Date: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 06:14:20 +0200 (METDST)

Battambang, Cambodia, Aug 15, 2019 (AFP) - As he tears off a leg of a charcoal-grilled rat at a roadside stall in western Cambodia, Yit Sarin hails the simple joy of rodent and rice washed down with beer.   "It's delicious," he says of the snack.   Barbecued field rats are not everybody's idea of a tasty treat, but in Cambodia's rural Battambang province they are popular as a quick -- and cheap -- snack, with small skewered ones going for $0.25 each while larger rodents can cost $1.25.

Rats were commonly eaten in the 1970s, under the ultra-Maoist Khmer Rouge, when frogs, tarantulas and other small creatures were considered fair game as a means to survive.   Now they are simply an inexpensive lunch for workers and farmers -- though there is disagreement over what its meat tastes like.    Sarin tells AFP that rat is like "chicken or beef", whereas others say it's more like pork.

He is one of many customers and Cambodian tourists stopping at a stall outside of Battambang town, where rows of grilled field rats are displayed over burning coals and served with dipping sauces made from lime juice, black peppers or chillies.    Vendor Ma Lis says the snack has grown in popularity since she launched her stall more than a decade ago and sold just a few kilograms a day.   Today, she can net daily sales of around 20 kilograms, making brisk business from van-loads of travelling Cambodians and the occasional curious foreigner. 

The holiday season also spells bad news for the field rodents -- Ma Lis can sell up to 180 large rats a day on the Cambodian New Year or water festival.   Dismissing any health concerns one might have about eating her unconventional treat, Ma Lis says her rodents are caught from rice fields and are good for you.    "These rats are healthier than pork and chicken... they eat lotus roots and rice grains," she says, as she flips the barbecued bodies on the grill.    Despite the snack's enduring appeal, many people remain squeamish.     "They feel it is disgusting," she says, smiling.
Date: Fri 31 May 2019 08:04 ICT
Source: The Phnom Penh Post [edited]
<https://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/svay-rieng-man-succumbs-rabies-after-bitten-dog>

A 50-year-old man from Svay Rieng province died on Tuesday night [28 May 2019], 19 days after being bitten by a dog in Trapaing Trav village in Kampong Ro district's Nhor commune.

The wife of the bitten man told The Post that before the incident, while she was at home, her husband went to a paddy field with their 5-year-old niece and sheltered in a hut where he always rests on sunny days.

When they arrived at the hut, they saw a dog asleep on the ground. The dog woke up and bit [the man's] niece, causing a minor skin injury with no bleeding, [the wife] said.

[The man] went to help her, but the dog suddenly jumped up and bit him on the right forearm, this time inflicting more serious injuries. "The dog bit my niece and he helped her. He said the dog had seemed gentle. "They chased the dog to hit it, but it lunged back from about 5 metres away and bit my husband," [the wife] said.

She said that after being bitten, [her husband] sought treatment from a traditional Khmer physician but did not go to a doctor for an injection.

"After leaving the traditional physician, he didn't get any more treatment. Our children told him to see a doctor for injections, but he didn't go."

"As days went by, he was busy growing rice, spraying rice fertilizer, and pumping water. He kept putting off going to see a doctor until he was in serious danger," she said.

She said her husband became feverish and was unable to drink water, and developed a fear of water, fire, and the wind.

At this point, she sent her husband to the Svay Teap Referral Hospital where he was injected with a serum and sent to the provincial hospital. That hospital, in turn, sent him on to the capital's Pasteur Institute in Cambodia.

Because the gate was not yet open, she finally sent her husband to Calmette Hospital next door. When they arrived at Calmette Hospital, doctors told [the wife] that her husband was in a critical condition and they could not save his life.

She then took her husband back home, arriving there on Tuesday morning
[28 May 2019]. [He] died that same night.

[She] said the dog was probably carrying rabies. She didn't know where it came from and it was sleeping in the paddy fields.

Ly Sowath, a doctor at the Pasteur Institute in Cambodia's Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, could not be reached for comment.

