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United States of America

FCO - UK information on the United States
Updated: 25 July 2002

SUMMARY
Most visits to the United States are trouble-free. However, visitors should continue to be vigilant about their personal security.

SAFETY AND SECURITY<
R />Travellers to the United States should use common sense and take basic precautions.

If staying in a hotel, do not leave your door open at any time.

Do not wear ostentatious jewellery and avoid walking in obviously run down areas.
If arriving at night, take a taxi to your hotel and collect your hire car the next day.
If departing on an evening flight avoid leaving luggage and souvenirs in view in your hire car during the day. Thieves are targeting these vehicles and stealing the contents.
Drive on main highways and use well-lit car parks.

Do not stop if your car is bumped from behind. Instead, indicate to the other driver to follow you to the nearest public area and call for police assistance.
Do not sleep in your car on the roadside or in rest areas.
LOCAL LAWS AND CUSTOMS
Travellers wishing to visit Canada during their stay should contact the Canadian Consulate and US Immigration and Naturalisation Service for entry clearance requirements. If travellers have 90 day visa waiver for US, they should not wait until the end of their stay to travel between US and Canada. Travellers must not overstay past expiration date of their visa as they may risk being denied entry in either country or be deported. Travellers need to carry passports, round trip airline tickets showing their confirmed departure for return from US or Canada to country of origin, and they may need to show proof of sufficient funds to cover their stay.

Travellers should be aware that the age of consent varies from state to state in the US, as does the age at which someone may legally buy and consume alcohol.
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Foot and Mouth Disease:
Travellers are prohibited from carrying into the US any agricultural products, particularly animal products – including dairy products – that could spread FMD. (Some hard cheeses and canned meats are permitted. If you are in any doubt, you must check with a US customs or US Department of Agriculture (USDA) official immediately on arrival in the airport terminal). Passengers are required to tick the appropriate box on the US Customs declaration form if they have recently visited a zoo, or been on a farm or in contact with livestock. Passengers are specifically required to identify any farm contacts to US Customs and USDA officials. All luggage is subject to inspection. Penalties for not declaring farm visits or prohibited items can run to $1,000.

All US ports of entry and airports are on heightened alert to ensure that passengers, luggage and cargo are checked as appropriate. This includes placing additional inspectors and dog teams at airports to check incoming flights and passengers.

USDA are saying that soiled shoes, clothing or luggage will be disinfected on arrival. Food products and any other items suspected of potentially carrying the FMD virus will be confiscated and destroyed.
HEALTH
Medical treatment can be very expensive; there are no special arrangements for British visitors. The British Embassy and Consulates-General cannot assist with medical expenses.

Travellers who are HIV-positive
Travellers to the United States who are HIV-positive are not eligible, under current United States visa law, to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Programme. They are required to apply for a visa and a waiver of the ineligibility before travelling. US immigration authorities state applicants’ details will remain confidential and an applicant’s HIV status will not/not be declared on their passport. For more details contact the US Embassy in London.
GENERAL
Comprehensive travel and medical insurance is essential.
NATURAL DISASTERS
Visitors to the United States will be aware of reports of large-scale wild and forest fires throughout the country. Those travelling to affected areas should be particularly vigilant and pay attention to advice from local authorities and press and radio announcements about personal safety and how to avoid starting fires. Further information can be obtained from the National Interagency Fire Centre, 3833 S. Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho, 83705-5354; tel: +1 208 387 5512; Website: www.nifc.gov

Travel News Headlines WORLD NEWS

Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services [edited]
<https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDAAPHIS/bulletins/23806a5>

The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) under secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, Greg Ibach, is alerting international travellers of a deadly swine disease they could unknowingly bring back into the United States on their clothes, shoes, or hands.

African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious and deadly disease affecting both domestic and feral (wild) pigs. It does not affect human health and cannot be transmitted from pigs to humans. Recent spread of the disease to new countries in Asia and Europe has triggered a series of actions by USDA, state agriculture departments, and the pork industry to bolster protections against ASF in the United States and keep ASF out of North America.

