1st April 2019
https://www.aa.com.tr/en/asia-pacific/rainstorm-lightning-kill-10-kill-in-bangladesh/1439210

Rainstorm, lightning kill 10 kill in Bangladesh

DHAKA, Bangladesh 

At least 10 people were killed and dozens other injured as a tropical storm lashed different parts of Bangladesh, including capital Dhaka, on Sunday evening, local media reports said. The storm, coupled with gusty winds and lightning uprooted trees, sunk a boat, blew away bricks from buildings and collapsed a wall, reports said citing police and Met Office as sources. Of the deceased, six were killed in Dhaka, including a woman and her five-year-old son who drowned when a boat capsized in River Buriganga during the storm. Two people were killed as bricks from under construction buildings fell on them. A 45-year-old woman was killed after a tree fell on her and a rickshaw puller died as a wall collapsed on him.

Authorities had to close down river routes and operations of flights at Dhaka’s international airport for about two hours, the New Age newspaper reported.  Also, four people including two teenage sisters were struck dead by lightning on Sunday, the report added.  According to Dhaka Medical College and Hospital sources, at least 18 people came to the hospital with minor injuries after the storm. Both April and May are very prone to seasonal storms in the South Asian country with hundreds of rivers.

Date: Fri 15 Mar 2019
Source: Prothom Alo [edited]
<https://en.prothomalo.com/bangladesh/news/192569/3-of-a-family-infected-with-Nipah-virus>

The 3 members of a family from Baliadangi upazila's [2nd-lowest tier of regional administration] Ujarmoni village in Thakurgaon [district] are suspected to have been infected with the deadly Nipah virus, reports United News of Bangladesh [apparently later confirmed as Nipah virus; see below. - ProMED Mod.TY].

The victims include a 28 year old mother; her son, aged 8; and her daughter, aged 4. They were taken to Rangpur Medical College Hospital on Thursday [14 Mar 2019], said ABM Maniruzzaman, the resident medical officer of Baliadangi Upazila Health Complex. He said the victims had been suffering from fever for the last 3 days. They also reported headache and vomiting. The trio was 1st taken to Thakurgaon Modern Sadar Hospital and later shifted to RMCH.

Nipah virus is transmitted from animals to humans and can also be transmitted through contaminated food or directly between people, according to the World Health Organisation. There is no vaccine for the virus, which is spread through body fluids and can cause inflammation of the brain.

The mother's husband said his wife and children fell sick after eating jujube [fruit of the _Ziziphus jujuba_ bush] on Wednesday night [13 Mar 2019].

Thakurgaon civil surgeon Abu Mohammad Khairul Kabir said their blood samples had been collected for testing. A medical team from the Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research is scheduled to visit RMCH.

In February [2019], 5 members of a family died mysteriously in Baliadanga upazila. It is unclear what caused their deaths [Nipah virus is suspected]. In 2001, Nipah virus was identified as the causative agent in an outbreak of human disease occurring in Bangladesh. Genetic sequencing confirmed this virus as Nipah virus, according to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention.
======================
[This is the 2nd family in Bangladesh to have been infected by Nipah virus this year [2019]. Nipah virus infections occur sporadically in Bangladesh. As noted in the previous comment (ProMED-mail archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20150204.3143251), "Giant fruit bats or flying foxes (_Pteropus_ of several species) are reservoirs of Nipah virus, and . . . they contaminate date palm sap or the fruit. [The above report suggests that the family may have eaten contaminated jujube fruit]. This is the season for cases of Nipah virus infection to occur. The transmission season is usually January to April."

"It is unfortunate that the public awareness efforts have not prevented these cases from occurring. Perhaps because cases are sporadic and geographically scattered there is little public perception of risk of infection and serious disease. Until effective public education to prevent infection by avoiding eating contaminated fruit or date palm sap is implemented, sporadic cases will continue to occur."

