Date: Mon, 19 Nov 2018 13:31:53 +0100

Maputo, Nov 19, 2018 (AFP) - The World Health Organisation on Monday said global efforts to fight malaria have hit a plateau as it reported there were more cases of the killer disease in 2017 than the previous year.   The latest WHO report showed that the number of malaria cases climbed to 219 million last year, two million higher than 2016, while international funding has declined.

"The world faces a new reality," WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, warned as the UN agency launched the new report.   "As progress stagnates, we are at risk of squandering years of toil, investment and success in reducing the number of people suffering from the disease," the WHO chief said.   Malaria, which is spread to people through the bites of infected female mosquitoes, occurs in 91 countries but about 90 percent of the cases and deaths are in sub-Saharan Africa.

Foreign funding to some of the most affected countries has declined, in certain instances by more than 20 percent for every individual at risk of contracting the disease.    "A considerable proportion of people at risk of infection are not being protected, including pregnant women and children in Africa," the WHO chief said.   The disease killed 435,000 people last year, the majority of them children under five in Africa.

Another constraint in fighting malaria has been mosquitoes building up resistance to some commonly used insecticides, according to the report.   WHO said it was embarking on new ways to scale up the battle against one of the world's deadliest diseases.   The plan includes country-led projects to "jumpstart aggressive" control efforts, said Kesete Admasu, who heads Roll Back Malaria, a global partnership initiative to curb the parasitic disease.   Mozambique is one of the target countries.   "Business as usual is no longer an option," said Admasu.

Most malaria cases reported last year were in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, India, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda.   Five countries accounted for nearly half of the cases: Nigeria (25 percent), DR Congo (11 percent), Mozambique (five percent), and India and Uganda with four percent each.    However countries such as Ethiopia, India, Pakistan and Rwanda recorded "substantial" declines in malaria cases.
Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2018 11:47:13 +0100

Ouagadougou, Nov 6, 2018 (AFP) - Two soldiers were killed and three were injured, two of them seriously, in a blast in northern Burkina Faso, the theatre of a jihadist insurgency, security sources said Tuesday.   Their vehicle triggered an improvised explosive device (IED) late Monday on a road near Nassoumbou, near the Malian border, they said.   The landlocked Sahel country has seen regular Islamist attacks since the start of 2015.    The north and the east are the worst-hit areas, while the capital Ouagadougou has been attacked three times.   In the last month, around two dozen members of the security forces have been killed, mainly by IEDs, according to an unofficial tally.
Date: Sun, 7 Oct 2018 05:53:42 +0200

Ouagadougou, Oct 7, 2018 (AFP) - Six police officers were killed in an ambush with an improvised explosive device in northern Burkina Faso, while another member of the security forces died in a blast in the country's east, security sources told AFP on Saturday.   The first attack took place late Friday on a police convoy in the town of Solle near the border with Mali.   "The leading vehicle ran over a mine and six were killed," one source said, adding that the convoy then came under gunfire leaving some other officers injured.

Another security source said that "at least" six police had died in Friday's attack, adding that a search for the attackers was underway in the area.   Separately, one member of the Burkina Faso security forces was killed late Saturday and another was injured when a similar device exploded in the eastern town of Pama, according to a security source.   Local residents say air strikes are being carried out in the forests surrounding Pama, which are known in the region as a refuge for jihadist fighters and bandits.

The African country has seen regular Islamist attacks since the start of 2015, especially the north and east of the country.   According to an official count published last month, such attacks have killed 118 people so far, 70 of whom were civilians.   On Thursday, six soldiers were also killed in the east of the country in similar circumstances.   Last week the opposition held a demonstration in the capital Ouagadougou to protest the government's inability to stem the increasingly frequent attacks.
Date: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 14:51:36 +0200

Ouagadougou, Sept 26, 2018 (AFP) - Eight soldiers were killed on Wednesday by a blast in the troubled north of Burkina Faso, President Roch Marc Christian Kabore announced.   "I have just learned that eight Burkinabe soldiers died after their vehicle drove over a home-made mine planted by the enemies of our people," he said.  The convoy had been heading from Baraboule in Soum province, where jihadists have carried out a string of attacks since 2015, to the town of Djibo.   "The lead vehicle in the convoy hit the mine" as it was coming off a bridge, a security source told AFP.

Kabore expressed his "deepest condolences to the defence and security forces, to the families and relatives of the victims."   "These horrible and cowardly attacks will never sap our common resolve to defend our national territorial integrity, to restore peace and security for the happiness and prosperity of the Burkinabe people."   One of the world's poorest countries, Burkina Faso started experiencing cross-border jihadist attacks in its northern region in 2015 -- an offensive that has now spread to the east of the country.

On Sunday, three miners -- a Burkinabe national, an Indian and a South African -- were seized by armed men between Djibo and a local gold mine.   Hours later, three police officers deployed to help search for the trio were killed in a clash with armed men at Tongomael, about 30 kilometres (20 miles) away.

Abductions include that of Australian Kenneth Elliott and his wife Jocelyn, humanitarian workers in their eighties, who were kidnapped in Djibo in 2015.    Jocelyn Elliott was released but her husband, who had been running a clinic for the poor for decades, is still being held.   On September 8, Kabore said additional security measures would shortly be unveiled "to eradicate the curse of terrorism".
Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2018 19:47:38 +0200

Ouagadougou, Sept 5, 2018 (AFP) - Two soldiers died and six were wounded Wednesday when a roadside bomb struck their vehicle in eastern Burkina Faso, a poor Sahel state where Islamist unrest is gaining ground, security sources said.   The attack in Kabonga was the latest using an improvised explosive device against soldiers or police, and came as a senior police official warned of rising unrest in the country's east.

A similar strike a week ago killed seven people, soldiers and gendarmes sent to reinforce a police station that had come under attack in the restive town of Pama.   A security source said the latest blast targeted a mine clearance team that was also headed for Pama to "search for and neutralise" explosive devices planted by jihadists who have infiltrated the area in recent months.

A similar attack three weeks ago killed six other people in the region.   Local media published a warning by police commissioner Karim Drabo who oversees the region. He said armed militants aimed "to set up bases for terrorist attacks in the zone" and were "gaining ground".   Since 2015, Burkina Faso has battled increased Islamist violence of the sort that plagues neighbouring Mali and Niger, and experts say the recent surge is likely the result of pressure on jihadist insurgents there.
More ...