Date: Tue 8 Oct 2019
Source: Braintree & Witham Times [abridged, edited]
<https://www.braintreeandwithamtimes.co.uk/news/south_essex_news/17953315.six-measles-cases-now-confirmed-across-southend/>

Six cases of measles have now been confirmed in Southend as day centres, forced to close, officially reopened.  Fears had emerged that more than 200 people may have been exposed following an outbreak at 4 learning disability day centres for adults. The number of cases, which stood at 3 on Friday [4 Oct 2019], rose to 6 over the weekend. Of the 8 initial suspected cases, one has been ruled out, while another is still awaiting test results.  A number of day centres were forced to close after the announcement last Wednesday [2 Oct 2019], with all centres reopening yesterday [Mon 7 Oct 2019].
Rebecca Dockett, 35, from Southend, who works with young disabled people, said the closures will have affected many. "I do understand the decision by the council to close these centres, but we must make sure our people living with these difficulties do not miss out too much," she said. "I hope this whole situation will be sorted, and it is good news that our centres have reopened. These services are a lifeline and vital way for people with difficulties to connect with each other and the outside world. I agree it is a necessary precaution, but you hope it will not have affected too many."  Last week, the council confirmed 50 people were given vaccinations, with more vaccinated on Monday [7 Oct 2019], although exact numbers are unclear.

So far, 76 people have called Southend's public information line, which will be open from 8 a.m. to midday tomorrow [Wed 9 Oct 2019], before closing as the number of calls has rapidly reduced.  Four centres -- Project 49, Salvation Army Hadleigh Training Centre, RE House, and Summer Care Day Centre -- all closed last week and then reopened yesterday [Mon 7 Oct 2019].  Project 49 reopened with a limited programme, and those unable to attend due to the situation are being contacted directly.  A spokesman for Southend Council thanked Southend Clinical Commissioning Group for the support.  [Byline: Sean Davies]
Date: Fri 20 Sep 2019
Source: The Bureau of Investigative Journalism [abridged, edited]
<https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2019-09-20/exclusive-at-least-100-cases-of-salmonella-poisoning-from-british-eggs>

Dozens of people have been made ill after eating British eggs contaminated with one of the most dangerous forms of _Salmonella_, the Bureau can reveal, despite government assurances that the risk had been virtually eliminated. There have been at least 100 cases recorded in the past 3 years, and 45 since January [2019], in a major outbreak that health officials have traced back to contaminated eggs and poultry farms.

Despite outbreaks of this strain occurring for more than 3 years, the government has issued no public warnings about the safety of hens' eggs. In 2017, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) told the public that it was safe for vulnerable people, including pregnant women, the elderly, and children, to eat raw, runny, or soft-boiled eggs. At the time, the head of the FSA said, "The risk of _Salmonella_ is now so low you needn't worry."

Internal records obtained by the Bureau show that 25 egg-laying poultry flocks in the UK have tested positive for _Salmonella_ in 2019. Seven were contaminated with the most serious strains of the bacteria, including _Salmonella_ Enteritidis, the strain behind this major outbreak. Two egg-packing factories -- one of which supplies leading supermarkets -- have also been contaminated. _Salmonella_ bacteria are found in the guts of livestock, including chickens.

Eggs from the infected flocks were kept from sale and either sent for processing to kill the bacteria or disposed of, while the birds were culled. However, contaminated eggs still reached the public, with Public Health England (PHE) confirming 45 people had been poisoned since January 2019. The exact route to the public is unclear. PHE told the Bureau it was not aware of any deaths.

An egg business that supplies major supermarkets is among those contaminated by the bacterium. One of Fridays Ltd's egg-packing factories was temporarily closed this year [2019] to deal with _Salmonella_, which has also been found on 3 farms that supply the business. The company, which produces 10m eggs a week, confirmed it had removed the farms from its supply chain and disinfected the factory.

Fridays said in a statement: "Like all responsible UK egg farmers and egg packers, we carry out regular testing of our firms and those of our suppliers ... _Salmonella_ occurs naturally in the environment. However, with regular precautionary testing, vaccination of hens, and rigorous control procedures, its prevalence in farming can be minimized."  [Byline: Andrew Wasley, Alexandra Heal]
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[Salmonellosis is often thought to be associated with cracked eggs or eggs dirty with fecal matter, a problem controlled by cleaning procedures implemented in the egg industry. It is clearly the case, however, that most of the salmonellosis outbreaks linked to eggs were associated with uncracked, disinfected grade A eggs, or foods containing such eggs. The undamaged eggs become contaminated during ovulation, and thus were contaminated with the bacteria before the eggshell was formed. To avoid this, uncooked eggs should only be used as an ingredient, if pasteurized. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
United Kingdom: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/40>]
Date: Thu 26 Sep 2019
Source: The London Free Press [edited]
<https://lfpress.com/news/local-news/legionnaires-disease-outbreak-linked-to-cooling-tower-health-officials>

An air conditioning cooling tower is to blame for an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that landed 6 people in the hospital in a single south-central London neighbourhood, public health officials announced Thursday [26 Sep 2019].

