Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2019 11:49:46 +0200 (METDST)

Kuala Lumpur, Sept 9, 2019 (AFP) - Malaysia prepared to seed clouds after air quality in parts of the country reached unhealthy levels due to smog from forest fires in neighbouring Indonesia, an official said Monday.   Smog regularly blankets parts of Southeast Asia during the dry season when burning is used to clear Indonesian land for palm oil, paper plantations and other crops, sparking ire from regional neighbours.   In the latest outbreak, parts of Malaysia's eastern state of Sarawak on Borneo island have been blanketed over the past few days.

The pollutant index in some places has reached "very unhealthy levels", said Gary Theseira, special functions officer with the environment ministry.   "It is extremely severe in Kuching," Theseira told AFP, referring to a city of half a million people.   He said Malaysia is prepared to carry out cloud seeding to induce rain in an effort to ease the smog.   "The moment the cloud situation is right, the chemicals will be loaded and the aircraft will take off and proceed with the seeding," he said.

Some countries conduct seeding during prolonged dry spells to induce rain and clear the air by releasing certain chemicals into the clouds, although some experts have questioned its efficacy.   Boo Siang Voon, a 47 year-old engineer in Kuching described the skies as "hazy, hot with smoky smell".   "This year the smog is getting worse. Residents are using face masks. We should not pay the price of our health for the open burning. We want a solution," he told AFP.   The Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur and neighbouring Singapore were also experiencing hazy conditions on Monday, with the air laced with the smell of burning foliage, although the pollutant index remained at moderate levels.   Some Kuala Lumpur residents complained about eye and throat irritation.

Malaysia's meteorological department Sunday warned that hot conditions will prevail for another week, and the monsoon season is only expected to arrive at the end of September or early October.   The ministry of science, technology and innovation on Friday said it would lodge a complaint with Indonesia for the haze and called for quick action to be taken to put out the fires.   Indonesian authorities have deployed thousands of extra personnel since last month to prevent a repeat of the 2015 fires, which were the worst for two decades and choked the region in haze for weeks.   Under pressure from neighbours, Indonesian leader Joko Widodo last month warned that officials would be sacked if they failed to stamp out forest fires.
Date: Tue 16 Jul 2019 3:34 PM MYT
Source: The Star [abridged, edited]
<https://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2019/07/16/je-virus-detected-in-pig-farm-in-tambunan/>

The Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus has been detected in Tambunan [Sabah], about 100 km (62 mi) from [the state capital, Kota Kinabalu], says the state agriculture and food industries minister Datuk Junz Wong on [Tue 16 Jul 2019]. He said Health Department officials in Sabah had detected the virus in a pig farm in Kampung Lubang, Tambunan on [11 Jul 2019].

On being informed, the Department of Veterinary Services started inspection at all 7 pig farms within the vicinity. "My officers are still on the ground and taking samples from the pigs in the area."

Wong's confirmation came after an internal memo from the Veterinary Department informing the department that health officials had found a [presumably human] case of JE in Tambunan.

There is no cure for JE, but vaccinations [for people] are encouraged by health officials as they provide a form of protection. JE is a type of viral brain infection that can affect both humans and animals. It can be passed on to humans by infected animals through the bite of an infected culex mosquito.

An infected person develops inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) and suffers symptoms such as sudden onset of headache, high fever, neck stiffness, convulsions and muscle weakness, and might even fall into a coma.

Last month [June 2019], the Sarawak Health Department urged public to be cautious after confirming 5 JE cases in the state.  [byline: Muguntan Vanar]
===================
[JE virus is endemic in Malaysia's Borneo, including Sabah and its neighbouring state, Sarawak. Pigs are susceptible to JE virus infection, develop high viremias that serve as infectious blood meals for culex vector mosquitoes. The report above does not indicate which tests were done to determine JE virus infection in the pigs, whether by virus isolation, PCR demonstration of JE virus genomic segments or development of antibodies. Pregnant sows may have transplacental infection of their foetal piglets with teratogenic effects. Piglets and very young pigs may develop encephalitis when infected by JE virus. Infected adult male pigs may develop orchitis with a loss of libido and reduced fertility. Since pigs are JE virus amplifying hosts, people in the areas where pigs are infected should be especially careful to avoid mosquito bites. Vaccination may be the best measure for avoiding JE. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Maps of Malaysia:
<http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/asia/my.htm> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/65149>]
Date: Mon 15 Jul 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/malaria-cluster-reported-in-pahang-malaysia-last-case-reported-in-2011/>

