Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 19:03:18 +0200 (METDST)
By Menna Zaki

Wad Ramli, Sudan, Aug 26, 2019 (AFP) - Days after a devastating flood swallowed up his  village, Alsediq Abdelqader bulled his truck through the waters in a desperate attempt to locate his small house north of the Sudanese capital.   Flash floods from the Nile inundated his home last week in Wad Ramli village on the eastern river bank, expelling him and his family who managed to  clamber aboard a ferry to the nearest dry land.

His drive through the flash floods was not easy as he had to avoid floating mattresses, house appliances and broken tree branches.    "My entire home is destroyed," said the 57-year-old. "I have lived all my life in this village and I have never seen a flood like this before."   "I'm struggling to recognise my house and trying to identify it, as some others have done, by the trees around it."   His home is among thousands destroyed or damaged by the  floods that struck at least 15 states, affecting nearly 200,000 people across Sudan.

The worst hit area was White Nile state in the south.   About 62 people were killed and nearly 100 injured overall, said the official SUNA news agency quoting a health ministry official as saying the crisis "did not reach the level of being declared a disaster."    Volunteers and aid workers immediately rushed to Wad Ramli when the savage floods hit.    Authorities dispatched lorries and boats to wade through the thick water to rescue families and salvage their furniture and valuables.   But Abdelqader was among the less fortunate, unable to find their belongings.    "I have not managed to recover any of my furniture or belongings. My family is now staying with relatives in a nearby village," said Abdelqader.

- 'Mosquitoes everywhere' -
On the main road outside Wad Ramli, piles of sodden furniture are strewn about as homeless families shelter in dozens of make-shift tents.    The crisis comes as Sudan ushers in a political transition to civilian rule.   A prime minister and a civilian majority ruling body are to oversee a three-year transitional period following the ouster of veteran ruler Omar al-Bashir in April.     On Friday, the newly-appointed Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok visited Wad Ramli and gave directives to intensify aid efforts. 

The UN says the crisis is expected to drag on until October.    "We have not been able to survey the number of houses affected in Wad Ramli due to the rising water levels," said Farouk Ahmed, supervisor of a Red Crescent aid team.   He estimates the village alone had about 6,000 residents.    And as Wad Ramli inhabitants reel from the floods, residents of nearby villages are bracing themselves for water levels to keep rising.

In Wawesi Gharb village, about half a kilometre (500 yards), 35-year-old farmer Sami Ali says he is running out of ways to roll back the water threat.   "We placed piles of sandbags around houses to reduce the damage in case we were flooded especially after the water surrounded our village from all sides," he said.    Another resident, 24-year-old Hozeifa al-Ser, expressed fear of an outbreak of diseases especially as "mosquitoes and flies are hovering everywhere".

- 'We will go back' -
Mobile health clinics were set up oustside the village to serve Wad Ramli but aid workers say medicine and food are in short supply.   In the tents, hundreds of villagers are pondering ways return to their lives.   Along with her two sisters and their families, Nafisa al-Saeed said they plan to go back home after the water recedes.   "We lived in this village all our lives. We will have to go back and rebuild our houses.

Authorities just have to build flood barriers but we will not leave this place," she said.   But 19-year-old Shehab al-Din Mohamed says he lost his documents and identification cards as well as university application papers.     "The academic year will start soon and I have no idea how I would submit my documents after I lost everything," he said.   "It seems like we will be living here (in the tent) until October, and I have no idea what to do." 
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 14:02:01 +0200 (METDST)

Khartoum, Aug 23, 2019 (AFP) - Rain and flash floods have killed 54 people in Sudan since the start of July and affected nearly 200,000, the United Nations said Friday.   The worst affected area is While Nile state in the south but Khartoum and other regions have also been affected.   "More than 37,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged," the UN said, quoting figures from the government body it partners with in the crisis response.   "Humanitarians are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods," it said, adding that most of the 54 recorded deaths were due to collapsed roofs and electrocution.

The floods are having a lasting humanitarian impact on communities, with cut roads, damaged water points, lost livestock and the spread of water-borne diseases by insects.   The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said an extra $150 million were needed from donors to respond to the floods, in addition to the $1.1 billion required for the overall humanitarian situation in Sudan.
Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2019 22:42:07 +0200 (METDST)

Khartoum, Aug 13, 2019 (AFP) - Heavy rain in Sudan has caused extensive flooding that killed at least seven people in the country's south Tuesday, the state news agency reported.   "Seven citizens were killed, two injured and 10 villages affected by rain and flooding in Jazira state," SUNA said.    The downpours, which have battered parts of Sudan for days now, destroyed hundreds of homes in the capital Khartoum.   At least six other people were killed over the past week in Jazira and in the western region of Darfur where thousands of people were affected by flooding.
Date: Wed, 3 Jul 2019 15:33:33 +0200

Juba, July 3, 2019 (AFP) - South Sudan has stepped up surveillance along its porous southern border after an Ebola case was detected just inside DR Congo, an health official in Juba told AFP Wednesday.   The case of the deadly virus was confirmed in Ariwara, in Congo's north-eastern Ituri province, just 70 kilometres (43 miles) from the frontier with Yei River State in South Sudan.

It is the closest Ebola is known to have come to South Sudan since a major outbreak began in Congo last August.   Dr Pinyi Nyimol, the director general of South Sudan's Disease Control and Emergency Response Centre, said a team of reinforcements had been sent to the region to bolster surveillance after the case was confirmed.   "We are very worried because it is coming nearer, and people are on the move so contact (with Ebola) could cross to South Sudan," he told AFP.

South Sudan has already declared a state of high alert and vaccinated health workers.   There are screening centres at border crossings in high-risk areas and an Ebola treatment unit and laboratory in the capital Juba, Nyimol said.   But the world's youngest country is considered particularly vulnerable to the notorious virus.

Years of ruinous civil war have left its health system in tatters.   The border with the Democratic Republic of Congo has many unofficial crossing points, posing challenges for detection.   Fighting in and around Yei River State since September has also driven nearly 20,000 civilians into DR Congo and Uganda, both countries that have detected Ebola.

The outbreak in the eastern Congo provinces of North Kivu and Ituri has already claimed more than 1,500 lives since August.    Two people also died in Uganda in June after a family returned from eastern Congo where they buried an Ebola-stricken relative.   Ebola spreads among humans through close contact with the blood, body fluids, secretions or organs of an infected person, or objects contaminated by such fluids.
Date: Wed, 5 Jun 2019 23:49:47 +0200

Washington, June 5, 2019 (AFP) - The United States on Wednesday warned its citizens in Sudan to exercise "extreme caution" and prepare to leave the country as the death toll in a crackdown on protests topped 100.   The United States had already in April warned its citizens against non-essential travel and ordered the departure of all but vital US embassy personnel as demonstrations swelled in the capital Khartoum.

Updating its guidance after the army forcibly ended protests, the United States said that the embassy was closed to the public and that US citizens still present should "make plans to leave Sudan."   "Shelter in place at home or another safe location," the State Department said. "Exercise extreme caution if you must go outside."

Protesters, led by students and ordinary residents alarmed by the cost of living, have staged months of demonstrations that led to the army sacking veteran leader Omar al-Bashir in April.   The protesters kept up their sit-in, urging a transition to civilian rule, but Sudanese forces this week forcibly dispersed them, prompting strong condemnation by Western nations.
More ...