Date: Sat 27 Apr 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]
<https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/04/two-people-dead-in-canadian-salmonella-outbreak-linked-to-celebrate-brand-frozen-profiteroles-and-eclairs-from-thailand/>

Frozen profiteroles and mini eclairs sold in grocery stores are the apparent sources of 2 deaths among at least 73 lab-confirmed cases of _Salmonella_ Enteritidis infections in Canada as of 27 Apr 2019, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). The outbreak, which was 1st announced on 5 Apr 2019, has spread to 6 Canadian provinces: British Columbia (27), Alberta (12), Saskatchewan (9), Manitoba (10), Ontario (13) and Quebec (2).

The outbreak began in early November 2018 and remains ongoing, with the most recent case having been reported in late March 2019. Outbreak victims range in age between 1 and 88 years. PHAC has not determined whether _Salmonella_ was a contributing factor in either of the deaths. A total of 19 outbreak victims have been hospitalized.

Many of the victims reported eating Celebrate brand classic/classical or eggnog-flavoured profiteroles or mini chocolate eclairs purchased at various grocery stores before becoming ill. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued a Food Recall Warning for certain Celebrate brand products.

The implicated products were manufactured in Thailand by Mountain Mist (The Belgian Baker) Thailand Ltd. and distributed in Canada by Retail Resource Services Inc., located in Beaumont, Alberta, Canada (Retail Resource). All lot codes of the following Celebrate brand products have been recalled so far. CFIA warns that more products may be recalled, depending on the outcome of its food safety investigation.

Mini Chocolate Eclairs, 365 g (UPC 8 858762 720047)
Classical Profiteroles / Classic Profiteroles, 325 g (UPC 8 858762
720009)
Egg Nog Profiteroles, 375 g (UPC 8 858762 720016)
Classic Foodservice Profiteroles, 4 kg (no UPC)
Pineapple Foodservice Profiteroles, 4 kg (no UPC)
Coconut Foodservice Profiteroles, 4 kg (no UPC)
Passionfruit Foodservice Profiteroles, 4 kg (no UPC)
Mango Foodservice Profiteroles, 4 kg (no UPC)

The recalled products were sold in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and may have been distributed elsewhere in Canada.

PHAC advises consumers to take the following precautions if they have purchased or been given one of the recalled products:

- Do not eat recalled Celebrate brand profiteroles (cream puffs) or mini chocolate eclairs.
- Throw them out immediately and properly wash and sanitize any containers that were used to store these products before using them again.
- If you have any profiteroles or mini eclair products without the original packaging and are unsure if these products are included in this advice, throw them out just to be safe.
- Wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds immediately following contact with any of the identified Celebrate brand products.
- Do not prepare food for other people if you think you are sick with a _Salmonella_ infection or suffering from any other contagious illness causing diarrhoea.  [Byline: Phyllis Entis]
==========================
[The source of this outbreak is likely to be eggs used in the pastries. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Canada: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/12>]
Date: Sun, 28 Apr 2019 22:11:14 +0200

Montreal, April 28, 2019 (AFP) - Over 6,500 people were told to quickly leave their homes near Montreal late Saturday and early Sunday after floodwaters breached a dike in rain-soaked eastern Canada.   The evacuations came as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called for increased measures to make infrastructure "climate resilient."   The flooding across Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick "highlights how important it is that we fight climate change, that we adapt and mitigate the impacts of more extreme weather events," he said.

According to the latest government data, nearly 8,000 people have been forced from their homes in Quebec -- more than in 2017, during what was then the area's worst flooding in half a century.   The barrier protecting Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, just west of Montreal, gave way Saturday night, causing a surge of water of up to 1.5 meters (five feet) to crash through the area.   "We didn't have time to do anything, the water rose while were chatting, I just had time to take my medication," one resident told public broadcaster
Radio-Canada.

Hundreds of policemen, firefighters and soldiers helped evacuate nearly 2,600 homes in the area, a provincial police spokesman said.   "It's going very well. Thankfully no one was injured, no one is missing," Sergeant Daniel Thibodeau said.   Around 1,700 soldiers have been deployed to the hardest-hit regions -- and Montreal and Ottawa declared states of emergency last week.

