Date: Tue, 21 May 2019 12:37:30 +0200

Khartoum, May 21, 2019 (AFP) - Sudanese protest leaders called on their supporters Tuesday to prepare for a general strike after talks with the country's military rulers stalled on who will lead an agreed three-year transition.   Protest leaders had reached agreement with the ruling military council on the other main aspects of the transition.   But early on Tuesday, the generals who overthrew veteran president Omar al-Bashir last month baulked at protesters' demands for a civilian head and a civilian majority for an agreed new sovereign council to lead the transition.

"In order to achieve a full victory, we are calling for a huge participation in a general political strike," said the Sudanese Professionals Association, which took the lead in organising the four months of nationwide protests that led to Bashir's ouster.   "The strike is our revolutionary duty and the participation in the sit-in ... is a crucial guarantee to achieve the goals of the revolution."

Protest leader Madani Abbas Madani told AFP the preparations for a "general political strike and civil disobedience" were already under way.   "Whenever we will decide on applying these plans, we will make an announcement," said Madani, a prominent leader of protest umbrella group the Alliance for Freedom and Change.   The two sides launched what had been billed as a final round of talks on the transition late on Sunday.

The military council has faced pressure from Western government and the African Union to agree to a civilian-led transition -- the central demand of the thousands of demonstrators who have spent weeks camped outside army headquarters in Khartoum.   When talks broke up early on Tuesday, neither side said when they would resume.

Protest leader Siddiq Yousef told reporters they had been suspended.   "The main point of dispute that remains is concerning the share of representatives of the military and the civilians in the council and who will be the head of the new body," the two sides said in a joint statement.   The military council has been pushing for its chairman General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan to head the new sovereign council but protest leaders want a civilian.
Date: Wed, 24 Apr 2019 14:11:55 +0200

Khartoum, April 24, 2019 (AFP) - Protest leaders in Sudan threatened Wednesday to launch a "general strike" unless the country's military rulers meet their demand to hand power to a civilian administration.   Responding to a journalist's question on what steps demonstrators would take if the ruling military council fails to cede power, protest leader Siddiq Farouk threatened "escalatory measures".    "We will launch a million-strong march, and we are preparing for a general strike," he said.
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2019 04:57:44 +0200
By Fran BLANDY

Udier, South Sudan, April 19, 2019 (AFP) - By the time he was brought into the remote clinic in northeastern South Sudan, two-year-old Nyachoat was already convulsing from the malaria attacking his brain.   After being given medication he lies fast asleep, naked and feverish, attached to a drip, his anxious mother sitting on the bed next to him.   Nyachoat could be saved, but others are not so lucky.   In South Sudan mind-bending horrors abound of war, ethnic violence, rape, hunger and displacement.

But for civilians living in the shadow of conflict, the greatest danger is often being cut off from health services, whether due to violence or lack of development in the vast, remote areas that make up much of the country.   According to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), which supports the tiny clinic where Nyachoat is recovering in Udier village, 70 percent of all illness deaths are due to easily treatable malaria, acute watery diarrhoea and respiratory infections.   In case of more serious illness there is "no place" to go, said Nyachoat's 22-year-old mother Buk Gader.

A study by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) last year showed almost 400,000 people had died as a result of South Sudan's nearly six-year war.   Half of these were due to violent deaths, and half because of the increased risk of disease and reduced access to healthcare as a result of the conflict.   ICRC health field officer Irene Oyenya said the Upper Nile region was particularly affected.   "There were (aid) organisations which were supplying primary healthcare, but then during the war, most of the organisations got evacuated" and pulled out of the country, she said.

- Blocked by swamps -
Udier is a village with a dirt airstrip whose sun-baked sand, which when not used by twice weekly ICRC flights bringing medicine and supplies, serves as a football pitch for youths. It is also a pedestrian highway for those who come from far flung huts and cattle camps to market.   In the tiny market, there is little fresh food available. Villagers can buy red onions or sit for a strong Sudanese coffee, infused with ginger, while in the dry season nomadic Falata herdswomen in flowing dresses sell milk from their cattle.   A brick building next to the airstrip, its roof long blown off in a storm, is the village school, but for several days in a row no teacher shows up.   In the surrounding villages, women are hard at work mudding their huts and re-thatching the roof in anticipation of the rains to come within weeks.

