1 Aug 2019

The number of dengue fever cases and deaths continue to rise in Singapore. According to the latest National Environment Agency (NEA) data, 8946 cases have been reported through 31 Jul [2019], about 5 times more than the total number of dengue cases reported in the same period last year [2018]. In addition, the dengue death total has risen to 9 through 20 Jul [2019], according to local news accounts.
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/singapore-dengue-outbreak-nearly-9000-cases-through-july-26099/>

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Singapore:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/150>
Date: 27 Jul 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [abridged, edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/singapore-reports-increase-in-measles-in-recent-weeks-12249/>

The Singapore Ministry of Health has noted an increase in the number of measles cases in Singapore in recent weeks. In the past week, there were 17 confirmed cases of measles infection at a residential home for persons with intellectual disability, and a foreign worker dormitory.

Officials say there is no evidence of community spread from these cases.

As of 22 Jul 2019, 116 measles cases have been notified to MOH in 2019. 88 of these cases were local, and 28 were imported from Bangladesh, Dubai, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam. No deaths were reported in 2019 arising from the notified cases of measles.

Peak dengue season in Singapore: 8000 cases, 5 times last year's [2019] number.

Measles vaccination is compulsory by law for all children residing in Singapore, as children are at high risk of developing complications.
Date: Sat 27 Jul 2019
Source: Today Online [abridged, edited]
<https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/swimming-or-rafting-rivers-here-is-a-lesser-known-infection-you-may-catch>

It was supposed to be a fun school camp. Instead, the outdoor adventure turned into a harrowing ordeal for a 14-year-old student in Singapore when he contracted an unusual infection, likely from camp activities.

Weeks following his contact with murky water, the boy showed up at KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) with fever, stomach pain, nausea and jaundice. Tests also showed a swollen liver and spleen. On the 2nd day, his condition worsened and he was transferred to the intensive care unit. The infection causing his misery? Leptospirosis, a disease more commonly seen in rodents, livestock, dogs and cats but can also spread to humans.

As families spend time bonding on holidays overseas and adrenaline-seekers head outdoors and go on off-the-beaten tracks, health experts raised the possibility that they could expose themselves to less commonly seen infections such as leptospirosis.

In the last 2 years, 96 human cases of leptospirosis were notified in Singapore, based on data published by the Ministry of Health. It was added to the list of notifiable infectious diseases in September 2016.

The _Leptospira_ bacteria, which is commonly found in tropical countries, can enter the body [through] cuts on the skin, the eye, or mucous membranes that line body parts such as the mouth, nose and windpipe. Associate Professor Chong Chia Yin, senior consultant at KKH's infectious disease service, said that besides exposure to urine or bodily fluids from infected animals, people may also get the disease if they are exposed to contaminated water during recreational activities such as swimming, water sports and rafting in contaminated lakes and rivers.

Dr. Chan Si Min, head and consultant at the division of paediatric infectious diseases at National University Hospital, said that leptospirosis can range in severity, from mild or asymptomatic (no symptoms) to severe and life-threatening, resulting in jaundice, kidney failure and bleeding in the lungs. It can also affect other organs such as the liver and heart. Assoc. Prof. Chong said that about 5% to 15% of cases will have life-threatening consequences. Death rate is the highest among people above 60 years old.

Certain measures may help reduce the risk of contracting leptospirosis when travelling and engaging in outdoor recreational activities. Assoc. Prof. Chong advised researching travel destinations before getting there, to check if there are any floods, previous outbreaks of leptospirosis in the lakes, rivers, and so forth.

Dr. Chan advised those who are wading, swimming or boating in freshwater -- which may be contaminated by animals shedding the infection in urine -- should avoid being submerged in the water or swallowing it.

Wear protective footwear and clothing when taking part in outdoor activities, as leptospirosis can be transmitted via abrasions or cuts on the skin that come into contact with contaminated soil, mud or water. For instance, it is advisable to wear covered splash-proof shoes or boots instead of going barefoot or wearing slippers, and long pants instead of shorts when trekking, and to be aware of touching certain surfaces that could potentially lead to accidental cuts and abrasion, Dr. Leong Hoe Nam [an infectious diseases specialist] said.

Assoc. Prof. Chong advised: "Avoid participating in outdoor water activities if you have any cuts on your skin."

Some studies suggest that taking the antibiotic doxycycline shortly after exposure to leptospirosis can potentially reduce illness caused by the disease.

It is not standard procedure to prescribe doxycycline before travel to prevent leptospirosis. However, Dr. Leong said that he might consider giving the medication to certain groups of adult travellers heading to high-risk areas as a preventive measure.