"ASF has never been detected in the United States," said Ibach, "but an outbreak here would not only affect the pork industry, but also have major impacts on trade and raise food prices for consumers. We are asking international travellers to help prevent the spread of ASF to the United States by understanding what products can be brought back into the United States and declaring any agricultural items in their baggage."

The USDA's Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) new traveller website provides updated information about potentially harmful pests and diseases that can hitchhike on food or other agricultural products. When returning to the United States, travellers are reminded to declare food items and animal products in their luggage. Failure to declare items may result in serious penalties.

"USDA and US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) recognize the crucial work of detector dog teams at US ports of entry." said Ibach. "While travellers' declarations of any food products brought with them to the United States is a critical step to protecting US agriculture, the dogs and secondary agricultural inspections provide another line of defence to keep ASF out of the country."

Travellers will also see some changes at airports as USDA works with CBP to increase screenings of passenger baggage. This includes training and adding 60 additional beagle teams for a total of 179 teams working at key US commercial, sea, and air ports and ensuring travellers who pose an ASF risk receive secondary agricultural inspection. USDA is also coordinating with CBP to expand arrival screenings, including checking cargo for illegal pork and pork products.

Anyone who visits a farm in an ASF-affected country should take specific precautions before returning to the United States. Follow the farm's biosecurity protocols and wear site specific footwear and coveralls or clothing. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or dispose of clothes and footwear worn on the farm before returning, and declare the farm visit to CBP when re-entering the United States. Travelers should not visit farms or any other locations with pigs -- including livestock markets, zoos, circuses, and pet stores with pot-bellied pigs -- for at least 5 days after returning.

More information on ASF, partner resources, and additional resources for travellers are available on the APHIS ASF webpage
and in this infographic
======================
[This disease would be extremely serious for the US, and likely for all of North America. The warning is appropriate for travellers to be more alert to situations that could ultimately have horrible outcomes. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019 3:50 PM EDT
Source: The Day [edited]

Groton [New London county] public health officials are reminding residents to refrain from feeding or approaching wild or stray animals after a dog found in the area of Midway Oval tested positive for rabies [Wed 20 Mar 2019].

Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that can infect all warm-blooded animals, including people, the Ledge Light Health District said in an alert sent to media outlets.

The disease mostly is spread by wild animals, but stray cats and dogs may also become infected and spread the virus, the district's alert said. The rabies virus lives in the saliva and brain tissue of infected animals, and the disease can be spread by scratches from infected animals or when infected saliva comes into contact with open wounds, breaks in the skin or mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth.

For more information, contact Ledge Light Health District at (860) 448-4882, extension 1311, or the animal control officer at (860) 441-6709.
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Connecticut, United States:
Connecticut county map:

Please keep your animals up-to-date on their rabies vaccine. It is for their protection and for your protection.

Regarding the 1st article, it sounds like South Carolina could consider using some oral rabies vaccine bait for some of their wild animals.

Unfortunately, wild animals may attack even when you are unaware of their presence.

Animals may be either unusually friendly and timid (dumb rabies) or aggressive and vicious (furious rabies). These are 2 presentations of the same disease but we should be aware of both forms and teach both forms to our children. - ProMED Mod.TG]
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: Aiken Standard [edited]

[One person] in Aiken county may have been exposed to rabies following an unfriendly encounter with a wild raccoon, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control [DHEC].

According to a DHEC press release, the victim was on the North Augusta Greeneway Walking Trail on 16 Mar 2019 when they were bitten by a raccoon. The raccoon was later submitted to DHEC and tested positive for rabies. [Apparently the DHEC knows there is a victim so their earlier statement of "may have been exposed" seems a bit odd. - ProMED Mod.TG]

The victim who was bitten has since been referred to their health care provider. The raccoon on the Greeneway trail was the 3rd animal diagnosed with rabies in Aiken county this year [2019]. Statewide, there have been 32 confirmed cases of rabies in 2019. Coyotes, foxes, and skunks are also common carriers of the virus. Although it is extremely rare in people, rabies can be spread to humans and can also claim the lives of pets. The virus causes hallucinations, hydrophobia (fear of water), aggression, and death in its final stages.

