Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2019 18:59:25 +0100 (MET)

MOUSOUNI ISLAND, India, Nov 9, 2019 (AFP) - Cyclone Bulbul hit India and southern Bangladesh on Saturday, leaving two dead as authorities in the countries ordered more than two million people to get out of the path of the storm.   The cyclone, packing winds of up to 120 kilometres (75 miles) per hour, has "weakened" and "started crossing" India's West Bengal and Bangladesh's Khulna coast at about 9:00 pm (1500 GMT), Dhaka's Meteorological Department said in a special bulletin.   "It is likely to move in a northeasterly direction" and "weaken gradually, and may complete crossing West Bengal-Khulna coast by midnight tonight," the department said.     Airports and ports were shut down and the deaths were reported before the full force of the cyclone had hit.   One person was killed by an uprooted tree in Kolkata and another by a wall that collapsed under the force of the winds in Odisha state, authorities said.

More than 60,000 people were moved away from the coast on the Indian side of the border.   Bangladesh disaster management secretary Shah Kamal told AFP that "2.028 million" have been evacuated and moved to more than 5,500 cyclone shelters.   He said there was no reports of casualties and rejected reports in local media that dozens of local fishermen were missing on the southern coast.    Bangladeshi troops were sent to some villages, while about 55,000 volunteers went door-to-door and making loudspeaker announcements in the streets to get people away from the danger zone in villages, many of which were below sea level.

- Ports closed, flights halted -
A storm surge up to two metres (seven feet) was predicted along the coast, Bangladesh's Meteorological Department said.   About 1,500 tourists were stranded on the southern island of Saint Martin after boat services were suspended due to bad weather.   Bangladesh's two biggest ports, Mongla and Chittagong, were closed because of the storm, and flights into Chittagong airport were halted.   In India, flights in and out of Kolkata airport were suspended for 12 hours because of the storm.   On the West Bengal island of Mousouni, which lies in the path of the storm, frightened residents took shelter in schools and government buildings because they had not been able to escape.   Military planes and ships have been put on standby to help in emergencies, Indian authorities said.

Bulbul hit the coast at the Sundarbans, the world's largest mangrove forest, which straddles Bangladesh and part of eastern India, and is home to endangered species including the Bengal tiger and the Irrawaddy dolphins.   Bangladesh's low-lying coast, home to 30 million people, is regularly battered by cyclones that leave a trail of destruction.   Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed in cyclones in recent decades.   While the frequency and intensity have increased, partly due to climate change, the death tolls have come down because of faster evacuations and the building of 4,000 cyclone shelters along the coast.   In November 2007, Cyclone Sidr killed more than 3,000 people. In May this year, Fani became the most powerful storm to hit the country in five years, but the death toll was about 12.
Date: Thu 26 Sep 2019, 12:00 AM
Source: Daily Sun [edited]
<https://www.daily-sun.com/printversion/details/426450/West-Nile-virus-found-in-Bangladesh>

A new mosquito-borne virus, West Nile Virus (WNV), has been found in Bangladesh. However, detailed information about the virus has not been available yet as the government's concerned department didn't investigate to know its origin.

According to the experts, West Nile is a potentially life-threatening viral infection which can pass to animals and humans if they are bitten by an infected mosquito.

WNV is a virus of the _Flaviviridae_ family, which includes the viruses responsible for Japanese encephalitis and dengue fever. It mainly affects birds, but it can also infect mammals and reptiles. Between 70-80% of people have no symptoms. Up to 1% of those who become ill have serious and potentially fatal complications, they added.

"We have asked the Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research (IEDCR) to investigate the West Nile virus," said Dr. Sanya Tahmina Jhora, Director of the Disease Control unit of Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) on [Wed 25 Sep 2019].

Asked about the West Nile virus, Prof. Dr Meerjady Sabrina Flora, Director of Institute of Epidemiology of the IEDCR, said: "A report about the West Nile virus has come to us. A study of the ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) has mentioned the detection the virus in Bangladesh. Our team will go to the spot and carry out investigation about the West Nile virus. We can give details about it after the investigation," she added.

