Date: Wed 17 Apr 2019
Source: CNN [edited]
<https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/17/health/measles-israel-flight-attendant/index.html>

An Israeli flight attendant has slipped into a coma after contracting measles, according to health officials. The 43-year-old woman has encephalitis, or inflammation of the brain, a well-known and potentially deadly complication of the virus. She was otherwise healthy before getting measles.  "She's been in a deep coma for 10 days, and we're now just hoping for the best," said Dr. Itamar Grotto, associate director general of Israel's Ministry of Health.

The flight attendant, who works for El Al, the Israeli national airline, might have contracted the virus in New York, in Israel, or on a flight between the 2, Grotto said. Health authorities do not believe that she spread the virus to anyone on the flights.  She's unable to breathe on her own and is on a respirator in the intensive care unit at Meir Medical Center in Kfar Saba, near Tel Aviv. She developed a fever on 31 Mar [2019] and entered the hospital that same day.

Ongoing measles outbreaks in the USA and Israel started with parents who've chosen not to vaccinate their children, according to health authorities. Authorities believe that the flight attendant was vaccinated as a child, but the vaccine isn't perfect, and in her case, it didn't work.  "I knew this was going to happen sooner or later," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University and an adviser to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on vaccines. "We have the reintroduction of a serious viral infection with a population that's withholding the vaccine from their children, and now it's spreading beyond that population."

Like many others of her generation around the world, the flight attendant, who has not been identified, received only one dose of the measles vaccine when she was a child.  It wasn't discovered until later that one dose is only about 93% effective. More recently -- in the USA, starting in 1989 -- children have been given 2 doses, which is about 97% effective, according to the CDC. It's not known why most people who get measles recover fully while others have devastating complications.

About one out of every 1000 children who gets measles will develop encephalitis, according to the CDC. This can lead to convulsions and leave a child deaf or with an intellectual disability.  Additionally, one or 2 out of 1000 US children who get measles will die from it. Worldwide, the illness is fatal in one or 2 out of every 100 children. No fatalities have been reported in the USA from measles this year [2019] or last year [2018]. In Israel, a toddler and an elderly woman died last year [2018] of the disease. In the European Union, 35 people died of the disease in 2018, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

There have been 3920 cases of measles in Israel from March 2018 through 11 Apr [2019], said Grotto, who is also a professor of epidemiology and public health at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.  In the USA, there have been fewer than 1000 cases in about the same time period.
 
In Europe, there were 34 383 cases of measles based on data reported to the World Health Organization from April of last year [2018] to April of this year [2019]. Ukraine had the highest number of cases in the past 12 months, with more than 72 000, followed by Madagascar and India with more than 69 000 and 60 000 cases, respectively. WHO warned that there are delays in reporting and that this data may be incomplete.

Grotto said there was a surge of cases in Israel last fall [2018] when large numbers of ultra-Orthodox Israelis traveled to Ukraine on a religious pilgrimage during the Jewish New Year. Ukraine has had more than 72 000 measles cases this year [2019], more than any other country, according to the World Health Organization.

About 85% to 90% of Israeli measles cases have been among ultra-Orthodox Jews, Grotto said. There's nothing in Judaism that teaches against vaccination; on the contrary, rabbis encourage vaccination in keeping with Jewish teachings on protecting your health and the health of others.

Ultra-Orthodox Jews tend to have large families, and Grotto said those who don't vaccinate tend to have practical, not ideological, reasons. "Sometimes, they vaccinate their 1st or 2nd child, but with so many children, they don't always have time to vaccinate them all," he said. "They're not against vaccines. They have nothing against them ideologically."

To turn the tide in the outbreak, Israeli public health authorities have increased vaccine clinic hours, opened mobile clinics in religious neighborhoods and taken out ads in newspapers in religious communities.  [Byline: Elizabeth Cohen]
=======================
[Additional information: "A 10-year-old boy on the same flight also has suffered permanent brain damage from measles infection. In November [2018], an 18-month-old toddler in Jerusalem died of the disease, the 1st recorded death from measles in Israel in the past 15 years. A month later, an 82-year-old woman became the 2nd fatality." <https://www.jpost.com/Breaking-News/El-Al-stewardess-10-year-old-child-in-coma-after-contracting-measles-587236>.  Communicated by: ProMED-mail Rapporteur Kunihiko Iizuka]

[There is concern that transmission will increase as family and friends gather for Passover. - ProMED Mod.LK]
Date: Mon 1 Apr 2019
Source: Israel National News [abridged, edited]
<http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/261203>

An unvaccinated new mother at the Poriya Medical Center in northern Israel was diagnosed Sunday [31 Mar 2019] evening with measles and placed in an isolation room, Kan 11 reported.

All 26 new-borns in the nursery, their mothers, and the baby born to the infected woman were given immunoglobulin.

The infected woman gave birth on Fri 29 Mar 2019 evening and broke out with a rash the next day. Examinations showed that she was ill with measles.

The hospital emphasized that the issue "is being dealt with and is under control. There is no danger to other new mothers or patients."
 
According to the Ministry of Health, by 14 Feb 2019, there had been 3505 confirmed cases of measles. By 18 Mar 2019, the number had jumped to 3701 confirmed cases for a total of 196 new cases in 4 weeks, or approximately 6 new cases every day.

Since then, there have been several additional cases, including 3 daycare children in Lod.

Jerusalem leads the outbreak with 1338 confirmed cases, and Beit Shemesh places 2nd, with 413. Lagging behind are Tzfat (265), Beitar Illit (228), Bnei Brak (206), Modi'in Illit (114), and Tel Aviv-Yafo (102).
 
