Date: Wed 8 Aug 2018
Source: Government of Mongolia website, Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Light Industry [in Mongolian, machine transl., summ., edited]
<http://zasag.mn/news/view/20351>

On 2 Aug 2018, 2 cases of rabies in cattle were recorded in Orkhon soum (administrative subdivision) in the northern Darkhan-Uul aimag (province). Samples from the sick animals were submitted to the aimag's Veterinary Hygiene Center laboratory, where rabies was confirmed on 6 Aug 2018. The Orkhon Soum Emergency Commission was convened to establish a restrictive regime, in prescribed areas, under the auspices of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture. Mr Gankhuu, deputy director of the provincial police office, said that the animals were killed and disinfected. He warns herders to make sure they refrain from approaching potential rabid animals, such as dogs, wolves, [red] foxes, and corsac foxes.

The Aimag Professional Inspection Agency is responsible for providing herders and citizens with advice, warnings, handouts, and inspections of business entities and individuals who are selling raw materials of animal origin. Within this framework, a team of doctors and specialists from the Zoonoses Disease Research Center of Selenge aimag (province) collected samples from animal products and raw materials from 67 enterprises including food shops and sausage shops. The Aimag's Professional Inspection Agency warns that the origin of animal products must be certified [see comments].
===========================
[A different interpretation of the above information was published on 9 Aug 2018 by Xinhuanet News under the title "Mongolia reports two cases of mad cow disease" (<http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-08/09/c_137378541.htm>). The report says: "Two cases of mad cow disease were found in Mongolia, local media reported on Thursday" [8 Aug 2018].

In view of the significant public health hazard and international trade impact of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the issue that, most probably, reflects a translational error is to be addressed in some detail. Allegedly citing the country's Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Light Industry and local media, the Xinhua report says, "The ministry found the 2 cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad cow disease in Orkhon soum (administrative subdivision) in the northern Darkhan-Uul Province on Monday [6 Aug 2018]. "Mad cow disease causes a degeneration of the brain and spinal cord in cattle, which can be transmitted to humans through eating beef. "With more than 66 million livestock animals, Mongolia aims to raise meat exports tenfold in the coming years and to diversify its heavily mining-dependent economy. "But frequent outbreaks of livestock animal diseases such as mad cow disease and the foot and mouth disease have taken a toll on its meat exports. In mid May [2018], 15 cases of mad cow disease were reported in the Must [Most] soum of Khovd aimag, in the west."

As informed by Mongolia's government agency, the recent 2 cases in cattle were, in fact, caused by rabies, an endemic fatal zoonosis in Mongolia; they were not cases of BSE ("mad cow disease"), a disease hitherto not identified in Mongolia (and it is hoped never will be). The 15 mentioned cases last May [2018] in the aimag Khovd were probably rabies as well.

In 2017, rabies was reported from 15 of Mongolia's aimags, including Khovd. Of the total of 218 rabies cases in animals reported by Mongolia for 2017, 72 were cattle. The other rabid farm animals were 80 small ruminants (sheep and goats), 32 horses, and 5 camels. The disease was obviously recorded also in vector animals: dogs (13) and fauna (16).

According to Mongolia's periodic reports to the OIE, rabies has not been reported in recent years from the Darkhan-Uul aimag. It may be assumed that its recent introduction into this region is behind the special attention paid by the authorities to the described event in cattle there. It is foot and mouth disease, recently spreading westward in Mongolia, not BSE, that may potentially adversely affect exports, unless it is controlled soon. The described effort by the Zoonoses Disease Research Center of Selenge aimag to collect samples from animal products and raw materials from 67 enterprises including food shops and sausage shops is obviously commendable; its relation to the rabies event in northern Darkhan-Uul aimag deserves to be explained. - ProMED Mod.AS]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map: Mongolia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1>.]
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 12:45:44 +0200

Ulaanbaatar, Oct 25, 2017 (AFP) - The death toll from an avalanche in Mongolia rose to 17 on Wednesday after rescuers found the bodies of seven missing climbers who had ignored a ban on climbing a mountain.   The Mongolian nationals went missing on Sunday after climbing the 4,021-metre (13,192 foot) Mount Otgontenger, the National Emergency Management Agency said.