Besides potentially reducing the risk of illness by leptospirosis, it also protects against malaria, which is another type of zoonotic disease (that can be passed from animals to humans) more commonly seen among travellers, he added.  [Byline: Eveline Gan]
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[Leptospirosis is a zoonotic spirochetal infection that is distributed widely throughout the world in warm climates. The microorganism can be found in fresh (not salty) water, wet soil, or vegetation that has been contaminated by urine from chronically infected animals.

Leptospirosis affects humans and a variety of animals that include dogs, cattle, pigs, and rodents. Different leptospiral serovars are prevalent in particular geographical regions. Leptospires enter the body through open sores or wounds in the skin, or through mucous membranes following exposure to contaminated water. Outbreaks frequently follow large rainfalls, flooding with fresh water, and increasing rodent numbers.

Leptospirosis is a risk during recreational activities, such as camping, fresh water swimming, canoeing, kayaking, rafting, golfing, and trail biking, that involve exposure to water in lakes, rivers, or ponds contaminated by urine from leptospire-infected animals (<https://www.cdc.gov/leptospirosis/exposure/index.html>).

Leptospirosis is also an occupational hazard for people who work outdoors or with animals; for example, workers in wet agricultural settings (such as rice field workers), ranchers, slaughterhouse workers, trappers, loggers, sewer workers, veterinarians, fishery workers, dairy farmers, or military personnel.

Because of the relatively nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation of leptospirosis, its diagnosis cannot be made confidently without laboratory confirmation. The _Leptospira_ Dip-S-Tick (DST) IgM dot-ELISA test kits (PanBio Integrated Diagnostics) can provide in-the-field testing of suspected patients (<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC149700/>). Confirmatory testing uses the microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Molecular assays such as DNA PCR can also be used, if available. - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Singapore: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/150>]
Date: Fri, 10 May 2019 10:52:12 +0200

Singapore, May 10, 2019 (AFP) - Singapore has reported its first ever case of monkeypox, brought in by a Nigerian man thought to have contracted the rare virus by eating bushmeat at a wedding.   Symptoms in humans of monkeypox -- which is endemic in parts of Central and Western Africa -- include lesions, fever, muscle ache and chills.

Transmission is usually via close contact with infected animals such as rodents and monkeys and is limited between people. It has only been fatal in rare cases.   The man who brought in the virus arrived in Singapore on April 28, the city-state's health ministry (MOH) said in a statement late Thursday.   The 38-year-old developed symptoms two days later and is currently isolated at an infectious disease centre in a stable condition, the ministry said.

At least 23 individuals who had been in close contact with the man had been traced, and those who are in Singapore will be quarantined and monitored for 21 days as a precaution, MOH said.   One had already left Singapore on May 5 before the Nigerian was diagnosed at hospital but has since made contact with the city's health authorities and has reported he is well.   "The risk of community spread of monkeypox in Singapore is low," said Leo Yee Sin, executive director of Singapore's National Centre for Infectious Diseases.   He said that on average "each infected person transmits the infection to less than one other person", which makes the virus less infectious than the common flu.

Outside Africa, human monkeypox infections had only been previously reported in the United States, Britain and Israel, according to the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention.   Singapore, a tiny but affluent city-state dependent on external trade and tourism, has toughened measures against infectious diseases after it was hit hard by the 2003 SARS virus outbreak.   The disease killed 33 people in Singapore, inflicted major losses on the economy and hit the number of international visitors.
Date: Thu 9 May 2019
Source: Straits Times [edited]
<https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/moh-confirms-one-imported-case-of-monkeypox-in-singapore>

The Ministry of Health (MOH) has confirmed one imported case of monkeypox infection in Singapore, involving a Nigerian national who arrived last month [April 2019] for a workshop. The 38-year-old man tested positive for the rare viral disease, which is primarily transmitted to humans from animals, on Wednesday (8 May [2019]), said the MOH on Thursday [9 May 2019]. It is the 1st case of monkeypox reported here.

He is currently in an isolation ward at the National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID), and is in stable condition.

Meanwhile, 22 of 23 individuals who have been identified as close contacts of the patient are also under quarantine as a precautionary measure. One of the close contacts, a workshop participant, had left Singapore on 5 May [2019] before the patient was diagnosed. He has reported to the MOH that he remains well with no symptoms.  "Nonetheless, as a precaution, MOH has informed the public health authority in his home country," said the ministry. The MOH added that while it is possible for the disease to be transmitted between humans, the risk of spread is low.

