Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2019 12:11:43 +0200 (METDST)
By Kyoko HASEGAWA

Tokyo, Sept 9, 2019 (AFP) - A powerful typhoon that battered Tokyo overnight with record winds killed two people, police said Monday, as cancelled trains caused commuter chaos and more than 100 flights were scrapped, leaving thousands stranded at the airport.   Typhoon Faxai, packing winds of up to 207 kilometres (129 miles) per hour, made landfall in Chiba just east of the capital before dawn, after barrelling through Tokyo Bay.   The transport disruptions unleashed by the storm came less than two weeks before the start of the Rugby World Cup, and delayed the arrival of the Australian team -- a reminder that Japan's typhoon season could present challenges for organisers.

Police confirmed two people were killed in the storm -- a woman in her fifties who was found dead in Tokyo and an elderly man in the neighbouring Chiba prefecture.   Security camera footage showed that high winds pushed her across a street and into a wall, while the 87-year-old man was found dead in the woods under a fallen tree.   The storm injured more than 30 people, including a woman who sustained serious injuries after gusts toppled a protective netting structure at a golf driving range onto nearby houses.   Non-compulsory evacuation orders were issued to hundreds of thousands and authorities said more than 2,000 people had taken refuge in shelters at one point.

- Commuters stranded -
The strong winds downed trees and power lines. Nearly 760,000 households were still without electricity in the Tokyo area Monday evening.    Scaffolding was ripped from buildings and protective sheeting hung to keep construction debris off the streets was crumpled and torn by the storm.

While the damage was relatively light given the wind speeds, it was enough to cause chaos in the capital's notoriously busy morning commute.   The overland East Japan Railway train system was largely halted in the early hours of operation while tracks were checked for fallen trees and other debris.   The storm also caused delays and stoppages on subway lines, leading to massive crowds at some stations in the busy metropolitan area that is home to 36 million people.

Bullet train services that were suspended during the storm had largely resumed, though some were operating on a reduced schedule. Some roads were blocked by downed trees.   And trains running to and from Narita International Airport were halted, with buses and taxis the only options left to those arriving or hoping to fly out.   Thousands of people were stranded at the airport Monday evening, with officials preparing to distribute blankets and food.

- Wallabies arrival delayed -
At least 138 domestic flights were cancelled, with the weather even delaying the arrival of the Wallabies in Tokyo on Monday ahead of the World Cup that kicks off on September 20.   The French team managed to sneak in just ahead of the typhoon and reach their training camp near Mount Fuji.

By mid-Monday morning, the storm had moved back offshore and was headed northeast away from Japan, back into the Pacific.   The weather agency warned that landslides were still possible in Chiba as well as the northern Fukushima region as the storm headed away from land.   Japan is used to severe tropical storms and typhoons during late summer and autumn.   Strong typhoon Krosa lashed western Japan in mid-August, bringing strong winds and torrential rain that claimed one life.   And in late August, heavy rains left three people dead when massive floods also hit western Japan.

But this year, the typhoon season coincides with the Rugby World Cup, presenting a possible headache for teams and organisers.   Tournament rules say that if a pool match has to be scrapped due to extreme weather, it is classed as a draw, which could have a major impact on what is set to be a very close competition.   Nicholas van Santen, a spokesman for Rugby World Cup organisers, said they were working closely with the teams to minimise any disruption to their training schedules.   "In the days and hours leading up to the typhoon making landfall, the organising committee monitored the situation closely with the tournament's weather information provider and the relevant authorities," said Van Santen.
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 05:21:13 +0200 (METDST)

Tokyo, Aug 28, 2019 (AFP) - Japanese authorities on Wednesday issued a rare evacuation order for 240,000 people in the country's southwest over flood and landslide fears, as officials confirmed a man was killed in heavy rains.   The evacuation orders came after the Japan Meteorological Agency issued its highest-level alert for several parts of the northern Kyushu region.   The alert is issued "if there is a significant ikelihood of catastrophes" and is activated once a disaster is declared, ordering people to take measures to protect their lives.   Nearly a million more people are under a lower-level evacuation advisory over the heavy rains.   Evacuation orders and advisories are issued by local authorities but are not mandatory even though officials urge residents to heed them.

The fire and disaster management agency said it had already received multiple reports of houses flooded in Saga prefecture and officials were working to confirm details of the damage.   "We are seeing unprecedented levels of heavy rains in cities where we issued special warnings," the Japan Meteorological Agency added in a hastily organised press conference Wednesday morning.   "It is a situation where you should do your best to protect your lives," weather agency official Yasushi Kajiwara said.   He also urged those currently facing evacuation advisories to act before the warning was upgraded further.   "Please don't wait," he said.   The JMA's emergency warnings affect areas in Saga, Fukuoka and Nagasaki in northern Kyushu, where the rains have already killed one person.   A Saga official confirmed to AFP a man was found dead in his car on Wednesday after being swept away by floodwaters.

The severe weather has also disrupted transport, with train services partially suspended in parts of northern Kyushu and some roads closed.   Footage on local television showed rivers swollen by rainwater and parked cars surrounded by muddy brown water rising nearly up to the vehicles' roofs.   In some parts of the affected area, small landslides have already been reported.   Inside Saga station, stranded passengers were sat on benches with water around their ankles.   Japanese authorities regularly urge people to take evacuation orders seriously, particularly after disastrous heavy rains last summer in Japan's west killed more than 200 people.   Many of the deaths were blamed on the fact that evacuation orders were issued too late and some people failed to follow them. Entire neighbourhoods were buried beneath landslides or submerged in floodwaters during the disasters.
Date: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 20:21:28 +0200 (METDST)

Tokyo, Aug 15, 2019 (AFP) - A powerful tropical storm lashed Japan on Thursday, bringing strong winds and torrential rain that claimed at least one life, prompted warnings of landslides and flooding, and sparked evacuation advisories and travel chaos at a peak holiday period.   Severe Tropical Storm Krosa -- one notch below a typhoon -- slammed into the southern Hiroshima region, packing wind gusts of up to 126 kilometres (78 miles) per hour.   Dramatic television footage showed violent winds uprooting trees, snapping lampposts and spinning pods on a Ferris wheel.

