Date: Wed 28 Aug 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/tularemia-significant-rise-in-sweden-92551/>
-------------------------------------
As of [Mon 26 Aug 2019], about 560 human cases have been reported, much more this time of year than usual and even more than 2015 when 859 people across the country suffered from the illness. Most cases of illness are reported from central Sweden (the Dalarna region, Gavleborg and Orebro), but an increasing number of reports are also starting to come in from other regions, especially in northern Sweden.

Since the number of illness cases is usually highest in September in Sweden, the outbreak is expected to grow further in the coming weeks.

Infections in Sweden are mainly seen in forest and field hares and rodents, but the disease has been reported in several other species, including other mammals, birds, amphibians, insects, and ticks.

Tularemia, or harpest as it is known as in Sweden, is one of the most common native zoonoses in people in Sweden. People are infected mainly through mosquitoes, but also through direct contact with sick or dead animals and by inhalation of, for example, infectious dust.

The number of reported cases of harpest in humans varies from year to year, in recent years there have been reported between about 100 to over 800 cases per year. More than 90 percent of reported human cases have fallen ill in Sweden.
=========================
[This outbreak, primarily in central Sweden, continues to increase in size.  _Francisella tularensis_ subsp. _tularensis_ (type A) is associated with lagomorphs (rabbits and hares). Wild rodents are also frequently infected, and occurrence of human cases is usually linked to these host species. _F. tularensis_ is transmitted primarily by ticks and biting flies, and is highly virulent for humans and domestic rabbits.

Tularemia is largely confined to the Northern Hemisphere and is not normally found in the tropics or the Southern Hemisphere. _F. tularensis_ subspecies _holarctica_ naturally infects several mammalian wildlife species in northern Europe, in particular, mice, rabbits, hares, beavers, voles, lemmings, and muskrats. The ticks _Dermacentor reticularis_ and _Ixodes ricinus_ are vectors for the bacterium, although previous research has suggested that mosquito bites are the most frequent route of transmission to humans in Sweden.

In addition to vector transmission, tularemia may be spread via contact with infected animals or environmental fomites by inhalation, or by ingestion of the poorly cooked flesh of infected animals or contaminated water.

Tularemia can be transmitted by aerosol, direct contact, ingestion, or arthropods. Inhalation of aerosolized organisms (in the laboratory or as an airborne agent in an act of bioterrorism) can produce a pneumonic form. Direct contact with, or ingestion of, infected carcasses of wild animals (such as cottontail rabbit) can produce the ulceroglandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal (local lesion with regional lymphadenitis), or typhoidal form. Immersion in or ingestion of contaminated water can result in infection in aquatic animals. Ticks can maintain infection transstadially [pathogen remains with the vector from one life stage ("stadium") to the next] and transovarially [transmission of a pathogen from an organism (as a tick) to its offspring by infection of eggs in its ovary], making them efficient reservoirs and vectors.

The manifestations of infection in this growing outbreak in parts of Sweden are not stated. If vector borne, the most common form would be ulceroglandular with an ulcer at the introduction site and enlarged lymph nodes in that area. If waterborne, oropharyngeal would be most common. Among flying vectors, deer flies are often brought up but mosquitoes are also relevant as shown in this Swedish publication:

Reference
---------
Thelaus J, Andersson A, Broman T, et al: _Francisella tularensis_ subspecies _holarctica_ occurs in Swedish mosquitoes, persists through the developmental stages of laboratory-infected mosquitoes and is transmissible during blood feeding. Microb Ecol. 2014; 67(1): 96-107;  <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907667/>

