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Tanzania

General
Nowadays there are few areas of our planet where you can really experience the timeless wonder and separation from the hum drum we face in our daily lives. Visiting Africa is fascinating and provides a new perspective on another life, another
world. The vast, untamed and primitive landscape provides a perfect glimpse into a life which many miss as they go about their daily chores. A trip which includes the majestic splendour of Africa’s tallest peak, Mt Kilimanjaro, rates high on the list of the unofficial wonders of the world and one not to be missed if the opportunity arises.
Mt Kilimanjaro
This is the highest peak in all of Africa stretching 5895m above sea level. Actually a few years ago the height of the summit was reassessed and then dropped by approximately 10m with more accurate recording by global positioning satellite. However, this minimal change will not be noticed by most travellers! There are a number of routes up to the summit and obviously which route is taken will make a significant difference to both the difficulty of the trek and any potential medical difficulties. Travelling with sufficient and well experienced guides and porters, and being part of a well organised group, are probably the most important factors in protecting your health.
Travelling to Tanzania
Mt Kilimanjaro is situated just across the border from Kenya in the northern part of Tanzania. You can approach the region by a number of different routes including buses from Nairobi, travelling from Dar es Salaam or flights straight into Moshi. How you travel for your climb of Kilimanjaro makes quite a significant difference to some of the health issues which you may face along the way.
General Health Issues
Before you leave for your trip make sure you are in good enough general health. If you can’t even run up a flight of stairs without collapsing then a trip up Kilimanjaro might not be the best choice! If you are unsure then see your doctor and ask for his or her advice at an early stage - before you commit yourself to the trip.
Long-Haul Flights
Flying to either Nairobi or Dar es Salaam takes between 9 to 10 hours from most Western European centres. This is regarded as a ‘long-haul flight’ so make sure you realise the risks associated with blood clotting in the legs and drink plenty of still fluids (water is the best), walk around the plane and use compression stockings if you are at any particular risk. (DVT in travel - TMB)
Food & Water
In Africa, as in many other areas of the world, what you eat and what you drink are essential for your well being. Being part of a large group has its advantages but you also need to stick with food and water that suits you personally. Don’t take extra risks with what you eat or drink just because others seem to be okay. Have your own sensible rules and remember to care for your stomach! Dehydration is common while climbing in a hot climate just make sure the water you drink is pure. You will also lose salt through perspiration and this will need to be replaced by increasing the amount of salt you put on your food at meal times.
What shoes to wear
Remember this is a walking holiday so prepare well in advance. Obviously increase your walking at home before you leave but remember to also include some significant hill walks to test your shoes. Blisters and corns are regularly associated with poorly fitted and substandard boots so spend that extra to get a pair that suits you and supports both the arch of your foot and also your ankles. A slightly larger pair is essential to lessen the pressure on your feet. Good thick socks will help to absorb perspiration and cushion your feet against friction.
Clothes to bring
This is one of the most difficult areas to sort out. The weather and climate along your climb will vary from a beautiful Irish-like summer day, to a roasting hot, dehydrating scorcher to a chilly or freezing night when the sun retires after about 6 pm. You must pack light cotton clothing but warm enough for the chill of the evenings at altitude. A wide brimmed hat (and sun lotion) is essential to protect against sun burn.
Problems at Altitude
High altitude is defined as over approx 3500m and as you know Kilimanjaro is a whole lot higher. The affects of altitude can hit anybody but most commonly it is the fit younger traveller who experiences the most serious consequences and even death. The doctor who discusses your vaccines and malaria prophylaxis will talk through the issues relating to Altitude sickness and may prescribe a medication to lessen the risks in certain circumstances. But remember, this disease can kill so if you develop any possible symptoms (lightheadedness, headaches, altered gait etc) please report it to your guide immediately. (Altitude sickness - TMB)

Being part of a group
The main advantage of being part of a group is that each member can help look-out for others during the trip. Never get separated from your main party and always report it if you feel one of your group is not quite right medically. This may be the first signs of altitude sickness and you could quite literally save a life by your intervention.
Mosquitoes and Malaria
Mosquitoes do not tend to live above 2000m and so the risk of malaria while climbing Kilimanjaro does not occur. However, you have to get to that altitude first and so protection against mosquito bites and malaria prophylaxis will be essential for this trip. (Malaria protection - TMB)
Rabies Risks in Tanzania
Any warm blooded animal can transmit rabies and so it is extremely important that you avoid any contact with dogs, cats, monkeys, and other animals on the slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro such as hyrats and other beaver like creatures. Report any contact immediately to your group leader.
Vaccinations for visiting Tanzania
As you travel to Tanzania from Western Europe we normally recommend that you have a number of vaccinations to cover against a range of diseases. In certain patients it may also be worth considering further vaccination cover against conditions like Rabies and Hepatitis B. These should be talked through in detail with your vaccinating doctor.
After your visit
When you return home you must remember that certain diseases can present days, weeks or even months afterwards. If you develop any peculiar symptoms (fever, headache, diarrhoea, skin rash etc) please make contact so this can be urgently assessed.
In the vast majority of cases the traveller climbing Kilimanjaro will stay perfectly healthy and well providing they follow the main common sense rules. Have a great safe trip and enjoy some of the splendours that Africa has to provide.

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Fri 6 Dec 2019
From: Paola De Benedictis <pdebenedictis@izsvenezie.it> [edited]

A 44-year-old man was admitted to a public hospital (ICU Bisceglie, Barletta-Andria-Trani province, Apulia region, Italy) on 8 Oct 2019 with a suspected rabies infection. At the time of admission, he presented acute respiratory distress. Due to his deteriorating clinical conditions, he was transferred to the ICU of a tertiary hospital (ICU Policlinico, Bari, Italy), where he died of rabies on 19 Nov 2019, after a hospital stay of 42 days. Antemortem laboratory diagnostic tests for rabies performed at the National and FAO Reference Centre for Rabies, IZSVe (Padova, Italy) confirmed the initial suspicion based on the patient's clinical history.

The man had been bitten on his right hand by an aggressive dog on 8 Sep 2019 on the Island of Zanzibar (Tanzania). He immediately underwent post-exposure prophylaxis, which consisted of wound washing with an antiseptic solution (Betadine and hydrogen peroxide) and rabies vaccination in absence of rabies immunoglobulin administration. However, the patient was immunocompromised due to a corticosteroid therapy prescribed to treat an autoimmune disease and, unfortunately, such an important anamnesis went unnoticed until the onset of the symptoms.