Sowath told The Post in February [2019] that the vaccine against rabies is effective if received before being bitten or in the 1st 24 to 48 hours afterwards [see comment].

Doctors ask people to observe the health of the animal that bites them. If the dog does not get sick or die within 10 days, it is a sign that it was not carrying rabies. But anyone suspecting any irregularity should get vaccinated as soon as possible.

According to the Pasteur Institute of Cambodia, the disease is 100 per cent preventable through post-exposure vaccination if provided in time, but it is [almost] 100 per cent fatal once symptoms develop.  [Byline: Ry Sochan]
=====================
[The last comment by Cambodia's Pasteur Institute deserves to be listened to and memorized. The appearance of clinical rabies signs indicates the termination of the incubation period; at this stage, attempts to save the life of the victim are doomed to fail.

On the other hand, we have reservations concerning the cited Cambodian Pasteur Institute's advice of February 2019, in which it was allegedly stated that "the vaccine against rabies is effective if received before being bitten or in the 1st 24 to 48 hours afterwards." Such information may leave exposed people's life seriously threatened in case they have missed seeking medical help during the 1st 48 hours after being exposed.

In fact, the incubation period for rabies is typically 1 to 3 months but may vary from less than a week to more than 2 years. Due to the potentially long incubation period, there is no time limit for giving post exposure treatment (PET) before the appearance of clinical signs: all potential exposures should be risk-assessed. This and much more useful updated information on PET is available in the recently (April 2019) published "Guidelines on managing rabies post-exposure" (Public Health England, April 2019, 40 pages) at <https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/800017/PHE_guidelines_on_rabies_post-exposure_treatment.pdf>.

Hopefully, the family of the victim's niece, who was exposed to the same dog, has already sought medical advice. - ProMED Mod.AS]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Cambodia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/65113>]
1st October 2018
Kong Meta | Publication date 01 October 2018 | 08:22 ICT
https://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/rabies-vaccine-now-available-in-battambang

The Health Ministry and the Pasteur Institute opened the first rabies prevention centre in Battambang on Thursday after observing a growing demand for vaccination in the province. Ministry spokeswoman Or Vandin said the Battambang centre’s opening will also be convenient for people living in neighbouring provinces.  “Now, those in Pursat, Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, Pailin and Kampong Chhnang provinces, can go to Battambang rather than travel to Phnom Penh,” she said.  Previously, patients who got rabies would travel to the capital for vaccination. The centre brings the service closer to the people in the province, she added. Vandin said 22,000 people took rabies vaccine last year.

Date: Thu 23 Aug 2018
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases [edited]
<http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0006644>

Citation
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Di Francesco J, Choeung R, Peng B, et al. Comparison of the dynamics of Japanese encephalitis virus circulation in sentinel pigs between a rural and a peri-urban setting in Cambodia. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018 Aug 23;12(8):e0006644.

Abstract
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Japanese encephalitis is mainly considered a rural disease, but there is growing evidence of a peri-urban and urban transmission in several countries, including Cambodia. We, therefore, compared the epidemiologic dynamic of Japanese encephalitis between a rural and a peri-urban setting in Cambodia. We monitored 2 cohorts of 15 pigs and determined the force of infection - rate at which seronegative pigs become positive - in 2 study farms located in a peri-urban and rural area, respectively. We also studied the mosquito abundance and diversity in proximity of the pigs, as well as the host densities in both areas. All the pigs seroconverted before the age of 6 months. The force of infection was 0.061 per day (95 percent confidence interval = 0.034-0.098) in the peri-urban cohort and 0.069 per day (95 percent confidence interval = 0.047-0.099) in the rural cohort.

Several differences in the epidemiologic dynamic of Japanese encephalitis between both study sites were highlighted. The later virus amplification in the rural cohort may be linked to the later waning of maternal antibodies, but also to the higher pig density in direct proximity of the studied pigs, which could have led to a dilution of mosquito bites at the farm level. The force of infection was almost identical in both the peri-urban and the rural farms studied, which shifts the classic epidemiologic cycle of the virus. This study is a 1st step in improving our understanding of Japanese encephalitis virus ecology in different environments with distinct landscapes, human and animal densities.