Health officials in Malaysia are investigating a malaria cluster in Kuala Lipis, Pahang state. On [Thu 11 Jul 2019], 4 confirmed cases of malaria were reported to Kuala Lipis District Health Office (PKD) from Betau Health Clinic. All cases involve Orang Asli children aged 4-10 from 2 villages, 2 cases [each] from Kampung Pagar and Kampung Serdang. All cases have been taken to the Kuala Lipis Hospital ward and given treatment.

Kuala Lipis has not reported a malaria case for the past 8 years; the last case was reported in 2011.

The Pahang State Health Department has activated the epidemic room on [12 Jul 2019] and control activities and case detection (active case detection) conducted by Kuala Lipis PKD Team in Kampung Pagar and Kampung Serdang. A total of 393 blood slides have been taken from residents in both villages for microscopic testing. [Based on] initial examination of the slides, PKD found 11 more malaria infections in Kampung Serdang.

>From [11-15 Jul 2019], there have been 15 cases reported from these 2 villages. All cases have been diagnosed with _Plasmodium vivax_, hospitalized for treatment and are in a stable condition.

PKD has also carried out malaria control activities by conducting indoor residual spraying and distribution of mosquito nets in the affected locality. At this point, the PKD team is in the process of tracking cases and vector control activities.

Residents in the locality have been given health education to take preventive measures by wearing clothing that covers the limbs and using repellents to prevent mosquito bites. In addition, residents are advised to sleep in the mosquito nets and avoid activities that take place in or near the forest area at night.

The Ministry of Health is monitoring the occurrence of this malaria case cluster, and the collaboration of the public is very much needed to ensure that the incidence of malaria can be controlled.
=====================
[Along with China and the Republic of Korea, Malaysia is one of the 3 countries of the WHO Western Pacific Region, and it's also among 21 countries in total across the globe identified by WHO in 2016 as having the potential to eliminate malaria by 2020. The selection was based on an analysis that looked at the likelihood of elimination across key criteria. Reaching malaria-free status is a critically important public health and sustainable development goal. It is also a core objective of the WHO Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030, which calls for the elimination of malaria in at least 10 countries by the year 2020.

It is also worth noting that the dominant local human malaria species in Malaysia is _Plasmodium vivax_ (69%) with 33 areas (foci) with active malaria transmission; the populations at greater risk are labourers, including foreign workers, in agriculture, farming, and forestry sectors in East Malaysia. There are 8666 people at risk of malaria in these areas.

As "an important aspect of the disease in the country is the presence of _P. knowlesi_ malaria, a parasite normally found in monkeys, and now accounting for the majority of local cases", the 3 main activities to keep Malaysia on the course of malaria elimination by 2020 are as follows:
- increase surveillance of _P. knowlesi_ zoonotic infections and strengthen elimination efforts;
- intensify surveillance activities to address the threat of malaria importation and better target foreign and migrant workers engaged in activities such as agriculture, forestry, and mining; and
- continue to invest in its national malaria strategy to ensure the financing of programmes targeting elimination and prevention of reintroduction. (<https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/273633/WHO-CDS-GMP-2018.13-eng.pdf>)

The resurgence of _P. vivax_ among this specific group of people (aged 4-10 years old) is worrisome, and further investigation will elucidate the specific contextual situation to support the national effort to eliminate malaria by 2020. - ProMED Mod.ST]

[_Plasmodium vivax_ are seen in 2 isoforms, one with a long incubation time of up to 8 months (White NJ. The rise and fall of long-latency _Plasmodium vivax_. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2019 Apr 1; 113(4):  163-168. doi: 10.1093/trstmh/trz002.  <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30809676>).