Despite the internationally coordinated efforts to achieve a global goal of zero human dog-mediated rabies deaths by 2030, rabies still reaps human victims. In most cases, appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis [PEP] can safely prevent the infection in humans. However, shortages in rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) still represent the main constraint for human death prevention. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) makes administration of RIG unnecessary after a bite. In this particular case, PrEP and antibody titration of the victim before his travel might have saved his life. Of note, recent WHO recommendations reshape the PrEP protocol from 3 to 2 shots administered within one week (0-7). Moreover, we believe that enhanced awareness and information should be envisaged at different levels, and disseminated by travel health advisors, travel agents, and resorts or through official public health guidelines,  similarly to those recommended by the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC-ATL, <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/Tanzania>, paragraph "Keep away from animals" under "Stay Healthy and Safe").
--------------------------------
Lidia Dalfino, MD, Bari hospital
Sergio Carbonara, MD, Bisceglie hospital
Paola De Benedictis, DVM, PhD, FAO RC, IZSVe
===================
[Zanzibar island is a popular tourist destination in a semi-autonomous region of Tanzania, located off the eastern coast of Africa. Its government has undertaken, with the support of NGOs, great efforts to control and eradicate canine rabies since the earlier decade of the century. This was done mainly by annual rabies vaccinations, leading to a significant decline in the number of clinically confirmed canine rabies cases. In 2015, the Zanzibar government felt close to officially declaring the island free from canine rabies but this goal was eventually not achieved. In October 2017, the Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC) informed that The local authorities were "working hard towards ensuring a 70% vaccination coverage across the entire island within next 2 months" and that Zanzibar "is very close to being declared the 1st region in Africa to be free from rabies." (<https://rabiesalliance.org/news/towards-freedom-canine-mediated-rabies-zanzibar-island-wide-strategic-dog-vaccination>). This end, unfortunately, has not yet been reached, as tragically demonstrated by the case described above.

According to media reports, the victim, a businessman from the city of Andria in southern Italy, was visiting Kiwengwa beach, a resort area in the northeast of the island. "The family had arrived only a day earlier in Zanzibar and was on an excursion in the area when the animal attacked him. The animal was reportedly suffering from rabies and the wound was treated by local medics, which included it being disinfected at the local hospital."

According to the report above, for which the authors, Drs De Benedictis, Dalfino, and Carbonara are gratefully acknowledged, PEP was applied in Zanzibar but did not include rabies immunoglobulin. The victim continued with his holiday before returning to Italy. "He showed no signs of ill health for 2 weeks after returning, but then towards the end of September (2019), he started to feel unwell. Speaking to a friend before he died, he said the symptoms had included high blood pressure and spasms." The friend told local media: "The rabies [pre-exposure] vaccination was not something he had because it was only recommended, and was not listed as compulsory. An absurdity. [He] was very unlucky." (<https://ananova.news/tourist-bitten-by-rabid-stray-dog-in-zanzibar-dies>.)

The US CDC website provides pre-travel vaccination advice to "all travellers", "most travelers", and "some travellers". Rabies is one of the 5 vaccines which "some travelers" to Tanzania should be vaccinated with "after consulting their doctors." It is recommended for the following groups:
- Travellers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites;
- people who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers);
- people who are taking long trips or moving to Tanzania;
- children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck. (<https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/tanzania#vaccines-and-medicines>).

WHO's advice concerning pre-travel vaccination, for all destinations, fall in broad line with CDC's, while adding the following:

"Pre-exposure vaccination is also recommended for individuals travelling to isolated areas, or to areas where immediate access to appropriate medical care is limited, or to countries where modern rabies vaccines are in short supply and locally available rabies vaccines might be unsafe and/or ineffective." (<https://www.who.int/ith/vaccines/rabies/en/>).

Should immunocompromised travelers apply PrEP?
The availability of RIG at destination may influence such a decision. The advice of one's GP and/or travel medicine expert deserves to be sought in a timely fashion.

A report of previous cases of inadequate antibody response to rabies vaccine in an immunocompromised patient and a literature search revealing 15 additional immunocompromised patients, of whom 7 did not exhibit the minimum acceptable level of antibodies after a complete postexposure prophylaxis regimen, are available in ref 1 below.

Reference
---------
1. Kopel E, Oren G, Sidi Y, David D. Inadequate antibody response to rabies vaccine in immunocompromised patient. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012; 18(9): 1493-5;

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Kiwengwa Beach, Zanzibar North, Tanzania:
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2019 20:04:29 +0200 (METDST)

Nairobi, Sept 28, 2019 (AFP) - A Canadian tourist died Saturday while parachuting from the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest peak and Tanzania's top tourist attraction.   Justin Kyllo, 51, was killed after his parachute failed to open, Tanzanian National Parks spokesman Pascal Shelutete said.   Kyllo had arrived in the country on September 20, he said.   Around 50,000 people climb the nearly 6,000-metre mountain, located near the northeastern frontier with Kenya, every year.
Date: Fri 20 Sep 2019
From: Daniel R. Lucey MD, MPH [edited]

ProMED-mail reports since 14 Sep [2019] of a Tanzanian woman who died in Dar es Salaam on 8 Sep [2019] and was declared negative for Ebola by Tanzanian officials raises the question of what did cause her death. Given her travel to Uganda in August [2019], perhaps bat-associated Sosuga virus could be tested for if stored specimens exist. Similar to this young woman from Tanzania, the initial patient from the USA working in Uganda in 2012 in whom Sosuga virus was discovered had [experienced] fever, headache, rash, and diarrhoea (EID 2014; 20: 211-216). This virus was found from fruit bats in Uganda in 3 locations approximately 130 km [about 81 mi] apart (J Wildl Dis 2015; 51:774-779). An IgM and IgG test was developed at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and antiviral compounds active against this virus were reported in 2018.

Daniel R. Lucey MD, MPH
Consultant, ProMED
=======================
[The fatal case of a young Tanzanian woman studying in Uganda who died after travelling back to Tanzania for her field studies, as reported in ProMED-mail post http://promedmail.org/post/20190914.6674377, continues to elude an aetiological diagnosis. The initial concern for Ebola infection has since effectively been ruled out (see http://promedmail.org/post/20190914.6674377), but outside observers have called for greater transparency and information sharing given widespread rumours surrounding this case and its potential public health implications for neighbouring countries as well as Tanzania itself (see http://promedmail.org/post/20190918.6680252).