"Abstract
--------
In Sweden, mosquitoes are considered the major vectors of the bacterium _Francisella tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_, which causes tularemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mosquitoes acquire the bacterium as aquatic larvae and transmit the disease as adults. Mosquitoes sampled in a Swedish area where tularemia is endemic (Orebro) were positive for the presence of _F. tularensis_ deoxyribonucleic acid throughout the summer. Presence of the clinically relevant _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was confirmed in 11 out of the 14 mosquito species sampled. Experiments performed using laboratory-reared _Aedes aegypti_ confirmed that _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was transstadially maintained from orally infected larvae to adult mosquitoes and that 25% of the adults exposed as larvae were positive for the presence of _F. tularensis_-specific sequences for at least 2 weeks. In addition, we found that _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was transmitted to 58% of the adult mosquitoes feeding on diseased mice. In a small-scale in vivo transmission experiment with _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_-positive adult mosquitoes and susceptible mice, none of the animals developed tularemia. However, we confirmed that there was transmission of the bacterium to blood vials by mosquitoes that had been exposed to the bacterium in the larval stage. Taken together, these results provide evidence that mosquitoes play a role in disease transmission in part of Sweden where tularemia recurs."  - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Sweden:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/108>]
Date: Mon 12 Aug 2019 16:01 CEST +02:00
Source: The Local [edited]
<https://www.thelocal.se/20190812/rabbit-fever-hundreds-infected-as-outbreak-grows-in-sweden>

Swedish health authorities have warned an outbreak of rabbit fever (tularemia) is expected to grow, with hundreds of people affected so far.

A total of 212 confirmed cases have been reported to The Public Health Agency of Sweden (Folkhallsomyndigheten) so far in 2019, sharply increasing from late July 2019. That is twice as many as in a normal year.

But Sweden has not yet seen the end of it, the authority warned on [Mon 12 Aug 2019]. "Since the number of cases (of rabbit fever) is usually at its highest in September, the outbreak is expected to grow further in the coming weeks," it wrote in a statement.

Most cases have been reported in Dalarna, Gavleborg, and Orebro counties in central Sweden, but in the past week Vasterbotten and Norrbotten have also seen an increase, often limited to a specific area.

Many of those affected by the disease have been infected via mosquito bites.  [Byline: Emma Loefgren]
=========================
[_Francisella tularensis_ subsp. _tularensis_ (type A) is associated with lagomorphs (rabbits and hares). Wild rodents are also frequently infected, and occurrence of human cases is usually linked to these host species. _F. tularensis_ is transmitted primarily by ticks and biting flies, and is highly virulent for humans and domestic rabbits.

Tularemia is largely confined to the Northern Hemisphere and is not normally found in the tropics or the Southern Hemisphere. _F. tularensis_ subspecies _holarctica_ naturally infects several mammalian wildlife species in northern Europe, in particular, mice, rabbits, hares, beavers, voles, lemmings, and muskrats. The ticks _Dermacentor reticularis_ and _Ixodes ricinus_ are vectors for the bacterium, although previous research has suggested that mosquito bites are the most frequent route of transmission to humans in Sweden.

In addition to vector transmission, tularemia may be spread via contact with infected animals or environmental fomites by inhalation, or by ingestion of the poorly cooked flesh of infected animals or contaminated water.

Tularemia can be transmitted by aerosol, direct contact, ingestion, or arthropods. Inhalation of aerosolized organisms (in the laboratory or as an airborne agent in an act of bioterrorism) can produce a pneumonic form. Direct contact with, or ingestion of, infected carcasses of wild animals (such as cottontail rabbit) can produce the ulceroglandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal (local lesion with regional lymphadenitis), or typhoidal form. Immersion in or ingestion of contaminated water can result in infection in aquatic animals. Ticks can maintain infection transstadially [pathogen remains with the vector from one life stage ("stadium") to the next] and transovarially [transmission of a pathogen from an organism (as a tick) to its offspring by infection of eggs in its ovary], making them efficient reservoirs and vectors.

The manifestations of infection in this growing outbreak in parts of Sweden are not stated. If vector borne, the most common form would be ulceroglandular with an ulcer at the introduction site and enlarged lymph nodes in that area. If waterborne, oropharyngeal would be most common. Among flying vectors, deer flies are often brought up but mosquitoes are also relevant as shown in this Swedish publication:

Thelaus J, Andersson A, Broman T, et al: _Francisella tularensis_ subspecies holarctica occurs in Swedish mosquitoes, persists through the developmental stages of laboratory-infected mosquitoes and is transmissible during blood feeding. Microb Ecol. 2014; 67(1): 96-107; <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907667/>