Outbreaks like this one is common in areas where there is a transmission potential due to the presence of anopheles mosquitoes, and a limited local transmission is started from an introduced case, usually an asymptomatic carrier from an endemic area. It is important to know which isoform is found in this outbreak to understand the transmission dynamics and when it was introduced. Thus, genotyping should be performed. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Pahang, Malaysia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/13035>]
Date: Sat, 13 Jul 2019 10:41:55 +0200

Kuala Lumpur, July 13, 2019 (AFP) - Flash floods killed a Dutch tourist in a popular cave located in the rugged Mulu National Park on Malaysia's Borneo island, an official said Saturday, as a search continues for a missing guide.    Local fire and rescue chief Law Poh Kiong identified the dead man as 66-year-old Peter Hans Hovenkamp from Utrecht in the central Netherlands.     "He died due to drowning following flash floods in the caves. His body was found in a river inside the cave and was taken to the Miri public hospital for a post-mortem on Saturday," he told AFP.   Law said a search-and-rescue operation involving 16 officers had been launched to locate 20-year local tour guide Roviezal Robin.   Eight other tourists in the same group "almost become victims" but fled to higher ground and escaped from being washed into the river, Law added.

Hovenkamp was reported missing on Friday while the group was touring the popular "Deer Cave", home to an estimated three million bats which form amazing patterns in the sky when they leave each dusk.   Mulu park, located in the remote Borneo jungle of Sarawak state and famous for its caves, cliffs and gorges, is a UNESCO world heritage site.   It sees thousands of visitors annually, particularly for its cooling rains during the summer months.    Law described the death as "a freak tragedy."
Date: 23 Jun 2019
Source: Outbreak News [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/methanol-poisoning-cluster-in-malaysia-89090/>

The Malaysia Ministry of Health is reporting a methanol poisoning cluster believed linked to counterfeit alcohol.

For the period of 11-21 Jun 2019, 3 methanol poisoning clusters were reported to the National Crisis Preparedness and Response Center (CPRC). The incidents involved 19 cases from the following states:
Penang (8), Johor (6) and Negeri Sembilan (5). The cause of the methanol poisoning was believed to be due to the counterfeit liquor branded by Myanmar Whiskey, Miludeer Beer, Whiskey 99 and Martens Extra Strong.

The cluster of methanol poisoning cases in Penang began on 11 Jun 2019 and involved 8 Myanmar citizens. Two of the cases have died. They had been drinking Myanmar branded whiskey. The drink was purchased from the same seller who sells directly at the premises where these poisoning victims work. On 21 Jun 2019, one methanol poisoning case was still being treated at a Penang hospital in critical condition, while 5 others were discharged.

In the state of Johor, reporting of methanol poisoning cases has been received since 18 Jun 2019. It involves 6 cases, 3 Malaysians and one Pakistani, Nepalese and Indian, respectively. Three of the cases involved were found to have consumed a drink believed to be counterfeit branded Miludeer Beer. Four of the cases of methanol poisoning have died. On 21 Jun 2019, one case was still being treated at the Sultanah Aminah Hospital (HSA) in critical condition, and one more reported case of blurred vision was being treated in a regular ward at Sultan Ismail Hospital, Johor Bahru, Johor.

The Negeri Sembilan Health Department (JKNNS) reported one methanol poisoning cluster on 20 Jun 2019 involving 5 cases from the Port Dickson district including 2 deaths. It involves 3 Malaysians, one Indian citizen and one Myanmar citizen. Investigations found cases involved drinking alcoholic beverages allegedly branded Miludeer Beer (2 cases), Whisky 99 (1 case) and Martens Extra Strong (1 case), while one case had no brand information. On 21 Jun 2019, 3 cases were being treated at Port Dickson Hospital, 2 critical cases, and one case in a regular ward.

Clinical samples were taken from all 19 cases for methanol test analysis. The results showed 5 positive cases of methanol and one negative case of methanol but showed symptoms and clinical signs of methanol poisoning. Laboratory results for the remaining 13 cases are still pending.

The Penang State Health Department, Negeri Sembilan and the State of Johor have collaborated with the Royal Malaysian Police and Royal Malaysian Customs in an investigation to identify the sources of the counterfeit alcoholic drink.

