizes the testing of the brain;
- avoid feeding wild animals. Foxes and raccoons are the main sources of rabies in the Robeson County area and feeding them increases the likelihood of interaction between the wildlife and dogs, cats and humans.
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