Fri 11/10/2019 14:43
WorldHealthOrganizationNews@who.int

Attributable to the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan, WHO and UNICEF

KHARTOUM, 11 October 2019 -  "Sudan has launched an oral cholera vaccination campaign in response to the ongoing outbreak of cholera. More than 1.6 million people aged one year and above in the Blue Nile and Sinnar states will be vaccinated over the coming five days.  “The announcement of the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan on the cholera outbreak last month allowed national and state authorities, and health partners, to act quickly and respond to the outbreak.

“Since the announcement on 8 September, 262 cases of suspected cholera and eight related deaths have been reported as of 9 October in the Blue Nile and Sinnar states. No cholera-related deaths have been reported since mid-September. “The vaccines were procured and successfully shipped using funding from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. In addition, Gavi is providing nearly US$ 2 million to cover operational costs for the campaign.

“We joined efforts to respond as quickly as possible to contain the current outbreak of cholera and prevent it from spreading further in Sudan. The vaccination campaign kicking off today in combination with other measures including scaling up water, sanitation and hygiene activities, enhancing surveillance, prepositioning supplies and case management, will help protect people who are at highest risk.

“The first round of the campaign will conclude on 16 October and will be followed by a second round in four to six weeks to provide an additional dose to ensure people are protected for at least the next three years.  “As part of the campaign, over 3,560 vaccinators, more than 2,240 social mobilizers, and almost 70 independent monitors have been trained and deployed to the two affected states.”
Date: Wed 9 Oct 2019
Source: Dabanga [edited]
<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/rift-valley-fever-suspected-in-red-sea-state-human-and-livestock-deaths>

Arbaat in El Ganeb locality in Sudan's Red Sea state reported 10 new cases of suspected Rift Valley fever* on Monday and Tuesday [7 and 8 Oct 2019], bringing the total number of registered cases to 5, and 3 deaths.  Doctor Ahmed Dereir told Radio Dabanga about the spread of the disease in 8 villages in the area of Arbaat, pointing out that the cases were transferred to Port Sudan for treatment. He explained that the governor formed an emergency room of 35 people representing various government agencies, medical committees, and members of the Forces for Freedom and Change.

Ali Bayrak, head of the Community Support Committee for the residents of Arbaat called on the government for the explicit announcement of the results of laboratory testing of samples.  The state Ministry of Health committed to provide 2 doctors to the villages of the Arbaat Administrative Unit and training 10 medical staff, and 3 midwives, in addition to the distribution of water chlorination tablets and the provision of 3 spraying vehicles.

As reported by Radio Dabanga on Sunday [6 Oct 2019], one man and more than 20 head of cattle died in Arbaat on Thursday and Friday [3 and 4 Oct 2019], and that to date, so far, 3 people and 420 cows have died of the disease, now suspected to be Rift Valley fever, that hit the area of Arbaat, north of Port Sudan, over the past weeks, medical doctor Ahmed Dereir told Radio Dabanga.

According to the UN World Health Organisation (WHO) Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but also has the capacity to infect humans. Infection can cause severe disease in both animals and humans. The disease also results in significant economic losses due to death and abortion among RVF-infected livestock.

RVF virus was 1st identified in 1931 during an investigation into an epidemic among sheep on a farm in the Rift Valley of Kenya, and most cases occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Key facts:
- Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but can also infect humans.
- The majority of human infections result from contact with the blood or organs of infected animals.
- Human infections have also resulted from the bites of infected mosquitoes.
- To date, no human-to-human transmission of RVF virus has been documented.
- The incubation period (the interval from infection to onset of symptoms) for RVF varies from 2-6 days.
- Outbreaks of RVF in animals can be prevented by a sustained programme of animal vaccination.
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[On Wed 9 Oct 2019, villages in the area of Arbaat in El Ganeb locality in Red Sea state reported 9 new cases suspected to be Rift Valley fever, bringing the total number of reported cases to 65 (<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/nine-more-cases-of-rift-valley-fever-in-sudan-s-red-sea-state>). In addition to the Red Sea state outbreak mentioned above, a separate report indicates that Rift Valley fever is occurring in Sudan's River Nile state (see Rift Valley fever - Sudan: (RS,NR) human, animal, alert, OIE Archive Number: http://promedmail.org/post/20191014.6726088). These 2 Sudan states mentioned above are adjoining, so it is not surprising that suspected or confirmed Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks are occurring there simultaneously. The Ministry of Health is investigating the outbreaks in both states. Not only are these outbreaks a human health problem, they are clearly an animal health problem as well, with 420 cattle reported dying of the disease. A One Health response is urgently needed, with participation of physicians, veterinarians and entomologists. There was evidence of RVF virus in the neighbouring Central African Republic this year (2019). Last year (2018), human and animal cases occurred in neighboring South Sudan (see Valley fever - South Sudan (09): (EL) human, animal, WHO http://promedmail.org/post/20180410.5735975).