The MOH continues to monitor the situation and take preventative and control measures to address these methanol poisoning incidents. Consumers are advised to ensure each purchased alcohol product has a label containing complete manufacturer, importer, agent and listing information.

Consumers are also advised to avoid consuming home-brewed alcoholic beverages or alcohol being sold at low prices.

If individuals have symptoms of methanol intoxication such as stomach-ache, nausea, vomiting, headache, and vision loss within 5 days of consuming an alcoholic drink, MOH advises them to seek immediate treatment at any clinic or the closest hospital.
===========================
[Methanol toxicity initially lacks severe toxic manifestations. Its pathophysiology represents a classic example of lethal synthesis in which toxic metabolites cause fatality after a characteristic latent period. In other words, these people may not realize they are sick or ill until some time after consumption.

Methanol is sometimes used as an ethanol substitute for alcohol. Foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables, fruit juices, fermented beverages, and diet soft drinks containing aspartame are the primary sources of methanol in the human body, but [they contain] minute quantities.

Wood alcohol is also known as methanol. It is a commonly used toxic organic solvent causing metabolic acidosis, neurologic issues, and death when ingested. It is a part of many commercial industrial solvents and of adulterated alcoholic beverages or is mistaken as being the same as alcohol for ingestion. Methanol toxicity remains a common problem in many parts of the developing world, especially among members of lower socioeconomic classes.

Neurological complications are recognized more frequently due to advanced technologies and because of early recognition of the toxicity and advances in supportive care. Hemodialysis and better management of acid-base disturbances remain the most important therapeutic improvements.

Serum methanol levels of greater than 20 mg/dL correlate with ocular injury. Funduscopic changes are notable within only a few hours after methanol ingestion. The mechanism by which the methanol causes toxicity to the visual system is not well understood. Formic acid, the toxic metabolite of methanol, is regarded as being responsible for ocular toxicity, and blindness can occur in humans.

The prognosis in methanol poisoning correlates with the amount of methanol consumed and the subsequent degree of metabolic acidosis; more severe acidosis confers a poorer prognosis. Methanol has a relatively low toxicity. The adverse effects are thought to be from the accumulation of formic acid, a metabolite of methanol metabolism. The prognosis is further dependent on the amount of formic acid that has accumulated in the blood, with a direct correlation existing between the formic acid concentration and morbidity and mortality. Little long-term improvement can be expected in patients with neurologic complications.

The minimal lethal dose of methanol in adults is believed to be 1 mg/kg of body weight. The exact rates of morbidity and mortality from methanol intoxication are not available.

Rapid, early treatment is necessary for survival, but sequelae such as blindness may be permanent.

Metabolic acidosis in methanol poisoning may necessitate the administration of bicarbonate and assisted ventilation. Bicarbonate potentially may reverse visual deficits. In addition, bicarbonate may help to decrease the amount of active formic acid.

Antidote therapy, often using ethanol or fomepizole, is directed towards delaying methanol metabolism until the methanol is eliminated from the patient's system either naturally or via dialysis. Like methanol, ethanol is metabolized by ADH, but the enzyme's affinity for ethanol is 10-20 times higher than it is for methanol. Fomepizole is also metabolized by ADH; however, its use is limited because of high cost and lack of availability.

Hemodialysis can easily remove methanol and formic acid. Indications for this procedure include (1) greater than 30 mL [1 oz] of methanol ingested, (2) serum methanol level greater than 20 mg/dL, (3) observation of visual complications, and (4) no improvement in acidosis despite repeated sodium bicarbonate infusions.

Intravenous administration of ethanol in a 10 percent dextrose solution may be helpful. As ethanol prolongs the elimination half-life of methanol, the treatment may take several days, and the patient should be hospitalized. Dialysis may be necessary to prevent kidney failure as well. Hemodialysis remains an effective treatment.

Portions of this comment were extracted from:
<http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1174890-overview>,
<http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1174890-treatment>,
<https://www.nap.edu/read/4795/chapter/35>, and
<https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ershdb/emergencyresponsecard_29750029.html>. - ProMED Mod.TG]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Malaysia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/147>]
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