Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 18:29:25 +0200 (METDST)

Beirut, Aug 26, 2019 (AFP) - Lebanese authorities on Monday detained the owner of a travel agency accused of having left thousands of travellers stranded with fake flight and hotel reservations.   Fawaz Fawaz, the Lebanese owner of New Plaza Tours, was captured in Syria and transferred to Lebanon, the General Security agency said in a statement, without elaborating.

The security agency accused Fawaz of committing "fraud and embezzlement" through a travel agency, by selling fake flight tickets and hotel reservations.   This left "thousands of Lebanese" stranded in Turkey, Georgia and other countries without accommodation or return flights, it said.   Local media was rife with stories last week of Lebanese travellers forced to sleep on airport and hotel floors because of the scandal.   New Plaza Tours is reportedly not licensed by the tourism ministry.   On Friday, Lebanon's Middle East Airlines said it had filed a lawsuit against Fawaz in 2015 over outstanding debts owed by one of his several travel agencies.
Date: Mon 26 Nov 2018 (accessed)
Source: Epidemiology and Infection, 1st view, published online 15 Nov 2018 [edited]
<https://doi.org/10.1017/S095026881800300X>

Citation: Kassir MF, El Zarif T, Kassir G, Berry A, Musharrafieh U, Bizri AR (2018).
Human rabies control in Lebanon: a call for action.

Epidemiology and Infection 1-8.
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Abstract:   The status of rabies as a neglected disease has made its eradication rather challenging in different parts of the world despite the availability of a successful vaccine. Lebanon, in particular, is a country endemic to the disease with several cases of rabies deaths reported over the past 30 years. The risk of rabies, however, has taken a new turn over the past few years in Lebanon with 2 emerging situations that have made the control of the disease rather challenging: the neighbouring Syrian war and the local garbage crisis.

Both of these milestone events might have contributed to an increase in the number of disease vectors as well as individuals at risk, thus nourishing the cycle of disease transmission. In this observational study, the effects of these 2 events are investigated, with an update on the status of this preventable, yet often neglected, disease in the country. Both events were found to be concomitant with a notable increase in the number of dog bites and thus possible rabies exposure.

Current regulations are explored through interviews with veterinarians, and customs recommendations, ranging from policies to control of dog populations to awareness campaigns in high-risk individuals, are then proposed to help control the disease.
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[According to information included in the paper, between 2005 and 2016, a total of 7369 animal bites were reported to the LMOPH (Lebanese Ministry of Public Health), with an annual average of 614 bites per year. About 91 percent of the bites were caused by dogs, of which 53 percent were by domestic dogs and 47 percent by stray dogs. The remaining 9 percent involved cats, bats and rodents. It may be assumed that some events involved farm animals as well, not mentioned in the paper.

In 2013, a steep increase in numbers was observed and was sustained up to 2016. The yearly average of animal bites post-2013 was, reportedly, 1004 ± 272 bites per year, which is significantly higher than the average of 355 ± 145 bites per year prior to 2013 (span from 1991 to 1996 and 2001 to 2013). The highest number of bites (per 100 000 individuals) was observed in the northern governorate and in the (southern) Nabatieh governorate (Lebanon's administrative map at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_and_towns_in_Lebanon>).

Counting bites does not necessarily reflect the incidence of rabies in animals; it may serve as suggestive of increased rabies incidence in the vector animals. Unfortunately, no information about clinically suspected and/or lab confirmed rabies in animals is included in the paper. Lebanon has reported a rabies case in a dog to the OIE in March 2018 (http://promedmail.org/post/20180314.5687339); this was the 1st reported animal rabies case from Lebanon since 1995(!).

As suggested by the authors, the Syrian war and the local garbage crisis are plausible explanations for increased rabies incidence in Lebanon. A wide circulation of the virus in Lebanon's canines/fauna, particularly in the Nabatieh governorate bordering northern Israel, was suggested in the past, most recently in http://promedmail.org/post/20180321.5701731 (item 4) and in ref 1.