Rabies is normally spread through bites but can also be spread when open wounds or areas like the eyes, nose, or mouth come into contact with saliva or blood of an infected animal. Infected areas should be washed with soap and water and medical attention should be sought immediately.  If a wild animal is foaming at the mouth and shows a lack of motor control (stumbling, staggering, or bumping into things) it may have rabies. Rabid animals are often very aggressive and do not fear people or other animals. [This behaviour may describe raccoons with distemper, but although they are not usually aggressive with distemper, they can be. The point is, when an animal is not acting normally it is time to move on and leave it alone and report it to the authorities in your area. - ProMED Mod.TG]

"To reduce the risk of getting rabies, always give wild and stray animals their space," said David Vaughan, Director of DHEC's Onsite Wastewater, Rabies Prevention, and Enforcement Division. "If you see an animal in need, avoid touching it and contact someone trained in handling animals, such as your local animal control officer or wildlife rehabilitator."

DHEC also stresses the importance of keeping pets up to date on their rabies shots to prevent the spread of the disease. For more information, call DHEC's Environmental Affairs Aiken office at 803-642-1637 during normal business hours on weekdays.  [Byline: Kristina Rackley]
========================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of South Carolina, United States:
South Carolina county map:
Date: Fri 15 Mar 2018
Source: WJHG [edited]

A rabies alert has been expanded to all of Bay County. The Florida Department of Health in Bay County is expanding a rabies alert issued in March [2019]. Health officials say there were 4 confirmed rabies cases in the span of a month.

Health officials say the most recent case involved a rabid raccoon killed by dogs off Oakenshaw Drive between Highway 2301 and Camp Flowers Road in Youngstown. Florida law requires pets 4 months or older to be vaccinated. If an animal is not vaccinated, keep the pet inside. Health officials say cats are the most likely to be infected with rabies.

Rabies is a fatal viral infection of the nervous system transmitted from animal to animal or animal to human by bite, scratch, or mucous membrane exposure. If your pet fights a wild animal, contact the Florida Department of Health in Bay County. The wild animal will need to be tested for rabies. Health official ask you do not shoot the wild animal in the head.  The alert will last 60 days.
==========================
[In the eastern USA, the main terrestrial reservoir of rabies is raccoons (see map of distribution of major rabies virus variants among carnivores at

A strategy that has been developed to control and contain the spread of rabies in raccoons is the use of oral rabies vaccination [ORV], which can be implemented by distributing bait. Florida has not been included in recent ORV actions, but the northwestern part of the state has been established as a zone needing enhanced rabies surveillance (see <https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed2030034>). - ProMED Mod.PMB]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Florida, United States: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/212>]
Date: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 23:35:47 +0100
By Nova SAFO

Chicago, March 18, 2019 (AFP) - The US Midwest struggled Monday with historic flooding that claimed at least three lives, displaced residents and damaged hundreds of homes and businesses.    Swollen waters hit much of Nebraska, as well as parts of Iowa, Wisconsin, and South Dakota, after a major storm last week dumped snow and rain, even as melting snow was already raising the levels of area waterways.   Neighboring states could also be affected as floodwaters drain, officials said.    President Donald Trump on Monday described the floods as "devastating" and said the White House would remain in close contact with state officials.    "Our prayers are with the great people of South Dakota," he said in one tweet.    In another aimed at Iowa residents, he said: "We support you and thank all of the first responders working long hours to help the great people of Iowa!"

- 'Historic' flooding -
The National Weather Service (NWS) described the flooding as "major" and "historic," forecasting that it would continue across large sections of the middle of the country.    "Flood Warnings and Advisories are scattered throughout the Plains, Mississippi Valley, and western parts of the Ohio Valley region, with a focus in Nebraska and western Iowa," the NWS said in an advisory.    "Farther west and north, areal flooding is also possible in the Northwest and Northern Plains as snowmelt continues over frozen ground."   The early damage assessment total for the state of Nebraska was more than $260 million, according to emergency management officials.

