diDate: Mon 3 Jun 2019
Source: FM1 Today [in German, machine trans., edited]
<https://www.fm1today.ch/q-fieber-hat-mehrere-faelle-von-lungenentzuendungen-verursacht/1058594>

Several cases of pneumonia have occurred in the Ticino Maggia Valley in recent weeks. Those affected have been infected with Q fever. The situation is, however, under the control of the health authorities.

Q fever is transmitted by a bacterium found in goats. The Ticino health authorities have therefore ordered the vaccination of exposed animals. In addition, the transport of the animals from one farm to another was prohibited.

Infection with goat milk is considered very unlikely. Even from person to person, the disease is not transmitted. Q fever manifests itself with flu-like illnesses, but without a cold or sore throat. In 1-2 percent of cases there are complications.

Q fever is a notifiable disease in Switzerland. Since the beginning of the year [2019] around 50 cases have been reported, 20 of them from Ticino, said Daniel Koch of the Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH).

Therefore, there will be an increase this year [2019] compared to the approximately 40 cases that have occurred on average per year since 2012. In 2012, the disease was again declared as notifiable after 17 cases of illness occurred in the canton of Vaud.

According to Koch, the situation is under control, despite the increased occurrence of illnesses in Ticino. The established monitoring system proved its effectiveness. The last time a major epidemic of Q fever occurred in 1983. At that time, more than 400 people fell ill in Valais.
Date: Sun, 28 Apr 2019 11:34:28 +0200

Geneva, April 28, 2019 (AFP) - Four German hikers have been killed by an avalanche in the Swiss Alps, police in the southern canton of Valais said Sunday.   The accident took place on Friday in the village of Fieschertal, but bad weather prevented rescue services from finding the victim's bodies before Saturday, police said.   All equipped with search beacons, and an investigation into their deaths has been opened, they added.
Date: Mon 1 Apr 2019
Source: Swiss Info [abridged, edited]
<https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/public-health_rise-in-measles-cases-in-switzerland-/44865680>

The Federal Office of Public Health external link said on Monday [1 Apr 2019] that 55 cases of measles were reported in March [2019], nearly twice the number of cases registered at the beginning of the year [2019].

In all, 97 cases have been recorded in 2019, the office said. This compares to 15 cases during the same 3-month period at the start of last year [2018]. In 2018, there were a total of 48 measles cases, and in 2017, there were 105.

In the World Health Organization external link (WHO)'s European  region, which covers nearly 900 million people, some 82,600 in 47 countries contracted measles last year [2018], the highest number this decade. Of those, 72 cases were fatal. The worst-affected countries were Ukraine (53,000 cases), followed by Serbia (5076), Israel (2919), France (2913), Russia (2256), Italy (2517), Georgia (2203), and Greece (2193). Six of the 53 countries did not report.

The record number in Europe is partly due to a growing number of pockets where parents are refusing vaccination for their children, the WHO said in February [2019]. At the same time, the WHO said, record numbers of children are getting the vaccine, offering hope that the rise in infections may not last.

In 1987, the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health announced a vaccination strategy that it hoped would eradicate measles by the year 2000. To eradicate measles, the WHO advocates a vaccination coverage of 95% of the population. Swiss coverage is currently below this at 87% for 2-year-olds and 93% for 16-year-olds.

In Switzerland, there are large differences between cantons, with more urban cantons reaching a near-100% level, while rural areas score much lower, with the lowest vaccination rate in the tiny canton of Appenzell Inner Rhodes at 82%.
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[HealthMap/ProMED map of Switzerland:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/105>. - ProMED Mod.MPP]
Date: Mon 25 Feb 2019
Source: Swissinfo.ch [abridged, edited]
<https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/infectious-disease_why-some-swiss-people-still-get-measles/44774826>

Measles, a potentially deadly virus, is still breaking out in Switzerland, despite the availability of vaccinations.

At the beginning of February 2019, 60 children who had not been vaccinated were sent home after measles erupted in the Steiner School in the town of Biel. Families with an anthroposophical lifestyle, as advocated by Rudolf Steiner, are often restrictive with vaccinations because of the purported benefits of getting a disease naturally. Many others fear the side effects of vaccines more than the underlying diseases that they protect against. Daniel Koch, head of the infectious diseases department at the Swiss Federal Health Officeexternal link (BAG) assures the public that bad reactions are rare and that the effects of measles are much worse.

In 2018 there were 48 measles cases in Switzerland, but in an epidemic year, figures can rise to well over 1000 sufferers (1112 in 2009). To eradicate it, WHO advocates a vaccination coverage of 95% of the population. Swiss coverage is below this at 94%.

There are large differences between Swiss cantons, with more urban cantons reaching a near 100% level, while rural areas score much lower, with the lowest vaccination rate in the tiny canton of Appenzell Inner Rhodes at 82%.
Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 21:26:43 +0100

Geneva, Feb 19, 2019 (AFP) - An avalanche left four skiers injured Tuesday at a resort in the Swiss Alps where rescue operations went on after dark with police fearing people could still be trapped under the snow.   The authorities held a press conference to announce the injuries, including one person seriously hurt, after local reports said up to a dozen people were engulfed by the avalanche.   Police officers said that based on witness reports other skiers could still be buried and the search would continue into the night.

Swiss RTS television said the army had set up lighting to aid the 240 rescue workers at the site.   The police had earlier tweeted that several people were under the avalanche that hit early afternoon on a slope 2,600 metres (8,600 feet) up at Crans-Montana, which was busy with skiers during school holidays.   A local newspaper, Le Nouvelliste, had quoted the head of Crans-Montana's municipal government, Nicolas Feraud, as estimating that "between 10 and 12 people" were buried under the snow.   "We are shocked and hope for good news about these people," Feraud was quoted as saying. 

A first attempt at locating victims using sniffer dogs was unsuccessful, a rescue worker told Le Nouvelliste, with four helicopters joining the search from the air.   Pierre Huguenin, of the Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research, described the snow in the area as damp and dense.   According to statistics from his institute, after 15 minutes under an avalanche, the chances of survival are no more than 50 percent.   Le Nouvelliste said the avalanche swept over 300 to 400 metres (yards) of the lower section of the Kandahar piste.   It quoted rescue workers as saying the snow was compacted and more than two metres (seven feet) thick.

Crans-Montana's website had listed the risk of an avalanche at two on a scale that runs from one (lowest risk) to five.    As the victims were on a designated ski slope, they were unlikely to have detector equipment to help rescue workers locate them.   The vast majority of deadly avalanches in the Alpine nation hit people skiing off-piste.    "We don't know yet whether the avalanche detached by itself or was set off by skiers, or a rockfall," Swiss avalanche expert Robert Bolognesi told the daily 20 Minutes.
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