When they do come, swelling the swampy marshlands and rivers for miles around, roads will become impassable.    It becomes "difficult for young children to swim or women or men to carry patients to reach here," said Oyenya.   Marginalised for decades prior to independence from Sudan in 2011, and engulfed in war since 2013, South Sudan has seen little development. The healthcare sector is one of many propped up by international aid organisations.   However, the country is also the most dangerous for humanitarian workers with around 100 killed over the past five years, according to United Nations figures. Dozens of organisations have been forced to pull out of areas they served due to the conflict.

The Upper Nile region, where Udier is situated near the borders of Sudan and Ethiopia, was wracked by conflict in 2017 as government forces waged a major offensive to seize the opposition-held town of Pagak.   The ICRC was forced to evacuate patients and staff from its hospital and health centre in the village of Maiwut which was looted, leaving "not even a needle on the ground", according ICRC's Oyenya.   Many relocated to Udier, which was spared from fighting.   A year later in 2018, angry protesters looted around 10 humanitarian agency compounds in the town of Maban, 72 kilometres (44 miles) north of Udier.   ICRC's head of delegation in South Sudan, James Reynolds, said a peace deal signed in September 2018 "has improved security, mobility, and access for humanitarian workers".   But fresh fighting in the southern Equatorias region "has made access to certain areas very difficult."

- Women bear the burden -
In opposition-held Udier, the clinic supported by the ICRC provides crucial healthcare support to the region, where like throughout South Sudan, maternal and child mortality is sky-high.   Every day a small group of patients sits outside under a fragrant Neem tree, waiting to be helped, some from nearby while others have walked for a day or two.   Oyenya says a major challenge is that women, who do all the heavy work and take care of up to 10 children, may delay bringing them to the centre in time. That can be deadly.

Sometimes the children come alone: a nine-year-old girl in a purple polka dot dress confidently tells Oyenya she is suffering from bloody diarrhoea and, she thinks, malaria. Her parents are nowhere in sight.   For anything more serious, such as pregnancy complications, blood transfusions and operations, the nearest hospital is in government-held Maban, a five-hour drive away or a three-day walk.   The other option is a three-day walk to Gambella in Ethiopia.   "They may reach there alive, or they may not reach there alive," said Oyenya.
Monday 25th March 2019
https://www.afro.who.int/news/south-sudan-launches-yellow-fever-vaccination-campaign-stop-outbreak-sakure-nzara-county

South Sudan launches Yellow Fever vaccination campaign to stop outbreak in Sakure, Nzara county Gbudue State 
 
Yambio, 25 March 2019 – The Ministry of Health with support from the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners launched a reactive yellow fever (YF) vaccination campaign in Sakure, Nzara County Gbudue State to vaccinate 19,578 individuals aged 9 months to 65 years against YF.

The vaccination campaign follows the declaration of a yellow fever outbreak on 29 November 2019, where a total of three laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths have been reported after investigations were carried out in Sakure payam.

In December 2018, a team comprising of epidemiologists, a public health officers, entomologists; laboratory specialists as well as risk communication experts carried out detailed epidemiological, laboratory, and entomological investigations to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, identify the vectors, assess the risk of an epidemic, and to initiate control measures to interrupt transmission and prevent further spread of the disease.

The reactive YF vaccination is part of the global strategy to Eliminate Yellow Fever Epidemics (EYE) by 2026, said Dr Olushayo Olu, WHO Representative for South Sudan. It serves to protect high-risk populations against the YF virus in the immediate term and will serve as a bridge towards the introduction of yellow fever vaccine into the routine immunization system in the long term.

YF is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The "yellow" in the name refers to the jaundice that affects some patients. Symptoms of yellow fever include fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting and fatigue. A small proportion of patients who contract the virus develop severe symptoms and approximately half of those die within 7 to 10 days.

YF has an incubation period of 3-6 days following infection. Many people do not experience symptoms, but when these do occur, the most common are fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. In most cases, symptoms disappear after 3 to 4 days.

South Sudan last experienced a yellow fever outbreak in May 2003, in Imatong region of Torit County, with a total of 178 cases with 27 deaths (CFR 15%) in Imatong and Ikotos districts, Torit County.

With funding from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, European Union Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), South Sudan secured a total of 21 800 doses from the Global emergency yellow fever vaccine stockpile of the International Coordination Group (ICG) on vaccine provision.

