Date: Wed 14 Aug 2019
Source: Universitat Hohenheim [in German, trans. Britta Lassmann, edited]
<https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/pressemitteilung?tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=44374>

The University of Hohenheim and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology [IMB] have detected spotted fever in a hyalomma tick, the 1st time such a tick is suspected to have caused disease in a human in Germany.

This tick feeds on humans and can transmit a form of spotted fever in Germany. What were still unanswered questions about the tropical giant tick hyalomma is now certainty. At the beginning of August [2019], it was suspected that for the 1st time, a human in Germany had contracted a disease with the typical symptoms of rickettsiosis from the bite of a hyalomma tick. Experts from the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart and the IMB in Munich were able to detect the pathogen _Rickettsia aeschlimannii_ in the tick. The number of hyalomma ticks in Germany increased significantly in 2019 compared to the previous year [2018]. In nearly half of the hyalomma ticks, _R. aeschlimannii_ can be detected. The tick researchers continue to ask the population to send them suspicious ticks.

It was probably no coincidence that this 1st case was in a horse owner. Tropical ticks of the genus _Hyalomma_ feed on large mammals. For several years, these ticks have been on the rise in Germany. Now tick researchers report the 1st suspected case of spotted fever transmitted in Germany. "Not only do we now know for sure that the hyalomma tick is also targeting humans," says Prof Dr Med Ute Mackenstedt, a parasitologist at the University of Hohenheim, "but also that there is the urgent suspicion that the transmission of spotted fever by these ticks is actually possible here in Germany."

The case: At the end of July [2019], the horse owner from near Siegen was bitten by a hyalomma tick. He sent the tick to the tick researcher in Hohenheim. He then presented to the hospital only a few days later with severe symptoms. Spotted fever caused by the bacterium _R. aeschlimannii_ was suspected. The tick was sent by courier service to the IMB in Munich, where the pathogen was detected in the tick. Thereafter, the patient received targeted antibiotic therapy, and his symptoms rapidly improved.

"We are talking about a suspected case, because direct detection of the pathogen from the patient was not possible," explains PD Dr Med Gerhard Dobler, medical doctor at the IMB. "The treatment of the patient came 1st. But the preceding tick bite, the typical symptoms
and, above all, the proof of the pathogen in the tick suggest that the case was spotted fever. The fact that the patient responded to targeted antibiotic therapy further supports this."

_R. aeschlimannii_ causes a feverish infection with headache and muscle pain, extreme joint pain, and a burning sensation. Typical for the disease, however, is the rash that gave the disease its name. This classic sign shows mainly on the extremities. The incubation period is about one week.

"If spotted fever is suspected after a hyalomma bite, a swab should be taken from the bite site and sent for examination," advises PD Dobler. "If there are questions, you are welcome to contact us. Ideally, we would also like to examine the tick."

About half of the hyalomma ticks, the researchers say, are infected with rickettsia. Transmission takes place exclusively via tick bite. "The number of hyalomma ticks in Germany is significantly higher this year [2019] than in the previous year [2018]," reports Prof Dr Med Mackenstedt, referencing the publication in which the situation was presented in 2018. The Hohenheim parasitologist not only cooperates closely with the IMB in Munich, but also with the working group of Prof Dr Med Christina Strube at the Veterinary University (TiHo) Hannover. "Together they already have found 50 such ticks in Germany in 2019. Last year [2018] there were a total of 35." Last year, these ticks had survived the winter in Germany for the 1st time.

"Rickettsia are the only pathogens that we have been able to detect so far," explains PD Dr. Dobler. "We have not found the virus that causes the dangerous Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever, nor the pathogens _Theileria equi_ and _Babesia caballi_, both of which can be transmitted from ticks to horses."

The research team continues to ask the population for support to further explore the spread and potential dangers. In case of a tick bite, it's best to remove the tick with a tick remover, TickCard, or tweezers. Then send the animal in a small, tightly closed container to:
University of Hohenheim
Prof. Dr. Ute Mackenstedt
Department of Parasitology
Emil-Wolff-Strasse 34
70599 Stuttgart

Background: Tick genus _Hyalomma_
_Hyalomma marginatum_ and _Hyalomma rufipes_ are native to the dry and semi-arid areas of Africa, Asia, and southern Europe. Until recently, they did not occur in central and northern Europe. Their striped legs are striking, and they are much larger than the native ixodes ticks.