Meanwhile, high waves smashed into a breakwater, engulfing a 10-metre lighthouse, while swollen rivers broke their banks and swamped nearby roads.  Authorities issued a voluntary evacuation advisory to around 430,000 people in the storm's path, although few appeared to have heeded the warning.

A 82-year-old man was confirmed dead after he fell in the sea in Hiroshima while trying to moor his boat, a local government spokesman said.    Japanese news agency Kyodo reported that a total of 49 people were injured from Wednesday to Thursday.   "We still have intermittent downpours," said Takayoshi Sugimoto, a disaster management official in the southwestern province of Tokushima.   "We will remain vigilant," he told AFP.

The national disaster management agency said a party of 18 people, including children, were stranded during a barbeque in a valley when a river rose rapidly on Wednesday. They were rescued Thursday morning.   Krosa also sparked travel chaos as people battled to return to major cities following the Obon holiday.   More than 800 domestic flights were cancelled to and from cities in western Japan, and bullet train services were either scrapped or sharply reduced.   Ferries connecting the southern Shikoku island and other parts of Japan were also cancelled as high waves lashed the coast.

The storm brought strong winds and downpours to the capital Tokyo.   Several ceremonies commemorating the end of World War II were cancelled in western Japan due to bad weather.    Krosa weakened significantly from earlier in the week as it stalled in the Pacific Ocean but it boasts an unusually large eye, meaning it is likely to dump rain over a wide area.   It was moving north at 35 kilometres (22 miles) per hour and the rain was expected to last for an extended period.   The storm crossed Japan's mainland and hit the Sea of Japan late Thursday.
Date: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 09:43:43 +0200 (METDST)

Tokyo, Aug 15, 2019 (AFP) - A powerful tropical storm lashed Japan on Thursday, bringing strong winds and torrential rain that claimed at least one life, prompted warnings of landslides and flooding, and sparked evacuation advisories and travel chaos at a peak holiday period.   Severe Tropical Storm Krosa -- one notch below a typhoon -- slammed into the southern Hiroshima region, packing wind gusts of up to 126 kilometres (89 miles) per hour.   Dramatic television footage showed violent winds uprooting trees, snapping lampposts and spinning pods on a ferris wheel.

Meanwhile, high waves smashed into a breakwater, engulfing a 10-metre lighthouse, while swollen rivers broke their banks and swamped nearby roads.    Authorities issued a voluntary evacuation advisory to around 430,000 people in the storm's path although few appeared to have heeded the warning.   A 82-year-old man was confirmed dead after he fell in the sea in Hiroshima trying to moor his boat, a local government spokesman said.

Public broadcaster NHK and local authorities said at least 21 people sustained injuries, including a man in his 50s, who broke his leg.   "We still have intermittent downpours," said Takayoshi Sugimoto, a disaster management official in the southwestern province of Tokushima.   "We will remain vigilant as more rain is expected in the afternoon," he told AFP.   The national disaster management agency said a party of 18 people including children got stranded during a barbeque in a valley when the river rose rapidly on Wednesday. They were rescued Thursday morning.   Krosa also sparked travel chaos as people battled to return to major cities following the Obon holiday.   At least 761 domestic flights were cancelled to and from cities in western Japan and bullet train services were either scrapped or sharply reduced.

Ferries connecting the southern Shikoku island and other parts of Japan were also cancelled as high waves lashed the coast.   Krosa weakened significantly from earlier in the week as it stalled in the Pacific Ocean but it boasts an unusually large eye, meaning it is likely to dump rain over a wide area.   It was moving north at 30 kilometres per hour and the rain is expected to last for an extended period.   The storm is forecast to cross Japan's mainland and hit the Sea of Japan by Thursday night, reducing its strength.
Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:14:26 +0200 (METDST)

Tokyo, Aug 14, 2019 (AFP) - Japan was bracing Wednesday for a severe tropical storm expected to bring heavy rain and strong winds during the peak holiday period, with dozens of flights and bullet train services cancelled.   The storm, named Krosa, is expected to churn slowly over western parts of the country, potentially affecting millions of people returning to major cities from their hometowns after the traditional "Obon" summer holidays.    Japan Airlines scrapped 62 domestic flights to and from airports in southern Japan for Wednesday.   "All the flights from and to Miyazaki and Tanegashima airports have been cancelled and partially for Amami airport," a spokesman told AFP.

All Nippon Airways meanwhile cancelled 34 flights for Miyazaki airport. Both airlines said they would decide later how many flights they will cancel for Thursday, when the storm is forecast to make landfall.   Meanwhile, West Japan Railway announced the cancellation of Thursday's shinkansen bullet train service between Osaka and southwestern Japan.   Krosa, which is packing maximum gusts of 144 kilometres (90 miles) per hour, was expected to hit the southwestern Shikoku island on Thursday before moving across western Japan, the Japanese Meteorological Agency said.   The agency warned of the risk of landslides and flooding due to heavy rain.
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