As discussed by ProMED Mod.LK, the Ebola-like symptoms manifested in this case can be caused by other viral haemorrhagic fevers and a variety of other pathogens (see http://promedmail.org/post/20190914.6674377). ProMED thanks Dr. Lucey for raising the intriguing possibility of Sosuga virus in his letter. We continue to seek any additional information about this case, as well as alternative etiologic diagnoses and how they could be tested for.

Citations and URLs for the articles referenced by Dr. Lucey are as follows:

Albarino CG et al.: Novel Paramyxovirus Associated with Severe Acute Febrile Disease, South Sudan and Uganda, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014; 20(2): 211-216. <https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2002.131620>.

Amman BR et al.: A Recently Discovered Pathogenic Paramyxovirus, Sosuga Virus, is Present in _Rousettus aegyptiacus_ Fruit Bats at Multiple Locations in Uganda. J Wild Dis. 2015; 51(3): 774-779. <https://www.jwildlifedis.org/doi/10.7589/2015-02-044>. - ProMED Mod.LXL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
28 Jul 2019

As many as 13 have died while 6677 have been infected across Tanzania. In Dar es Salaam region alone, 6631 cases and 11 deaths have occurred.

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Tanzania:
Date: 20 Aug 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

A suspected aflatoxicosis outbreak is being reported in Tanzania. The World Health Organization (WHO) was informed of the situation by the Ministry of Health in late June 2019. Since 1 Jun 2019, sporadic cases presented with symptoms and signs of abdominal distention, jaundice, vomiting, swelling of lower limbs, with a few cases of fever and headache, from Dodoma and Manyara Regions in Tanzania. As of 11 Aug 2019, a total of 53 cases and 8 deaths have been reported from Chemba, Kondoa and Kiteto Districts. The situation is under investigation.

Aflatoxin is a potent toxin and a very serious health issue in many parts of the developing world. Major outbreaks have been seen in Africa, India, Malaysia and Taiwan over the years. This mycotoxin is a natural toxin produced as a secondary metabolite to certain strains of the fungus _Aspergillus_ spp, in particular _Aspergillus flavus_ and _Aspergillus parasiticus_.

Aflatoxins are contaminants of foods intended for people or animals as a result of fungal contamination. The commonest foods implicated are cereals like corn, wheat and rice, oilseeds like peanuts and sunflower, and spices. However, the toxin can affect a very wide range of food stuffs (see below).

Different factors contribute to aflatoxin contamination. In semi-arid climates, the effect of drought can increase the amount of _Aspergillus_ spp in the air causing pre-harvest contamination of certain crops. Crops grown and stored in more tropical environments where the temperature and humidity are high usually have a higher risk of both pre and post-harvest contamination. Of course, much of the problem lies with homegrown crops not harvested or stored properly.

Aflatoxin poisoning can be divided into acute and chronic disease depending on the amount of toxin ingested. When people (or animals) ingest aflatoxin contaminated foods, the liver is the main target for disease. There is a direct link between aflatoxin poisoning and liver cancer. Liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma is an important public health concern in many parts of the world due to aflatoxin. According to the CDC, acute aflatoxin poisoning results in liver failure and death in up to 40 per cent of cases in some regions.

Besides the obvious health risks, there is the massive economic loss occurring in parts of the world that can't afford it. Prevention and control of aflatoxin in developing countries is mainly focused on good agricultural practices. Because it is impossible to completely eliminate this danger, in the United States feeds and grains are laboratory tested for levels of aflatoxins, and food with unacceptable levels are removed from the market.

Foods most commonly affected by aflatoxins (from the USDA's Food Safety Research Information Office): [linked from:

- cereals (maize, corn, sorghum, pearl millet, rice, wheat)
- oilseeds (peanut, soybean, sunflower, cotton)
- spices (chilies, black pepper, coriander, turmeric, ginger)
- tree nuts (almonds, pistachio, walnuts, coconut)
- dried fruits (sultanas, figs)
- cocoa beans
- milk, eggs, and meat products*

* Milk, eggs, and meat products are occasionally contaminated due to the consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated feed by animals.
====================
["Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites produced by certain fungi in/on foods and feeds. They are probably the best known and most intensively researched mycotoxins in the world. Aflatoxins have been associated with various diseases, such as aflatoxicosis, in livestock, domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The occurrence of aflatoxins is influenced by certain environmental factors; hence the extent of contamination will vary with geographic location, agricultural and agronomic practices, and the susceptibility of commodities to fungal invasion during preharvest, storage, and/or processing periods. Aflatoxins have received greater attention than any other mycotoxins because of their demonstrated potent carcinogenic effect in susceptible laboratory animals and their acute toxicological effects in humans. As it is realized that absolute safety is never achieved, many countries have attempted to limit exposure to aflatoxins by imposing regulatory limits on commodities intended for use as food and feed.

"Fungal growth and aflatoxin contamination are the consequence of interactions among the fungus, the host and the environment. The appropriate combination of these factors determines the infestation and colonization of the substrate, and the type and amount of aflatoxin produced. However, a suitable substrate is required for fungal growth and subsequent toxin production, although the precise factor(s) that initiates toxin formation is not well understood. Water stress, high-temperature stress, and insect damage of the host plant are major determining factors in mold infestation and toxin production. Similarly, specific crop growth stages, poor fertility, high crop densities, and weed competition have been associated with increased mold growth and toxin production. Aflatoxin formation is also affected by associated growth of other molds or microbes. For example, preharvest aflatoxin contamination of peanuts and corn is favored by high temperatures, prolonged drought conditions, and high insect activity; while postharvest production of aflatoxins on corn and peanuts is favored by warm temperatures and high humidity.

"Humans are exposed to aflatoxins by consuming foods contaminated with products of fungal growth. Such exposure is difficult to avoid because fungal growth in foods is not easy to prevent. Even though heavily contaminated food supplies are not permitted in the marketplace in developed countries, concern still remains for the possible adverse effects resulting from long-term exposure to low levels of aflatoxins in the food supply.