Record flooding was reported in 17 locations in the state and 10 American Red Cross shelters were operating for displaced residents.    At its highest point, the Missouri River was expected to crest at 47.5 feet (14.5 meters), beating its 2011 record by more than one foot.    "Comparisons to 2011 were inevitable," the NWS office in Iowa tweeted, "but these floods have resulted in many more rescues and widespread damage in eastern Nebraska and western Iowa."   Failing levees were blamed for flooding in numerous communities -- damaging homes and businesses.    The US Army Corps of Engineers, which maintains federal levee systems, said a majority were compromised along an approximately 100-mile portion of the Missouri River in southeast Nebraska.

- Military base under water -
Hundreds of people were rescued in Nebraska, where 54 cities issued emergency declarations, as did four Native American tribal areas.    Fremont, a city of more than 25,000, was surrounded by floodwaters over the weekend and cut off from aid.    It finally received food and other emergency supplies Sunday after crews managed to clear debris and mud from a road, officials said.    Three dozen Iowa counties were under states of emergency.    Roads were closed throughout Wisconsin and more than 200 people were evacuated, according to officials.

A third of Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska was overcome with floodwater, and was not expected to be dry again until Thursday.   "It's important to understand that this is going to take weeks and months to recover so this will be a prolonged effort," one of the base's leaders, Kevin Humphrey, said in a statement.    Three people were reported killed.   A Nebraska farmer died Thursday, during the height of the storm, trying to rescue a motorist stranded by floodwaters, the Omaha World-Herald reported.    On the same day, 80-year-old Betty Hamernik died after being trapped by floodwaters in her home in rural Columbus, Nebraska, according to the newspaper.    Aleido Rojas Galan, 55, was killed Friday in Iowa when his vehicle was swept away by floodwaters, TV station KETV said.
More ...

World Travel News Headlines

Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2019 11:52:43 +0100

Sanaa, March 25, 2019 (AFP) - Nearly 110,000 suspected cases of cholera have been reported in war-hit Yemen since the beginning of January, including 190 related deaths, the UN said on Monday.   The UN office for humanitarian affairs (OCHA) said children under the age of five make up nearly a third of 108,889 cases which were reported between January 1 and March 17.

OCHA said the spike, which comes two years after Yemen suffered its worst cholera outbreak, was concentrated in six governorates including in the Red Sea port of Hodeida and the Sanaa province home to the capital.   Early rains could be blamed for the recent increase in suspected cholera cases, it said.   "The situation is exacerbated by poor maintenance of sewage disposal systems in many of the affected districts, the use of contaminated water for irrigation, and population movements," OCHA added.   The waterborne disease is endemic to Yemen, which witnessed the worst cholera outbreak in its modern history in 2017.

More than one million suspected cases were reported within an eight-month period that year. More than 2,500 people died of the infection between April and December 2017.    Yemen's brutal conflict, which pits Iran-linked rebels against a regional pro-government alliance led by Saudi Arabia, has left some 10,000 people dead since 2015 and pushed millions to the brink of famine.    The war has created the perfect environment for cholera to thrive, as civilians across the country lack access to clean water and health care.
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]

Swedish public health authorities, Folkhalsomyndigheten, is reporting an outbreak of psittacosis, or parrot disease, since November 2018. According to officials, some 60 cases have been reported from the regions of Vastra Gotaland, Kalmar, Jonkoping, and Skane. This is the highest number of cases reported in one winter in 2 decades.

Those who have now fallen ill have mainly come into contact with bird droppings from wild birds, for example through the handling of bird tables and other outdoor activities. A smaller number are believed to have been infected by domestic birds (parrots) in cages. The most common way someone gets infected with the bacteria that cause psittacosis (_Chlamydia psittaci_) is by breathing in dust containing dried secretions (e.g., droppings, respiratory) from infected birds. It is rare for psittacosis to spread from person to person.