The group was made up of four women and 13 men aged 30 to 50, and there were no survivors.   Ten bodies had been found earlier this week, while a separate team of 10 climbers had found their way down the mountain safely.   Otgontenger is a popular destination for climbing tourism, boasting the country's most extensive granite wall.   Just four other climbers have died since the 1960s, but the environment ministry in 2015 banned climbing for safety reasons.
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:29:35 +0200

Ulaanbaatar, Oct 23, 2017 (AFP) - Ten climbers who ignored a ban on ascending Mongolia's Mount Otgontenger have been killed by an avalanche while seven others are still missing, rescue services said Monday.   The Mongolian nationals have been missing since Sunday after reaching the peak of the 4,021-metre (13,192 foot) mountain, the National Emergency Management Agency said.   The bodies were found at a lower altitude of 3,400 metres, according to the agency.    The group was made up of four women and 13 men aged 30 to 50, and it is unclear who among them are still missing. 

A separate team of 10 climbers managed to make it down the mountain safely.   Rescue operations were suspended in the evening because of darkness and will start again Tuesday morning.   Otgontenger is a popular destination for climbing tourism, boasting the country's most extensive granite wall.   Just four other climbers have died since the 1960s, but the environment ministry in 2015 banned climbing for safety reasons.
Date: Fri 24 Jun 2016
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/measles-back-in-mongolia-cdc-issues-travel-notice-56163/>

After being declared measles-free in 2014, measles is back in very large numbers in Mongolia in 2016, prompting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to issue a travel notice for travellers to the East Asian country.

Mongolia reported no confirmed measles cases in 2012, 2013 and 2014. In 2015, they reported more than 1600 confirmed cases, just a year after being declared measles free.

The CDC reported last week that the measles outbreak in Mongolia has reached more than 19,000 cases nationwide and 59 infant deaths. Most of the infected have been students and infants. The capital city of Ulaanbaatar is most seriously hit.

CDC recommends that travellers to Mongolia protect themselves by making sure they are vaccinated against measles, particularly infants 6-11 months of age (one dose of measles vaccine) and children 12 months of age or older (2 doses of measles vaccine). Clinicians should keep measles in mind when treating patients with fever and rash, especially if the patient has recently travelled internationally.  [Byline: Robert Herriman]
======================
[The outbreak continues to grow in Mongolia in 2016 since re-appearing in 2015, after having been absent for 3 years. See ProMED-mail post Measles update (15): Mongolia http://promedmail.org/post/20160513.4220074. One has to wonder whether declaration of being measles-free in 2014 led to people stopping vaccinating their children. - ProMed Mod.LK]

[A HealthMap of Mongolia may be accessed at
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1>.]
Date: Thu 12 May 2016
Source: Xinhua News Agency [edited]
<http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-05/12/c_135354549.htm>

Mongolia launched a nationwide vaccination campaign on [Thu 12 May 2016] to combat a serious measles outbreak, targeting 18 to 30-year-olds.

According to the Mongolian Health Ministry, as of 6 May [2016], a total of 19,194 measles cases were recorded nationwide and 59 infants died of measles infection.

The ministry said most of the infected were students and infants.

United Nations Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) provided the current batch of measles vaccines for around 624,000 young people in Mongolia.

Vaccination centres have been set up in universities, colleges, and family clinics in the country.

The Mongolian government hopes the campaign, which will last until 25 May 2016, would contain the outbreak and reduce infection cases.

The current measles outbreak started earlier this year [2016], and spread to all provinces and cities of Mongolia. Kids have been prevented from going to kindergartens and schools in some badly-hit regions. The capital city of Ulan Bator is most seriously hit. ...  --more
=====================
[Measles was reported to have killed more than 10 children and infected 3263 others in Mongolia in the 1st 2 months of 2016
(<http://www.finlandtimes.fi/worldwide/2016/03/14/25778/Measles-outbreak-kills-more-than-10-children-in-Mongolia>).

It appears effective measures to stop the spread of the disease and to warn the public did not occur and now the outbreak has grown. - ProMED Mod.LK]

[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/1>.]
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