Date: Wed 15 Nov 2017 20:00 pm (GMT +2)
Source: MMEGI online [edited]
<http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?aid=73096&dir=2017/november/15>

Dozens of Nthompe Koma Primary School pupils on Monday night [13 Nov 2017] thronged Mahalapye health facilities following a food poisoning incident allegedly caused by rape they ate at school.

Classes came to a halt yesterday [14 Nov 2017] as more students showed signs of food poisoning while health workers were present at the school and hospital to establish what could have caused the incident that led to at least 26 pupils being admitted at Mahalapye Hospital. According to a source, it is suspected that the students were fed rape, which was recently sprayed with pesticides.

"The students started vomiting and having diarrhoea at their homes after school. A huge number of them were rushed to the hospital and it was said that the newly treated vegetable was given to them," the source said.

Mahalapye Hospital Superintendent, Dr Kumal Bose said they are yet to establish the cause of diarrhoea and vomiting, whether it is the food they ate or not. "We attended to a total of 82 students of whom 26 were admitted and others discharged. More students were coming in this morning [15 Nov 2017].

We have sent our public health team to the school to investigate all possible causes," he said. Mahalapye chief education officer,

Maria Dikeme [Principal Education Officer] confirmed the incident. "It is true that a lot of students from the school were taken to various health facilities yesterday [14 Nov 2017].

The students were fed sorghum and rape at break time and the sorghum has been taken for tests by the public health team. All of the rape was cooked yesterday. We will, however, go to the source if there is still any left so that it can be tested," she said.

Dikeme said more students were taken to the hospital the following day as some developed signs late.

"We do not have a certain number currently, but we have recorded over 100 cases with 11 pupils still admitted at the hospital," she said.

She said they kept the pupils within the school so they could monitor them rather than sending them home while parents are at work.

Dikeme said there were some pupils who were in school yesterday [14 Nov 2017] who were not affected and that there was no report of any adult person having been diagnosed with the same problem.  [Byline: Innocent Selatlhwa]
===================
[Rape seed and soybeans are both grains. This article says a possible pesticide. The class of chemicals causing these clinical signs would be organophosphates. Grains are often treated with chemicals to prevent insect infestation and ruination of the crop. Therefore it is possible an organophosphate was used on the grain, and not washed or cleaned before being put into human consumption, could produce vomiting and diarrhoea. These could be signs associated with organophosphates. There are likely other crop chemicals capable of producing this, but the organophosphate class is large with numerous chemicals.

The article does not tell us if the pupils are being treated or if they are, what they are being treated with.

Consequently, the results of the testing is very important. Hopefully the testing will reveal the cause of this situation. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/58857>.]
Date: Tue 10 Oct 2017 15:55 pm (GMT + 2)
Source: MmegiOnline [edited]
<http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?aid=72290&dir=2017/october/10>

The Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP) has noted a high number of dead hippopotamuses along the Okavango River near Mohembo.

A statement from the from DWNP says the carcases are floating in the river from Namibia into Botswana. "The cause of death is not known at the moment. The veterinarians are working hard to establish it," says the statement.

The public is therefore warned not to touch any carcass found along the river or anywhere else. "Eating meat of these animals will be very dangerous as Anthrax is suspected to be causing the mortalities. Any sightings are to be reported to the nearest DWNP office, police station or kgotla".
=====================
[Mohembo is on the Botswana/Namibian border, and the Okavango river comes straight from the Bwabwata NP; see:
<http://www.citymaphq.com/botswana/botswana_general/mohembo.html>

According to Wikipedia: "Before it enters Botswana, the river drops 4 metres in a series of rapids known as Popa Falls, visible when the river is low, as during the dry season." [<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okavango_River>] So these carcasses may be poor condition. But either way, the warning to the locals not to butcher them is very wise. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/163>.]
Date: Mon 10 Apr 2017
Source: The Southern Times [edited]
<https://southernafrican.news/2017/04/10/bots-malaria-death-toll-rises-as-drugs-run-out/>

The recent heavy rains which pounded most parts of Botswana resulting in the outbreak of malaria are likely to reverse the gains that the southern African nation had achieved in the fight against the scourge.

Recently, a release from the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) stated that Botswana was among 8 other African countries that have shown commitment and innovation in the fight against the disease and were honoured by ALMA. "The progress in Botswana shows what is possible when a country and its leaders make malaria a priority," the release quoted Joy Phumaphi, executive secretary of ALMA as saying.

However, assistant minister of health and wellness, Phillip Makgalemele, told the parliament last week [3 to 9 Apr 2017] that due to the heavy rains, Botswana is experiencing an increase in the number of reported malaria cases. In February this year [2017], Botswana had recorded 5 cases of malaria deaths. But Makgalemele stated that the number has risen to 7. "By the beginning of this month [March 2017], we had recorded 627 cases and 7 deaths. About 60 per cent of these cases are from Okavango District," he said, adding that the country has also recorded sporadic cases from non-endemic malaria districts in southern Botswana.

According to Makgalemele, malaria transmission period runs from around October to early May. "Annually, in preparation for this season, my ministry conducts integrated vector control interventions, public education, community mobilisation and capacity building. Drug and commodity availability are also ensured," he said. He explained that, based on the early warning of normal to above normal rainfall this year [2017] by the Meteorological Services, his ministry intensified its efforts to prepare for the eventuality of a possible outbreak.