In general, psittacosis causes mild illness in people. The most common symptoms include fever and chills, headache, muscle aches, and dry cough. Psittacosis can also cause pneumonia (a lung infection) that may require treatment or care in a hospital. Rarely, psittacosis can result in death. Most people begin developing signs and symptoms of psittacosis within 5-14 days after exposure to the bacteria (_C. psittaci_). Occasionally, people report the start of symptoms after more than 14 days.
=================
[The news report above attributes the increase in number of human cases of psittacosis in Sweden since Nov 2018 mainly to contact with wild bird droppings, for example through the handling of bird tables and other outdoor activities. Outbreaks of avian chlamydiosis, due to _Chlamydia psittaci_ or the other Chlamydia species, have been reported occasionally in wild birds including shorebirds, waterfowl, and migratory birds, especially in birds under stress (<http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/psittacosis.pdf>).

An outbreak in Australia was probably caused by organisms carried in wild birds and spread when organisms in bird droppings became aerosolized during activities such as lawn mowing (<https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15757553>). An increase in psittacosis cases in Sweden in the winter of 2013 was also linked to wild birds, apparently through exposure to wild bird droppings; most cases were associated with tending bird feeders (<https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23725809>; also see ProMED-mail post Psittacosis - Sweden (02): wild bird http://promedmail.org/post/20130509.1701695).

Vastra Gotaland, Kalmar, Jonkoping, and Skane are counties located in southern Sweden. A map of Swedish counties can be found at <https://fotw.info/flags/se(.html>. - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: PNA [edited]

A public elementary school in Tubungan town, Iloilo has recorded a total of 36 chickenpox cases from 15 Jan to 3 Mar [2019], the Provincial Health Office (PHO) said. In an interview on Wednesday [20 Mar 2019], Dr. Patricia Grace Trabado, PHO head, said the cases were observed as patients who sought treatment at the rural health units (RHU) and private clinics in Tubungan.

All the cases were recorded in Cadabdab Elementary School, with 21 male and 15 female students affected. Trabado said affected pupils might still be attending school even though they were infected, which resulted in its transmission.

She emphasized that the spread of the infection might have been prevented if the children were advised not to attend school with the onset of infection. "If a child is showing chickenpox symptoms, especially when he or she was previously exposed to an affected person, then the pupil will be advised to stay at home," she said.

Trabado said the source of the infection came from the 1st patient working in Iloilo City but lives in Tubungan town. "The patient might have a family member that attends school in Cadabdab. From there, we see where the infection originated," she said. Trabado, however, did not give figures of the disease other than that from the school.

The RHUs and private clinics were able to monitor and manage the cases, Trabado said. All the student patients were discharged, given medication, and let the viral infection take its course. "And eventually, the patients recovered," she said. However, Trabado warns that a child with chickenpox can get secondary infection when he or she scratches the blisters, creating skin lesions.

She added that cases of chickenpox and mumps are mostly observed during the summer season. Trabado said patients with chickenpox experience fever and headache in the first 1 or 2 days before the itchy blister rash appears.  [Byline: Gail Momblan]
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services [edited]
<https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDAAPHIS/bulletins/23806a5>

The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) under secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, Greg Ibach, is alerting international travellers of a deadly swine disease they could unknowingly bring back into the United States on their clothes, shoes, or hands.

African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious and deadly disease affecting both domestic and feral (wild) pigs. It does not affect human health and cannot be transmitted from pigs to humans. Recent spread of the disease to new countries in Asia and Europe has triggered a series of actions by USDA, state agriculture departments, and the pork industry to bolster protections against ASF in the United States and keep ASF out of North America.

"ASF has never been detected in the United States," said Ibach, "but an outbreak here would not only affect the pork industry, but also have major impacts on trade and raise food prices for consumers. We are asking international travellers to help prevent the spread of ASF to the United States by understanding what products can be brought back into the United States and declaring any agricultural items in their baggage."

The USDA's Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) new traveller website provides updated information about potentially harmful pests and diseases that can hitchhike on food or other agricultural products. When returning to the United States, travellers are reminded to declare food items and animal products in their luggage. Failure to declare items may result in serious penalties.

