Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2020 20:19:53 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, March 8, 2020 (AFP) - A German tourist died Sunday of the novel coronavirus in a Sinai resort of eastern Egypt, the health ministry announced, the first death from the epidemic recorded in Africa.   "The 60-year-old German citizen showed symptoms of a fever (and) checked into Hurghada hospital on 6 March," before testing positive for COVID-19, it said in a statement.   The tourist, who arrived from Germany a week ago, died after having refused to be transferred to an isolation ward until 7 March once his breathing had been affected by "acute pneumonia".

On Saturday, the health ministry announced 45 suspected cases of Egyptians and foreigners contracting the virus aboard a Nile cruise ship.   The boat was carrying 171 people -- 101 foreigners and 70 Egyptian crew -- Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouli told reporters.    Besides the cruise ship cases, Egypt has detected three cases of the virus, the first of which was announced on February 14.    The health ministry said last week that the first patient, a Chinese national, had recovered and been released.

The other two cases, a Canadian working in an oil company and an Egyptian who returned from Serbia through France, were still undergoing treatment.     Other countries, including France, have announced that six travellers returning from Egypt had tested positive for the virus.   Israeli Interior Minister Aryeh Deri on Sunday announced an entry ban on "anyone who has been in Egypt during the past two weeks and is not a citizen or resident of Israel".
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2020 10:08:01 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, March 2, 2020 (AFP) - Egypt on Monday reported its second case of novel coronavirus, more than two weeks after announcing the first confirmed infection in Africa.   The foreigner is showing "minor symptoms" and has been quarantined, the ministry and the World Health Organization said in a joint statement.   Other people who had contact with the patient are undergoing medical tests, it added.   Egypt announced its first confirmed case of novel coronavirus on February 14.   The patient, a Chinese national, was released last week after recovering, the statement said.

Cairo has been cooperating with French and Canadian authorities after they both announced seven confirmed cases of the virus from travellers coming from Egypt.    With the number of cases rising in the Gulf, Qatar imposed a temporary ban on visitors coming from Egypt via transit points on Sunday citing the spread of COVID-19.   Kuwait stopped short of a flight restriction but added extra screening measures for travellers boarding their flights from Egypt.

Egyptian Health Minister Hala Zayed travelled to China on Sunday amid mounting criticisms and satirical posts on social media of her ministry's handling of the outbreak.   At a press conference at Cairo airport, she praised Beijing's efforts to contain the spread of the virus.   The global death toll from the epidemic surpassed 3,000 on Monday after dozens more were killed in China and cases soared around the world with a second fatality on US soil.
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 10:59:27 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - Egypt's Sharm el-Sheikh has welcomed the first British charter flights since 2015, when the Islamic State group's bombing of a Russian airliner dealt a devastating blow to the Red Sea resort.   Britain halted flights to Sharm el-Sheikh following the attack, which killed all 224 people on board the plane that took off from the resort, long popular with British tourists.

After multiple airport inspections and visits by aviation security experts, Britain announced in October that it was lifting the flight restrictions.   "Sharm el-Sheikh airport received the first two direct charter flights... from London's Gatwick airport carrying 184 passengers and Manchester airport carrying 190 passengers," Egypt's civil aviation ministry said in a statement late Sunday.    The flights were operated by Britain's biggest travel agency, TUI.

The company has scheduled three flights a week between London's Gatwick Airport and Sharm el-Sheikh until late March, the statement said.   British budget airline easyJet said in January it would restart flights to the resort town in June.   On Sunday, flag carrier EgyptAir said it would start operating a weekly flight between London and Sharm el-Sheikh later this month.   British tourists have long been vital to the tourism industry in Sharm el-Sheikh, which was left reeling after the airliner bombing.

Egypt has since sought to lure tourists back, boosting airport security and allowing international inspections of security procedures there.   Russia, another major source of tourists to Egypt, initially suspended all direct flights to the North African country following the attack.   It resumed direct flights to Cairo in 2018 but has yet to restart them to popular Red Sea resorts.   Egypt's tourism industry has shown signs of recovery in recent years with arrivals reaching 11.3 million in 2018, compared with 5.3 million in 2016.
Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2019 20:16:40 +0100 (MET)

Cairo, Dec 28, 2019 (AFP) - At least 28 people including textile workers and several Asian tourists were killed Saturday in two separate road crashes in Egypt, official media and other sources said.   The deadliest accident occurred when a bus transporting textile workers collided with a car on the road between the cities of Port Said and Damietta in northern Egypt, state-run Al-Ahram newspaper said on its website.   At least 22 men and women who worked for a clothing factory were killed and eight others injured, the report said.   The accident came only hours after two buses carrying tourists collided with a truck east of Cairo on the road to the Ain Sokhna resort on the Red Sea, according to a security official.

