Date: Tue 11 Jun 2019
Source: Anadolu Agency [edited]
<https://www.aa.com.tr/en/africa/525-people-infected-with-cholera-in-ethiopia/1501455>

At least 525 people have been infected with the cholera bacterium in Ethiopia, according to health sources [information released] on [Tue 11 Jun 2019]. The Ethiopian Public Health Institute confirmed that the cause of the death of 16 people by this infectious disease caused by _Vibrio_ bacteria. The deadly epidemic occurred in Oromia, Amhara, Tigray regional states as well as the Addis Ababa city administration.

The majority of the casualties were recorded in Amhara, with 14 people, the local broadcaster FANA quoted, Beyene Moges, the deputy director of the institute, as saying in a press conference. Beyene also cited as saying that 19 samples were examined in a lab to determine the cause. Medicinal supplies were dispatched to the affected areas, according to FANA.

Cholera is an acute epidemic infectious disease and it is characterized by watery diarrhoea, extreme loss of fluid and electrolytes, and severe dehydration.
Date: Thu 23 May 2019 Source: XinHuaNet [edited] <http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-05/23/c_138083427.htm>
An acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) outbreak in Ethiopia's northern Amhara regional state has left 12 people dead, an official said on Thu 23 May 2019. Asaye Gebreselassie, deputy director of Wag Himera zone in Amhara regional state, said the outbreak killed 4 people and sickened 67 others in recent days, according to state media outlet Ethiopia News Agency.
A medical taskforce comprising federal, regional and zonal personnel has been deployed to the affected areas, Gebreselassie said. With the rainy season expected to start in June and continue until mid-September, the government is trying to prevent the spread of the AWD.
Federal and regional health institutions have been combating the diarrhea outbreak by treating unhygienic conditions in factories, health facilities, agricultural areas and eateries.
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Vax Before Travel [abridged, edited]
<https://www.vaxbeforetravel.com/ethiopian-children-remain-risk-measles-virus>

The eastern African country of Ethiopia has been reporting measles outbreaks for many years, however, in 2019, new information indicates children are the ones most vulnerable for this infectious disease.

According to reporting by the European Commission, approximately 54% of the 4000 measles cases in Ethiopia reported during 2019 affected children under 5 years of age.

Moreover, over 60% of the children had never received their 1st measles vaccine dose.

This new data estimates that by the end of 2019, about 3.5 million children will be susceptible to the measles virus, mainly because of the failure to achieve the 'herd-immunity' necessary to interrupt transmission.

Moreover, these Ethiopian children are not the only under-vaccinated population.

An estimated 169 million children missed out on the 1st dose of the measles vaccine between 2010 and 2017, or 21.1 million children a year on average, said UNICEF on 25 Apr 2019.

And, the measles virus is one of the leading causes of death among children, particularly in developing countries. An estimated 100,000 measles deaths occurred globally in 2017.

Ethiopia announced it would aggressively confront this under-vaccination issue by integrating the measles vaccine 2nd dose (MCV2) vaccination into the routine immunization program in the 2nd year of life.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Health said about 3 348 363 children will receive measles vaccine 2nd doses.

Dr Chatora Rufaro, World Health Organization (WHO) Ethiopia representative said in a press release, "The introduction of the 2nd dose of measles vaccination in Ethiopia will significantly contribute to a reduction of measles morbidity and mortality as well as the overall child mortality by preventing measles outbreaks."

To notify visitors about Ethiopia's ongoing measles risks, the CDC issued an initial Level 1 Travel Alert in 2015. Since then, the CDC advises all visitors to Ethiopia to ensure they are immunized against the measles virus.  [Byline: Don Ward Hackett]
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[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/95>]
Date: Mon 13 May 2019
Source: New Business Ethiopia [abridged, edited]
<https://newbusinessethiopia.com/acute-water-diarrhea-outbreak-kills-3-people-in-ethiopia/>

The outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) has killed 3 people in the North Gondar Tselemt area in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. The 3 people who were getting medical treatment after acquiring AWD have passed away, according to the state broadcaster ETV. The report indicated that currently 151 people affected by AWD are also identified in 3 locations of Amhara region. Currently in North Gondar, Tselemt area, 90 people infected with AWD have been identified and are being treated. While in Abergele area, 58 people and 4 in Beyeda area are getting treatment after acquiring AWD.

The ETV report indicated that the 152 suspected of acquiring AWD are being treated separately in the 3 localities. It is indicated that a medical team at the national, regional, and zone level is mobilized to contain the outbreak in the areas. In addition, teams from WHO and Doctors Without Borders are also engaged to combat AWD in the areas, according to ETV.

Ethiopia has the poorest sanitation facilities in Africa and has been frequently hit by AWD. In Ethiopia, AWD outbreaks have been reported in different parts at different times. The outbreak in Moyale area in the southern part of the country in 2016 resulted in a total of 268 cases and 2 deaths reported. In 2017, it was also reported that some parts of the Somali region of Ethiopia were also affected by an AWD outbreak resulting in the deaths of many people.
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[Especially in east Africa, AWD is used instead of cholera. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Ethiopia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/95>]
Date: Tue 23 Apr 2019
Source: Addis Herald, an Anadolu Agency report [edited]
<https://www.addisherald.com/28-hippos-die-at-gibe-sheleko-national-park-ethiopia-cause-unknown/>

At least 28 hippopotamuses were found dead in a national park in southwestern Ethiopia, local media reported on [Mon 22 Apr 2019].

According to the local broadcaster FANA, the giant semi-aquatic creatures died in the Gibe Sheleko National Park, part of the Gibe River which is the largest tributary of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia.

The cause for the deaths is still unknown, FANA said, citing Bahrua Mega, the head of the park. She said the deaths have been reported since fortnight, while 15 of the hippos died in a single day. According to her, most of the large mammals that died at the national park --which is home to nearly 200 hippos--, were aged.

The experts are investigating the cause of the sudden hippo deaths, she added.

"There have been illegal activities threatening the existence of the park," Mega said, adding that people have been cutting trees and using patches of land for settlements within the park. The 36 000 sq km (around 13 900 sq mi) park is located at 250 km southwest of the capital Addis Ababa.

[This article contains a photograph of dead hippos in a lake. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]
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[Gibe Sheleko National Park was established only in 2009 and is administered by the southern region. The park is about 174 km southwest of Addis Ababa, on the edge of the Ethiopian highland massif and covers 248 sq km in 3 districts of the Guraghe Zone. This park is unique due to its high bird species diversity and woodland eco-system.

Anthrax is hyper-enzootic in Ethiopia. In 2017 alone there were 196 bovine outbreaks, and the government has given up reporting the numbers of equine and sheep & goat outbreaks each year. Wildlife outbreaks occur but are under-reported. During 1999 through 2002 there was a total mortality of 1600 animals of 21 different species in the Omo Magoo National Park in the SW of the country. So there is a good probability that Ethiopia has joined the international hippo anthrax association. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Ethiopia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/95>]
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