"USDA and US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) recognize the crucial work of detector dog teams at US ports of entry." said Ibach. "While travellers' declarations of any food products brought with them to the United States is a critical step to protecting US agriculture, the dogs and secondary agricultural inspections provide another line of defence to keep ASF out of the country."

Travellers will also see some changes at airports as USDA works with CBP to increase screenings of passenger baggage. This includes training and adding 60 additional beagle teams for a total of 179 teams working at key US commercial, sea, and air ports and ensuring travellers who pose an ASF risk receive secondary agricultural inspection. USDA is also coordinating with CBP to expand arrival screenings, including checking cargo for illegal pork and pork products.

Anyone who visits a farm in an ASF-affected country should take specific precautions before returning to the United States. Follow the farm's biosecurity protocols and wear site specific footwear and coveralls or clothing. Thoroughly clean and disinfect or dispose of clothes and footwear worn on the farm before returning, and declare the farm visit to CBP when re-entering the United States. Travelers should not visit farms or any other locations with pigs -- including livestock markets, zoos, circuses, and pet stores with pot-bellied pigs -- for at least 5 days after returning.

More information on ASF, partner resources, and additional resources for travellers are available on the APHIS ASF webpage
and in this infographic
======================
[This disease would be extremely serious for the US, and likely for all of North America. The warning is appropriate for travellers to be more alert to situations that could ultimately have horrible outcomes. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: ReliefWeb [edited]

The Federal Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and UNICEF, has launched a large-scale mass vaccination campaign in Sudan to vaccinate more than 8.3 million people 9 months to 60 years of age against yellow fever in the states of Blue Nile, Gezira and Sennar during 10-29 Mar 2019.

The campaign represents a crucial step in protecting a large portion of the population and reducing the risk of severe and deadly yellow fever outbreaks in the country. It is the 3rd and final drive thatSudan is undertaking to protect populations at risk and prevent yellow fever epidemics, pending the implementation of infant immunization as routine practice.

The campaign forms a critical part of Sudan's ongoing work to protect all populations against yellow fever epidemics, in alignment with the global Eliminate Yellow fever Epidemics (EYE) Strategy. The country plans to complement these yellow fever mass campaigns and ensure long-term protection through the introduction of yellow fever vaccination into routine immunization in the coming months.

"We acknowledge the commitment of the health authorities in Sudan to avail cash and fuel during this economic crisis to ensure that their people, especially children, are protected with a quality vaccine which will contribute to health security and making the world safer," said Dr. Naeema Al-Gasseer, WHO Representative in Sudan.

"Yellow fever vaccination is the most important tool we have to prevent yellow fever outbreaks. The vaccine will be freely available to any eligible person and will provide life-long protection against the disease. While protecting yourself against mosquito bites is important to reduce the risk of many diseases, only vaccination can eliminate the risk of yellow fever outbreaks," she added.

Yellow fever is a viral disease that is transmitted by certain types of mosquito. Infection can cause fatal illness, including jaundice, and death, and can spread rapidly, locally and internationally, especially in urban areas. However, the disease can be prevented by a single dose of a highly effective and safe vaccine. This campaign aims to boost protection in the general population and will target all eligible people.

Sudan is at high risk for the spread of yellow fever due to a combination of climate and ecological factors, and because there are still areas of low population immunity. Recent years have seen global changes in the epidemiology of yellow fever, with outbreaks occurring in areas that were not previously assessed as being at high risk.

"We are observing a changing nature in yellow fever disease dynamics. It is very important that every eligible person in this campaign receives the vaccine to protect themselves, their families and their communities," said Professor Dr. Babkir Kabaloo, Undersecretary of the Federal Ministry of Health.

"The current campaign represents one of the final phases in the Ministry's efforts to protect the entire nation against yellow fever outbreaks. This campaign will cover Blue Nile, Gezira, and Sennar states. In the coming months, the remaining states of Khartoum, Northern and River Nile will also be covered, completing the protection of the entire Sudanese population," he added.

