Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2020 16:38:39 +0100 (MET)
By Hiroshi HIYAMA

Tokyo, Jan 16, 2020 (AFP) - Japan has confirmed a case of a mystery virus that first emerged in China and is from the same family as the deadly SARS pathogen, authorities said Thursday.   It appears to be only the second time the novel coronavirus has been detected outside China, after the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed a case in Thailand.   Japan's health ministry said a man who had visited the central Chinese city of Wuhan, the apparent epicentre of the outbreak, was hospitalised on January 10, four days after his return to Japan. He reported a persistent fever.

Tests on the patient, who was released from hospital on Wednesday, confirmed he was infected with the new virus.   "This is the first domestic discovery of a pneumonia case related to the new coronavirus," the ministry said in a statement.   "We will continue active epidemiological research while also coordinating efforts with the World Health Organization and related agencies to conduct a risk assessment."   The outbreak has killed one person so far, with 41 patients reported in Wuhan.

The outbreak has caused alarm because the new virus is from the same family as the pathogen that causes SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed 349 people in mainland China and 299 in Hong Kong in 2002 and 2003.   Authorities in Wuhan said a seafood market was the centre of the outbreak. It was closed on January 1.   Japanese authorities said the man had not visited the market and that it was possible he had been in contact with a person infected with the virus while in Wuhan.

- Outbreak in Japan 'unlikely' -
Health ministry official Eiji Hinoshita told reporters that the risk of the disease spreading from the patient was considered low, with careful checks done on those who had been in close contact with him.   "At this point, we feel it is unlikely this will lead to a dramatic outbreak," he said, adding that the patient was no longer suffering a fever and was recuperating at home.

Officials declined to give further information on the man, including his nationality, citing privacy concerns.   Local media said the patient was a Chinese national in his 30s living in Kanagawa, just southwest of Tokyo.   Public broadcaster NHK said he had already recovered and was resting at home, as quarantine officials at Tokyo's Narita airport boosted health checks on all travellers.

The health ministry urged people who develop a cough or fever after visiting Wuhan to wear a surgical mask and "swiftly visit a medical institution".   Hinoshita said Japan would need to be on guard ahead of the Lunar New Year, a popular travel period in China.   "It is expected that Japan will see many visitors from China," he said.   It is not yet clear whether the mystery virus can be transmitted between humans, but on Wednesday authorities said it was possible it had spread inside a family.

The woman diagnosed in Thailand, who is in a stable condition, also said she had not visited the Wuhan seafood market.   And WHO doctor Maria Van Kerkhove on Tuesday said she "wouldn't be surprised if there was some limited human-to-human transmission, especially among families who have close contact with one another".   Hong Kong authorities on Tuesday said several dozen people had been hospitalised with fever or respiratory symptoms after travelling to Wuhan, but no cases of the new virus have so far been confirmed.
Date: Tue 7 Jan 2020
Source: National Institute of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Center for Infectious Diseases [in Japanese, trans. & summ. Rapp. KI, edited]
<https://www.niid.go.jp/niid/images/epi/rubella/2019/rubella191225.pdf>

Urgent Information on Rubella Outbreak in Japan: as of 25 Dec 2019
------------------------------------------------------------------
Rubella reports in week 51 of 2019 [16 Dec - 22 Dec 2019], 6 cases were diagnosed with rubella and reported.

Rubella in weeks 1-51
---------------------
The cumulative number of reported cases was 2294, an increase of 6288 from 2288 in week 50 (Figures 1, 2-1, and 2-2). Even if diagnosed in the 51st week, reports reported late on or after [26 Dec 2019] are not included, so care must be taken in interpreting the number of reports.

Number of reported cases of congenital rubella syndrome
-------------------------------------------------------
The number of cases of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome reported since the start of notification of all cases in 2008 (Figure 3), 2014 report. Since then, there have been no reports of congenital rubella syndrome
(<http://www.niid.go.jp/niid/ja/rubella-m-111/rubella-top/700-idsc/5072-rubella-crs-20141008.html>)

A total of 4 people were reported, 1 each in weeks 4, 17, 24, and 44 in 2019
Presumed infected area: Saitama Prefecture 1 person, Tokyo 2 people, Osaka Prefecture 1 person.
Gender: 3 males, 1 female
Kuching vaccination history: Yes (1 time, vaccination year unknown, type unknown) 1 person, 3 unknown, maternal rubella history during pregnancy: Yes 1 person, unknown 2 people, none 1).