An image of a _Pteropus_ fruit bat can be found at
<http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3d/Pteropus_giganteus_fg01.JPG>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Bangladesh: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/153>
Rangpur Division, Bangladesh: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/16030>]
Date: Mon 4 Mar 2019
Source: The Daily Star [edited]
<https://www.thedailystar.net/city/news/death-5-thakurgaon-nipah-virus-found-victims-body-1710307>

The Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR) has found the presence of Nipah virus in one of the 5 family members who died in Baliadangi upazila of Thakurgaon early in February [2019; upazilas are the 2nd lowest tier of regional administration in Bangladesh].  "Samples of one of the deceased were collected, and investigators detected presence of Nipah virus there," said IEDCR Director Meerjady Sabrina Flora in a statement yesterday [3 Mar 2019].

IEDCR formed 2 committees, which conducted investigations at Baliadangi Upazila Health Complex, Thakurgaon Sadar Hospital, Rangpur Medical College Hospital and various places of Baliadangi upazila between 25 Feb-1 Mar [2019].

During the time, investigators also collected samples of hospital doctors, nurses, health workers and family members of the victims, neighbours, and villagers. The investigation found that those who died had fever, headache, vomiting, and infection. Nipah virus was not found in samples of living persons of the family.  "In the investigation, it was not known if the deceased had a history of drinking raw date palm sap (a popular drink), but the investigators think 4 of the victims were infected by Nipah virus from the other," said the IEDCR statement.

Nipah virus generally transmits through drinking date palm sap infected by bats carrying the virus. Meerjady has advised all not to drink raw date sap.  If anyone is infected by Nipah virus, health personnel and family members should use masks and gloves when they take care of the patients, and wash hands with soap afterwards. The patients should be kept in isolated environment, she said.
====================
[Nipah virus infections occur sporadically in Bangladesh. As noted in the previous comment (ProMED-mail archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20150204.3143251) "Giant fruit bats or flying foxes (_Pteropus_ of several species) are reservoirs of Nipah virus, and, as the above report indicates, they contaminate date palm sap or the fruit. This is the season for cases of Nipah virus infection to occur. The transmission season is usually January to April.

As mentioned in comments in a previous post (ProMED-mail archive no. http://promedmail.org/post/20140113.2168940), local residents scarify the upper areas of palm trees to collect sap in large jars. The bats come to drink the sap and defecate and urinate in the sap. If the bats are shedding Nipah virus, it contaminates the sap. If the sap is consumed uncooked, humans that drink it can become infected. Local people say that cooking the sap adversely alters the flavour. However, skirts made of local bamboo can serve as a barrier preventing bats' access to the sap collecting sites. Person to person transmission can occur as well.

It is unfortunate that the public awareness efforts have not prevented these cases from occurring. Perhaps because cases are sporadic and geographically scattered, there is little public perception of risk of infection and serious disease. Until effective public education to prevent infection is implemented, sporadic cases will continue to occur.

An image of a _Pteropus_ fruit bat can be found at
<http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3d/Pteropus_giganteus_fg01.JPG>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Bangladesh: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/153>.]
Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2019 07:20:54 +0100
By Shafiqul ALAM

Dhaka, Feb 21, 2019 (AFP) - At least 70 people were killed when fire tore through crumbling apartment blocks in a historic part of Dhaka, setting off a chain of explosions and a wall of flames down nearby streets, officials said Thursday.    It started in one building where chemicals for deodorants and other household uses were illegally stored and spread at lightning speed to four nearby buildings, the fire service said.    People became trapped by the flames at a nearby bridal party and a restaurant. TV images showed the gates to one building were chained up so residents were unable to escape.

Traffic jams in the clogged narrow streets held up the rescue operation.   Bangladesh fire chief Ali Ahmed said at least 70 people were killed but that the toll would likely rise.    "The number of bodies may increase. The search is still going on," he told AFP.   Doctors said at least 10 of the scores of injured were in critical condition.   Firefighters who took almost 12 hours to bring the fire under control, went through the blackened floors of the building, littered with spray cans, looking for bodies.