"Abstract
--------
In Sweden, mosquitoes are considered the major vectors of the bacterium _Francisella tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_, which causes tularemia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mosquitoes acquire the bacterium as aquatic larvae and transmit the disease as adults. Mosquitoes sampled in a Swedish area where tularemia is endemic (Orebro) were positive for the presence of _F. tularensis_ deoxyribonucleic acid throughout the summer. Presence of the clinically relevant _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was confirmed in 11 out of the 14 mosquito species sampled. Experiments performed using laboratory-reared _Aedes aegypti_ confirmed that _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was transstadially maintained from orally infected larvae to adult mosquitoes and that 25% of the adults exposed as larvae were positive for the presence of _F. tularensis_-specific sequences for at least 2 weeks. In addition, we found that _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_ was transmitted to 58% of the adult mosquitoes feeding on diseased mice. In a small-scale in vivo transmission experiment with _F. tularensis_ subsp. _holarctica_-positive adult mosquitoes and susceptible mice, none of the animals developed tularemia. However, we confirmed that there was transmission of the bacterium to blood vials by mosquitoes that had been exposed to the bacterium in the larval stage. Taken together, these results provide evidence that mosquitoes play a role in disease transmission in part of Sweden where tularemia recurs."  - ProMED Mod.LL]

[Maps of Sweden:
<http://www.ezilon.com/maps/images/europe/Swedish-political-map.gif>
and <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/108>]
Date: Wed 7 Aug 2019, 10:47 AM CEST
Source: The Local SE [edited]
<https://www.thelocal.se/20190807/harpest-what-you-need-to-know-about-the-mosquito-borne-disease>

There have been several reported cases of tularemia or rabbit fever, known as 'harpest' in Sweden, this summer [2019], mostly in the north and centre of the country.  The animals most likely to carry the disease are wild hares, hence the name rabbit fever, and rodents, but it can also be transferred to humans via mosquito bites and occasionally tick bites. It's also possible for the infection to be transmitted by inhaling dust or drinking water that is contaminated by urine or feces from animals with the disease, according to Swedish healthcare service 1177. The disease cannot be carried from human to human.

It is too early to measure the exact extent of the disease this year [2019], since statistics from the Public Health Agency won't be available until later. But the Swedish Veterinary Institute has warned of several findings of dead animals that had been infected with the disease, and a "suspected outbreak".

A total of 33 people in the Gavleborg region have been affected by rabbit fever since the start of July [2019], according to regional healthcare authorities. In most cases, the patients had been infected in the Ljusdal area, and one case related to a patient who became sick after cleaning out a barn.

At least 12 people have been affected by rabbit fever in the Dalarna region alone, a doctor in communicable diseases told SVT Dalarna, and he said the figure was expected to increase.

"It looks like there will be a lot of cases this year [2019], more than last year [2018]," doctor Anders Lindblom said, adding: "Not everyone [who is affected by rabbit fever] seeks medical care and reports the illness."

At least a further 5 people have confirmed cases of rabbit fever in Norrbotten too. Sweden had a large outbreak of rabbit fever in 2015, when 859 people across the country suffered from the illness, the majority of them in Norrbotten and Vasterbotten. In 2018, 107 cases were reported across Sweden, with Dalarna the most severely affected region.

Symptoms of rabbit fever typically begin with swelling or tenderness in the lymph node and a skin lesion at the site of any bite or direct contact, followed occasionally by symptoms that can include a skin rash, nausea, and headaches.

The best way to protect yourself from infection is to avoid mosquito bites as much as possible (either by using repellents, or wearing long, loose clothing when going outside between dusk and dawn), and being especially careful if you need to touch a dead animal such as a rodent or hare, using precautions such as a face mask and gloves.
===================
[_Francisella tularensis_ subsp. _tularensis_ (Type A) is associated with lagomorphs (rabbits and hares). Wild rodents are also frequently infected, and occurrence of human cases is usually linked to these host species. _F. tularensis_ is transmitted primarily by ticks and biting flies, and is highly virulent for humans and domestic rabbits.

Tularemia is largely confined to the Northern Hemisphere and is not normally found in the tropics or the Southern Hemisphere. _F. tularensis_ subspecies _holarctica_ naturally infects several mammalian wildlife species in northern Europe, in particular, mice, rabbits, hares, beavers, voles, lemmings, and muskrats. The ticks _Dermacentor reticularis_ and _Ixodes ricinus_ are vectors for the bacterium, although previous research has suggested that mosquito bites are the most frequent route of transmission to humans in Sweden.