For Additional Information or to Request Interviews, Please contact:

Ms Jemila M. Ebrahim
Communications Officer
Mobile: +211 921 647 859
Email: ebrahimj@who.int
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
Source: ReliefWeb [edited]
<https://reliefweb.int/report/sudan/sudan-set-protect-over-8-million-people-its-largest-ever-yellow-fever-vaccination-drive>

The Federal Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and UNICEF, has launched a large-scale mass vaccination campaign in Sudan to vaccinate more than 8.3 million people 9 months to 60 years of age against yellow fever in the states of Blue Nile, Gezira and Sennar during 10-29 Mar 2019.

The campaign represents a crucial step in protecting a large portion of the population and reducing the risk of severe and deadly yellow fever outbreaks in the country. It is the 3rd and final drive thatSudan is undertaking to protect populations at risk and prevent yellow fever epidemics, pending the implementation of infant immunization as routine practice.

The campaign forms a critical part of Sudan's ongoing work to protect all populations against yellow fever epidemics, in alignment with the global Eliminate Yellow fever Epidemics (EYE) Strategy. The country plans to complement these yellow fever mass campaigns and ensure long-term protection through the introduction of yellow fever vaccination into routine immunization in the coming months.

"We acknowledge the commitment of the health authorities in Sudan to avail cash and fuel during this economic crisis to ensure that their people, especially children, are protected with a quality vaccine which will contribute to health security and making the world safer," said Dr. Naeema Al-Gasseer, WHO Representative in Sudan.

"Yellow fever vaccination is the most important tool we have to prevent yellow fever outbreaks. The vaccine will be freely available to any eligible person and will provide life-long protection against the disease. While protecting yourself against mosquito bites is important to reduce the risk of many diseases, only vaccination can eliminate the risk of yellow fever outbreaks," she added.

Yellow fever is a viral disease that is transmitted by certain types of mosquito. Infection can cause fatal illness, including jaundice, and death, and can spread rapidly, locally and internationally, especially in urban areas. However, the disease can be prevented by a single dose of a highly effective and safe vaccine. This campaign aims to boost protection in the general population and will target all eligible people.

Sudan is at high risk for the spread of yellow fever due to a combination of climate and ecological factors, and because there are still areas of low population immunity. Recent years have seen global changes in the epidemiology of yellow fever, with outbreaks occurring in areas that were not previously assessed as being at high risk.

"We are observing a changing nature in yellow fever disease dynamics. It is very important that every eligible person in this campaign receives the vaccine to protect themselves, their families and their communities," said Professor Dr. Babkir Kabaloo, Undersecretary of the Federal Ministry of Health.

"The current campaign represents one of the final phases in the Ministry's efforts to protect the entire nation against yellow fever outbreaks. This campaign will cover Blue Nile, Gezira, and Sennar states. In the coming months, the remaining states of Khartoum, Northern and River Nile will also be covered, completing the protection of the entire Sudanese population," he added.

Sudan's health authorities and partners are working to introduce yellow fever vaccine in the national immunization schedule in the near future. This will help ensure the protection of the whole population and generations to come against this fatal but preventable disease.
=====================
[It is good to see this ambitious yellow fever (YF) vaccination campaign drawing to a close. Incorporating YF vaccine into routine childhood vaccination schedules is prudent and if successful will eliminate the need for intensive, country-wide campaigns to deal with outbreaks. YF is no stranger to Sudan. Between 3 Oct and 24 Nov 2013, a total of 44 confirmed cases of YF were reported, including 14 deaths. A total of 12 localities in West and South Kordofan were affected by that outbreak. There was a large YF outbreak in the Darfur state in 2012-2013. In 2012, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said that more than 840 people were infected with YF in Darfur and that the epidemic affected 35 of 64 localities in the region since September 2012. The total recorded cases of YF in Greater Darfur hit 849 with a 20% death toll during an epidemic in 2012 (see WHO Disease Outbreak News <http://who.int/csr/don/2012_12_03/en> as reported by ProMED post http://promedmail.org/post/20130125.1513849, as noted at the time by Mod.JW). Mounting campaigns in the face of these types of outbreaks is inefficient, logistically difficult, and costly -- financially and in terms of human lives. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Sudan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/96>]
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