In Fredericton, New Brunswick, crews have been busy hauling away driftwood and debris as waters start to recede. More than 400 households were flooded in the province, and the main highway connecting to the rest of Canada remained closed.   In Ottawa, a bridge connecting the capital to Gatineau, Quebec was closed and 18 residents fled their flooded homes.   Trudeau was in the Ottawa area on Saturday for a briefing from emergency management officials -- where he helped to fill sandbags with his young son.
Date: Thu, 25 Apr 2019 23:52:16 +0200

Ottawa, April 25, 2019 (AFP) - Ottawa's mayor declared a state of emergency in the Canadian capital on Thursday in anticipation of rising flood waters and heavy rains.   No homes have been evacuated, but authorities expect waters along the Ottawa River to rise above levels in 2017 that saw the worst floods in Eastern Canada in half a century.   Environment Canada issued a special weather statement predicting up to 35 millimetres (1.3 inches) of rain by Saturday morning. Together with the snowmelt that feeds the river, waters are expected to rise up to 11 centimetres (4.3 inches) above peak levels reached in May 2017.

In addition to assistance from the province of Ontario with management of the emergency situation, some 400 troops will be deployed on Friday to key areas to help fill sandbags.   "We can no longer do it alone," Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson told a news conference. "We are now beyond our city's capacity, and that is why we have called in the armed forces."   Ottawa suburban neighbourhoods most at risk include Cumberland, Britannia and Constance Bay.   Meanwhile, northeast of the city a hydroelectric dam on the Rouge River in Quebec province overflowed, prompting the emergency evacuation of some 50 area homes.   Due to its risk of breach, an alert was issued for communities downriver. The Rouge feeds into the Ottawa River east of the capital.
Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2019 01:55:28 +0200

Montreal, April 21, 2019 (AFP) - Flooding in eastern Canada forced the evacuation of more than 1,500 people while over 600 troops have been deployed in response, authorities said Sunday.   Warming weather over the Easter weekend has brought spring floods due to heavy rains and snowmelt from Ontario to southern Quebec and New Brunswick.

Authorities, who initially feared a repeat of catastrophic 2017 floods in Quebec, the worst in half a century, appeared more confident about the situation on Sunday.   "We are optimistic about the coming days," civil security spokesman Eric Houde told AFP.   "There will be significant floods but overall not at the level of 2017, except in certain areas like Lake St Pierre," a widening of the St Lawrence River in Quebec, he added.   "The big difference from 2017 is the level of preparation of municipalities and citizens."

Over the past several days, towns have mobilized volunteers and distributed hundreds of thousands of sandbags to erect barriers or protect houses in threatened areas.   The areas most affected were around Ottawa, and Beauce, a region south of Quebec City where nearly 800 people were evacuated. More than 1,200 homes had been affected by the flooding in Quebec by late Sunday.

The provincial governments of Quebec and New Brunswick asked for reinforcements from the military.    About 200 soldiers had deployed in Quebec by late Saturday, and 400 others near Ottawa, in Laval north of Montreal and in Trois-Rivieres between Montreal and Quebec City.   About 120 additional soldiers stood at the ready to be mobilized in New Brunswick.   On Saturday, the flooding claimed its first victim in the municipality of Pontiac, west of Ottawa: a man in his seventies who did not see that a bridge had been washed away, and plunged his car into the stream below.
Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2019 01:08:11 +0200

Montreal, April 21, 2019 (AFP) - The bodies of three world-renowned professional mountaineers -- two Austrians and an American -- were found Sunday after they went missing during an avalanche on a western Canadian summit, the national parks agency said.   American Jess Roskelley, 36, and Hansjorg Auer, 35, and David Lama, 28, of Austria went missing late Tuesday at Banff National Park. Authorities launched an aerial search the next day.   The three men were attempting to climb the east face of Howse Pass, an isolated and highly difficult route.

They were part of a team of experienced athletes sponsored by American outdoor equipment firm The North Face.   "Parks Canada extends our sincere condolences to their families, friends and loved ones," the agency said in a statement.   "We would also like to acknowledge the impact that this has had on the tight-knit, local and international climbing communities. Our thoughts are with families, friends and all those who have been affected by this tragic incident."

Roskelley was the son of John Roskelley, who was also considered one of the best mountaineers of his own generation.   Father and son had climbed Mount Everest together in 2003. At the time, the younger Roskelley was only 20 years old, and became the youngest mountaineer to climb the planet's highest mountain above sea level.   Auer and Lama, from Tyrol in Austria, were also considered among the best mountaineers of the times.
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