In addition to vector transmission, tularemia may be spread via contact with infected animals or environmental fomites by inhalation, or by ingestion of the poorly cooked flesh of infected animals or contaminated water. - ProMED Mod.PMB]

[Tularemia can be transmitted by aerosol, direct contact, ingestion, or arthropods. Inhalation of aerosolized organisms (in the laboratory or as an airborne agent in an act of bioterrorism) can produce a pneumonic form. Direct contact with, or ingestion of, infected carcasses of wild animals (such as cottontail rabbit) can produce the ulceroglandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal (local lesion with regional lymphadenitis), or typhoidal form. Immersion in or ingestion of contaminated water can result in infection in aquatic animals. Ticks can maintain infection transstadially [pathogen remains with the vector from one life stage ("stadium") to the next] and transovarially [transmission of a pathogen from an organism (as a tick) to its offspring by infection of eggs in its ovary], making them efficient reservoirs and vectors. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Sweden: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/108>]
Date: Wed, 1 May 2019 23:49:20 +0200

Copenhagen, May 1, 2019 (AFP) - Negotiations have resumed between Scandinavian airline SAS and its striking pilots, a mediator said Wednesday, as hundreds more flights were cancelled due to the strike action which has affected over 380,000 passengers.   It is the first time both sides have sat down together for talks since SAS pilots walked off the job in Sweden, Denmark and Norway on Friday demanding better pay and conditions, though they met prior to the walkout.   "There are discussions underway in Oslo. They concern the three countries," Jan Sjolin, a spokesman for the Swedish National Mediation Office, told AFP.   Despite the resumed negotiations SAS still cancelled flights that had been scheduled for Thursday. 

Around lunchtime on Wednesday the airline announced it was cancelling 280 flights scheduled up to 2:00pm (1200 GMT) Thursday, affecting 20,000 passengers.   Then shortly after 10pm (2000 GMT), with negotiations still going on in Oslo, SAS announced it was cancelling another 429 flights, affecting another 34,590 passengers.    That brings the total of cancelled flights to over 4,000 since the stoppage by 1,409 pilots hit domestic, European and long-haul SAS flights.   "The situation is still very much deadlocked. The parties have not been able to agree," mediator Mats Wilhelm Ruland told media later Wednesday, adding however that both parties had signalled they wished to continue negotiations, Norwegian daily VG reported.

The Swedish Air Line Pilots Association, which initiated the strike, has said that months of previous talks had failed to result in a solution to pilots' "deteriorating work conditions, unpredictable work schedules and job insecurity".   It added that work schedules, not wages, were the SAS pilots' main gripe as most have to work at variable times and days and sometimes several weekends in a row.   After almost going bankrupt in 2012, SAS has implemented repeated savings programmes in recent years to improve its profitability.
Date: Tue, 30 Apr 2019 12:44:44 +0200

Stockholm, April 30, 2019 (AFP) - Scandinavian air carrier SAS said Tuesday it had to cancel another 504 flights on Wednesday, affecting 47,000 passengers, as a pilot strike continued into its fifth day.   Since the start of the strike on Friday some 3,300 departures have been cancelled, affecting a total of almost 327,000 passengers, according to the company.   "I am deeply concerned that the pilot strike hasn't been resolved and that it is continuing to affect our customers," CEO Rickard Gustafson said in a statement.   "The unions have not yet indicated that they are ready to release their ultimate demands and return to the negotiating table, which means that we remain in a deadlock," he added.

Pilots are demanding better pay and work conditions and the Swedish Air Line Pilots Association, which initiated the strike, has said that months of talks had failed to result in a solution to pilots' "deteriorating work conditions, unpredictable work schedules and job insecurity".   As the strike commenced negotiations between the parties broke down and around lunchtime on Tuesday the parties were still not in direct contact.   "The mediators are in contact with the parties, but no negotiations are going on," Bosse Andersson, head of communications for the Swedish National Mediation Office, told AFP.
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