Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2020 13:51:24 +0100 (MET)

London, March 17, 2020 (AFP) - British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab on Tuesday advised UK citizens against all non-essential travel overseas for the next 30 days, in response to the global coronavirus pandemic.   "UK travellers abroad now face widespread international border restrictions and lock downs in various countries. So I have taken the decision to advise British nationals against all non-essential international travel," he said in a statement.
Date: Sat, 14 Mar 2020 11:43:55 +0100 (MET)

London, March 14, 2020 (AFP) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has faced criticism for his country's light touch approach to tackling the coronavirus outbreak, is preparing to review its approach and ban mass gatherings, according to government sources Saturday.   Emergency legislation is due to be passed next week in parliament and the ban would come into force from next weekend.   The legislation could see the cancellation of events such as the Wimbledon tennis tournament and the Glastonbury music festival, due to begin at the end of June, as well as major horse races including Royal Ascot and Grand National.    The government's current plan is to delay the peak of the outbreak until the weather becomes warmer to cushion the blow on the health services, and the advice so far is for people who show symptoms to self isolate for a week.

The health officials advising the government argue that taking drastic measures too early would have only limited benefit and would risk tiring a population before the peak of the crisis.    But many events such as Premier League football matches, the London Marathon and the May local elections have already been suspended or postponed.    Queen Elizabeth II has postponed a number of engagements scheduled for next week "as a precautionary measure", according to Buckingham Palace.    Her eldest son, Prince Charles, has postponed a trip to Bosnia, Cyprus and Jordan, scheduled to begin next week.    The country has 798 cases of Covid-19 disease linked to the new coronavirus, including 10 deaths, according to latest figures.    But a senior health official estimated that the number of infected people is more likely to be between 5,000 and 10,000.

Johnson has come under increasing pressure to follow fellow European leaders in cancelling large gatherings, but he has previously said the government would only do so when health officials advised him to do so.   Health experts on Saturday demanded that their colleagues advising the government "urgently and openly share the scientific evidence, data and models it is using to inform its decisions."   "This transparency is essential to retain the scientific community, healthcare community, and the public's understanding, co-operation and trust," they wrote in a letter to the Times.
Date: 23 Feb 2020
Source: UK Government Department of Health and Social Care [edited]
<https://www.gov.uk/government/news/cmo-for-england-announces-four-new-cases-of-novel-coronavirus>

Four further patients in England have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases in the UK to 13. The virus was passed on in the Diamond Princess cruise ship, and the patients are being transferred from Arrowe Park to specialist NHS infection centres.
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2020 21:19:05 +0100 (MET)
By Joe JACKSON

London, Feb 17, 2020 (AFP) - Britain on Monday battled the fallout from Storm Dennis after the second severe storm in seven days left one woman dead over the weekend.   Winds of more than 90 miles (140 kilometres) an hour, along with more than a month's worth of rain in 48 hours in some places, led officials to issue rare "danger to life" warnings.   A 55-year-old woman was found dead after being swept away by near the flood-prone town of Tenbury Wells in western England.   "We are all devastated," her family said in a statement after a body was discovered.

James Bevan, chief executive of the Environment Agency, which is responsible for flood protection, said more than 400 homes in England had been flooded while at least 1,000 agency staff were working "to protect and support those communities which have been hit".   "This is not yet over," he told BBC radio.   "We still have many flood warnings in force and we may still see significant flooding in the middle of this week from larger rivers."   The storm also pummelled much of France, with some 20,000 people without electricity on Monday after suffering power cuts in the northwest.

- 'More extreme' -
In Britain, more than 600 warnings and alerts -- a record number -- were issued on Sunday, extending from the River Tweed on the border of England and Scotland to Cornwall in the southwest.   After a day of torrential rain, major flooding incidents were declared in south Wales and parts of west central England.  In northern England, the defence ministry deployed troops in West Yorkshire, which had also been hit by flooding from last weekend's Storm Ciara.   There were fears that rivers there could burst their banks.

Newly appointed environment secretary George Eustice said the government had done "everything that we can do with a significant sum of money" to combat increased flooding.    "We'll never be able to protect every single household just because of the nature of climate change and the fact that these weather events are becoming more extreme," he said.   Youth climate activists gathering for a national conference in Staffordshire, west central England, were forced to cancel the event because of the storm.   "There's a bleak irony in our being beaten back by climate change," 15-year-old attendee Sophia said in a statement released by organisers.