Rubella reports since 2013
--------------------------
Since the epidemic of 2013 (14,344), there were 319 in 2014, 163 in 2015, 126 in 2016 and 91 in 2017.

Despite a downward trend (Figures 2-1, 2-2, 3), 2946 people were reported in 2018, and 2294 in week 51 in 2019.

Number of reports by region
---------------------------
By region, Tokyo (854: no increase from week 50), Kanagawa (293: one increase from week 50), Yo-ken (200: no increase from week 50), Saitama (197: no increase from week 50), Osaka (130: no increase)

(No increase from 49 weeks), with more than 100 reports (Figures 4 and 7). Week 51 is for Aichi prefecture (3 people) (Figure 5).

The largest number was 250 from the Kinki region (11%), 168 from the Kyushu region (7%), 125 from the Chubu region (5%), 96 people (4%) from the Chugoku / Shikoku region and 72 (3%) from the Hokkaido / Tohoku region were reported. No report is high. Only in Chichi Prefecture (Figures 4 and 7).

Symptoms (with duplication)
----------------------------
In the descending order, rash 2262 (99%), fever 2035 (89%), lymphadenopathy 1324 (58%), conjunctival congestion 1066 (46%), cough 567 (25%), arthralgia / arthritis 542 (24%), nasal discharge 499 (22%), thrombocytopenic purple 7 (0.3%) had plaque disease and 1 (0.04%) had encephalitis. In addition; sore throat 41; headache 42; malaise 24; 11 people, diarrhea / watery / soft stools; 11 people, papular hemorrhage of hard palate / palate mucosa; 8 people, thrombocytopenia; 7 people, leukopenia; 3 people, hepatitis / hepatic dysfunction; meningitis in 1 person, and pneumonia in 1 person. Fever, rash, lymphadenopathy

All reported were 1182 (52%).

Laboratory diagnosis method (with duplication)
----------------------------------------------
Virus isolation was 26 (1%), 4 in 1E, and 2 in 2B. Detection of viral genes by PCR 1326. Of these (58%), of which 625 had been genotyped, 548 in 1E and 35 in 2B.  1207 (53%) of serum IgM antibodies were detected, of which both viral genes and serum IgM antibodies were detected; were 413 (34%). Rubella antibody seroconversion or significant increase with paired sera was found in 54 (2%) patients.  In addition, after being accepted by the public health center as measles (clinical diagnosis example), the result of the test diagnosis is reported to rubella (test diagnosis example): there were 136 cases in which this was changed.

Putative source of infection
----------------------------
Profession
In the occupation statement column added to the notification slip from January 2019, 837 (36%) were listed as company employees. The most common was 33 healthcare professionals (10 nurses, 5 medical clerks, 4 pharmacies, 3 doctors, 2 occupational therapists, 2 nursing assistants, 1 dentist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dental assistant, working at a dental clinic 1 person, 1 laboratory technician, 2 medical professionals), 12 childcare workers, 16 teachers, 11 police officers and police officers, 7 firefighters were reported, and 7 SDF personnel were reported.

Age and gender
94% (2166) of the reported cases are adults, with 3.6 times more men than women (1795 men, 499 women) (Figure 8, 9, 10). The median age of male patients is 40 years (0-76 years), especially for men in their 30s and 40s (59% of all men) (Figure 8). The median age of female patients is 30 (0-76), especially in their 20s and 30s (64% of all women). Figure 9).

