Date: Wed 12 Jun 2019
Source: New York Times [edited]
<https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/12/travel/dominican-republic-deaths.html>

More than two million Americans visit the Dominican Republic every year, making up about a third of the country's tourists. Six have died in the last year during their visits. Because of the seeming similarities among their deaths, their family members have suggested that they are connected and have raised suspicions about the resorts where they died. Here's what we know, and don't know, about the circumstances.

Who has died, and how?
Yvette Monique Sport, 51, died in June 2018 of a heart attack. Her sister, Felecia Nieves, has said that Ms. Sport had a drink from the minibar in her room at a Bahia Pri­ncipe resort, one of a number on the island, then went to sleep and never woke up.

In July 2018, David Harrison, 45, died at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana. Mr. Harrison died of a heart attack and The Washington Post reported that his death certificate also listed "pulmonary oedema, an accumulation of fluid in the lungs that can cause respiratory failure, and atherosclerosis" as causes of death. He and his wife were in the Dominican Republic for their wedding anniversary with their son.

In April of this year, Robert Wallace became sick at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana, where he was attending a wedding and died. The 67 year old's family said that he became ill after drinking scotch from the minibar in the hotel. Miranda Schaup-Werner, 41, of Allentown, Pa., was celebrating her 10th wedding anniversary when she died at the Luxury Bahia Pri­ncipe Bouganville, on May 25 of this year of a heart attack. She had been at the resort for less than 24 hours.

A few days later, Nathaniel Edward Holmes 63, and Cynthia Ann Day, 49, from Prince George's County, Md., were found dead in their room at the Grand Bahia Pri­ncipe La Romana. The two had recently become engaged. An autopsy found that the couple had respiratory failure and pulmonary oedema.

Are the hotels connected?
Four of the dead were staying at Bahia Pri­ncipe resorts, which are part of a group of 14 hotels in the Dominican Republic that are popular among tourists because they are all-inclusive. The Luxury Bahia Pri­ncipe Bouganville, where Ms. Schaup-Werner died, is less than a five-minute walk away from the Grand Bahia Pri­ncipe La Romana, where Mr. Holmes and Ms. Day died. Both are near the town of San Pedro De Macoris.

The Hard Rock is across the island from the other two hotels in Punta Cana. It is not known which Bahia Principe resort Ms. Sport was staying in.

What are the hotels saying?
In a statement on Friday, Bahia Principe said reports of the deaths had been inaccurate and that the hotel was committed to "collaborating completely with the authorities and hope for a prompt resolution of their inquiries and actions." Hard Rock Hotels & Casinos said in a statement on Tuesday evening that it is waiting for official reports about the deaths and is, "Deeply saddened by these two unfortunate incidents, and we extend our sincerest sympathy to the families of Mr. Harrison and Mr. Wallace."

What are Dominican officials doing?
The Dominican Attorney General's office and the national police are investigating the deaths, but tourism officials have been downplaying them. The tourism minister, Francisco Javier Garci­a, said last week that in the last five years, more than 30 million tourists have visited the country, and that these deaths are "isolated incidents" and the island is safe for tourists. "These are situations that can occur in any country, in any hotel in the world," he said. "It's regrettable but sometimes it happens." The tourism ministry said last week that hotels had 60 days to install security cameras. What are U.S. officials saying?

In a statement issued Tuesday evening, the U.S. State Department said that "Dominican authorities have asked for F.B.I. assistance for further toxicology analysis," and it could take up to a month to receive the results. A spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control said that the organization had not received a request for assistance from the Dominican Republic relating to these deaths. Are there any theories as to what might be causing the deaths? Tom Inglesby, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, said in a phone interview that the symptoms that have been reported, like pulmonary oedema, bleeding and vomiting blood, are "consistent with poisoning," perhaps accidental.

