Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2019 10:48:29 +0100 (MET)

Frankfurt am Main, Dec 30, 2019 (AFP) - Cabin crew at Lufthansa subsidiary Germanwings began a planned three-day strike Monday with their union warning the industrial dispute could last longer.   Daniel Flohr, deputy head of air stewards' union UFO, told public broadcaster ZDF "we could prolong it at short notice", failing concessions from bosses, although "we don't want that".

A live list on the carrier's website showed 182 flights between major German cities like Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg and Munich were slashed as UFO called members off the job.   Some connections to neighbouring Austria and Switzerland, including Zurich and Vienna, were also cut.   Set to be folded into Eurowings over the long term, Germanwings operates flights on behalf of the larger Lufthansa subsidiary.   Around 15 percent of Eurowings flights over the three-day period were affected by the walkout, a company spokesman told AFP.

The situation at major airports was "calm" with "no queues," he said, as many passengers had been able to book on trains or other Lufthansa group airlines.   "People were well informed" about the strike, the spokesman added. "We hope things stay this stable."   Frankfurt airport -- Germany's largest -- also said on its website Monday was a "normal day" with "occasional short waits at security checks".

Germanwings bosses judge the strike over rules governing part-time work unjustified.   The dispute has already seen a brief "warning strike" at four Lufthansa subsidiaries, while the group's flagship airline suffered a two-day walkout affecting 1,500 flights and 200,000 passengers in November.
Date: Fri, 27 Dec 2019 20:21:08 +0100 (MET)

Frankfurt am Main, Dec 27, 2019 (AFP) - A German cabin crew union on Friday called a three-day strike at Lufthansa subsidiary Germanwings, plunging passengers into turmoil over the busy end-of-year holiday as it ramps up a bitter row over pay and conditions.   The UFO union said Germanwings employees would strike from 2300 GMT on Sunday until 2300 GMT on Wednesday as talks with bosses remain deadlocked.   The strike period covers New Year's Eve and the January 1 public holiday.   "We are deliberately announcing the strike early so Germanwings passengers have a chance to book flights with other airlines or make alternative travel plans," said UFO vice-chairman Daniel Flohr in a video message.

The union stopped short of announcing a fresh stoppage at flagship carrier Lufthansa itself, but warned that more strike calls could follow from January 2.   Flohr said UFO took stoppages at this time of year -- when many people are travelling to meet friends and family -- "very seriously".   But Germanwings management had "given its employees no clear options for the future," he argued.   A Lufthansa spokesman had earlier condemned the union's latest strike threats, saying "this is no way to resolve the conflict".   Board member Detlef Kayser said in a statement that "UFO has refused for weeks to put concrete demands in writing."

- Increasingly bitter -
Lufthansa and UFO have for months been locked in an increasingly bitter dispute that has triggered repeated walkouts.   A 48-hour stoppage at the main Lufthansa brand led to 1,500 cancellations at German airports in November, affecting 200,000 passengers.   A one-day warning strike in October prompted several dozen flight cancellations at Lufthansa subsidiaries Eurowings, Germanwings, SunExpress and Lufthansa CityLine.   As well as demanding higher wages, especially for entry-level jobs, the UFO union is seeking better benefits and easier routes into long-term contracts.    Lufthansa for a long time refused to discuss the demands, claiming the union no longer had the right to represent its 22,000 cabin crew employees owing to an internal leadership struggle.   The company even challenged UFO's legal status in court.

But the group changed its stance during November's massive strike, agreeing to arbitration with UFO leaders and two mediators.   The UFO union on Sunday said those talks "had failed".   Both sides have agreed to keep details of the talks confidential but German media reported they could not even agree on which topics should be covered by the arbitration.   Aside from pushing its demands for better pay, UFO is reportedly also seeking assurances that certain staff members will not face disciplinary action over the strikes.   Lufthansa said it was putting its hopes in a fresh round of talks proposed by the mediators for January, but UFO denied a new date had been agreed.
Date: Sun, 22 Dec 2019 19:14:14 +0100 (MET)

Frankfurt am Main, Dec 22, 2019 (AFP) - A German cabin crew union on Sunday threatened Lufthansa with fresh walkouts after Christmas as discussions to resolve a bitter dispute over pay and conditions failed to make progress.   Speaking after the latest round of arbitration talks, the UFO union said efforts to come up with a "credible and legally secure" resolution with the help of independent mediators had failed.

While there would be no walkouts on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day or Boxing Day, "we could now announce a strike at any time," vice-chairman Daniel Flohr told reporters at Frankfurt airport.   Lufthansa flight attendants staged a massive 48-hour strike last month that led to 1,500 flight cancellations at German airports, affecting some 200,000 passengers.   As well as demanding higher wages, especially for entry-level jobs, the union is seeking better benefits and easier routes into long-term contracts.

Lufthansa for a long time refused to discuss the demands, claiming the union no longer rightfully represented staff after an internal leadership struggle. It even challenged UFO's legal status in court.   But Germany's flagship carrier changed its stance during November's stoppage, agreeing to arbitration with UFO leaders and two independent mediators.   Lufthansa on Sunday said it continued to expect that through arbitration "good solutions can be found" for its 22,000 cabin crew employees.   The mediators have proposed fresh talks in early January, according to DPA news agency.