Vaccination history
None (479: 21%) or unknown (1594: 69%) account for 90% of vaccination histories (Figures 8 and 9). Of those who had been inoculated (221 persons: 10%), both the date of inoculation and the lot number were reported... Estimated infected area
The estimated number of infected areas was 1774 (77%) in Japan, 460 (20%) unknown in Japan and abroad, 48 (2%) outside Japan, 12 people (0.5%) in Japan or abroad have low outbreaks overseas (Figure 11).  ...[continued]
******
IDWR Surveillance Data Table 2019 week 51 [16 Dec-22 Dec 2019], Japan
Date: Tue 7 Jan 2020
Source: National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan [edited]
<https://www.niid.go.jp/niid/en/survaillance-data-table-english.html>

Notifiable diseases, number of cases of the week and total number of cases by prefecture.
Total number of cases was updated with delayed reported and discarded cases.
- 2019, week 51:
<https://www.niid.go.jp/niid/images/idwr/data-e/idwr-e2019/201951/zensu51.csv>
- 2018, week 51:
<https://www.niid.go.jp/niid/images/idwr/data-e/idwr-e2018/201851/zensu51.csv>
- 2017, week 51:
<https://www.niid.go.jp/niid/images/idwr/data-e/idwr-e2017/201751/zensu51.csv>

Week 51; 2019/2018/2017
Rubella (FN, FO), current week 6/84/4; cum 2294/2806/91 (data of 2017 was checked. - Rapp.KI)
=====================
[Rubella, also called German measles, is a disease spread by the coughs and sneezes of infected people. Symptoms include rash and fever for 2-3 days. Rubella on its own is not a high-risk infection. But rubella is very dangerous for a pregnant woman and her developing baby. If a pregnant woman gets rubella virus, her baby could have birth defects such as deafness, cataracts (blurred vision), heart defects, mental disabilities, and organ damage. Pregnant women who are not protected against rubella through either vaccination with the MMR vaccine or previous rubella infection should not travel to Japan during this outbreak. (from <https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/alert/rubella-japan>). - ProMED Mod.LK]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Japan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/156>]
Date: Tue 10 Dec 2019
Source: The Telegraph [edited]
<https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/pet-owners-increased-risk-deadly-tick-borne-disease-spreads/>

A tick-borne virus that is rapidly spreading throughout Asia has such a high death rate that it should be treated on par with diseases such as Ebola, a Japanese virologist has warned.

The new virus -- severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) -- is spread by tick bites and was 1st identified by Chinese researchers 8 years ago.

It has a death rate of 30 percent, similar to diseases such as Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, classified by the World Health Organization as having "epidemic potential."

Owners of pet cats and dogs have been warned to be especially vigilant, as they carry ticks.

SFTS was 1st identified in Japan in 2013, when 40 patients were identified. The number of cases has risen sharply since then, with 96 in the 1st 11 months of this year [2019], and experts are anticipating that the total will surpass 100 for the whole of 2019.

"SFTS is a tick-borne infection with a fatality rate around 30 percent, and it should be classified as a viral haemorraghic fever," said Dr Masayuki Saijo, director of Japan's National Institute of Infectious Diseases.

"The route of the virus infection is very similar to Ebola [Ebola virus is not tick-borne. - ProMED Mod.TY] and the fact that the fatality rate is so high means that SFTS should be treated as a biosafety level 3 pathogen," he added.

With a high mortality rate and no effective treatment available, experts are warning people to take precautions against ticks while they are in rural areas. Pets are also susceptible to carrier insects, such as the Asian longhorned tick, and owners are being cautioned to be vigilant.

"We have recently found that domestic cats and dogs show similar symptoms of the virus as humans when they are infected, and the fatality rate in cats exceeds 50 percent," Dr Saijo told the Telegraph.

"We have identified several cases in Japan in which pet owners have been infected by their pets and at least one case in which a vet died after being bitten by an infected cat," he said.

As well as being found in China and Japan, SFTS has now been confirmed on the Korean Peninsula, Taiwan and, last year [2018], in Viet Nam. The disease is believed to have evolved between 50 and 150 years ago, and previous deaths, particularly in developing parts of east Asia, were blamed on other illnesses or were simply recorded as being from unknown causes.

The primary clinical symptoms in humans are fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, low platelet count, a low white blood cell count, elevated liver enzyme levels, and, ultimately, multiple organ failure.

Most cases are reported in rural areas between March and November, with the virus believed to lie dormant in the host for between 6 days and 2 weeks before the symptoms become apparent. Anyone who finds a tick embedded in their body is being advised not to try to remove it themselves but to seek medical attention.