But until toxicology reports are available, he said, it is difficult and too soon to definitively say what caused the visitors' deaths. "It's rare for travellers to die of unknown causes like this, and to have a high number of them in a relatively short period of time is alarming, shocking, sad," Dr. Inglesby said. "It's something that investigators should be able to get to the bottom of." The fact that toxicology reports have not been released or completed is "unconscionable and inexplicable," he said. Have there been other incidents? Two couples have come forward to say they fell ill while staying at one of the Bahia Pri­ncipe resorts where tourists have died. In January 2018, Doug Hand, 40, and his wife Susie Lauterborn, 38, were staying at the Grand Bahia Pri­ncipe La Romana when, he said in a phone interview, they got sick with fevers, nausea, cold sweats, diarrhoea and fatigue. Mr. Hand said that he didn't drink alcohol on the trip, but he did notice a "mouldy, mildew smell like the A.C. or filter hadn't been cleaned."

When Mr. Hand told an employee in the hotel's lobby that his wife was sick, the employee gave him directions to a doctor, but seemed more focused on ensuring the couple attended a meeting about buying time shares, Mr. Hand said. Kaylynn Knull, 29, and Tom Schwander, 33, are suing the resort chain for $1 million, their lawyer told The Times, because the Colorado-based couple became violently ill during their stay at the Grand Bahia Pri­ncipe La Romana last summer. Ms. Knull got a persistent headache and was sweating and drooling profusely, the lawyer, David Columna, said. She also had blurry vision, nausea and diarrhoea, she told CNN, and family doctors determined the couple had been exposed to organophosphates, a class of insecticides. "The hotel did nothing," said Mr. Columna, who is representing Ms. Knull and Mr. Schwander in the Dominican Republic. The couple, he said, "spent the night inhaling the chemical and they are still having side effects of the intoxication and the hotel hasn't given us any idea of what happened." [Byline: Elisabeth Malkin, Tariro Mzezewa]
Date: 6 Jun 2019
Source: Washington Post [edited]
<https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/dominican-republic-deaths-autopsies-show-similarities-for-all-three-us-victims/2019/06/06/508c179c-87ac-11e9-98c1-e945ae5db8fb_story.html?utm_term=.d51102bfb8ed&wpisrc=nl_evening&wpmm=1>

Dominican government officials released more-detailed autopsy results on Thursday [6 Jun 2019] for 3 American tourists who died at adjacent beach resorts owned by the same hotel company during the last week of May 2019.

All 3 victims experienced eerily similar symptoms and internal trauma before their deaths, according to a news release from Dominican authorities. Pathologists said autopsies showed the 3 had internal haemorrhaging, pulmonary oedema, and enlarged hearts.

Toxicology reports are pending [These are likely to be the most interesting. - ProMED Mod.TG].

A U.S. State Department official said authorities have not yet established a connection between the 30 May 2019 deaths of 49-year-old CAD, and 63-year-old NEH, both of Prince George's County, MD, and the death on 25 May 2019 of 41-year-old MSW of Pennsylvania.

The FBI is providing Dominican law enforcement with "technical assistance with the toxicology reports," the State Department official said.

MSW had just checked into the Luxury Bahia Principe Bouganville, in the town of San Pedro de Macoris, and was taking pictures from her room balcony when she started to feel ill.

Less than 2 hours later, she was dead, local authorities said.

The bodies of CAD and HEH were found inside their room at the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana after relatives grew concerned because they had not checked out of the resort.

The hotels are located next to each other on the island's southern coast, about 60 miles from the tourist-heavy Punta Cana area.

Dominican authorities initially did not run toxicology tests for MSW because there were no signs of violence, said Ramon Brito, a spokesman for the National Police's special tourism unit. After the Maryland couple was found, investigators ordered a set of tests to determine whether anything the 3 Americans consumed may have led to their deaths, Brito said.  [Byline: Arelis R. Hernandez]
Dominican Republic
18 Mar 2019

(Probable and conf.) 624 cases. Municipalities most affected: Santo Domingo Este, Santo Domingo de Guzman, Barahona, and Santo Domingo Norte.
<https://infosurhoy.com/cocoon/saii/xhtml/en_GB/health/cases-of-dengue-and-malaria-increase-in-302-and-179-in-the-first-2-months-of-the-year/>
Date: Mon 31 Dec 2018
Source: Outbreak News [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/rabies-4th-human-death-recorded-dominican-republic-year-56961/>

A 5-year-old boy died Saturday [29 Dec 2018] in a Santo Domingo hospital from rabies, the 4th such case of the year [2018] in the Dominican Republic, according to an El Comercio report (computer translated).