The adult ticks feed on large animals. They are active hunters and move quickly towards their host. They cover a distance of up to 100 m [328 ft]. Humans can serve as hosts. In contrast, tick larvae and nymphs mainly infest birds and small mammals and can stay up to 28 days with their hosts. Migratory birds can introduce larvae and nymphs to Germany.

In Eurasia, both _Hyalomma_ species are considered transmitters of the Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and the Arabic hemorrhagic fever virus (Alkhumra virus). They also transmit the bacterium _Rickettsia aeschlimannii_, which causes a form of spotted fever.

Reference:
Chitimia-Dobler L, et al. Imported _Hyalomma_ ticks in Germany in 2018. Parasites & Vectors. 2019; 12 (134).
<https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-019-3380-4>.

More information:
Picture and video material [in German]
<https://zecken.uni-hohenheim.de/>
Press release: Tropical ticks in Germany: University of Hohenheim asks to send conspicuous tick finds [in German]
<https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/pressemitteilung?tx_ttnews[tt_news]=42880>
Press release: Tropical ticks: New immigrant species winters in Germany for the 1st time [in German]
<https://www.uni-hohenheim.de/pressemitteilung?tx_ttnews[tt_news]=43734>
-----------------------------------
communicated by:
Roland Hubner
Superior Health Council
Brussels
Belgium
roland.hubner@sante.belgique.be
====================
[Given that the ticks were found last year (2018) and that they overwintered and were found again this year (2019), it is likely that this genus of tick is becoming established in Germany. Although the species of _Hyalomma_ that infected the man with _Rickettsia aeschlimannii_ was not determined, there is a clear association of this rickettsia with the 2 species of _Hyalomma_ that were tested. The published report cited above states, "35 ticks with an unusual appearance or behaviour were reported to us during summer-autumn 2018. For 17 of them, the description or photos implied that they belong to the hard tick genus _Hyalomma_. The remaining 18 ticks were sent to us and were identified as adult _Hyalomma marginatum_ (10 specimens) or adult _Hyalomma rufipes_ (8 specimens). All ticks tested negative for CCHF virus, _Coxiella burnetii_, _Coxiella_-like organisms, _Babesia_ spp. and _Theileria_ spp. The screening for rickettsiae gave positive results in 9 specimens. The _Rickettsia_ species in all cases was identified as _R. aeschlimannii_." Given that these ticks can be transported by birds migrating from Africa, continued surveillance in Germany for the rickettsia and the other pathogens that were not found currently is prudent. - ProMED Mod.TY]

The first human case of _R. aeschlimannii_ infection was identified in a patient who had fever, rash, and an eschar similar to _R. conori_ infection (Mediaterrian spotted fever) after travel in Morocco (1). _R. aeschlimannii_ infections in humans have been previously confirmed in South Africa, in Algeria, and in Tunisia (2). To our knowledge, the first human case of _R. aeschlimannii_ infection reported in Europe occurred in Greece and was reported in 2013 (3).

1. Raoult D, Fournier PE, Abboud P, Caron F. First documented human Rickettsia aeschlimannii infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2002; 8: 748-9. doi: 10.3201/eid0807.010480
2. Demoncheaux JP, Socolovschi C, Davoust B, Haddad S, Raoult D, Parola P. First detection of _Rickettsia aeschlimanii_ in _Hyalomma dromedarii_ ticks in Tunisia. Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2012; 3: 398-402.
3. Germanakis A, Chochlakis D, Angelakis E, Tselentis Y, Psaroulaki A. _Rickettsia aeschlimannii_ infection in a man, Greece. Emerg Infect Dis. 2013; 19: 1176-7.  - ProMED Mod. LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Germany:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/101>.]
Date: Thu 1 Aug 2019
Source: Deutsche Welle [edited]
<http://www.dw.com/en/tuberculosis-outbreak-at-german-school-infects-over-100/a-49854829>

An unusually high number of students and teachers at a school in southwestern Germany have been infected with tuberculosis. Health officials are scouring the school for clues about why the disease spread.

Health officials on Thursday [1 Aug 2019] examined a school in the southwestern German town of Bad Schonborn where a tuberculosis outbreak has infected dozens of children and adults.

A total of 109 students, teachers and other school employees have been infected, the district administration of Karlsruhe said. Four people, including at least 2 students, have active cases of tuberculosis. That means they are presenting symptoms and could be contagious. The actively sick students have been removed from the school and are receiving medical treatment, the district administration said.

"We cannot rule out the possibility that there will be new cases of active illness," Ulrich Wagner from the Karlsruhe health department told the Badische Neueste Nachrichten newspaper.