"Evidence of acute aflatoxicosis in humans has been reported from many parts of the world, namely the 3rd World Countries, like Taiwan, Uganda, India, and many others. The syndrome is characterized by vomiting, abdominal pain, pulmonary edema, convulsions, coma, and death with cerebral edema and fatty involvement of the liver, kidneys, and heart.

"Conditions increasing the likelihood of acute aflatoxicosis in humans include limited availability of food, environmental conditions that favor fungal development in crops and commodities, and lack of regulatory systems for aflatoxin monitoring and control.

"Because aflatoxins, especially aflatoxin B1, are potent carcinogens in some animals, there is interest in the effects of long-term exposure to low levels of these important mycotoxins on humans. In 1988, the IARC placed aflatoxin B1 on the list of human carcinogens. This is supported by a number of epidemiological studies done in Asia and Africa that have demonstrated a positive association between dietary aflatoxins and Liver Cell Cancer (LCC). Additionally, the expression of aflatoxin-related diseases in humans may be influenced by factors such as age, sex, nutritional status, and/or concurrent exposure to other causative agents such as viral hepatitis (HBV) or parasite infestation.

"The economic impact of aflatoxins derives directly from crop and livestock losses as well as indirectly from the cost of regulatory programs designed to reduce risks to animal and human health. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that 25% of the world's food crops are affected by mycotoxins, of which the most notorious are aflatoxins. Aflatoxin losses to livestock and poultry producers from aflatoxin-contaminated feeds include death and the more subtle effects of immune system suppression, reduced growth rates, and losses in feed efficiency. Other adverse economic effects of aflatoxins include lower yields for food and fiber crops.

"In addition, the ability of aflatoxins to cause cancer and related diseases in humans given their seemingly unavoidable occurrence in foods and feeds make the prevention and detoxification of these mycotoxins one of the most challenging toxicology issues of present time."  <http://poisonousplants.ansci.cornell.edu/toxicagents/aflatoxin/aflatoxin.html>.

Aflatoxins are a huge challenge in developing countries as they affect crops, animals and people and people and animals consuming the crops or drinking milk from affected animals. It should be noted that this is not the 1st time Tanzania has experienced this situation from aflatoxin. We hope the authorities are able to track down and remove the contaminated product and render appropriate medical care for the affected individuals. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
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World Travel News Headlines

Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 10:27:16 +0200 (METDST)

Nairobi, March 31, 2020 (AFP) - Six of Africa's 54 nations are among the last in the world yet to report cases of the new coronavirus. The global pandemic has been confirmed in almost every country, but for a handful of far-flung tiny island states, war-torn Yemen and isolated North Korea.  In Africa authorities claim they are spared by god, or simply saved by low air traffic to their countries, however some fear it is lack of testing that is hiding the true impact.

- South Sudan -
The east African nation is barely emerging from six years of civil war and with high levels of hunger, illness and little infrastructure, observers fear the virus could wreak havoc.   Doctor Angok Gordon Kuol, one of those charged with overseeing the fight against the virus, said the country had only carried out 12 tests, none of which were positive.   He said the reason the virus has yet to reach South Sudan could be explained by the low volume of air traffic and travel to the country.   "Very few airlines come to South Sudan and most of the countries affected today they are affected by... people coming from abroad."   He said the main concern was foreigners working for the large NGO and humanitarian community, or people crossing land borders from neighbouring countries.   South Sudan has shut schools, banned gatherings such as weddings, funerals and sporting events and blocked flights from worst-affected countries. Non-essential businesses have been shuttered and movement restricted.   The country can currently test around 500 people and has one isolation centre with 24 beds.

- Burundi -
In Burundi, which is gearing up for general elections in May, authorities thank divine intervention for the lack of cases.   "The government thanks all-powerful God who has protected Burundi," government spokesman Prosper Ntahorwamiye said on national television last week.   At the same time he criticised those "spreading rumours" that Burundi is not capable of testing for the virus, or that it is spreading unnoticed.   Some measures have been taken, such as the suspension of international flights and placing handwashing stations at the entrances to banks and restaurants in Bujumbura.   However several doctors have expressed their concerns.   "There are zero cases in Burundi because there have been zero tests," a Burundian doctor said on condition of anonymity.

- Sao Tome and Principe -
Sao Tome and Principe -- a tiny nation of small islands covered in lush rainforest -- has reported zero cases because it is unable to test, according to World Health Organisation representative Anne Ancia.   However "we are continuing preparations," with around 100 people in quarantine after returning from highly-affected countries, and the WHO keeping an eye on cases of pneumonia.   With only four ICU beds for a population of 200,000 people, the country is desperate to not let the virus take hold and has already shut its borders despite the importance of tourism to the local economy.

- Malawi -
Malawi's health ministry spokesman Joshua Malango brushed aside fears that Malawi might not have registered any Covid-19 cases due to a lack of testing kits: "We have the testing kits in Malawi and we are testing."   Dr Bridget Malewezi from the Society of Medical Doctors told AFP that while "we may not be 100 percent ready", government was gearing up for the arrival of the virus.   She suggested it may only be a matter of time before the pandemic hits Malawi.    "It's only been in the past few weeks that it has been rampantly spreading across Africa so most people feel it will get here at some point...," she said.   Malawi has asked people coming from hard-hit countries to self-quarantine, which Malawezi said had helped "safeguard the country from any possible spread of the virus".

- Lesotho -
Tiny Lesotho, a kingdom encircled by South Africa with only two million inhabitants, went into national lockdown on Monday despite registering zero cases.   Until last week the country had no tests or testing centres, and received its first kits thanks to a donation by Chinese billionaire Jack Ma.   Authorities had reported eight suspected cases which they had not been able to test and the first results are expected soon.

- Comoros -
The Indian Ocean island nation of the Comoros, situated between Madagascar and Mozambique, has yet to detect a single case of the virus, according to the health ministry.   One doctor in the capital Moroni, Dr Abdou Ada, wonders if it may not be because of the wide use of the drug Artemisinin to treat malaria.   "I believe that the mass anti-malarial treatment explains the fact that the Comoros are, at least for now, spared from Covid-19. it is a personal belief that needs to be confirmed scientifically."
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 09:50:04 +0200 (METDST)
By Sophie DEVILLER with Dene-Hern CHEN

Bangkok, March 31, 2020 (AFP) - Underfed and chained up for endless hours, many elephants working in Thailand's tourism sector may starve, be sold to zoos or be shifted into the illegal logging trade, campaigners warn, as the coronavirus decimates visitor numbers. Before the virus, life for the kingdom's estimated 2,000 elephants working in tourism was already stressful, with abusive methods often used to 'break them' into giving rides and performing tricks at money-spinning animal shows.   With global travel paralysed the animals are unable to pay their way, including the 300 kilograms (660 pounds) of food a day a captive elephant needs to survive.