The child, who entered the Robert Reid Cabral Children's Hospital 10 days ago, remained in an induced coma, and yesterday his condition began to worsen, presenting respiratory, cerebral, and cardiac failures, according to a hospital spokesman.

The boy was bitten by a dog on 19 Nov 2018 in Pedernales, in the southwest of the Dominican Republic, and 10 days later he was subjected to an anti-rabies vaccination scheme, receiving 4 doses.

This death follows a 6-year-old child who died on 14 Dec 2018.
====================
[We do not know what kind of wound care this child received prior to getting the post exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Neither does this article tell us the location of the bite on the body. This article also does not mention rabies immunoglobulin (RIG).

We are sorry for the family and the loss of this child. Sadly, this is an example of the urgency and necessity to get medical attention very quickly.

According to the US Center for Disease Control (CDC),

- The rabies virus is transmitted through saliva or brain/nervous system tissue. You can only get rabies by coming in contact with these specific bodily excretions and tissues.

- It's important to remember that rabies is a medical urgency but not an emergency. Decisions should not be delayed.

- Wash any wounds immediately. One of the most effective ways to decrease the chance for infection is to wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water.

- See your doctor for attention for any trauma due to an animal attack before considering the need for rabies vaccination.

- Your doctor, possibly in consultation with your state or local health department, will decide if you need a rabies vaccination. Decisions to start vaccination, known as post exposure prophylaxis (PEP), will be based on your type of exposure and the animal you were exposed to, as well as laboratory and surveillance information for the geographic area where the exposure occurred.

- In the USA, post exposure prophylaxis consists of a regimen of one dose of immune globulin and 4 doses of rabies vaccine over a 14-day period. Rabies immune globulin and the 1st dose of rabies vaccine should be given by your healthcare provider as soon as possible after exposure. Additional doses or rabies vaccine should be given on days 3, 7, and 14 after the 1st vaccination. Current vaccines are relatively painless and are given in your arm, like a flu or tetanus vaccine (<https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/exposure/index.html>). - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Pedernales, Pedernales, Dominican Republic:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/2198>]
Date: Sat 1 Dec 2018
Sources:  <http://outbreaknewstoday.com/dominican-republic-reports-increase-malaria-45684/>

Health officials in the Dominican Republic are reporting an increase in malaria cases in 2018.

According to a Diario Salud report [computer translated], 438 cases have been reported year to date compared to just 360 during the same period in 2017.

92 percent of the malaria cases were due to _Plasmodium falciparum_ and the remainder were _P. vivax_ or mixed infections.

One death has been reported.

In the last month, 31 cases of malaria have been reported, of these, 27 are indigenous and 4 are imported, 3 from Venezuela and one from Guyana.
========================
[Autochthonous malaria has been reported from the Dominican Republic over the past 15 years, documented especially by malaria in returning visitors. The main problem is the proximity to Haiti, where malaria is endemic, and asymptomatic carriers from Haiti start local transmission in the Dominican Republic. One solution could be screening upon arrival, or if that is not possible, a course of treatment for instance with artemether/lumefantrine upon arrival, ending with a single dose of primaquine to inactivate gametocytes, as recommended by WHO (Policy brief on single-dose primaquine as a gametocytocide in _Plasmodium falciparum_ malaria. WHO, Geneva January 2015; <https://www.who.int/malaria/publications/atoz/policy-brief-single-dose-primaquine-pf/en/>). - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Dominican Republic: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/24>]
More ...