Author summary
--------------
The number of Japanese encephalitis cases has decreased substantially over the past decades with the implementation of childhood vaccination programs. Japanese encephalitis virus, however, remains the most important cause of acute viral encephalitis in Eastern and Southern Asia, with an estimated 68 000 cases reported annually worldwide. Our results demonstrate that Japanese encephalitis virus circulates intensely both in a rural and a peri-urban setting in Cambodia, which raises important public health concerns as peri-urban areas are densely populated. These results support the importance of changing vaccination recommendations for travelers and of not focusing national immunization programs against Japanese encephalitis solely on rural areas.
====================
[Although ProMED has posted relative few reports of Japanese encephalitis (JE) in Cambodia over the years, that country is within the JE virus endemic area. JE virus is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis in Asia and the western Pacific. In Southeast Asia, JE virus is maintained in an enzootic cycle involving the _Culex tritaeniorhynchus_ group of mosquitoes and wild birds. Ardeid wading birds and pigs are amplifying vertebrate hosts. In endemic areas, incidence in humans is one-10 per 10 000 population. Children under 15 years of age are at greatest risk of encephalitis. For most travelers to Asia, the risk for JE is very low but varies based on destination, duration of travel, season, and activities.

Inactivated Vero cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine (manufactured as IXIARO) is the only JE vaccine licensed and available in the United States. This vaccine was approved in March 2009 for use in people aged 17 years and older and in May 2013 for use in children 2 months through 16 years of age.

USA CDC JE Vaccine Recommendations:
- JE vaccine is recommended for travelers who plan to spend 1 month or more in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season. This includes long-term travelers, recurrent travelers, or expatriates who will be based in urban areas but are likely to visit endemic rural or agricultural areas during a high-risk period of JE virus transmission.

- Vaccine should also be considered for the following:
1.- Short-term (less than1 month) travellers to endemic areas during the transmission season, if they plan to travel outside an urban area and their activities will increase the risk of JE virus exposure. Examples of higher-risk activities or itineraries include: 1) spending substantial time outdoors in rural or agricultural areas, especially during the evening or night; 2) participating in extensive outdoor activities (such as camping, hiking, trekking, biking, fishing, hunting, or farming); and 3) staying in accommodations without air conditioning, screens, or bed nets.
2.- Travellers to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak.
3.- Travellers to endemic areas who are uncertain of specific destinations, activities, or duration of travel.

JE vaccine is not recommended for short-term travelers whose visits will be restricted to urban areas or times outside a well-defined JE virus transmission season.

CDC summaries of JE virus, its epidemiology and available vaccines can be found on the US CDC website:
<https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/vaccine/index.html>.

The above report indicates that visitors to peri-urban areas that have pig populations should also consider vaccination if they are going to be present during the JE virus transmission season. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Cambodia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/145>]
Date: Sat, 19 May 2018 04:55:27 +0200

Phnom Penh, May 19, 2018 (AFP) - Five people, including a four-year-old child, were killed instantly in a lightning strike in southwestern Cambodia, officials said Friday, as the onset of the rainy season draws near.   The group was sheltering from a downpour in a mountainous area of Koh Kong province's Thmar Baing district on Thursday, police chief for minor crimes Lay Meng Laing told AFP, adding that three victims were from the same family.   The tropical Southeast Asian country of winding rivers and lakes is prone to lightning storms, a problem that some believe is worsening with the ravages of climate change.

Keo Vy, a spokesman for Cambodia's National Committee for Disaster Management, said the number of lightning deaths has now reached 50 people since January, while 41 died last year in the same period.    He said the government had conducted education seminars to warn residents in rural areas about the threats, encouraging them to avoid taking shelter under a tree and not to stand in pools of water.    The strikes also hit livestock, killing 36 cows since January.
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