The MOH offers the following precautions to take when travelling to areas affected by monkeypox in central and western Africa: - Maintain a high standard of personal hygiene, including frequent hand washing after going to the toilet, or when hands are soiled. - Avoid direct contact with skin lesions of infected living or dead persons or animals, as well as objects that may have become contaminated with infectious fluids, such as soiled clothing or linens (e.g., bedding or towels) used by an infected person. - Avoid contact with wild animals, and consumption of bush meat. - Returning travellers from areas affected by monkeypox should seek immediate medical attention if they develop any disease symptoms (e.g., sudden onset of high fever, swollen lymph nodes and rash) within 3 weeks of their return. They should inform their doctor of their recent travel history.

Before coming to Singapore, the man attended a wedding in Nigeria, where he may have consumed bush meat -- a possible source of transmission of the monkeypox virus. Bush meat, the meat of wild animals hunted and sold for food, is a popular source of protein in some parts of Africa where meat from domesticated animals is scarce or expensive.

Upon his arrival on 28 Apr [2019], he stayed at Hotel 81 Orchid in Geylang. In the following 2 days, he attended a workshop at the Samsung Hub in Church Street, in the Central Business District. On 30 Apr [2019], he developed fever, muscle ache, chills and skin rash. Between 1 and 7 May [2019], the man reported that he stayed in his hotel room most of the time. On 7 May [2019], he was taken to Tan Tock Seng Hospital by ambulance and referred to NCID.

Subsequently, the MOH identified the people who had come into close contact with the man, including 18 participants and trainers who attended the same workshop; one worker at the workshop venue; and 4 hotel staff. They have since been assessed by NCID and offered vaccination to prevent the disease or reduce the severity of symptoms, said the ministry.  "As a precautionary measure, they will be quarantined and monitored for 21 days from their date of exposure to the patient," said MOH. Those who develop symptoms will be treated at NCID, and all others who came into contact with the man and have a low risk of being infected are being put under active surveillance, and will be contacted twice daily to monitor their health status, the ministry added. MOH's investigation and contact tracing operations are ongoing.

Common symptoms of the disease are fever, headache, muscle ache, backache, swollen lymph nodes and skin rash. In its statement, the MOH said monkeypox is usually self-limiting, with most patients recovering within 2 to 3 weeks.  "In some cases, however, the virus can cause serious complications such as pneumonia, sepsis, encephalitis (brain inflammation) and eye infection with ensuing loss of vision," added the statement. "There have been reported mortality rates of 1% to 10% during outbreaks, with most deaths occurring in younger age-groups."

Transmission of monkeypox mainly occurs when a person comes into close contact with infected animals, usually rodents, through the hunting and consumption of bush meat. It added that transmission of the disease between humans is possible but limited, as a person is infectious only when he has symptoms, particularly skin rash.  "Transmission typically occurs from close contact with the respiratory tract secretions or skin lesions of an infected person, or objects recently contaminated by an infected person's fluids or lesion materials," it added.
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[This is not the 1st time that a human monkeypox (MPX) virus infection has been imported into another country from Nigeria. In 2018, 2 cases of MPX virus infection were imported into the UK with an additional case ensuing from local transmission from the 2nd patient. The 1st monkeypox case involved a male Nigerian naval officer who was attending a training course at a naval base in Cornwall in southwestern England. The 2nd patient was a UK man who returned to the country from a 22-day vacation in Nigeria on 4 Sep 2018. A 3rd imported case was an Israeli who lived and worked in the Port Harcourt area of Rivers state in southern Nigeria (an endemic MPX region). The man got sick about a week after his return to Israel from Nigeria.

MPX virus is endemic in Nigeria and has been actively transmitted this year (2019). Since the beginning of the outbreak in September 2017, 311 suspected cases and 7 deaths have been reported in 26 states in Nigeria. MPX virus transmission is currently occurring over a broad geographic area in Nigeria. This outbreak has been unusual. Rather than sporadic or rare cases, there have been over 100 cases scattered over a large geographic area since 2017 and again this year (2019). The reasons for this relatively sudden appearance are not clear. Perhaps there has been an epizootic of MPX virus infections among its rodent hosts, with spillover to people.

Monkeypox is an orthopoxvirus infection and is related to smallpox. The disease can also be confused with chickenpox, which is caused by an unrelated virus.

Non-human primates are not monkeypox virus reservoirs. The main reservoirs of monkeypox virus are suspected to be rodents, including rope squirrels (_Funisciurus_ spp., an arboreal rodent) and terrestrial rodents (genera _Cricetomys_ and _Graphiurus_).

Map of Nigeria:
<http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/nigeria.pdf>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Singapore: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/150>
Nigeria: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/62>]
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