Sudan's health authorities and partners are working to introduce yellow fever vaccine in the national immunization schedule in the near future. This will help ensure the protection of the whole population and generations to come against this fatal but preventable disease.
=====================
[It is good to see this ambitious yellow fever (YF) vaccination campaign drawing to a close. Incorporating YF vaccine into routine childhood vaccination schedules is prudent and if successful will eliminate the need for intensive, country-wide campaigns to deal with outbreaks. YF is no stranger to Sudan. Between 3 Oct and 24 Nov 2013, a total of 44 confirmed cases of YF were reported, including 14 deaths. A total of 12 localities in West and South Kordofan were affected by that outbreak. There was a large YF outbreak in the Darfur state in 2012-2013. In 2012, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said that more than 840 people were infected with YF in Darfur and that the epidemic affected 35 of 64 localities in the region since September 2012. The total recorded cases of YF in Greater Darfur hit 849 with a 20% death toll during an epidemic in 2012 (see WHO Disease Outbreak News <http://who.int/csr/don/2012_12_03/en> as reported by ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20130125.1513849, as noted at the time by Mod.JW). Mounting campaigns in the face of these types of outbreaks is inefficient, logistically difficult, and costly -- financially and in terms of human lives. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Date: Thu 21 Mar 2019
Source: SBS News, Australian Associated Press (AAP) report [edited]

An egg recall has been announced following the discovery of a _Salmonella_ outbreak at a Victorian egg farm. The scare has prompted a recall of some brands of eggs from outlets in 4 states.

To date, 5 cases of _Salmonella [enterica_ serotype] Enteritidis have been linked to eggs produced by Victoria's Bridgewater Poultry, the state's health department said on [Thu 21 Mar 2019]. The company's free-range and barn-laid eggs are packaged as Woolworths brand, Victorian Fresh, and Loddon Valley, with best-before dates ranging from [20 Mar to 29 Apr 2019]. They are on shelves in Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania, and South Australia. All other eggs are safe to eat, Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton said.

"It is important to know that not all eggs are affected, but any eggs carrying the listed brands should return them to the point of sale for a full refund. Alternatively, they can be discarded by throwing them into the garbage, not the garden or compost. "These eggs should not be given to pets or livestock."

Vulnerable people, including the elderly, are urged to avoid eating raw egg products.

Eggs of concern:
- Woolworths 12 Cage Free Eggs 700 g
- Victorian Fresh Barn Laid Eggs 600 g
- Victorian Fresh Barn Laid Eggs 700 g
- Victorian Fresh Barn Laid Eggs 800 g
- Loddon Valley Barn Laid 600 g (Victoria and South Australia only)
========================
[Salmonellosis is often thought to be associated with cracked eggs or eggs dirty with faecal matter, a problem controlled by cleaning procedures implemented in the egg industry. It is clearly the case, however, that most of the salmonellosis outbreaks linked to eggs were associated with uncracked, disinfected grade A eggs, or foods containing such eggs. The undamaged eggs become contaminated during ovulation, and thus were contaminated with the bacteria before the egg shell was formed. To avoid this, uncooked eggs should only be used as an ingredient, if pasteurized. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[Maps of Australia:
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019 3:50 PM EDT
Source: The Day [edited]

Groton [New London county] public health officials are reminding residents to refrain from feeding or approaching wild or stray animals after a dog found in the area of Midway Oval tested positive for rabies [Wed 20 Mar 2019].

Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that can infect all warm-blooded animals, including people, the Ledge Light Health District said in an alert sent to media outlets.

The disease mostly is spread by wild animals, but stray cats and dogs may also become infected and spread the virus, the district's alert said. The rabies virus lives in the saliva and brain tissue of infected animals, and the disease can be spread by scratches from infected animals or when infected saliva comes into contact with open wounds, breaks in the skin or mucous membranes, including the eyes, nose and mouth.

For more information, contact Ledge Light Health District at (860) 448-4882, extension 1311, or the animal control officer at (860) 441-6709.
======================
[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Connecticut, United States:
Connecticut county map:

Please keep your animals up-to-date on their rabies vaccine. It is for their protection and for your protection.