As of the end of October [2019], a total of 491 people had been treated in Japan for SFTS, with 70 patients dying. It appears that the illness is particularly dangerous to older people, with 90 percent of the recorded cases among people aged 60 or older.

The virus is carried by wild animals, primarily deer and boars in Japan, but also by hedgehogs, cattle, goats and sheep.

The institute is working on a treatment, with early indications suggesting that it can reduce fatalities by about 10 percent, Dr Saijo said.

"Viral zoonoses such as SFTS have become more prominent worldwide," he said. "With approximately 1/4th of the world's population and a vast diversity of wild and domestic animals living in close proximity to humans, it is very likely that China has the greatest potential for the emergence of infectious diseases worldwide.

"The frontline defense against such emerging infectious diseases continues to be careful clinical observation, heightened surveillance and rapid detection," said Dr Perlin.

While SFTS has not been recorded outside east Asia, tick-borne viruses are on the rise worldwide because of a combination of climate change and increased travel. Earlier this year [2019] a potentially deadly brain disease, tick-borne encephalitis virus, was found for the 1st time in the UK.

Japanese authorities have been conducting education programmes in areas that have reported a high number of cases, although there have been criticisms that the authorities are not taking adequate precautions.

In 2017, a press conference at the offices of the Miyazaki Prefectural Government descended into chaos when a live tick that had been brought in to show to journalists disappeared during the proceedings. A local government official placed the insect on a piece of paper to allow photographers to take close-up images, but it disappeared.

Officials searched for the tick but were unable to locate it. After the room was evacuated, 2 types of insecticide were sprayed on the carpet and the prefectural governor issued an apology the next day.  [Byline: Julian Ryall]
==================
[The above report indicates that SFTS virus has become established in Japan. There were cases every year from 2013 to present. Cases were widely disbursed geographically in 2018, with 24 prefectures reporting infected individuals. There were 96 cases in the 1st 11 months of 2019. Since there is no vaccine, the best way to avoid infection is to avoid tick bites and contact with infected pets, especially cats.

SFTS is a serious disease and of significant public health concern. Although SFTS virus infections may be serious, there is evidence for subclinical or mild infections as well, so the previous numbers may be an underestimate of the total number of infections. There is also some evidence for person-to-person direct transmission of the virus, but that appears to be a rare event. The virus is doubtless endemic in several countries in Asia, and cases have occurred previously in Japan. Apparently, there are 2 previously reported affected individuals who acquired their infections directly from an SFTS virus-infected cat. No mention was made of tick transmission in that instance. The possible route of transmission from the cat to the veterinarian and veterinary nurse via exposure to blood or other bodily fluids is not mentioned (see Severe fever w/ thrombocytopenia synd. - East Asia (02): Japan (MZ) http://promedmail.org/post/20181211.6204927).

SFTS virus is a tick-transmitted phlebovirus in the Bunyavirus family. Images of a longhorn tick, _Haemaphysalis longicornis_, the SFTS vector, can be seen at
<http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/pests/paralysis-tick/haemaphysalis-longicornis-description.htm>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Japan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/156>]
Date: Thu 28 Nov 2019
Source: Mainichi Newspaper [in Japanese, machine trans, edited]
<https://mainichi.jp/articles/20191128/k00/00m/040/224000c>

An announcement has been received that an employee of Kagoshima City and the drug development company Shin Nippon Kagaku (Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories (SNBL) in Tokyo) was infected with monkey-derived "B virus". The case concerns a technician, who was conducting animal experiments on monkeys at the research institute in Kagoshima City on the [28 Feb 2019]. The condition [of the infected individual] is not disclosed. This is the 1st time that infection has been confirmed in Japan, with about 50 cases overseas.

Most cases of past infections have come into contact with monkeys at animal testing facilities, and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases says that "normally there is no risk of spreading infection because it does not move from person to person."

B virus is a type of herpes virus, and most macaque monkeys such as rhesus monkeys and Japanese [cynomolgus macaque] monkeys have viruses. It does not cause airborne infection, but if one is bitten by a monkey with the virus, fever and sensory abnormalities [may] occur at the contact area. Severe infections may cause sequelae of neuropathy.