It could also be deduced from the data presented in Israel's rabies map of 2015 at <http://www.moag.gov.il/vet/Yechidot/Machon/maabada_kalevet/airueim%20kalevet/kalevet_2015/PublishingImages/rabiesmap272016.jpg>.

Reference 1.
D David, N Devers, BA Yakobson, I Davidson. Emergence of dog rabies in the Northern region of Israel. Epidemiol Infect 2009; 137(4): 544-8; DOI:10.1017/S0950268808001180. - ProMED Mod.AS]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at: Lebanon: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/85>]
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2018 14:31:16 +0200

Beirut, April 5, 2018 (AFP) - A funding gap is compromising the response to a measles outbreak in Lebanon, a United Nations statement said Thursday, warning it also risked allowing polio to spread from Syria.   The UN's Children Fund, which has provided free vaccines for children in Lebanon for a quarter of a century, said the first 12 weeks of 2018 had seen a sharp increase in measles cases.   It said it was currently among several partners supporting the Lebanese health ministry's immunisation campaign "not only for measles but also for polio in order to mitigate the risk of polio spreading from Syria."   "If we don't react now, more serious epidemics will hit," Tanya Chapuisat, UNICEF's representative in Lebanon, said.   The agency made a $5 million appeal to donors, arguing it needs to replenish vaccine stocks and reach vulnerable children in isolated areas.
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2017 22:13:18 +0100

Riyadh, Nov 9, 2017 (AFP) - Saudi Arabia and Kuwait on Thursday urged their citizens to leave Lebanon immediately, days after Lebanese prime minister Saad Hariri announced his resignation while visiting Riyadh.

"Due to the situation in the Republic of Lebanon, the kingdom asks its nationals visiting or living in Lebanon to leave as soon as possible, and advises its citizens not to travel there," said a Saudi foreign ministry source, quoted by state news agency SPA.   Kuwait called on "all its citizens to leave Lebanon immediately" and avoid going there as a precautionary measure, state agency KUNA reported a source at the foreign ministry as saying.

On November 4, Hariri announced in a televised speech from Saudi Arabia that he was stepping down, citing Iran's "grip" on Lebanon and threats to his life.   The shock announcement raised fears that Lebanon -- split into rival camps led by Hariri and the Iranian-backed movement Hezbollah -- could once again descend into violence.   Hariri, who also holds Saudi nationality and whose wife and children live in the kingdom, has since met Saudi King Salman and travelled to the United Arab Emirates, according to official media in the Gulf states.

Lebanese President Michel Aoun has said he will await Hariri's return before taking any decision, while Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah said Hariri's resignation had been "imposed" by Saudi Arabia.   The resignation coincided with the announcement in Saudi Arabia of an anti-corruption purge in which dozens of princes, ministers and businessmen have been rounded up.   Bahrain, a close ally of Saudi Arabia, advised its citizens against travel to Lebanon a day after Hariri's announcement.
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2016 14:33:35 +0200

Sidon, Lebanon, April 12, 2016 (AFP) - A car bomb exploded on Tuesday in Lebanon's southern port city of Sidon, killing at least one person identified as a Palestinian official, a security source said.   The source said the blast killed Fathi Zeidan, who headed the Fatah movement in the Miye Miye Palestinian refugee camp near Sidon.   "His identification card was found near the car which exploded, which was also his," the source told AFP.

A statement from Lebanon's armed forces said Zeidan had been driving the car when one kilogramme of explosives hidden inside his vehicle detonated.    The army's forensics unit arrived at the scene of the blast and cleared away scorched body parts lying near a car in flames, according to an AFP correspondent at the scene.   More than 450,000 Palestinians are registered in Lebanon with the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, and many live in squalid conditions in 12 official camps.   The camps are administered by Palestinian officials and security forces, rather than the Lebanese authorities.

In recent years, tensions have risen between Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas' Fatah movement and the Jund al-Sham Islamist group, especially in the Ain al-Hilweh camp, which is also near Sidon.   The rival factions in Ain al-Hilweh have clashed several times in the past year, with each side accusing each other of assassination attempts.   Ain al-Hilweh has become the scene of score-settling between several factions, and a breeding ground for extremist groups that have flourished on the back of the poverty afflicting the camp.
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