Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2019 12:22:15 +0100
By Bassem ABOUALABASS

Cairo, Jan 29, 2019 (AFP) - Alaa Hilal was out shopping in Cairo when she was attacked by a stray dog in broad daylight -- an increasing problem of daily life in Egypt which is stirring debate.   "I got out of my car and saw an exceptionally large street dog," the 38-year-old housewife told AFP at her home, northeast of Cairo.   "He approached me and bit me without barking or doing anything else," said Hilal, adding that she had been injured in the thigh.     An overpopulated mega-city of more than 20 million people, Cairo is already plagued by monster traffic jams, widespread waste problems and rampant pollution. Packs of stray dogs are only adding to the city's challenges.   Complaints about dog attacks, exposure to rabies and in some cases even deaths over the years have triggered calls for the animals to be brought under control.

- Hounds unleashed -
Commonly referred to as "baladi dogs", strays are widely viewed as unsanitary and dirty. They are typically seen running around the streets and scavenging garbage for food.   According to the agriculture ministry, there were around 400,000 cases of dog bites in 2017, up from 300,000 in 2014.    And 231 people died over the past four years from the wounds they received, mainly as a result of rabies.

A bite from a dog carrying the rabies virus can be fatal within 24 hours as it damages the human's nervous system, said Shehab Abdel-Hamid, the head of Egypt's society for the prevention of cruelty to animals (SPCA).    Hilal, who had never feared dogs having had several pets when growing up, was rushed to a nearby hospital only to discover that she was the ninth person to be bitten by the same dog.   "Due to the trauma caused by this incident, I became worried and I no longer want to be in the same place with them," she said.   There are no official data on the numbers of stray dogs, but activists say they are running loose in their millions.

A survey by the SPCA showed that the number of stray dogs "may reach up to more than 15 million", Abdel-Hamid said.   And though street dogs appear to fear the most crowded areas, they can be loud and aggressive in poorly lit and rubbish-strewn suburbs.    In November, a video widely circulated on social media showed a car hitting a teenager who was being chased by two stray dogs.   "Garbage is the main reason behind the stray dogs' crisis in Egypt," said Abdel-Hamid, highlighting how the problem was exacerbated when the rubbish men stopped working during the 2011 uprising.

- Government mauled -
The SPCA, however, lacks resources. Its headquarters in downtown Cairo was looted during the uprising and has not been renovated since, Abdel-Hamid added.    And Egyptian authorities say they can only intervene on a case by case basis.    "We do not go around the streets looking for dogs to kill them," said the agriculture ministry spokesman Hamed Abdel-Dayem. "We only take measures following complaints."   He didn't specify what measures are taken to bring the stray dog population under control.    But animal rights advocates often lambast the government, accusing it of mass culls.

In 2017, authorities killed more than 17,000 stray dogs following multiple complaints of dog "disturbances" and "biting" in Beni Sueif, south of Cairo, according to an August report by the governorate's veterinary directorate.    The Red Sea governor even offered a 100 Egyptian pounds ($5.58) award to those who capture and hand over at least five strays.   Animal rights defenders also accuse the government of killing dogs using a drug, known as "strychnine", a chemical substance listed as "unacceptable on animal welfare grounds" for euthanasia by the World Organisation for Animal Health.     But Abdel-Dayem denied that the government imported banned substances.   "Is it logical that we (the ministry) allow internationally prohibited substances to enter the country?" he told AFP when asked about the strychnine claim.

- 'Shelter of Hope' -
Animal rights advocates have sought to offer solutions, actively removing dogs from the streets and giving them homes.   Ahmed al-Shorbagi, 35, opened two dog shelters in a desert area west of Cairo, near the famed Giza pyramids.    The buildings with sheer concrete walls have kept more than 250 dogs safe for the past three years. Shorbagi contributes 40 percent to the funding of the shelters while the rest comes from donations.    "At first I followed the animal rescue pages on Facebook," Shorbagi told AFP, rubbing one dog's belly as she wagged her tail in joy.   "I saved a dog that I called 'Hope' and when I opened the shelter, I named it after her."

Shorbagi believes the solution lies in dog sterilisation programmes, providing rabies vaccinations and removing the garbage.    "Instead of the government paying millions of dollars to import poison, it should consider sterilisation," he said.    "We, as associations, proposed to the ministry of agriculture to solve the problem but it refused."   The ministry's spokesman denied however refusing to cooperate with private entities and hailed their work to help resolve the crisis.
Date: Sat, 29 Dec 2018 20:35:18 +0100
By Menna Zaki

Giza, Egypt, Dec 29, 2018 (AFP) - Crowds of tourists stared in awe at the towering pyramids of Giza near Cairo Saturday undaunted by a nearby bomb attack a day earlier that killed holidaymakers from Vietnam.    A roadside bombing claimed the lives of three tourists and their Egyptian guide Friday when it ripped through the bus they were on as it travelled near the world-famous attraction.

The attack comes as Egypt's vital tourism sector has begun to recover after years of instability and jihadist violence that scared visitors away.    "I think terrorism can strike anywhere in the world," Somand Yang from South Korea told AFP.    "You have to be careful but it is also like luck."   Security forces guarded the entrance to the sprawling site and Yang, 32, said she had no qualms about visiting.   "Lightning never strikes twice in the same place. So I figured it will be even safer today," she said.