Elephant camps and conservationists warn hunger and the threat of renewed exploitation lie ahead, without an urgent bailout. "My boss is doing what he can but we have no money," Kosin, a mahout -- or elephant handler -- says of the Chiang Mai camp where his elephant Ekkasit is living on a restricted diet.   Chiang Mai is Thailand's northern tourist hub, an area of rolling hills dotted by elephant camps and sanctuaries ranging from the exploitative to the humane.   Footage sent to AFP from another camp in the area shows lines of elephants tethered by a foot to wooden poles, some visibly distressed, rocking their heads back and forth.

Around 2,000 elephants are currently "unemployed" as the virus eviscerates Thailand's tourist industry, says Theerapat Trungprakan, president of the Thai Elephant Alliance Association. The lack of cash is limiting the fibrous food available to the elephants "which will have a physical effect", he added.  Wages for the mahouts who look after them have dropped by 70 percent.   Theerapat fears the creatures could soon be used in illegal logging activities along the Thai-Myanmar border -- in breach of a 30-year-old law banning the use of elephants to transport wood.  Others "could be forced (to beg) on the streets," he said. It is yet another twist in the saga of the exploitation of elephants, which animal rights campaigners have long been fighting to protect from the abusive tourism industry.

- 'Crisis point' -
For those hawking a once-in-a-lifetime experience with the giant creatures -- whether from afar or up close -- the slump began in late January.   Chinese visitors, who make up the majority of Thailand's 40 million tourists, plunged by more than 80 percent in February as China locked down cities hard-hit by the virus and banned external travel. By March, the travel restrictions into Thailand -- which has 1,388 confirmed cases of the virus -- had extended to Western countries.

With elephants increasingly malnourished due to the loss of income, the situation is "at a crisis point," says Saengduean Chailert, owner of Elephant Nature Park.   Her sanctuary for around 80 rescued pachyderms only allows visitors to observe the creatures, a philosophy at odds with venues that have them performing tricks and offering rides.   She has organised a fund to feed elephants and help mahouts in almost 50 camps nationwide, fearing the only options will soon be limited to zoos, starvation or logging work.  For those restrained by short chains all day, the stress could lead to fights breaking out, says Saengduean, of camps that can no longer afford medical treatment for the creatures.

Calls are mounting for the government to fund stricken camps to ensure the welfare of elephants. "We need 1,000 baht a day (about $30) for each elephant," says Apichet Duangdee, who runs the Elephant Rescue Park. Freeing his eight mammals rescued from circuses and loggers into the forests is out of the question as they would likely be killed in territorial fights with wild elephants. He is planning to take out a two million baht ($61,000) loan soon to keep his elephants fed.   "I will not abandon them," he added.
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 07:10:34 +0200 (METDST)
By Bernadette Carreon

Koror, Palau, March 31, 2020 (AFP) - A coronavirus-free tropical island nestled in the northern Pacific may seem the perfect place to ride out a pandemic -- but residents on Palau say life right now is far from idyllic.   The microstate of 18,000 people is among a dwindling number of places on Earth that still report zero cases of COVID-19 as figures mount daily elsewhere.   The disparate group also includes Samoa, Turkmenistan, North Korea and bases on the frozen continent of Antarctica.

A dot in the ocean hundreds of kilometres from its nearest neighbours, Palau is surrounded by the vast Pacific, which has acted as a buffer against the virus.   Along with strict travel restrictions, this seems to have kept infections at bay for a number of nations including Tonga, the Solomons Islands, the Marshall Islands and Micronesia.   But remoteness is not certain to stop the relentless march of the new disease. The Northern Mariana Islands confirmed its first cases over the weekend, followed by a suspected death on Monday.

Klamiokl Tulop, a 28-year-old artist and single mum, is hopeful Palau can avoid the fate of Wuhan, New York or Madrid -- where better-resourced health services were overrun.   But she describes a growing sense of dread, a fear that the virus is coming or could already be on the island undetected.   "You can feel a rising tension and anxiety just shopping," she told AFP. "Stores are crowded even more during non-payday weeks."   There have been several scares on Palau, including a potential case that saw one person placed into quarantine this week as authorities await test results.

- Antarctic seclusion -
Inside Australia's four remote Antarctic research bases, around 90 people have found themselves ensconced on the only virus-free continent as they watch their old home transform beyond recognition.   There is no need for social distancing in the tundra.   "They're probably the only Australians at the moment that can have a large dinner together or have the bar still open or the gym still open," Antarctic Division Operations manager Robb Clifton told AFP.   The bases are now isolated until November, so the group is safe, but Clifton admits "the main thing that's on the mind of expeditioners is how their loved ones are going back home."

In some places, reporting no cases does not always mean there are no cases to report.   North Korea has portrayed emergency measures as an unqualified success in keeping COVID-19 out, despite sustained epidemics in neighbouring China and South Korea.   But state media also appears to have doctored images to give ordinary North Koreans face masks -- handing sceptics reason to believe the world's most secretive government may not be telling the whole truth.

- 'Waiting for the inevitable?' -
While Palau has no confirmed cases, it has still been gripped by the society-altering fears and economic paralysis that have affected the rest of the world.   Supermarket aisles in the country's largest town Koror have seen panic buying and there are shortages of hand sanitisers, masks and alcohol.   The islands depend heavily on goods being shipped or flown in, meaning supplies can quickly run low.

United Airlines used to fly six times a week from nearby Guam -- which has seen more than 50 cases -- but now there is just one flight a week.   "Look at how bad we coped when shipments were late before this pandemic happened," Tulop said. "Everyone was practically in uproar."   Residents have been practising social distancing. Doctors are waiting for test kits to arrive from Taiwan. The government is building five isolation rooms that will be able to hold up to 14 patients.   It all feels like waiting for the inevitable.   "I would like to be optimistic we won't get the virus," Tulop said. "But Palau would most definitely get it. We rely heavily on tourism and most of us even need to travel for work."