According to the city, a technician was infected at the Safety Laboratory, which uses monkeys to investigate safety during drug development. In February of this year [2019], she complained of headache and fever, and this month [November 2019], the National Institute of Infectious Diseases determined that it was a B virus. Technicians have never been bitten or scratched and are likely to have touched excrement and saliva.  [byline: Ran Kanno]
======================
[The timeline of the infection in the above patient is uncertain. The 2nd report above indicates that the patient initially became ill in February 2019 but was diagnosed as a herpes B virus infection this month (November 2019). The 1st report above indicates that the patient is currently in a critical condition, but not for how long in that condition. The incubation period for human herpes B virus infections is 3-30 days, although CDC notes that it may be months or even years after infection is initiated for symptoms to appear.

Herpes B virus is an alpha herpes virus. Although herpes B virus is relatively common among the 3 species of macaques affected, human cases over the years have been sporadic and few -- 50 confirmed cases (now 51 with the case above) with 21 deaths. For those humans infected CDC notes that "vesicular skin lesions sometimes occur at the exposure site. The patient may also have lymphadenitis (inflamed lymph nodes), lymphangitis (infection of lymph vessels), nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and hiccups.

"The virus can spread to the central nervous system (CNS) and cause the following symptoms:
- hyperesthesias (increase in sensitivity to stimuli);
- ataxia (lack of voluntary control of muscle movements);
- diplopia (double vision);
- agitation;
- ascending flaccid paralysis (extreme weakness due to reduced muscle tone).

Most patients with CNS complications will die, even with antiviral therapy and supportive care, and those who survive usually suffer serious long-term neurologic problems. Respiratory failure associated with ascending paralysis is the most common cause of death. Respiratory involvement and death can occur 1 day to 3 weeks after symptom onset." The CDC website for this virus can be found at <https://www.cdc.gov/herpesbvirus/healthcare-providers.html>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Kagoshima City, Kagoshima, Japan:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/27800>]
Date: Mon 25 Nov 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/japan-syphilis-5700-cases-to-date-in-2019-pregnant-women-with-the-std-15273/>

In recent years, the number of syphilis cases has surged in Japan. In 2015, we reported on a big increase in syphilis cases in Japan where well over 2000 cases were recorded, a 4-fold increase from just 5 years earlier. In the past 2 years, more than 5500 cases were reported in 2017 and more than 6000 last year [2018]. Through [13 Nov 2019], the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID) reported 5703 syphilis cases, including 1464 cases in Tokyo and 921 cases in Osaka.

Another issue the NIID has been looking at is syphilis in pregnant women in Japan. According to a report in The Mainichi [<https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20191125/p2a/00m/0na/015000c>]: The NIID analyzed cases of syphilis reported from the 1st to the 26th week of 2019 [1-30 Jun 2019], a 6-month period from January, and found that a reported 106 of 1117 women with syphilis were pregnant. Of the 61 patients who gave their answers to a section on whether they had worked in the adult entertainment industry in the preceding 6 months, 56 said they had not done so. "It is possible that most of the expectant mothers suffering from syphilis were infected by their male partners," said Takuya Yamagishi, a doctor at the NIID. Through mid-October [2019], Japan has reported 17 congenital syphilis cases, the same as in all of 2018.
=====================
[Japan, as the United States and other countries, has experienced a rising incidence of primary and secondary syphilis that initially involved mainly men who have sex with men, but more recently has involved women in their 20s and 30s. See ProMED-mail: Syphilis - Japan (02): rising incidence, heterosexual women & men, urban  http://promedmail.org/post/20181202.6175741.

In the US and elsewhere, this increase in the incidence of syphilis in women of childbearing age has been associated with a rising incidence of congenital syphilis. However, we were not told in that prior ProMED-mail post if rates of congenital syphilis are similarly rising in Japan. Now, according to data compiled by Japan's National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID), the incidence of congenital syphilis in Japan is rising, with 17 cases reported by the 42nd week of 2019 (week ending 19 Oct 2019), which is as many as were reported in the whole of 2018  (<https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20191125/p2a/00m/0na/015000c>). - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Japan:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/156>.]
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