At the beginning of July [2019], 2 children at 2 different schools in Bad Schonborn were found to have active tuberculosis. Since then, the number of infected people has continued to rise, particularly at the Michael Ende Gemeinschaftsschule, where a student in the 8th grade was initially infected. Officials said that some 56 students in the 8th grade -- 88% of the entire class -- are currently infected.

The case is concerning because several children from different grades as well as teachers who would not have been greatly exposed to the 8th grade students have also tested positive for the infection.

Health officials are now examining the school's classrooms to determine how the bacteria were able to spread to so many people, local public broadcaster SWR reported.

Local officials emphasized that tuberculosis is a treatable and curable illness, adding that not everyone who is infected with the disease will become sick.

Tuberculosis is caused by bacteria that spread from person to person through tiny droplets released into the air by coughing and sneezing. When active, tuberculosis most often affects the lungs -- resulting in chest pain, fever, weight loss, and coughing that lasts for weeks. Sometimes blood is coughed up. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that around a quarter of the world's population is infected with latent tuberculosis -- meaning they are not actively ill and cannot transmit the disease.

The WHO says that those who are infected with tuberculosis bacteria have a 5% to 15% chance of becoming sick.
=====================
[The news report above says that a total of 109 students, teachers and other school employees at possibly 2 schools in Bad Schonborn have been infected, but only 4 of the 109 people, including at least 2 students, have active cases of tuberculosis (TB), the others presumably having latent tuberculous infection (LTBI). LTBI is a non-contagious form of TB and is detected by tuberculin skin testing or interferon-gamma release assays.

We are told that the 2 students with active TB are at 2 different schools in Bad Schonborn, but we are not told anything about the 2 adults with active TB; adults are usually thought to be better disseminators of TB than young children. A total of 56 of the students in the 8th grade -- 88% of the entire class at one of the schools -- are infected, but the source for this outbreak has not as yet been identified.

Although transmission of tuberculosis is thought to usually require close, repeated or prolonged contact with a contagious individual in a poorly ventilated environment, such as households, homeless shelters or schools, outbreaks of cases with TB due to genetically linked TB strains who do not have anything in common other than living in the same neighborhood or using the same public facilities such as food markets or cybercafes at a shopping mall have been described. See ProMED-mail posts Tuberculosis, MDR - Singapore (03): (AMK) linked to 2012 cybercafe outbreak http://promedmail.org/post/20160622.4302632 and Tuberculosis - China: (SH) neighborhood transmission, residents, migrants http://promedmail.org/post/20180428.5771588.

Bad Schonborn, with a population of 13 028 residents, is a town in northern Karlsruhe district in Baden-Wurttemberg, a state in southwest Germany
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Schonborn>).

A map showing the location of Bad Schonborn can be found at
<https://www.google.com/maps/place/76669+Bad+Schonborn,+Germany>.

More information on this outbreak would be appreciated from knowledgeable sources. - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/61075>]
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2019 12:56:26 +0200

Berlin, July 17, 2019 (AFP) - Germany will make childhood measles vaccinations mandatory from March 2020, aiming to wipe out the resurgent and potentially deadly disease, Chancellor Angela Merkel's cabinet decided Wednesday.   Children will only be admitted to kindergarten or school if they have had the jabs, and vaccinations will also be compulsory for staff in day-care centres, educational institutions, medical facilities and refugee shelters.   "We want to protect as many children as possible from a measles infection," said Health Minister Jens Spahn, who is aiming for at least 95 percent coverage.

Violations will lead to fines of up to 2,500 euros ($2,800) under the bill that is expected to pass easily through the Bundestag lower house of parliament.   Germany's paediatricians' association has long demanded mandatory childhood vaccinations against measles and a range of other diseases.   The UN World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that global efforts to increase immunisation coverage against deadly diseases are stagnating.

Last year, 350,000 cases of measles were reported worldwide, more than double the number for 2017.   And they increased fourfold globally in the first quarter of 2019 compared to the same period last year, according to WHO.   Germany recorded 543 cases last year, and hundreds so far this year.   The resurgence of the disease in some countries has been blamed on the so-called "anti-vax" movement, which is largely based on a 1998 publication linking the measles vaccine and autism that has since been debunked.
Date: Tue, 2 Jul 2019 13:38:57 +0200

Schwerin, Germany, July 2, 2019 (AFP) - German fire-fighters were Tuesday battling a huge forest blaze ripping through a former military training area littered with unexploded munitions dating back to the Nazi era.   Hundreds of emergency personnel -- backed by helicopters, army vehicles and police water canon -- have been fighting the flames and evacuated four nearby villages with a total of over 1,000 residents in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania state.   The acrid smell from the blaze, the largest recorded in the ex-communist northeastern state, has drifted as far as Berlin, 200 kilometres (125 miles) away, as much of Europe swelters in blistering summer temperatures.

