Date: Sat, 29 Feb 2020 22:42:54 +0100 (MET)

Dublin, Feb 29, 2020 (AFP) - Ireland on Saturday confirmed its first case of coronavirus after a man who had returned from northern Italy tested positive, the government said.   Health officials said the man, from the east of Ireland, was "receiving appropriate medical care" after they followed "established protocols" in testing and diagnosing him with COVID-19.   "The case is associated with travel from an affected area in northern Italy, rather than contact with another confirmed case," the Department of Health said in a statement.

The authorities were working rapidly to identify any contacts the patient may have had, "to provide them with information and advice to prevent further spread," it added.   Health Minister Simon Harris said the development was "not unexpected".    "We have been preparing for this since January," he added.   The COVID-19 epidemic continues to spread around the world, with cases now recorded in several dozen countries.   More than 2,900 people have been killed and nearly 86,000 infected.

Qatar and Ecuador both confirmed their first cases on Saturday and the US announced the first death.   Ireland's Six Nations match with Italy in Dublin on March 7 was postponed this week due to the epidemic.   Although Saturday saw its first confirmed case, neighbouring Northern Ireland -- part of Britain -- had already recorded a positive test in recent days while mainland UK has seen 23 cases so far.    In the northern Irish case, the woman involved had travelled through Dublin Airport on her way home to Northern Ireland from northern Italy.
Date: Fri 17 Jan 2020
Source: RTE [abridged, edited]
<https://www.rte.ie/news/newslens/2020/0117/1107997-mumps/>

Outbreaks of mumps have become widespread around the country, the Health Service Executive (HSE) has said. There were 132 cases of mumps reported to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre last week.

Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection, and the most common symptom of mumps is a swelling of the parotid glands. The glands are located on both sides of the face, and the swelling gives a person a distinctive "hamster face" appearance.

Speaking on RTE's Morning Ireland, Dr. Kevin Kelleher, the HSE's Assistant National Director of Public Health, said it is happening because a large portion of 15- to 30-year-old people [do not have] full protection against mumps. He said not all of them are getting the MMR [measles, mumps, rubella] vaccine or are getting only one dose, when people need at least 2 doses to be fully protected.

The HSE is warning schools, colleges and universities about the outbreak.
Date: Sat 4 Jan 2020
Source: The Irish Sun [edited]
<https://www.thesun.ie/news/4951599/mercy-university-hospital-cork-bans-visitor-flu-outbreak/>

People have been banned from visiting patients at the Mercy University Hospital (MUH) in Cork after an outbreak of influenza. Visitor restrictions are also in place at Cork University Hospital, The Mater Hospital and University Hospital Waterford.

A Mercy University Hospital spokesman said: "The risk is to patients from visitors, because of the virulence of flu in the community." All visitors have been banned [except] for in exceptional circumstances. The notice came into effect at 8:30 pm on Friday [3 Jan 2020], and the situation being reviewed on a daily basis.

The ban does not include people visiting young patients, those who are critically ill or those being treated in the intensive care unit. The MUH said: "Visiting is prohibited to the hospital in the interest of patient safety and the hospital is seeking the public's co-operation with the restrictions."

In September [2019], the HSE [Ireland's national health service] had urged people to the get seasonal flu jab, which protects against 4 strains of the flu virus. The health service [recommends] that people get the new vaccine each year because the flu viruses which affect people change each year.

The flu vaccine works by helping the immune system produce antibodies to fight the influenza virus. If a person has been vaccinated and they come into contact with the virus, these antibodies will attack it and stop the person from getting sick. The flu vaccine doesn't contain any live viruses and therefore it cannot give people the flu. [Byline: Danny De Vaal]
Date: 27 Dec 2019
Source: Cork Beo [edited]
<https://www.corkbeo.ie/news/local-news/four-cork-hospitals-enforce-strict-17481170>

Four Cork hospitals have been forced to put visiting restrictions in place after a high volume of patients were confirmed with the flu.  Cork University Hospital, Bantry General Hospital, Mallow General Hospital, and Mercy University Hospital have all been affected by the outbreak. They are asking patients with flu symptoms to see their local GP instead of heading straight to the emergency department.  The situation is currently being monitored, and the hospitals will release further updates in the coming days.

A spokesperson for the hospitals said: "Due to a high volume of patients confirmed with influenza in Cork University Hospital, Bantry General Hospital, Mallow General Hospital, and Mercy University Hospital, strict visiting restrictions have been put in place. The hospital would also like to remind the public of the importance of performing hand hygiene when visiting hospitals and would like to thank the public for their cooperation.

It is also important to note that it is not too late to get the flu vaccine, and it is provided free of charge for people in at risk groups, which include everyone aged 65 years and over, pregnant women, anyone over 6 months of age with a long term illness requiring regular medical follow-up such as chronic lung disease, chronic heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or those with lower immunity due to disease or treatment."  [Byline: Cormac O'Shea]
Date: Mon 9 Dec 2019
Source: Irish Times [abridged, edited]
<https://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/biggest-mumps-outbreak-in-a-decade-continues-with-103-new-cases-last-week-1.4109746>

The biggest mumps outbreak in a decade shows no sign of abating, with 103 new cases reported last week. So far this year [2019], 2458 cases of mumps have been reported, compared to 563 notified in all of 2018, according to the latest figures.

With the current outbreak mostly affecting teenagers and young adults, scores of schools and colleges have been affected. The Health Service Executive advises those diagnosed with the disease to stay at home for at least 5 days after their salivary glands swell in order to prevent the infection spreading.

The worst-affected part of the state is the greater Dublin area, which accounted for 1126 of the cases so far this year [2019], according to the HSE's Health Protection Surveillance Centre. In contrast, just 84 cases have been recorded in the Southern Health Board area.

Men are slightly more affected than women, and 869 cases have been recorded among 15-19-year-olds alone.

Public health officials have blamed the current outbreak on a dip in the MMR (measles/mumps/rubella) vaccination rates 20 years ago. This resulted from publicity surrounding the since-discredited claims by Dr Andrew Wakefield linking the vaccine to a rise in autism cases.

Doctors say the MMR vaccine is the best way to prevent the disease and its complications, though it is estimated to be only 88% effective in preventing mumps, and effectiveness wanes over time.

Since 1988 when MMR was 1st introduced, the largest outbreak of mumps was reported in 2009 when more than 3600 cases were notified.

Fortunately, there is no sign of a measles outbreak this year [2019]. Some 75 cases have been reported in the 1st 11 months of 2019, 40 of them in the greater Dublin area.  [Byline: Paul Cullen]
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