The fire started at about 10.40pm (1640 GMT) on Wednesday at Chawkbazar in the old Mughal part of the capital.   Ahmed said it may have been started by a gas cylinder and quickly spread through the building where chemicals were stored in rooms alongside the apartments.   Chemicals used for household products were also stored in the nearby buildings. They exploded as the fire spread, witnesses said.     "There was a traffic jam when the fire broke out. It spread so quickly that people could not escape," the fire chief said.   Another fire official told reporters the blaze was under control but was not extinguished despite the efforts of more than 200 firefighters.   "It will take time. This is not like any other fire," he said, adding that the inferno had been made more devastating by the "highly combustible" chemicals.   Fire trucks had struggled in the narrow streets to reach the scene and there was also a lack of water for the battle, officials said.   The main gate of one five storey building was chained up, trapping residents inside, according to images shown on Bangladesh television.

- 'Flames were everywhere' -
Members of a bridal party in a nearby community centre were also caught in the fire and many were injured. Others were caught in small restaurants.   Dhaka deputy police commissioner Ibrahim Khan said at least two cars and 10 cycle rickshaws were burned in the fire.   "The victims included passersby, some people who were eating food at a restaurants and some members of the bridal party," he told AFP.   "I saw the charred body of a woman who was holding her daughter in her lap as their rickshaw was caught in the fire," said one witness.

Haji Abdul Kader, whose shop was destroyed, said he only survived the blaze as as he had left to go to a pharmacy.   "When I was at the pharmacy, I heard a big bang. I turned back and saw the whole street, which was jam packed with cars and rickshaws, in flames. Flames were everywhere," he told AFP.   "I got burned and rushed to hospital," he said.

Doctors at Dhaka Medical College Hospital said at least 55 people were injured, including 10 in a critical condition.   Hundreds of people rushed to the hospital looking for missing relatives.  However, most of the bodies of the dead were charred beyond recognition.    Sohag Hossain, one of the injured, told the Daily Star that he and two friends were working at a plastic factory in one of the buildings at the time of the fire.    They heard an explosion and could not escape the flames.

A similar blaze in 2010 in an old Dhaka building, which was also used as a chemical warehouse, killed more than 120 people in one of the worst fire disasters in the city of 20 million people.      Dhaka authorities launched a crackdown on chemical warehouses in residential areas following the blaze, but efforts to rein in the practice have waned.   Many buildings in Bangladesh lack adequate fire safety measures and the enforcement of fire regulations in factories and apartment buildings is lax.  
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2019 09:55:22 +0100

Dhaka, Jan 8, 2019 (AFP) - Bangladeshi police Tuesday fired rubber bullets and tear gas as thousands of striking workers in the South Asian country's huge garment industry staged protests for a third day demanding wage hikes.   Bangladesh's 4,500 textile and clothing factories exported more than $30 billion worth of apparel last year, making clothing for retailers such as H&M, Walmart, Tesco, Carrefour and Aldi.

Police said more than 5,000 workers blocked a national highway at Hemayetpur outside the capital Dhaka and clashed with them for hours after they walked out of their factories.   "At least 12 policemen were injured after they threw rocks at our officers. We fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the protesters. Twelve factories were shut down," police official Sana Shaminur Rahman told AFP.

The online edition of the Manabjamin newspaper said at least 50 protesters were injured in waves of clashes, which also spread to garment factory hubs in Dhaka, Ashulia and Uttara involving thousands more workers.   The protests are the first major test for Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina since winning a fourth term in December 30 elections marred by violence, thousands of arrests and allegations of vote rigging and intimidation.   Bangladesh raised the minimum monthly wage for the garment sector's four million workers by 51 percent to 8,000 taka ($95) from December.

But senior workers say their raise was less than this and unions, which warn the strikes may spread, say the hike fails to compensate for price rises in recent years.   "The wages were hiked after five years. But in the five years the cost of living has increased more than the wage hike," Babul Akhter, head of the Bangladesh Garment and Industrial Workers Federation, told AFP.

Bangladesh is the world's second-largest garment maker after China.  But despite the industry's role in transforming the impoverished nation into a major manufacturing hub, garment workers are some of the lowest paid in the world.   The industry also has a poor workplace safety record with the collapse of a Rana Plaza garment factory complex killing more than 1,130 people in 2013 in one of the world's worst industrial disasters.    Following the disaster, major retailers formed two safety groups to push through crucial reforms in the factories, prompting manufacturers to plough in more than a billion dollars in safety upgrades.
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