Date: Sun 27 Oct 2019
Source: Radio Dabanga and AllAfrica [edited]
<https://allafrica.com/stories/201910280167.html>

According to the Sudanese Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), 323 suspected cholera cases, including 10 deaths, were reported in Blue Nile state, Sennar and Khartoum between the end of August 2019 and [22 Oct 2019]. The 1st case was detected on [28 Aug 2019], the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Sudan says in its latest Sudan Situation Report. Two cases were recently recorded in Ombadda locality in Omdurman, the twin-city of Khartoum.

On [6 Oct 2019], humanitarian partners in Sudan launched the Cholera Readiness and Response Plan, that targets 2.5 million people in 8 high-risk states (Blue Nile state, Sennar, El Gedaref, Kassala, El Gezira, White Nile state, Khartoum, and River Nile state).

An oral cholera vaccine campaign launched on 11 Oct 2019 is ongoing, targeting 1.6 million people in high risk communities in Blue Nile and Sennar states. The aim of the campaign is to contain the outbreak and prevent its spread to neighboring states.

Risk assessment
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Sudan has been facing a continuous surge of acute watery diarrhea/suspected cholera cases since 2016. The current outbreak was reported following recent heavy rains and flooding in 17 out of 18 states across the country. As a result of the flooding, the country reported widespread damage to infrastructure, thus more cholera cases can be expected in the future.
======================
[As stated in Lutwick LI, Preis J, Choi P: Cholera. In: Chronic illness and disability: the pediatric gastrointestinal tract. Greydanus DE, Atay O, Merrick J (eds). NY: Nova Bioscience, 2018; pp 113-136, oral rehydration therapy can be life-saving in outbreaks of cholera and other forms of diarrhea:
"As reviewed by Richard Guerrant et al (1), it was in 1831 that cholera treatment could be accomplished by intravenous replacement, and, although this therapy could produce dramatic improvements, not until 1960 was it 1st recognized that there was no true destruction of the intestinal mucosa, and gastrointestinal rehydration therapy could be effective, and the therapy could dramatically reduce the intravenous needs for rehydration. Indeed, that this rehydration could be just as effective given orally as through an orogastric tube (for example, refs 2 and 3) made it possible for oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to be used in rural remote areas and truly impact on the morbidity and mortality of cholera. Indeed, Guerrant et al (1) highlights the use of oral glucose-salt packets in war-torn Bangladeshi refugees, which reduced the mortality rate from 30 per cent to 3.6 per cent (4) and quotes sources referring to ORT as "potentially the most important medical advance" of the 20th century. A variety of formulations of ORT exist, generally glucose or rice powder-based, which contain a variety of micronutrients, especially zinc (5).

"The assessment of the degree of volume loss in those with diarrhea to approximate volume and fluid losses can be found in ref 6 below. Those with severe hypovolemia should be initially rehydrated intravenously with a fluid bolus of normal saline or Ringer's lactate solution of 20-30 ml/kg followed by 100 ml/kg in the 1st 4 hours and 100 ml/kg over the next 18 hours with regular reassessment. Those with lesser degrees of hypovolemia can be rehydrated orally with a glucose or rice-derived formula with up to 4 liters in the 1st 4 hours, and those with no hypovolemia can be given ORT after each liquid stool with frequent reevaluation."

References
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1. Guerrant RL, Carneiro-Filho BA and Dillingham RA. Cholera, diarrhea, and oral rehydration therapy: triumph and indictment. Clin Infect Dis. 2003;37(3):398-405; available at: <http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/3/398.long>.
2. Gregorio GV, Gonzales ML, Dans LF and Martinez EG. Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD006519. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD006519.pub2; available at: <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD006519.pub3/full>.
3. Gore SM, Fontaine O and Pierce NF. Impact of rice based oral rehydration solution on stool output and duration of diarrhea: meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials. BMJ 1992; 304(6822): 287-91; available at: <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1881081/>.
4. Mahalanabis D, Choudhuri AB, Bagchi NG, et al. Oral fluid therapy of cholera among Bangladesh refugees. Johns Hopkins Med 1973; 132(4): 197-205; available at: <http://www.searo.who.int/publications/journals/seajph/media/2012/seajph_v1n1/whoseajphv1i1p105.pdf>.
5. Atia AN and Buchman AL. Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009; 104(10): 2596-604, doi: 10.1038/ajg.2009.329; abstract available at: <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19550407>.
6. WHO. The treatment of diarrhea, a manual for physicians and other senior health workers. 4th ed. 2005; available at: <http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2005/9241593180.pdf>. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
Kenya: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/174>
Adamawa State, Nigeria: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6479>
Sudan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/96>]
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2019 13:41:25 +0100 (MET)

Juba, Oct 30, 2019 (AFP) - Three aid volunteers working at Ebola screening points along the DR Congo border were killed in clashes in South Sudan, the International Organisation of Migration (IOM) said Wednesday.   "The IOM volunteers, one female and two males, were caught in a crossfire during clashes that broke out" on Sunday, in Morobo County in the Central Equatoria region, the UN agency said in a statement.   Two other male volunteers were injured, while a female volunteer and the son of the woman who was killed were abducted.   "We are deeply saddened by the loss of our colleagues and we extend our heartfelt condolences to their families and friends," said IOM chief of mission in South Sudan, Jean-Philippe Chauzy.