"We have been monitoring stock levels of our anti-malarials at both Central Medical Stores (CMS) and our health facilities. Most of our health facilities have adequate stock levels of 1st line anti-malarials," said the assistant minister. However, Makgalemele said a few District Health Management Teams (DHMTs) have recently reported shortage of quinine injection, which is used for severe cases. He further added that they are expecting a 2nd consignment and additional stocks of this drug and other anti-malarials were expected in the coming weeks to cater for the increase in cases.

"Central Medical Stores is monitoring the situation by contacting DHMTs on a daily basis to monitor anti-malarials and anti-diarrhoeal. There has been no staff redistribution based on the outbreak. The National Malaria Control Programme has trained trainers of trainers from all our health districts on malaria case management to train the rest of the staff in their respective districts," he said. Makgalemele said the country-wide training was to strengthen case management of health care workers in both Malaria and non-malaria endemic areas.

"Specifically for this particular outbreak, national teams have been dispatched to monitor the situation in the affected districts. Our entomologists are also on the ground supporting the case investigations," he said. He highlighted that all DHMTs have malaria epidemic response teams. "During outbreaks, as is the case, these teams have been reactivated and are meeting on a weekly basis to assess the situation," he said.

He said due to high population mobility and standing water pools, sporadic cases of malaria can occur in non-endemic areas. My ministry has bought 2325 long lasting insecticidal mosquito nets (LLINS) which continue to be distributed in malaria endemic districts," he said. In addition he commented that all these nets have and were being distributed in the endemic areas adding that for the quarter ending December 2016, the average drug availability was 86.5 per cent.  [byline: Mpho Tebele]
================
[There has been an increase in malaria cases in South Africa, Botswana and Namibia in recent months following heavy rains (see ProMED-mail reports). These do strain drug supplies where artemisinin-combination therapy is the key treatment, acting rapidly and administered orally. Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) have been a huge success throughout Africa and their introduction is believed to be the main intervention responsible for the decrease in malaria mortality observed over the past 2 decades. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/169>.]
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 2017 22:44:47 +0200

Gaborone, Botswana, April 3, 2017 (AFP) - A strong earthquake with a magnitude of 6.5 struck the southern African nation of Botswana on Monday, US seismologists said, with the tremor felt in several neighbouring countries.    The epicentre of the quake, which hit at 7:40 pm (1740 GMT), was in a sparsely populated area 238 kilometres (about 150 miles) northwest of Botswana's capital Gaborone, the US Geological Survey said.

It struck at a depth of 29 kilometres, and rumbled throughout the capital for about 30 seconds, an AFP correspondent said.   In a statement published on social media late Monday, the government of Botswana said no deaths had been reported.   "We felt the house was vibrating, all the window and door panels shaking heavily. We went outside and felt the same," a resident of Letlhakane, a village in Botswana near the epicentre, told the Earthquake Report website.   The quake was also felt in several cities in South Africa as well as in Swaziland and Zimbabwe, several hundreds of kilometres from the epicentre,
witnesses said.

In central Johannesburg, two buildings were evacuated as a precaution, according to media reports.   "My whole bed was shaking. It was so scary. I didn't know what was happening," a resident of Durban, on the southeast coast of South Africa, told the News24 agency.   Earlier Monday, a smaller quake with a magnitude of 4.6 was recorded in north-western South Africa.   Strong earthquakes are rare in southern Africa, though in 2006 Mozambique was hit by a 7.5-magnitude quake that killed four people and injured 29.
Date: Mon 20 Mar 2017, 10:45 AM
Source: News24, a Traveller24 report [edited]
<http://traveller24.news24.com/News/Alerts/alert-limpopo-on-high-alert-as-botswana-issues-malaria-warning-20170320>

Travellers heading to Botswana or those who find themselves in Limpopo need to ensure they take the correct preventative measures as a warning have been issued for high levels of malaria in both of these regions.

The Ministry of Health and Wellness for Botswana has issued a warning that the country is experiencing high levels of malaria, following the recent heavy rains. "There have been increases in the number of cases in Okavango, Ngami, Chobe, Boteti, Tutume and Bobirwa. Travel agents are advised to warn their clients to seek medical advice 2 weeks before travelling to malarial areas."

The Limpopo Health Department [South Africa] has also announced an increase in the number or reported malaria cases in the province, particularly around Lephalale and Thabazimbi [both in Limpopo District, South Africa].

News24 reports the Limpopo health department on [Tue 14 Mar 2017] confirmed at least 46 cases of malaria had been reported in the western Waterberg district around Lephalale and Thabazimbi. The department's spokesperson Thabiso Teffo stated no fatalities had been reported. "It is an area that does not normally have malaria mosquitoes. We also worried that 70 percent of the cases reported were people who had not travelled. It means they had contracted malaria in the area they stay." Teffo said the department started spraying insecticide and informed residents and doctors.

However it is important to note that the department says it is "not an outbreak. It's malaria season". The concern is that the cases are uncommon because it's an area where we don't expect malaria.  [Byline: Selene Brophy]
======================
[The report mentions districts in both Botswana and South Africa. The main increase in the number of cases is in the Limpopo District, South Africa. The Limpopo District is bordering Botswana explaining the alert from the Botswana health authorities. The report also mentions the recent heavy rains in the region and ProMED has recently reported increased number of cases in northern Namibia as well as 3 fatal cases of malaria in Gauteng Province, South Africa. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/169>.]
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