The German army on Tuesday sent in armoured vehicles to clear pathways of dangerous unexploded ordnance (UXO) so that fire engines can enter the burning region that measured some 600 hectares (1,400 acres).   The former military training ground near the town of Luebtheen is littered with bombs, grenades and bullets from the Nazi era's Wehrmacht, the former Soviet army, and from reunited Germany's Bundeswehr.   Tests in the past had unearthed more than 45 tonnes of UXO per hectare, state environment minister Till Backhaus told local newspaper the Ostsee Zeitung, adding: "I pray to God that he sends us rain, as quickly as possible."
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2019 17:57:30 +0200
By Clare BYRNE

Paris, June 25, 2019 (AFP) - As Europe sizzled Tuesday at the start of a heatwave tipped to break records, drivers on Germany's famously speedy motorways were ordered to slow down and fans at the women's World Cup were showered in health warnings.

Meteorologists blamed a blast of torrid air from the Sahara for the unusually early summer heatwave, which could send thermometers above 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) in some places on Thursday and Friday.   Experts say such heatwaves early in the summer are likely to be more frequent as the planet heats up -- a phenomenon that scientists have shown to be driven by human use of fossil fuels.

In Germany, where forecasters have warned a June record of 38.5 degrees could be smashed, speed restrictions were placed on some stretches of "autobahns" as the unusually warm weather raised the risks of "blow-ups" -- the hot tarmac breaking up and shredding tyres.   A forest fire was raging north of Cottbus, the second-largest city in Brandenburg state, in an area that was just recovering from a fire in 2018.   It was deemed especially dangerous due to the risk of unexploded ammunition left in the area, which is home to a military training facility.

- 'Hell is coming' -
In Spain, TV weather presenter Silvia Laplana riffed on the doom-filled catchphrase "Winter is coming" from the blockbuster series Game of Thrones to describe what lay in store for the country.   "El infierno (hell) is coming," she tweeted alongside a weather map which showed most of the country coloured scarlet later in the week.   "Of course it's hot in summer but when you have a heatwave that is so extensive and intense, during which records are forecast to be beaten, it's NOT normal," she tweeted.   Temperatures are expected to be particularly sweltering in the northeast of Spain, with a stifling 45 degrees expected Friday in the city of Girona, and 44 degrees in Zaragoza at the weekend.   Five northern provinces were placed on an orange high alert for a heatwave on Wednesday, with another five to be added by the weekend.

- 'Overdoing' the warnings? -
Authorities were also taking no chances in France, where a heatwave in August 2003 was blamed for 15,000 deaths, many of them elderly people who were left to fend for themselves.   In a highly unusual move, Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer on Monday postponed national school exams to next week. Paris authorities have banned older models of diesel and petrol cars from Paris on Wednesday, fearing a build-up of pollution.   Health Minister Agnes Buzyn denied the government was being excessively vigilant.   "For all those who know (the risks), obviously it's too much, but if I can avoid unnecessary deaths, I will continue to communicate about prevention," Buzyn told LCI television, referring to the warnings on radio, TV and public transport.

The Red Cross meanwhile urged people to check on vulnerable neighbours, relatives and friends, saying the "coming days will be challenging for a lot of people, but especially older people, young children, and people with underlying illnesses or limited mobility."   Players and spectators at the women's football World Cup taking place in cities around France were also being inundated with messages about keeping hydrated.   In a rare gesture by FIFA on Monday evening, fans were allowed to bring their own bottles of water into the Paris stadium where Sweden took on Canada.   Phil Neville, the England coach, was sanguine about the impact of the weather on the tournament, however.   "There's no excuse, the players are ready for it."

Meanwhile, French beekeepers and farming groups said they were bracing for a "catastrophic" honey harvest this year after frost damage in winter, an unusually rainy spring, and, now, unusually high temperatures.   "In the hives, there is nothing to eat, beekeepers are having to feed them with syrup because they risk dying from hunger," added the union, which represents many small farms in honey-producing regions.   In the Baltic region of northeast Europe, crowds have flocked to lakes and rivers to cool down, leading to a spike in drownings.    Twenty-seven people were reporte to have drowned so far in Lithuania where the temperature soared to an unusual high of 35.7 degrees Celsius.
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