Rondy Ronny's job is to host big tourist events, but work has already dried up, and he admits to being "very anxious".   "I have loans and bills and payments due," he said. "This will definitely put me back, I hope the government will do something about our economy too, to help it recover."   Palau's biggest test may yet come with the first positive case.   But even in the most remote corners of the world, the impact of this truly global pandemic is already being felt.   Nowhere, it seems, is truly virus-free.
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 04:46:26 +0200 (METDST)

Panama City, March 31, 2020 (AFP) - The government of Panama on Monday announced strict quarantine measures that separate citizens by gender in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.   From Wednesday, men and women will only be able to leave their homes for two hours at a time, and on different days.   Until now, quarantine regulations were not based on gender.

Men will be able to go to the supermarket or the pharmacy on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and women will be allowed out on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.   No one will be allowed to go out on Sundays.

The new measures will last for 15 days.   "This absolute quarantine is for nothing more than to save your life," security minister Juan Pino said at a press conference.   According to Pino, more than 2,000 people were detained last week for not abiding by the quarantine.   Since the first case was reported on March 10, Panama has confirmed 1,075 cases of the coronavirus, 43 of which are in intensive care, and 27 deaths.
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2020 00:54:08 +0200 (METDST)
By Celia Lebur with AFP Africa Bureaux

Lagos, March 30, 2020 (AFP) - More than 20 million Nigerians on Monday went into lockdown in sub-Saharan Africa's biggest city Lagos and the capital Abuja, as the continent struggles to curb the spread of coronavirus.   President Muhammadu Buhari ordered a two-week "cessation of all movements" in key cities to ward off an explosion of cases in Africa's most populous country.

Businesses are being closed, non-food shops shut and people required to stay at home as officials look to track down possible carriers of the disease after reporting 131 confirmed cases and two deaths so far.   Enforcing the restrictions in sprawling Lagos will be a mammoth challenge as millions live crammed into slums and rely on daily earnings to survive.

In the ramshackle outdoor markets of Lagos Island, anxious locals complained they did not have the money to stock up, while at higher-end supermarkets better-off residents queued to buy supplies.    "Two weeks is too long. I don't know how we will cope," said student Abdul Rahim, 25, as he helped his sister sell foodstuffs from a stall in Jankarra market.    "People are hungry and they won't be able to stock food."

City officials have pledged to provide basic provisions to 200,000 households but the central government in Africa's largest oil producing nation is already facing financial strain as the price of crude  has collapsed.    The streets of Ghana's capital Accra were also empty as most people in two regions appeared to be following a presidential order to stay indoors after it went into force.

- Zimbabwe locks down -
Dozens of African nations have imposed restrictions ranging from night-time curfews to total shutdowns.    Zimbabwe, which is already suffering a recession, began enforcing a three-week lockdown after the disease left one person dead and infected six others.   Police mounted checkpoints on routes leading to Harare's central business district, stopping cars and turning away pedestrians who had no authorisation to be in the area.   "We don't want to see people here on the streets. We don't want to see people who have no business in town just loitering," a policewoman said through a loud hailer. "Everyone to their homes."

Some people were trying to head for villages.   "We would rather spend the 21 days at our rural home, where we don't have to buy everything. I can't afford to feed my family here when I am not working," said Most Jawure.   "We have been waiting here for more than two hours but there are no buses," Jawure told AFP while standing with his wife and daughter beside a bulging suitcase.

For many of Zimbabwe's 16 million people, the lockdown means serious hardship.   With the unemployment rate estimated at around 90 percent, most Zimbabweans have informal jobs to eke out a living and few have substantial savings.   As a similar scenario played out in other poor nations, the UN on Monday called for a $2.5-trillion aid package to help developing countries weather the pandemic, including debt cancellation and a health recovery "Marshall Plan".

- 'A matter of time' -
Experts warn that Africa is highly vulnerable to COVID-19 given the weak state of health systems across the continent.    The number of infections lags far behind Europe but testing has been limited and the figures are growing rapidly.    Angola and Ivory Coast on Sunday became the latest countries to record their first deaths, bringing the number of African fatalities to around 150 of nearly 4,800 recorded cases.

In Democratic Republic of Congo, two new cases were reported in the volatile South Kivu region and an adviser to the nation's president announced he had tested positive.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni ordered a 14-day lockdown in a bid to halt the spread of the disease after reporting 33 infections.    Police in South Sudan, one of a few nations in Africa yet to confirm a case, enforced strict new rules, shutting shops selling non-essential items and limiting passengers in public transport.   Mauritius, which has 128 cases -- the highest in East Africa -- has extended its lockdown to April 15.

South Africa's defence minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula on Monday denounced alleged intimidation by security forces after videos emerged showing some forcing civilians to squat or roll on the ground for allegedly violating restrictions.   In an interview with local Newzroom Afrika television channel, she said she was aware of two videos "which have circulated where clearly there (is) some abuse".   "I'm saying I condemn that, we will not allow that to continue," she said.
Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2020 21:41:43 +0200 (METDST)

Kampala, March 30, 2020 (AFP) - Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni on Monday ordered an immediate 14-day nationwide lockdown in a bid to halt the spread of the coronavirus which has so far infected 33 people in the country.   Uganda last week banned public transport and sealed its borders and urged the population to stay home, but stopped short of a full shutdown.

Museveni said that from 10:00pm Monday private vehicles would also be banned, seeking to avoid give a more advanced warning that would see people flee the city, as has happened across the continent where many poor residents see better chances of survival in the countryside.   "I would have given the public time to adjust but... a longer time would give people time to go to the villages and in so doing they would transfer the very sickness we're trying to prevent. This freezing of movement will last for 14 days," he said in a televised address.

Museveni also ordered a 14-day nationwide curfew from 7:00pm.   Shopping malls and businesses selling non-food items were ordered to close.   Food market vendors who continue to trade are forbidden to return to their homes for the duration of the 14-day lockdown, while factories could stay open if remain on the premises for the duration of the shutdown.

People are still allowed to move around on foot but not gather in groups of more than five at a time.    In recent days, opposition leaders Kizza Besigye and Bobi Wine had undertaken small-scale food deliveries to people who had ost their incomes due to earlier restrictions but Museveni criticised such actions as "cheap politics".   "I direct the police to arrest the opportunistic and irresponsible politicians who tried to distribute food," he said.   "Anybody arrested in that effort will be charged with attempted murder."   Museveni said the government would begin distributing food to those who needed it, without providing details.