If focal geographic areas of transmission are identified in this Sudan situation, increased surveillance of people and livestock should be initiated and livestock vaccination considered. RVF-infected livestock can pose a significant risk to humans in contact with them, often livestock owners and veterinarians. Abortions in livestock with a loss in productivity present an economic problem for many ethnic groups that depend on them for livelihoods.

The above report mentions abortion storms in a River Nile state outbreak that could have had serious economic, social and public health consequences. It is likely that RVF virus will persist in this area in transovarially infected eggs of _Aedes_ mosquito vectors. These eggs can remain viable for long periods and hatch when flooded during future rain events, with subsequent emergence of infected females ready to transmit the virus. This risk provides justification for maintaining livestock of the area well vaccinated into the future. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[A media (radio) report on an event of human and animal disease, in Sudan's area of Arbaat, north of Port Sudan, Red Sea state, caused by an "unknown fever" killing 3 people and 420 cows, was posted by ProMED-mail on 6 Oct 2019 as "undiagnosed," RFI (http://promedmail.org/post/20191006.6712623). The commentary suggested RVF as possible etiology, requesting further information. According to Sudan's official OIE report, dated 13 Oct 2019, an event of RVF has been diagnosed in "Arabaata dam area, Alghunub Wa Alolaib, Red Sea state" (http://promedmail.org/post/20191014.6726088), the animals affected being goats, which are thus considered, in this event, the virus' primary victims and main source of human infection, directly or through vectors. The samples from the goats were found RVF-infected by ELISA. In difference with the earlier media (radio) report, the OIE report indicated that there are "no cattle and sheep in this area." A media report dated 12 Oct 2019 (<https://khartoumstar.com/en/2019/10/12/ministry-of-health-rift-valley-fever-in-northern-sudan/>) reported RVF "emerging" in Sudan's River Nile state, naming the locations Berber, north of Bawqa, Ftouar, Joule and Sulaimaniya, and the Artoli region of the East Bank. The report cited Hatem Fadl, an official in the epidemiology and emergency department at the Federal Ministry of Health, saying that "4 cases of Rift Valley fever were diagnosed among 17 samples taken last week, [which] were sent to the Central Laboratory in Khartoum." Hatem pointed out that the Federal Minister of Health commissioned a team to investigate the injuries, [which] arrived in the villages of Artoli, Al-Bawqa, and Fatwwar [Fri 11 Oct 2019], before the disease was officially announced (12 Oct 2019). Additional data were included in the same media source on 13 Oct 2019 (<https://khartoumstar.com/en/2019/10/13/attempts-to-control-rift-valley-fever-in-the-nile-river-state/>). No details on animal cases in River Nile state have become available, nor specific lab results of the human samples. Additional information from Sudan, and clarification on the discrepancies between the media reports as far as animal species are concerned, will be welcomed. - ProMED Mod.AS]

[A map showing the location of the 2 states mentioned above can be accessed at:
<http://ontheworldmap.com/sudan/administrative-divisions-map-of-sudan.html>.

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Sudan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/96>]
Date: Thu 19 Sep 2019
Source: Dabang Sudan [edited]
<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/haemorrhagic-fever-cholera-spreading-in-sudan-as-reports-of-chikungunya-wane>

The Ministry of Health has reported 22 suspected cases of haemorrhagic fever in Kassala in eastern Sudan.

In a press statement, the director of emergencies and epidemics, Emtiaz Ata, told reporters that the ministry is examining suspected cases to make sure of the suspicion and to find out more about the disease.