- 'Completely devastated' -
Excited holidaymakers rode camels and queued to enter a tomb as they snapped pictures of the Great Pyramid, the only surviving structure of the seven wonders of the ancient world.   Hawkers followed the tourists, doggedly trying to sell trinkets and souvenirs.   Despite the steady flow of visitors, Egyptians working at the site said they were shaken by the attack -- and concerned that it could hit their livelihoods.    "I knew the guide who died yesterday," said Dalia Sadaka, as she accompanied a group of sightseers.    "I completely broke down yesterday, but I had to get to work in the morning," she said, pointing to her visibly swollen eyes.

- 'Truly regrettable' -
Earlier hit hard by a string of bloody attacks and unrest, visitor numbers to Egypt have more recently staged a partial recovery.    In October 2015, a bomb claimed by a local affiliate of the Islamic State jihadist group killed all 224 people on board a passenger jet carrying Russian tourists over the Sinai peninsula.     That incident dealt a severe blow to Egypt's tourism industry, which was still reeling from the turmoil set off by the 2011 uprising that forced veteran leader Hosni Mubarak from power.

The official statistics agency says arrivals reached 8.2 million in 2017, up from 5.3 million the year before.   But that figure was still far short of the record influx in 2010 when over 14 million came.    "I fear yesterday's incident may have an impact on our source of income," said an elderly man who offers camel rides, declining to give his name.    "It is very regretable," he said. "We were finally happy that tourism started picking up a bit."
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2018 16:07:04 +0100

Cairo, Dec 13, 2018 (AFP) - Egyptian authorities Thursday arrested a camel driver and a woman accused of having helped two Danes scale the Great Pyramid of Giza to take a video and naked photograph, sparking outrage in the country.   The interior ministry said the woman had put the pair into contact with the camel driver who took them to the site illegally at night on November 29 for 4,000 Egyptian pounds ($225, 200 euros).   The two had acknowledged their role in the incident and would be put on trial.

In a video called "Climbing the Great Pyramid of Giza", Danish photographer Andreas Hvid appears to scale the 4,500-year-old tomb on the outskirts of Cairo with a woman who is later seen removing her top.   Hvid says the video was shot in late November and posted on YouTube on December 8, setting in motion an investigation by Egypt's public prosecutor.   A photograph also released by Hvid appears to show the pair completely naked on top of each other while looking in the direction of a nearby pyramid.

The nearly three-minute video has so far notched up 4.5 million views on YouTube, while stirring a public outcry in Egypt.   "A 7,000-year-old civilisation has turned into a bed sheet," a Twitter user in Egypt lamented.   Hvid, 23, has explained back home to the Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet that he had "dreamed for many years of climbing the Great Pyramid" as well as of taking a naked photograph.   The young Dane, who runs his own YouTube channel, said the woman in the video was not his girlfriend. "It was just a pose. We did not have sexual relations," he said.

The Great Pyramid is the largest in Giza, standing 146 metres (480 feet) tall, and the only surviving structure of the seven wonders of the ancient world.   Climbing pyramids is forbidden in Egypt.   In 2016, a German tourist was barred from entering the country for life after he posted online footage of climbing one of the ancient structures.
Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2018 10:22:25 +0200

London, Aug 24, 2018 (AFP) - British tour operator Thomas Cook said it is removing all its customers from a hotel in Egypt after a UK couple staying there died in unexplained circumstances and other guests fell ill.   The company said late Thursday it was unclear what caused the deaths of the Britons, reportedly in their 60s, who had been staying at the Steigenberger Aqua Magic Hotel in the Red Sea resort of Hurghada.

Thomas Cook added in a statement that all of its other customers staying at the Steigenberger, reported to be 301 by the BBC, had the choice of relocating to another hotel in Hurghada or returning home.   It said it was "deeply saddened" by the deaths of the two guests.   "The circumstances of their deaths are still unclear," Thomas Cook said.   "We have also received further reports of a raised level of illness among guests. Safety is always our first priority, so as a precautionary measure we have taken a decision to remove all our customers from this hotel."   Red Sea governor Ahmad Abdallah told AFP that the couple, who were on holiday with their daughter, had died on Tuesday.

The BBC identified them as John Cooper, 69, and his wife Susan, 63, a Thomas Cook employee. The couple were from the town of Burnley, northwest England.   Abdallah said the man died in hospital after suffering exhaustion, followed by his wife who collapsed at the hotel on hearing the news.     The governor ruled out "criminal motive".

Thomas Cook said customers due to travel in the coming weeks to the hotel -- which the tour operator gave a 96-percent rating in an audit last month -- would be offered alternative holidays.   Egypt's key tourism industry has been recovering from a devastating blow in 2015 when jihadists bombed a Russian airliner carrying holidaymakers from the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, killing all 224 on board.
Date: Mon, 20 Aug 2018 13:04:55 +0200

Cairo, Aug 20, 2018 (AFP) - An Egyptian army captain has been killed by an improvised explosive device blast in North Sinai during a campaign to eliminate jihadists, medics said on Monday.   The officer died Sunday evening after an explosion hit his vehicle west of the coastal city of El-Arish, a local medical source said.   The Egyptian army has since February been conducting a major operation focused on the Sinai Peninsula to wipe out jihadists from the Islamic State group.

The military says that over 250 suspected jihadists and at least 35 soldiers have been killed in its "Sinai 2018" operation.   Jihadists launched an insurgency in Sinai after the 2013 military overthrow of Egypt's Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, who was forced out by the military in the face of mass protests against his rule.
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