Regarding the 1st article, it sounds like South Carolina could consider using some oral rabies vaccine bait for some of their wild animals.

Unfortunately, wild animals may attack even when you are unaware of their presence.

Animals may be either unusually friendly and timid (dumb rabies) or aggressive and vicious (furious rabies). These are 2 presentations of the same disease but we should be aware of both forms and teach both forms to our children. - ProMED Mod.TG]
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: Aiken Standard [edited]

[One person] in Aiken county may have been exposed to rabies following an unfriendly encounter with a wild raccoon, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control [DHEC].

According to a DHEC press release, the victim was on the North Augusta Greeneway Walking Trail on 16 Mar 2019 when they were bitten by a raccoon. The raccoon was later submitted to DHEC and tested positive for rabies. [Apparently the DHEC knows there is a victim so their earlier statement of "may have been exposed" seems a bit odd. - ProMED Mod.TG]

The victim who was bitten has since been referred to their health care provider. The raccoon on the Greeneway trail was the 3rd animal diagnosed with rabies in Aiken county this year [2019]. Statewide, there have been 32 confirmed cases of rabies in 2019. Coyotes, foxes, and skunks are also common carriers of the virus. Although it is extremely rare in people, rabies can be spread to humans and can also claim the lives of pets. The virus causes hallucinations, hydrophobia (fear of water), aggression, and death in its final stages.

Rabies is normally spread through bites but can also be spread when open wounds or areas like the eyes, nose, or mouth come into contact with saliva or blood of an infected animal. Infected areas should be washed with soap and water and medical attention should be sought immediately.  If a wild animal is foaming at the mouth and shows a lack of motor control (stumbling, staggering, or bumping into things) it may have rabies. Rabid animals are often very aggressive and do not fear people or other animals. [This behaviour may describe raccoons with distemper, but although they are not usually aggressive with distemper, they can be. The point is, when an animal is not acting normally it is time to move on and leave it alone and report it to the authorities in your area. - ProMED Mod.TG]

"To reduce the risk of getting rabies, always give wild and stray animals their space," said David Vaughan, Director of DHEC's Onsite Wastewater, Rabies Prevention, and Enforcement Division. "If you see an animal in need, avoid touching it and contact someone trained in handling animals, such as your local animal control officer or wildlife rehabilitator."

DHEC also stresses the importance of keeping pets up to date on their rabies shots to prevent the spread of the disease. For more information, call DHEC's Environmental Affairs Aiken office at 803-642-1637 during normal business hours on weekdays.  [Byline: Kristina Rackley]
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Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 16:10:28 +0100

Kinshasa, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - A six-month-old baby in the eastern DR Congo city of Bunia has died of Ebola, becoming the first fatality of the disease in a provincial capital, the heath ministry said Thursday.   Bunia, which has a population of 300,000, is the capital of Ituri province, which along with neighbouring North Kivu province has been battling an epidemic of Ebola since last August.

The baby is among 610 fatalities out of 980 recorded cases, the ministry said in a statement.   "The parents are apparently in good health," it said.   "Extensive investigations are underway and will include, among other things, analysis of the maternal milk to identify the source of contamination."   The ministry added that it had also registered 97 new cases in the previous three weeks.   This increase "was expected" given the impact of an attack on two Ebola treatment centres by armed groups in the troubled region, it said.
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 22:32:17 +0100

Blantyre, Malawi, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - Heavy rains could cause a dam in southern Malawi to give way if there is no let-up, authorities said Thursday, urging local residents to take shelter.   The warning came after cyclone Idai battered neighbouring Mozambique last Friday killing 242 people    Hurricane-force winds and rains have also ravaged hit eastern Zimbabwe where over 100 have died.

In Malawi, the storm has affected nearly a million people with over 80,000 displaced, according to the WHO.   The Chagwa dam "has had one of its major embankments eroded due to heavy rains," the interior security ministry said in a statement. "(It) is likely to burst in the event of heavy and incessant rains."   The statement advised local residents in the southern African country to evacuate "in case of an emergency".