A medical source said two Malaysian women and an Indian man were killed along with three Egyptians -- a bus driver, a tour guide and a security guard.   At least 24 others were injured, several of them tourists and some left in serious condition, the medical source said without giving further details.   Traffic accidents are common in Egypt where many roads are poorly maintained and regulations are laxly enforced.   But efforts by authorities to crack down on traffic violations, including speeding, appear to have borne fruit in recent years, with official figures showing a decline in road deaths.

In 2018 there were 8,480 road accidents compared with 11,098 the previous year, according to the bureau of statistics.   Deaths from traffic accidents fell from more than 5,000 in 2016 to 3,747 the following year and 3,087 in 2018, official figures show.   Ain Sokhna is a popular seaside resort town in the Suez governorate southeast of Cairo. It is also home to several petrochemical, ceramics and steel factories.
Date: Tue 30 Jul 2019
Source: Food Safety News [edited]
<https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2019/07/germany-reports-e-coli-cases-linked-to-egypt/>

The public health institute in Germany has reported more than 30 people have been sick with _E. coli_ in 2019 after going to Egypt. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) noted increased reports of enterohemorrhagic _E. coli_ (EHEC) related to or after staying in Egypt. Earlier in July 2019, Public Health England (PHE) also reported an increase in adults and children ill after coming back from Hurghada in Egypt.

In Germany, there are 31 cases of EHEC and 5 people with haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure associated with this form of _E. coli_ infection. This is significantly more than in the same period of previous years. In 2018, there were 21 EHEC and one HUS case. In 2017, 9 EHEC and 1 HUS case were recorded. The rise cannot be explained by the increase in travel to Egypt alone, according to RKI.

It follows a warning by PHE after 18 people fell ill with EHEC infection and one person developed HUS after returning from Egypt in 2019. 4 people needed hospital treatment. A PHE spokeswoman previously told Food Safety News that it was not a single outbreak as a variety of different EHEC strains had been detected in visitors to Egypt with EHEC O157 and EHEC O26 among them. The agency has told the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) about the cases.

What caused the German cases is unknown and sick people have stayed at different hotels in separate places, according to RKI, which has informed Egyptian authorities about the increase.

Dr Nick Phin, deputy director of the National Infection Service at PHE, said there are precautions that travellers can take. "These include ensuring meat is cooked thoroughly, not drinking tap water or ice made from tap water and trying to avoid swallowing water when swimming. Anyone suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting should ensure they keep well hydrated and seek medical advice if their symptoms don't improve within 48 hours. They should also avoid preparing or serving food while they have symptoms and thoroughly wash their hands after using the toilet to stop the bug being passed to others" he said.  [Byline: Joe Whitworth]
=======================
[This is the 2nd European country to report a spike to travel-related cases of EHEC related to Egypt. The German report does not specifically relate the cases to the Red Sea area of the country.

As a review, the classical enterohaemorrhagic _E. coli_ is the O157:H7 serotype although some are non-motile, that is, H-. Most O157 strains do not ferment sorbitol and that characteristic was used to screen for the strain using a sorbitol MacConkey agar. However, since non-O157 EHEC strains such as O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 do ferment sorbitol and, as seen here, some O157 also ferment sorbitol, laboratories now look for these isolates using genetic assays for the Shiga toxin genes.

Around 1903 Smith and Reagh reported on the different behaviour of salmonella strains. Their work was mostly ignored until Weil and Felix, working on _Proteus_ cultures, noted 2 forms, the swarming form called the H form (_mit Hauch_, in English: "with breath") and the non-swarming form, called the O form (_ohne Hauch_, in English: "without breath"). The H form contained both O and H antigens (correctly termed the OH form). These parallels were transposed to other Enterobacteriaceae.

If O antiserum is added to a culture, motility is preserved, whereas if H antiserum is added the culture does not move. Therefore, H antigen was involved with swarming in the agar plate (breathing might have been used to imply the ability to move). (_E. coli_, of course, do not swarm on certain agar plates like _Proteus_ bacteria do). - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Germany: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/101>
Egypt: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/55>]
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