The DGHS sources said the ICDDR,B detected the West Nile virus infected patient in an area near Dhaka city and informed the concerned authorities of the government to this end. However, talking to Daily Sun, the ICDDR,B communication department refused to comment.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States (US), West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the continental United States.

It is most commonly spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Cases of WNV occur during mosquito season, which starts in the summer and continues through fall. There are no vaccines to prevent or medications to treat WNV in people," it said.

The report also said "most people infected with WNV do not feel sick, but about 1 in 5 people who are infected develop a fever and other symptoms. About 1 out of 150 infected people develop a serious, sometimes fatal, illness. You can reduce your risk of WNV by using insect repellent and wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants to prevent mosquito bites."

The World Health Organization (WHO) said the West Nile virus can cause a fatal neurological disease in humans, while approximately 80% of people who are infected will not show any symptoms. "West Nile virus is mainly transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. The virus can cause severe disease and death in horses. Vaccines are available for use in horses but not yet available for people. Birds are the natural hosts of West Nile virus," it said.

The WHO statement said WNV can cause neurological disease and death in people. "WNV is a member of the _flavivirus_ genus and belongs to the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex of the family _Flaviviridae_. WNV is maintained in nature in a cycle involving transmission between birds and mosquitoes. Humans, horses and other mammals can be infected," it added. The WHO statement said human infection is most often the result of bites from infected mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds, which circulate the virus in their blood for a few days. The virus eventually gets into the mosquito's salivary glands. During later blood meals (when mosquitoes bite), the virus may be injected into humans and animals, where it can multiply and possibly cause illness.

It said the virus may also be transmitted through contact with other infected animals, their blood, or other tissues. A very small proportion of human infections have occurred through organ transplant, blood transfusions and breast milk.

The WHO report further said infection with WNV is either asymptomatic (no symptoms) in around 80% of infected people or can lead to West Nile fever or severe West Nile disease. About 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. The report added that symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis.

It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 people infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of the disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however, people over the age of 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. The incubation period is usually 3 to 14 days.

The WHO further said that treatment is supportive for patients with neuro-invasive West Nile virus disease, often involving hospitalization, intravenous fluids, respiratory support, and prevention of secondary infections. No vaccine is available for humans.  [Byline: Mohammad Al Amin]
=====================
[The news report above indicates the detection of West Nile virus (WNV) by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) in a patient near Dhaka city, the Capital in Bangladesh. This is the 1st report of WNV from Bangladesh affecting humans. A further investigation from the health authority concerned in the country seems underway to obtain more information about the reported finding.

Earlier, Islam et al have reported WNV antibody prevalence of approx. 5.4 percent in resident and migratory wild birds in 2015 [Islam, Ariful & Rahman, Mohammad & Paul, Suman & Hannan, M. A. & Hossain, Mohammad Elius & Rahman, Mohammed & Hosseini, Parviez & Dey, T. & Zeidner, N.. (2015). Seroprevalence of West Nile Virus in Wild Birds in Bangladesh].
West Nile virus (WNV) was 1st isolated in a woman in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937. It was identified in birds (crows and columbiformes) in the Nile delta region in 1953. Before 1997, WNV was not considered pathogenic for birds, but at that time in Israel, a more virulent strain caused the death of different bird species, presenting signs of encephalitis and paralysis.

The largest WNV outbreaks occurred in Greece, Israel, Romania, Russia and the USA, with outbreak sites on major bird migratory routes. In its original range, WNV was prevalent throughout Africa, parts of Europe, Middle East, West Asia, and Australia. Since its introduction in 1999 into the USA, the virus has spread and is now widely established from Canada to Venezuela.

Human infection most often results from bites of infected mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds, which circulate the virus in their blood for a few days. The virus eventually gets into the mosquito's salivary glands. During later blood meals (when mosquitoes bite), the virus may be injected into humans and animals, where it can multiply and possibly cause illness. The virus may also be transmitted through contact with other infected animals, their blood, or other tissues. Rarely, human infections have occurred through organ transplant, blood transfusions and breast milk. There is one reported case of transplacental (mother-to-child) WNV transmission (<https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/west-nile-virus>).