Neither side gave details about the discussions, but German media have reported that UFO is seeking guarantees that flight attendants won't face disciplinary action over the strikes.   Four of the Lufthansa group's smaller, subsidiary airlines have also walked out in the long-running battle for better wages.   A one-day warning strike in October led to several dozen flight cancellations at Eurowings, Germanwings, SunExpress and Lufthansa CityLine.
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 15:13:02 +0100 (MET)
By Michelle FITZPATRICK

Frankfurt am Main, Nov 7, 2019 (AFP) - Tens of thousands of Lufthansa passengers faced disruptions Thursday as cabin crew in Germany staged a "massive" 48-hour walkout in the biggest escalation yet of a bitter row over pay and conditions.   The strike called by Germany's UFO flight attendants' union started at 2300 GMT on Wednesday and was to last until 2300 GMT on Friday.

Lufthansa said it had scrapped 700 flights on Thursday and some 600 the following day, warning that "around 180,000 passengers will be affected" across Germany.   The UFO union argued that the stoppage was necessary because negotiations with Lufthansa bosses were deadlocked.   But it accepted a surprise olive branch offered by Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr on Thursday, and agreed to preliminary talks over the weekend.    The current strike would carry on as planned "but would not for now be expanded", UFO said on its website.   Lufthansa said it regretted the inconvenience to passengers and stressed that it was working "to minimise the impact of this massive strike on our customers".

The carrier was running an alternative flight schedule where possible, and said passengers could rebook their journeys for free or swap their flights for train tickets.  Knut Kress, a passenger at a quieter than usual Munich airport, voiced support for the flight attendants.   "It's good that there are still unions defending something," he told AFP. But 48 hours "is a long time", he added.   Fellow traveller Birgit Kellner complained about the lack of notice for passengers.   "They should inform passengers a little earlier, not just two days before."   The walkout is UFO's biggest call to action since a week-long strike in 2015 hit Lufthansa with mass cancellations.   It is also seen as a test of strength for the union, weakened by months of infighting that have left Lufthansa questioning its right to speak for cabin crew.

- Internal disputes -
Lufthansa's finance chief Ulrik Svensson declined to put a price tag on the strike but said such stoppages typically cost "between 10 and 20 million" euros per day.   The union already staged a day-long warning strike last month at four Lufthansa subsidiary airlines, causing several dozen flights to be axed at Eurowings, Germanwings, SunExpress and Lufthansa CityLine.

But the flagship Lufthansa brand was spared the upheaval after management offered an unexpected two-percent pay rise to avert the strike.   Since then, however, UFO vice-president Daniel Flohr said no progress had been made in talks.   As well as higher pay for cabin crew across the Lufthansa group, UFO is demanding more benefits and easier routes into long-term contracts for temporary workers.

Lufthansa, however, has long argued that UFO no longer has the right to represent its staff following an internal leadership tussle, and has challenged the union's legal status in court.   But CEO Spohr hinted at a shift in position when he told reporters Thursday Lufthansa wanted to try to resolve the existing legal issues with UFO in the weekend meeting, hoping to then start formal arbitration talks.

UFO's internal disputes have cost it support among the Lufthansa group's 21,000 flight attendants, with some members switching to rival unions.   Separately on Thursday, Lufthansa reported a jump in third-quarter net profits but said it was slashing over 700 jobs at its Austrian Airlines subsidiary as the group seeks to trim costs in the face of fierce competition.
Date: Fri 25 Oct 2019
Source: Berlin Spectator [edited]
<https://berlinspectator.com/2019/10/25/germany-west-nile-virus-spreads-faster-than-anticipated/>

Hundreds of people might be infected with the West Nile virus in Germany, experts believe. As many as 3 Germans have already developed the dangerous illness [caused] by this infection.  A month ago, one West Nile Virus case in Germany was reported. A man had developed the disease in the region around Leipzig. He was suffering from meningitis. When doctors looked for the cause, they discovered he was infected. Since he had not travelled, experts believe he [was] infected by a mosquito.

Now there are 2 more cases. According to German-language media, the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine there are suspected cases in the same region, close to Leipzig. Also there are 2 more confirmed cases of infected patients in Wittenberg, located in the Saxony-Anhalt province, and in Berlin.

The infected person in Berlin is a middle-aged woman. In September [2019], she suffered flu-like symptoms and a rash on her skin, and doctors found out she was infected. Because she had been in Berlin all along, they believe it likely was a mosquito in her case as well.

Before the 3 cases were discovered, the only person who had ever [become] infected with the West Nile virus in Germany was a veterinarian in Bavaria. When his case was investigated, doctors concluded that he was infected while examining a bird.

Because of those 3 patients in Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Berlin who developed the serious and sometimes fatal disease, experts believe the number of infected persons in Germany might be in the hundreds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta (USSA), one in 5 people infected develops fever and other symptoms, while only one in 150 are affected by the far more serious illness the virus can cause.

Animals, especially birds and horses in Germany, have been infected before. The authorities are convinced midges are to blame for spreading the West Nile virus, which originated in regions within Africa. Migrating birds and insects seem to have carried it all the way to Germany.

Researchers believe this situation is only the beginning. They say it is likely that West Nile virus will establish itself in Germany in years to come, especially during summers with excessive heat, the kind of season Germany experienced this year [2019], when both the hottest June day and the hottest day ever were recorded.

The only way to decrease the probability of infection is to avoid mosquito bites as effectively as possible -- for example, by using mosquito repellents. Their bites or direct contact to infected animals seem to be the main ways the virus spreads.  [byline: Imanuel Marcus]
More ...