A weary looking Museveni, 75, pleaded with the population to change their behaviour in the face of the threat from the virus.   "This virus would not do much damage if it was not for the carelessness of people. Don't go into a group of people if you have a cold. Stay at home," he pleaded.   Last week police and Local Defence Units (LDUs) -- a uniformed militia under the control of the military - violently cleared streets in central Kampala.   Following a public outcry, army chief General David Muhoozi on Monday apologised for those actions, describing them as "high-handed, unjustified and regrettable" and said the culprits would be "dealt with".
Date: Sun 29 Mar 2020
Source: Spanish government COVID-19 update 58 [in Spanish, trans. ProMed Mod.MPP, edited]

COVID-19 update 59 [data as of 28 Mar 2020 21:00 CET]
-----------------------------------------------------
Situation in Spain
------------------
In Spain, to date [28 Mar 2020], 78 797 cases have been reported, of which 6528 have died and 14,709 recovered (table 1 and figure 1 -- at source URL above). The Autonomous Communities with the greater cumulative incidence in the last 14 days are La Rioja 419.5 per 100,000 population), Madrid 287.1 per 100,000 population), Navarre (279.4 per 100,000 population), and Castile-La Mancha (238.3 per 100,000 population) (figures 2, 3). The distribution by age groups of hospitalized patients, those admitted to the ICU, and deaths is found in table 2.

Autonomous Community:
Total / last 24 hours / Incidence per 100,000 population in past 14 days

  • Madrid: 22,677 / 1157 / 287.14
  • Catalonia: 15,026 / 763 / 186.46
  • Basque Country: 5740 / 604 / 231.45
  • Castile and Leon: 5414 / 623 / 213.46
  • Castile-La Mancha: 5246 / 734 / 238.33
  • Valencia: 4784 / 750 / 87.43
  • Andalusia: 4682 / 405 / 50.45
  • Galicia: 3139 / 367 / 109.06
  • Navarre: 2011 / 182 / 279.42
  • Aragon: 1858 / 266 / 129.69
  • La Rioja: 1629 / 193 / 419.51
  • Extremadura : 1456 / 62 / 127.47
  • Canary Islands: 1125 / 100 / 47.18
  • Asturias: 1088 / 84 / 92.98
  • Cantabria: 1023 / 86 / 167.28
  • Balearic Islands: 958 / 96 / 79.69
  • Murcia: 872 / 70 / 53.62
  • Melilla: 48 / 3 / 46.25
  • Ceuta: 21 / 4 / 23.59
********
Total: 78,797 / 6549 / 151.04
======================
[Spain has been rapidly accelerating in terms of transmission of the SARS-CoV-2. As of today (29 Mar 2020), there have been a total of 78 797 cases and 6528 deaths reported, an increase from 72 248 cases with and 5690 deaths confirmed in the preceding 24 hours. The countrywide 2-week incidence per 100 000 population is 151. It is now 2nd in Europe, behind Italy, and 4th globally behind the USA, Italy, and China, in terms of absolute numbers of cases.

Of the 78,797 cases, 43 397 (55.1%) were hospitalized, 4907 (6.2%) were admitted to the ICU. The crude reported death rate was 8.3% with more deaths occurring than reported ICU admissions.

A map of Spain showing provinces (autonomous communities) can be seen at
and a HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/43>.

La Rioja, Navarre, and Basque Country are located together in the north of the country. Madrid is in the northern part of central Spain and Castilla de la Mancha is just to the south of Madrid, with Toledo as its capital. - ProMed Mod.MPP]
Date: Sun 29 Mar 2020
Source: Worldometer [accessed 10:30 PM EDT]

USA cases by state
State: Total cases / New cases

  • New York: 59,648 / 6193
  • New Jersey: 13,386 / 2262
  • California: 6312 / 653
  • Michigan: 5486 / 836
  • Massachusetts: 4955 / 698
  • Florida: 4950 / 912
  • Washington: 4483 / 173
  • Illinois: 4596 / 1105
  • Louisiana: 3540 / 225
  • Pennsylvania: 3419 / 668
  • Texas: 2808 / 479
  • Georgia: 2683 / 237
  • Colorado / 2307 / 246
  • Connecticut: 1993 / 469
  • Tennessee: 1720 / 208
  • Ohio: 1653 / 247
  • Indiana: 1514 / 282
  • Maryland: 1239 / 247
  • North Carolina: 1167 / 145
  • Wisconsin: 1154 / 165
  • Nevada: 920 / 299
  • Arizona: 919 / 146
  • Missouri / 903 / 65
  • Virginia: 890 / 151
  • Alabama: 827 / 125
  • South Carolina: 774 / 114
  • Mississippi: 758 / 179
  • Utah: 719 / 117
  • Oregon: 548 / 69
  • Minnesota: 503 / 62
  • Arkansas: 449 / 40
  • Kentucky: 439 / 45
  • Oklahoma: 429 / 52
  • District of Columbia: 401 / 59
  • Iowa: 336 / 38
  • Kansas: 319 / 58
  • Idaho: 310 / 49
  • Rhode Island: 294 / 55
  • New Hampshire: 258 / 44
  • Maine: 253 / 42
  • New Mexico: 237 / 29
  • Vermont: 235 / 24
  • Delaware: 232 / 18
  • Hawaii: 175 / 24
  • Montana: 161 / 32
  • West Virginia: 124 / 11
  • Nebraska: 120 / 24
  • Alaska: 102 / 17
  • North Dakota: 98 / 15
  • South Dakota: 90 / 22
  • Wyoming: 87 / 3
  • Guam / 56 / 5
  • Northern Mariana Islands: 2
  • Puerto Rico: 127 / 27
  • US Virgin Islands: 21 / 0
  • Wuhan repatriated: 3 / 0
  • Diamond Princess Cruise: 46 / 0
**************
Total: 142 321 / 38 179
Total reported deaths: 2484
====================
[The above are the latest breakdowns of confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the USA, as per Worldometer data. The total number of confirmed cases in the USA and territories is now 142 321 including 2484 deaths. New York state, with 59 648 (41.9%) cumulative cases reports and 6193 (33.3%) newly confirmed cases over the past 24 hours, is clearly the epicenter of the outbreak in the USA, although case reporting elsewhere is showing increases. Daily reported case counts are accelerating in New Jersey, Michigan, Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, and Illinois.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website (<https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html>) has 2 epidemic curves. One focuses on date of confirmation of disease, the other on date of onset of illness. The curve of interest, by date of onset of disease, is based on 14.6% of the number of cases plotted on the epidemic curve using date of confirmation of disease.