About 20 percent of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph nodes.

Treatment is supportive for patients with neuro-invasive West Nile virus disease, often involving hospitalization, intravenous fluids, respiratory support, and prevention of secondary infections. No vaccine is available for humans. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Bangladesh: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/153>]
2 Aug 2019

A record 19,513 people have been infected [as of] yesterday [1 Aug 2019], including 3464 outside Dhaka, the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) said, adding that 1712 new dengue cases were reported at hospitals in the last 24 hours since 8:00 am on Wednesday [31 Jul 2019]. Two pregnant women die of dengue at BSMMU [Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University]. With the latest development, the death toll in dengue disease has risen to at least 48 this year [2019], according to different hospital sources.
<https://www.thedailystar.net/city/news/2-pregnant-women-die-dengue-bsmmu-1780840>
Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2019 13:34:30 +0200 (METDST)

Dhaka, Aug 13, 2019 (AFP) - At least 40 people have died in Bangladesh's worst-ever outbreak of dengue, officials said Tuesday, as overburdened hospitals struggled to treat thousands of patients.   Outbreaks of the mosquito-borne viral infection, which causes flu-like symptoms but can be deadly if it develops into a haemorrhagic fever, usually occur in the South Asian nation during the monsoon season between June and September -- but this year the disease has reached epidemic proportions.

More than 44,000 people have been admitted to hospitals with the illness since January, including some 2,100 on Monday alone, said health ministry official Ayesha Akhter.    "We have confirmed 40 dengue-related casualties so far to Monday," she told AFP.   Local media put the number much higher, reporting that the death toll passed 100 last week.   The week-long holiday marking the Muslim festival of Eid-al-Adha has seen hundreds of thousands of people leaving Bangladeshi cities to return to their family homes in the countryside, raising concerns that the disease will spread further.

The country's health minister said the outbreak was "gradually reducing" while inaugurating an emergency dengue ward at a public hospital in Dhaka this week.   For the first time on record, holidays for all public health workers have been cancelled to help respond to the crisis, said health ministry director general Abul Kalam Azad.   "It is getting very tough to cope up with the amount of work pressure," one medical officer told AFP.
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 14:58:38 +0200

Dhaka, July 29, 2019 (AFP) - Bangladesh is in the grip of the country's worst-ever dengue fever outbreak, officials said Monday, with hospitals overflowing and social media flooded with pleas for blood donors.   Eight people have died and there have been 13,637 cases of the disease so far this year, with nearly 1,100 people -- most of them children -- diagnosed in the last 24 hours, according to official figures.   "This number is the highest since we started keeping record on dengue patients nearly two decades ago," senior health ministry official Ayesha Akter told AFP.

Local media reported that the number of victims could be much higher and the Amader Shomoy newspaper said at least 30 people had died of dengue this year.   The capital Dhaka is the worst-hit, with the city launching a fumigation drive to kill the Aedes mosquito, which is capable of spreading devastating diseases like dengue, Zika and chikungunya.

Dengue, which causes flu-like symptoms, can be deadly if it develops into a haemorrhagic fever. There is no vaccine or any specific medicine to treat dengue, according to the World Health Organisation.   An AFP correspondent visited major hospitals in Dhaka and saw patients lying on floors and in corridors as they waited for treatment.   The country's largest hospital -- Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) -- has treated some 1,858 dengue patients this month, according to director general A.K.M Nasir Uddin.   "We have opened a special corner for dengue patients," he told AFP.

Doctors have been working overtime to cope with the large volume of patients.   "Our facilities are overstretched and overwhelmed. We are struggling to cope," a medical officer at Dhaka's Mitford Hospital said.   There have been reports of blood banks struggling to meet the needs of seriously ill patients, with appeals for blood launched on social media sites such as Facebook.   One mother said she was worried about her sick daughter, aged four.   "Doctors have done all they could do. All I am doing now is calling Allah for help," Nasima Khatun told AFP.
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