Middlesex-London Health Unit inspectors collected samples from different areas in the neighbourhood to test for the presence of _Legionella_ bacteria, the germ that causes Legionnaires' disease. Laboratory testing confirmed samples from a cooling tower were a genetic match to the bacteria that made 6 people sick, the health unit says.

"The investigation and search for a cause were still active at the time, but laboratory reports received Tuesday [24 Sep 2019] drew a conclusive link for the largest cluster of cases," the London-area public health authority said in a statement Thursday [26 Sep 2019].

The health unit declined to release the exact location of the Legionnaires' disease cluster but said it did not involve people from the same address. Since sources of _Legionella_ can crop [up] temporarily then go away on their own, public health officials did not issue a warning to other residents in the area.

All 6 adults were hospitalized and are now recovering at home, the health unit says.

"We have taken extensive measures to ensure that this equipment no longer poses a threat to human health," associate medical officer of health Alex Summers said in a statement.

_Legionella_ bacteria exist in the environment. Most people contract the illness by inhaling water or soil that contains the bacteria. Elderly people and people with compromised immune systems are most vulnerable to a _Legionella_ infection. Legionnaires' disease causes severe pneumonia, fever, and muscle aches and can be fatal.

In a typical year, the health unit would see about 6 cases of _Legionella_ infection. To date, the London-area public health authority has encountered 15, 6 of which are linked.  [Byline: Jennifer Bieman]
=========================
[The news report above says that a neighbourhood cooling tower has been confirmed as the source for 6 cases of Legionnaires' disease in a south-central London neighbourhood on the basis of matching _Legionella_ genotypes. However, it is unclear from the news report if this cooling tower has been shut down or remediated. - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
London, England, United Kingdom: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/283>]
Date: Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:44:19 +0200 (METDST)

London, Sept 18, 2019 (AFP) - British Airways pilots on Wednesday cancelled a strike that had been due September 27, the British Airline Pilots Association union said after two walkouts last week that cost the company dear.   "Someone has to take the initiative to sort out this (pay) dispute and with no sign of that from BA the pilots have decided to take the responsible course," BALPA General Secretary Brian Strutton said in a statement.    The union chief added that the airline's "passengers rightly expect BA and its pilots to resolve their issues without disruption and now is the time for cool heads and pragmatism to be brought to bear.    "I hope BA and its owner IAG show as much responsibility as the pilots," he added.   It was now "time for a period of reflection before the dispute escalates further and irreparable damage is done to the (BA) brand."

However the union added that should the airline "refuse meaningful new negotiations, BALPA retains the right to announce further strike dates".   British Airways, which likes to call itself "the world's favourite airline", flew into turbulence last week as pilots staged a costly and historic two-day strike, tarnishing its global reputation according to aviation analysts.   Pilots walked out for the first time in the company's 100-year history, sparked by a bitter and long-running feud over pay.   BA faced the embarrassment of grounding its entire UK fleet on September 9 and 10, causing the cancellation of about 1,600 flights.   The move sparked travel chaos for about 200,000 passengers who had been due to fly in and out of London's Gatwick and Heathrow airports.

The disruption continued into September 11 because half of BA's 300 aircraft and more than 700 pilots were mostly in the wrong place.   As a result, BA was forced to cancel approximately ten percent of its daily 850 flights in and out of Britain that day.    BALPA and its members are demanding a bigger share of British Airways profits.   The airline has offered a salary increase of 11.5 percent over three years, which it argues would boost the annual pay of some captains to £200,000 ($250,000 or 226,000 euros).   However, the union has rejected the proposal made in July.   BALPA meanwhile estimates that last week's 48-hour strike cost the airline £80 million.   BA is owned by IAG, which was formed in 2011 with the merger of British Airways and Spain's Iberia. IAG has since added other carriers, including Austria's Vueling and Ireland's Aer Lingus.
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2019 11:40:02 +0200 (METDST)

London, Sept 13, 2019 (AFP) - British Airways has cancelled all its scheduled UK flights for September 27, when company pilots will again strike in a long-running row over pay.   It comes after the carrier cancelled all flights departing and arriving in the UK on Monday and Tuesday owing to BA's first strike by pilots in the company's 100-year history.

In a statement released late Thursday, BA called on the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) union "to call off their strike and return to negotiations".    The airline added: "We are very sorry that BALPA's actions will affect thousands more travel plans."   This week's strike sparked travel chaos for about 200,000 passengers, mostly using London's Gatwick and Heathrow airports.   BALPA estimates that the 48-hour strike cost the airline £80 million ($99 million, 89 million euros), but BA has yet to provide a figure.
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