- 'Supercomputer' announced -
Two rivers in south Wales burst their banks on Sunday, prompting rescue workers to launch operations to evacuate hundreds of people and their pets trapped in their homes.   Police said a man in his 60s died after entering the River Tawe, north of the Welsh city of Swansea, but later clarified that the death was not "linked to the adverse weather".

Meanwhile the bodies of two men were pulled from rough seas off the south coast of England on Saturday as the storm barrelled in.   Britain's Coastguard said it had sent a helicopter and rescue team to join navy and other search vessels after receiving reports of a man overboard in the sea near Margate, Kent.   "After many hours of searching, a body was sadly found in the water... and was brought to shore," it added.

Around the same time in nearby Herne Bay, emergency responders discovered another dead man following reports a person had been pulled from the sea, according to Kent police.   In a timely announcement the Met Office, Britain's national weather service, said Monday it would invest £1.2 billion ($1.6 billion) in a state-of-the-art supercomputer to improve forecasting.   The government claims it is the world's "most powerful weather and climate supercomputer".
Date: Sat 8 Feb 2020
Source: Food Safety News [edited]
<https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2020/02/nearly-200-ill-in-uk-after-eating-oysters/>

Almost 200 people have fallen ill after eating oysters in the United Kingdom in recent months. Since November 2019 there have been at least 180 reported cases of gastroenteritis associated with oyster consumption linked to multiple food outlets and oyster producers. A Public Health England spokeswoman told Food Safety News that norovirus had been identified as the cause of a number of these outbreaks.

"Public Health England is working with the Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland as well as affected local authorities to investigate outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness reported since November 2019 associated with consumption of oysters."

Officials say there is no connection to the norovirus outbreaks from oysters in Europe. In Sweden, 70 people fell sick after eating oysters, some of which came from domestic production and others from France. In Denmark, 180 people were ill after eating oysters from France. In France, 1033 people have been sickened and 21 needed hospital treatment. Italy and Netherlands also reported outbreaks linked to live oysters from France. Products were also recalled due to potential norovirus contamination in Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Hong Kong, and Singapore.

A spokeswoman for the Food Standards Agency told Food Safety News that it has identified that the outbreaks appear to be linked to consumption of oysters from several different harvesters. "We have identified from our investigations that there are numerous sites around the UK where oysters are produced and harvested. We have identified producers in East and South West of England and in Scotland that have supplied oysters that were eaten by a number of people reporting illness."

Two harvesters in the South and West of England voluntarily ceased production in mid-November [2019], and a harvester in the East of England decided to stop harvesting in early January 2020. When asked why there haven't been any product recalls when illnesses have been reported from November 2019, the spokeswoman said: "Oysters have a short shelf-life, and by the time cases of illness are reported, the affected oysters have normally been consumed. The official advice to consumers remains the same as usual: people should be aware of the risks of eating raw oysters. Elderly people, pregnant women, very young children, and people who have a weakened immune system should avoid eating raw or lightly cooked shellfish to reduce their risk of getting food poisoning. To prevent passing norovirus on to family and friends, it's vital to follow good personal hygiene practices."

The main symptoms of norovirus illness are diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, and stomach cramps. Symptoms can also include low-grade fever, headache, chills, muscle aches, and fatigue. People who are ill should drink plenty of liquids to replace lost body fluids and prevent dehydration.

Symptoms appear 1-2 days after being infected and typically last for 2-3 days. Norovirus is transmitted by having contaminated food or water or from person to person through contact with the skin, objects, or inhaling airborne particles.  [Byline: Joe Whitworth]
=================
[Researchers have analyzed the genetic sequences of 1077 samples of noroviruses found in oysters. Some sequences had been stockpiled in genetic databases since 1983. The scientists found that 80% of the known human noroviruses matched those found in oysters. The majority of the matches were in oysters from coastal waters, more likely to be contaminated with human sewage.

Noroviruses mutate very quickly, as do influenza viruses, and big outbreaks usually begin after a new strain emerges. There was a "convergence" between new strains circulating in oysters and those circulating in humans, the researchers also found.

Yongjie Wang, a food science specialist at Shanghai Ocean University and lead author of the study, concluded that oysters were an important reservoir for human noroviruses, a place where they can hide between outbreaks and mutate. They also can be transmitted back to humans, presumably when oysters are eaten raw.

Citation: Yongxin Yu, et al. Molecular Epidemiology of Oyster-Related Human Noroviruses and Their Global Genetic Diversity and Temporal-Geographical Distribution from 1983 to 2014. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015; 81(21): 7615-7624. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.01729-15. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Europe: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6010>]
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