According to the statement, the IOM has suspended screening for Ebola at five sites along the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo.   An Ebola outbreak has killed more than 2,000 people in DR Congo since August 2018, placing the region on high alert, with cases already having spread to Uganda.   "The safety of our personnel is paramount and will not be further jeopardised until we secure guarantees for the security of all our personnel operating in Morobo County," said Chauzy.    The UN's humanitarian agency OCHA also condemned the killings in a statement, noting it was the first reported killing of aid workers in South Sudan since 2018.

At least 115 aid workers, mainly South Sudanese, have been killed since the country plunged into conflict in December 2013 after President Salva Kiir accused his former deputy Riek Machar of plotting a coup against him.   The conflict has left nearly 400,000 dead and displaced millions.   A peace deal was signed in September last year and a ceasefire has largely held, but fighting in the Central Equatoria region has continued between government forces and a holdout rebel group.   A long-delayed unity government is due to be formed by November 12, however Machar is seeking further postponement over crucial outstanding issues.
Fri 11/10/2019 14:43
WorldHealthOrganizationNews@who.int

Attributable to the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan, WHO and UNICEF

KHARTOUM, 11 October 2019 -  "Sudan has launched an oral cholera vaccination campaign in response to the ongoing outbreak of cholera. More than 1.6 million people aged one year and above in the Blue Nile and Sinnar states will be vaccinated over the coming five days.  “The announcement of the Federal Ministry of Health in Sudan on the cholera outbreak last month allowed national and state authorities, and health partners, to act quickly and respond to the outbreak.

“Since the announcement on 8 September, 262 cases of suspected cholera and eight related deaths have been reported as of 9 October in the Blue Nile and Sinnar states. No cholera-related deaths have been reported since mid-September. “The vaccines were procured and successfully shipped using funding from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. In addition, Gavi is providing nearly US$ 2 million to cover operational costs for the campaign.

“We joined efforts to respond as quickly as possible to contain the current outbreak of cholera and prevent it from spreading further in Sudan. The vaccination campaign kicking off today in combination with other measures including scaling up water, sanitation and hygiene activities, enhancing surveillance, prepositioning supplies and case management, will help protect people who are at highest risk.

“The first round of the campaign will conclude on 16 October and will be followed by a second round in four to six weeks to provide an additional dose to ensure people are protected for at least the next three years.  “As part of the campaign, over 3,560 vaccinators, more than 2,240 social mobilizers, and almost 70 independent monitors have been trained and deployed to the two affected states.”
Date: Wed 9 Oct 2019
Source: Dabanga [edited]
<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/rift-valley-fever-suspected-in-red-sea-state-human-and-livestock-deaths>

Arbaat in El Ganeb locality in Sudan's Red Sea state reported 10 new cases of suspected Rift Valley fever* on Monday and Tuesday [7 and 8 Oct 2019], bringing the total number of registered cases to 5, and 3 deaths.  Doctor Ahmed Dereir told Radio Dabanga about the spread of the disease in 8 villages in the area of Arbaat, pointing out that the cases were transferred to Port Sudan for treatment. He explained that the governor formed an emergency room of 35 people representing various government agencies, medical committees, and members of the Forces for Freedom and Change.

Ali Bayrak, head of the Community Support Committee for the residents of Arbaat called on the government for the explicit announcement of the results of laboratory testing of samples.  The state Ministry of Health committed to provide 2 doctors to the villages of the Arbaat Administrative Unit and training 10 medical staff, and 3 midwives, in addition to the distribution of water chlorination tablets and the provision of 3 spraying vehicles.

As reported by Radio Dabanga on Sunday [6 Oct 2019], one man and more than 20 head of cattle died in Arbaat on Thursday and Friday [3 and 4 Oct 2019], and that to date, so far, 3 people and 420 cows have died of the disease, now suspected to be Rift Valley fever, that hit the area of Arbaat, north of Port Sudan, over the past weeks, medical doctor Ahmed Dereir told Radio Dabanga.

According to the UN World Health Organisation (WHO) Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but also has the capacity to infect humans. Infection can cause severe disease in both animals and humans. The disease also results in significant economic losses due to death and abortion among RVF-infected livestock.