A map of the United States can be seen at
<http://www.mapsofworld.com/usa/> and a HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at
Date: Sun 29 Mar 2020 11:46 AM GST
Source: Reuters [abridged, edited]

Iran's coronavirus death toll has risen to 2640, a health ministry official said on Sunday [29 Mar 2020], as the Middle East's worst-hit country grapples with the fast-spreading outbreak. "In the past 24 hours we had 123 deaths and 2901 people have been infected, bringing the total number of infected people to 38 309," Alireza Vahabzadeh, an adviser to the health minister, said in a tweet. "12,391 people infected from the virus have recovered." Health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur told state TV that 3467 of those infected were in "critical condition".  "I am happy to announce that also 12,391 people who had been infected across the country have recovered," Jahanpur said. "The average age of those who have died of the disease is 69."

President Hassan Rouhani urged Iranians to adapt to their new way of life, which was likely to continue for some time. "We must prepare to live with the virus until a treatment is discovered ... The new measures that have been imposed are for everyone's benefit ... Our main priority is the safety and the health of our people," Rouhani said during a televised meeting.

The government has banned inter-city travel after warning of a potential surge in coronavirus cases because many Iranians defied calls to cancel travel plans for the Persian New Year holidays that began on [20 Mar 2020]. The authorities told Iranians to stay at home, while schools, universities, cultural, religious, and sports centres have been temporarily closed.

To stem the spread of the virus in crowded jails, Iran's judiciary on Sunday [29 Mar 2020] extended furloughs for 100,000 prisoners. On [17 Mar 2020], Iran said it had freed about 85,000 people from jail temporarily, including political prisoners. "The 2nd wave of (the) temporary release of prisoners had already started and their (100,000 prisoners) furloughs have been extended until [19 Apr 2020]," judiciary spokesman Gholamhossein Esmaili was reported as saying by state television. Iran said it had 189,500 people in prison, according to a report submitted by the UN special rapporteur on human rights in Iran to the Human Rights Council in January [2020].  [byline: Parisa Hafezi]
===================
[In the 24 hours from 28 to 29 Mar 2020, the number of cases of COVID-19 confirmed in Iran grew from 35 408 to, 38 309, an increase of 2901 newly confirmed cases. The number of deaths has also increased from 2517 to 2640 an increase of 123 deaths in the 24-hour period. In terms of total numbers of confirmed cases, Iran ranks 7th globally behind USA, Italy, China, Spain, Germany and France. In early March 2020, Iran and Italy were on the same trajectory with respect to daily growth in cumulative newly confirmed cases, but starting 8 Mar 2020, Italy's daily reported newly confirmed cases accelerated at an alarming speed. By 14 Mar 2020, Italy was reporting almost twice as many cases as Iran on a daily basis.

A map of Iran showing provinces can be seen at
HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/128>. - ProMed Mod.MPP]
Date: Sun 29 Mar 2020
Source: Italian Government Health Ministry [in Italian, machine trans., edited]

Cases in Italy as of 6:00 pm 29 Mar 2020
----------------------------------------
Regarding health monitoring related to the spread of the new coronavirus [SARS-CoV-2] on the national territory, there are a total of 97,689 cases. At the moment 73,880 people are positive for the virus; 13,030 people have recovered. There are 27,386 patients hospitalized with symptoms, 3906 are in intensive care, and 42,588 are in home isolation.

There have been 10,779 reported deaths, however, this number can only be confirmed after the Istituto Superiore di Sanita has established the actual cause of the death.

Case distribution by province:
number of cases (number of new cases in past 24 hours)

  • Lombardy: 41 007 (1592)
  • Emilia-Romagna: 13 119 (736)
  • Veneto: 8358 (428)
  • Marche: 3558 (185)
  • Piedmont: 8206 (535)
  • Tuscany: 4122 (305)
  • Campania: 1759 (167)
  • Lazio: 2706 (201)
  • Liguria: 3076 (254)
  • Friuli Venezia Giulia: 1480 (44)
  • Sicily: 1460 (101)
  • Apulia: 1549 (91)
  • Umbria: 1023 (54)
  • Abruzzo: 1293 (160)
  • Molise: 127 (4)
  • Trento: 1594 (89)
  • Bolzano: 1214 (105)
  • Sardinia: 638 (14)
  • Basilicata: 202 (20)
  • Aosta Valley: 584 (73)
  • Calabria: 614 (59)
*********
Total: 97,689 (5217)
======================
[The tally of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Italy is now 97,689 cases, including 10,779 deaths, up from 92,472 cases and 10,023 deaths reported on 28 Mar 2020. The 24-hour change between 28 and 29 Mar 2020 was 5217 newly confirmed cases, compared with 5974 newly confirmed cases between 27 and 28 Mar 2020. Cases continue to be concentrated in Lombardy (41 007), the epicenter of the outbreak, Emilia-Romagna (13 119), and Veneto (8358), all in the northern part of the country. Those 3 provinces combined account for 52.8% of newly confirmed cases in the past 24 hours, representing a drop from the previous 24 hours when they represented 56.% of nationally reported cases. Another active province is Piemonte with a total of 8206 cases and represents 10.3% of newly reported cases. In the past 24 hours Tuscany has reported 5.9% of newly reported cases, a slight drop from the preceding day when it was reporting 6.1% of newly confirmed cases. There is an excellent interactive map at <http://opendatadpc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/b0c68bce2cce478eaac82fe38d4138b1> to visualize the caseloads per region in near real time.

On 9 Mar 2020, Italy announced a lockdown for the northern provinces where the outbreak was concentrated. On 10 Mar 2020, this was expanded to be countrywide. On 11 Mar 2020, Italy announced the closure of non-essential businesses. It is now 19 days since the start of the lockdown in the north and 18 days since the countrywide lockdown.

A map of Italy showing regions can be seen at
HealthMap/ProMED-mail map at <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/75>. - ProMed Mod.MPP]