The director-general of the Ministry of Health, Nureldin Hussein, said that the health situation in Kassala is not reassuring, and there must be measures and considerable precautions to adequately address the health issue and avoid epidemics.
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[It is not clear what is the cause of these suspected cases of hemorrhagic fever or whether epidemiological investigations have been carried out, laboratory tests conducted, the clinical course of the illness determined, or any specific response measures taken. Any updates from the public health personnel and physicians on the ground will be highly appreciated. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

25 September, 2019 – A shipment of 36 tons of cholera treatment medicines and supplies have arrived in Khartoum and are being prepared for distribution as part of the World Health Organization’s response activities supporting the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan to contain and halt a cholera outbreak.

The shipment includes 5000 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for immediate detection and screening of cholera patients at health facilities and high-risk areas. RDTs are an essential part of early detection and response activities as their use ensures timely management and reporting of cholera cases.

The shipment also contains medicines that can treat 2500 severely dehydrated patients, and which will be distributed to cholera treatment centres in Blue Nile and Sinnar states, where cases have been confirmed, as well as in the neighbouring at-risk states of White Nile, Kassala, Gedaref and Khartoum.

“Even with the rapid depletion of our resources, we are accelerating our coordinated response, including delivering more medicines and supplies,” said Dr Naeema Al Gasseer, WHO Representative in Sudan. “We are working around the clock with the Federal Ministry of Health, state authorities and partners to control the outbreak and prevent more deaths.”

As of 24 September, a total of 184 cholera cases have been reported, including 128 cases from Blue Nile State and 56 cases in Sinnar state. Eight cholera-related deaths have been recorded by the Federal Ministry of Health, including 6 in Blue Nile State and 2 in Sinnar State.

Open defecation, lack of clean water outside the capital city and a dilapidated health sector are serious threats in a country of about 40 million people. Cholera, a bacterial disease usually contracted from contaminated water supplies, can be fatal if not treated early.

As part of an overall integrated cholera response plan, WHO is working with the Ministry, state-level health ministries, United Nations agencies and nongovernmental organizations on surveillance of cases to monitor and control spread of the disease; maintain clean water, sanitation and nutrition; and raise awareness among at-risk communities.

To date, WHO has deployed international experts to support the ongoing response activities and has trained and deployed 9 rapid response teams, each consisting of at least 3 members, for assessment and surveillance of high-risk areas. 18 health volunteers have also been trained and deployed to conduct water quality assessments in the 2 affected States. WHO is also actively disseminating awareness messages on health and sanitation through focus group discussions with community leaders, especially women, and training workshops are ongoing for volunteers on conducting house-to-house and community visits to deliver relevant health messages.
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2019 11:57:24 +0200 (METDST)

Khartoum, Sept 26, 2019 (AFP) - Eight people have died from cholera in Sudan including six in the war-torn state of Blue Nile, according to the World Health Organisation, amid a surge in the number of reported cases.   A total of 184 cases of cholera have been reported in the northeast African country over the past month, including 128 cases from Blue Nile and 56 in Sinnar state, WHO said in a statement late Wednesday citing health ministry records.

"Eight cholera-related deaths have been recorded by the federal ministry of health, including six in Blue Nile state and two in Sinnar state," WHO said.   "We are working around the clock with the federal ministry of health, state authorities and partners to control the outbreak and prevent more deaths," WHO Sudan head Naeema al-Gasseer said in the statement.

WHO said a shipment of 36 tonnes of cholera treatment medicines and supplies have arrived in Khartoum and are being prepared for distribution as part of the organisation's response activities.   The shipment also contains medicine to treat 2,500 severely dehydrated patients, which is set to be distributed to cholera treatment centres in Blue Nile and Sinnar states, as well as other neighbouring high-risk states.

Cholera, a bacterial disease usually contracted from contaminated water supplies, can be fatal if not treated early.   Open defecation, lack of clean water outside Khartoum, and a dilapidated health sector further increases the threats from such diseases in a country of about 40 million people.   Dozens of people died from acute diarrhoea in Sudan in 2016 after thousands of cases were reported nationwide.   Blue Nile state, which has a large ethnic minority population, has been the focus of a rebellion by the Sudan People's Liberation Army-North since 2011.   The army declared a ceasefire after the overthrow of veteran president Omar al-Bashir earlier this year.
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