RVF virus was 1st identified in 1931 during an investigation into an epidemic among sheep on a farm in the Rift Valley of Kenya, and most cases occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Key facts:
- Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but can also infect humans.
- The majority of human infections result from contact with the blood or organs of infected animals.
- Human infections have also resulted from the bites of infected mosquitoes.
- To date, no human-to-human transmission of RVF virus has been documented.
- The incubation period (the interval from infection to onset of symptoms) for RVF varies from 2-6 days.
- Outbreaks of RVF in animals can be prevented by a sustained programme of animal vaccination.
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[On Wed 9 Oct 2019, villages in the area of Arbaat in El Ganeb locality in Red Sea state reported 9 new cases suspected to be Rift Valley fever, bringing the total number of reported cases to 65 (<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/nine-more-cases-of-rift-valley-fever-in-sudan-s-red-sea-state>). In addition to the Red Sea state outbreak mentioned above, a separate report indicates that Rift Valley fever is occurring in Sudan's River Nile state (see Rift Valley fever - Sudan: (RS,NR) human, animal, alert, OIE Archive Number: http://promedmail.org/post/20191014.6726088). These 2 Sudan states mentioned above are adjoining, so it is not surprising that suspected or confirmed Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks are occurring there simultaneously. The Ministry of Health is investigating the outbreaks in both states. Not only are these outbreaks a human health problem, they are clearly an animal health problem as well, with 420 cattle reported dying of the disease. A One Health response is urgently needed, with participation of physicians, veterinarians and entomologists. There was evidence of RVF virus in the neighbouring Central African Republic this year (2019). Last year (2018), human and animal cases occurred in neighboring South Sudan (see Valley fever - South Sudan (09): (EL) human, animal, WHO http://promedmail.org/post/20180410.5735975).

If focal geographic areas of transmission are identified in this Sudan situation, increased surveillance of people and livestock should be initiated and livestock vaccination considered. RVF-infected livestock can pose a significant risk to humans in contact with them, often livestock owners and veterinarians. Abortions in livestock with a loss in productivity present an economic problem for many ethnic groups that depend on them for livelihoods.

The above report mentions abortion storms in a River Nile state outbreak that could have had serious economic, social and public health consequences. It is likely that RVF virus will persist in this area in transovarially infected eggs of _Aedes_ mosquito vectors. These eggs can remain viable for long periods and hatch when flooded during future rain events, with subsequent emergence of infected females ready to transmit the virus. This risk provides justification for maintaining livestock of the area well vaccinated into the future. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[A media (radio) report on an event of human and animal disease, in Sudan's area of Arbaat, north of Port Sudan, Red Sea state, caused by an "unknown fever" killing 3 people and 420 cows, was posted by ProMED-mail on 6 Oct 2019 as "undiagnosed," RFI (http://promedmail.org/post/20191006.6712623). The commentary suggested RVF as possible etiology, requesting further information. According to Sudan's official OIE report, dated 13 Oct 2019, an event of RVF has been diagnosed in "Arabaata dam area, Alghunub Wa Alolaib, Red Sea state" (http://promedmail.org/post/20191014.6726088), the animals affected being goats, which are thus considered, in this event, the virus' primary victims and main source of human infection, directly or through vectors. The samples from the goats were found RVF-infected by ELISA. In difference with the earlier media (radio) report, the OIE report indicated that there are "no cattle and sheep in this area." A media report dated 12 Oct 2019 (<https://khartoumstar.com/en/2019/10/12/ministry-of-health-rift-valley-fever-in-northern-sudan/>) reported RVF "emerging" in Sudan's River Nile state, naming the locations Berber, north of Bawqa, Ftouar, Joule and Sulaimaniya, and the Artoli region of the East Bank. The report cited Hatem Fadl, an official in the epidemiology and emergency department at the Federal Ministry of Health, saying that "4 cases of Rift Valley fever were diagnosed among 17 samples taken last week, [which] were sent to the Central Laboratory in Khartoum." Hatem pointed out that the Federal Minister of Health commissioned a team to investigate the injuries, [which] arrived in the villages of Artoli, Al-Bawqa, and Fatwwar [Fri 11 Oct 2019], before the disease was officially announced (12 Oct 2019). Additional data were included in the same media source on 13 Oct 2019 (<https://khartoumstar.com/en/2019/10/13/attempts-to-control-rift-valley-fever-in-the-nile-river-state/>). No details on animal cases in River Nile state have become available, nor specific lab results of the human samples. Additional information from Sudan, and clarification on the discrepancies between the media reports as far as animal species are concerned, will be welcomed. - ProMED Mod.AS]

[A map showing the location of the 2 states mentioned above can be accessed at:
<http://ontheworldmap.com/sudan/administrative-divisions-map-of-sudan.html>.

HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Sudan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/96>]
Date: Thu 19 Sep 2019
Source: Dabang Sudan [edited]
<https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/haemorrhagic-fever-cholera-spreading-in-sudan-as-reports-of-chikungunya-wane>

The Ministry of Health has reported 22 suspected cases of haemorrhagic fever in Kassala in eastern Sudan.

In a press statement, the director of emergencies and epidemics, Emtiaz Ata, told reporters that the ministry is examining suspected cases to make sure of the suspicion and to find out more about the disease.

The director-general of the Ministry of Health, Nureldin Hussein, said that the health situation in Kassala is not reassuring, and there must be measures and considerable precautions to adequately address the health issue and avoid epidemics.
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[It is not clear what is the cause of these suspected cases of hemorrhagic fever or whether epidemiological investigations have been carried out, laboratory tests conducted, the clinical course of the illness determined, or any specific response measures taken. Any updates from the public health personnel and physicians on the ground will be highly appreciated. - ProMED Mod.UBA]
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