In the double digits are Tiberias (51), Rehovot (39), Petah Tikva (35), Migdal Ha'emek (28), Hatzor Hagalilit (26), Or Haganuz (25), and Immanuel (24). Elon Moreh, Kiryat Ye'arim, and Bat Ayin have each registered 23 measles cases, while both Hevron and Yitzhar have registered 21.

Elad and Ashdod have each had 19 measles cases, with Arad and Ofakim following close behind with 18 each. Kokhav Yaakov and Ramat Gan have both had 16 measles cases, while Itamar, Haifa, and Karmiel have registered 15 each. Four localities have had 14 measles cases: Givat Ze'ev, Rishon Lezion, Shiloh, and Hadera. The southern cities of Eilat and, Bat Yam have both registered 12 measles cases, as have Susia, and Rekhasim. Bringing up the end of the double-digit cases are Kfar Shamai and and Ma'alot-Tarshiha, with 10 cases each.

Dozens of other cities and towns have had single-digit numbers of measles cases.  [Byline: Chana Roberts]
========================
[HealthMap/ProMED map of Israel: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/90>. - ProMED Mod.MPP]
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2019 19:08:11 +0100

Jerusalem, Jan 21, 2019 (AFP) - Israel's economic capital Tel Aviv on Monday announced plans to raise taxes for short-term accommodation provided by services like Airbnb to match an increase in long-term rentals.   "The aim is to create an equilibrium" between tourist accommodation and long-term rentals, the Tel Aviv municipality said in a statement.   Several cities, including Paris, Berlin and Amsterdam, also have taken steps to regulate services like Airbnb which offer short-term accommodation to tourists mainly.

In October, Ireland announced plans to rein in popular short-term rental services such as Airbnb -- whose European headquarters are in Dublin -- in a bid to address a historic housing shortage.   The Tel Aviv municipality did not say by how much it would increase property taxes or when the new policy would take effect.
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:03:37 +0100
By Stephen Weizman

Ramon Airport, Israel, Jan 21, 2019 (AFP) - Israel inaugurated a new international airport Monday in its desert south meant to boost tourism to the nearby Red Sea and serve as an emergency alternative to Tel Aviv's Ben-Gurion airport.   Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attended the inauguraion ceremony at the sleek, glassy terminal, arriving on the ceremonial first flight.   "Ramon airport, this is Arkia 683, we're very excited," Netanyahu said from the cockpit on arrival in an exchange with the tower relayed over loudspeakers.   Initially Ramon Airport will handle only domestic flights, operated by Israeli carriers Arkia and Israir.    A date has not yet been given for the start of international flights.

The new airport, named after Ilan Ramon, Israel's first astronaut who died in the crash of the space shuttle Columbia, will in future host jumbo jets from around the globe.   Its website says that it will be able to initially handle up to two million passengers annually, but will be able to expand to a capacity of 4.2 million by 2030.   It says that it has a 3,600-metre-long runway and apron parking space for nine "large and wide-body aircraft".   It also has freight-handling facilities.   Ramon is about 18 kilometres (11 miles) from the Israeli Red Sea resort of Eilat and the adjacent Jordanian port of Aqaba.   Low-cost and charter airlines currently flying to Ovda airport, about 60 kilometres from Eilat, will move to Ramon, its website says.   They include Ryanair, Wizz Air, easyJet, SAS, Finnair and Ural Airlines.

- Anti-missile fence -
It will also replace Eilat's small municipal airfield, where for decades arriving aircraft have swooped past hotel towers.    Construction costs for the new airport have been put at 1.7 billion shekels ($455 million, 395 million euros).   Work began in 2013 but original specifications for the project were revised to allow for upgrades.   The Israel Airports Authority (IAA) has said that the plans for the Ramon project were revised in light of lessons learned during the 2014 Gaza war.   "In an emergency, not only will Israel's entire passenger air fleet be able to land and park there, but also additional aircraft," the IAA says.

After a rocket fired by Hamas militants in Gaza hit near the perimeter of Ben Gurion airport in 2014, international carriers suspended flights.   Israeli media have said that a 26-metre (85 foot) high, 4.5-kilometre (2.8 mile) long "smart" anti-missile fence has been installed to help protect Ramon, which is adjacent to the border with Jordan.    The IAA refused to comment on those reports.   Tourism brings in significant revenue for Israel, accounting for $5.8 billion in 2017, the last full year for which figures are available.   Arrivals to the country of more than eight million citizens hit a record 3.6 million last year, the Israeli tourism ministry said.   The United States, Russia, France, Germany and Britain accounted for most of the visitors.
Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2019 16:51:32 +0100

Jerusalem, Jan 1, 2019 (AFP) - Israel plans to inaugurate a new international airport in the south of the country near the Red Sea later this month, the transport minister announced Tuesday.   The Ramon airport will begin with only domestic flights before gradually moving toward full operation, Transport Minister Israel Katz said in a statement.

The inauguration ceremony will be held on January 21 with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in attendance.   Initially domestic flights will be operated by the Arkia and Israir carriers. A timeframe was not given for when the airport will be fully operational.   Construction costs for the airport have been put at 1.7 billion shekels ($455 million, 395 million euros). Work got underway in 2013 but original specifications for the project were revised to allow for upgrades.

The airport will be some 18 kilometres (11 miles) from the Israeli Red Sea resort of Eilat and near the Jordanian port of Aqaba.   Its website says that it will be able to initially handle up to two million passengers annually, but will be able to expand to a capacity of 4.2 million by 2030.   It will replace Ovda airport, some 60 kilometres away from Eilat, and will be able to serve as an alternative to Ben-Gurion International Airport near Tel Aviv during times of emergency.   The new airport is named after Ilan Ramon, Israel's first astronaut who died in the crash of the space shuttle Columbia.
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