Date: Sun, 21 Oct 2018 16:38:21 +0000
A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org>

- National. 19 Oct 2018. In the capital of Sine, there are currently 31 cases. In the capital of Mouridism, there are 8 cases; 6 cases were counted in Rosso, Senegal.
<https://www.ndarinfo.com/6-cas-de-dengue-enregistres-a-Rosso-Senegal_a23172.html>

- National. 15 Oct 2018. Dengue fever worries the population in several localities of Senegal. Fatick area has 3 cases. Currently, at least 23 dengue cases have been confirmed in the same region of Fatick (center), following tests on 487 suspected cases, revealed the chief of the commune, Mamadou Sarr at the beginning of October 2018.

In Senegal, dengue fever is concentrated this year [2018] in the Fatick region. In September 2018, 3 cases had been counted; the number rose to 23 cases in October 2018. According to the chief medical officer of the local area relayed by the Senegalese press agency: "Following tests on 487 suspected cases, at least 23 dengue cases were confirmed, and the average age of people affected by the disease varies between 20 and 40 years old. Most are women.

This is the 4th dengue epidemic in Senegal. On 19 Oct 2017, the disease was revealed to the public in the Louga region. The Institut Pasteur in Dakar confirmed the diagnosis of 9 cases of dengue fever out of a total of 24 samples received on 6 and 12 Oct 2017, respectively, which had been carried out at the Santhiaba health post in Louga commune, in northwest Senegal. On 27 and 28 Oct 2018, 2 other confirmed cases were recorded in the commune of Dahra, next to that of Louga. On 6 Nov 2017, the Senegalese health authorities recorded 79 confirmed cases out of 510 samples tested: 70 in Louga, 6 in Dahra, 2 in Coki, 1 in Keur Moma Sarr. "No serious case is noted so far. All the patients have been treated as outpatients," said the Ministry of Health and Social Action.

This is not the 1st time that an outbreak of dengue fever has been reported in the country. There were outbreaks also in 1981, 1984 and 2009, said Dr. Abdoulaye Bousso of the Center for Emergency Health Operations (COUS), an entity under the supervision of the Ministry of Health and Social Action in 2017. As of 30 Oct 2017, a total of 232 suspected patients, out of 36 positive cases (34 in Louga and 2 in Dahra), had been enumerated by the Senegalese health authorities. "No complication was noted in these patients; all patients diagnosed positive are doing well and have resumed their daily activities," said the Ministry of Health. For this year [2018], the number increased to 32 confirmed cases.
<http://www.sudonline.sn/maladie-traumatisante-epidemie-de-force-4-_a_41517.html> [in French trans ProMED Corr.SB]
Date: Thu, 3 May 2018 17:48:15 +0200

Ziguinchor, Senegal, May 3, 2018 (AFP) - Armed men tried to blow up a key bridge in a touristy part of Senegal's restive Casamance region, killing a fisherman, a military source said on Thursday.   The overnight attack on the Niambalang bridge near the Casamance capital Zinguinchor was the first on the bridge since 1998.   "Armed men tried to blow up the bridge with explosives" but failed, a military source told AFP.

They torched the huts of eight fishermen living underneath the bridge, killing one, the source said. A relative of the fisherman confirmed this.   The bridge links Zinguinchor to the beach resort of Cap Skirring, which is popular with Western tourists.   Tensions have mounted in Casamance following the massacre of 14 young men in execution-style killings in a protected forest on January 6.   The bloodbath caused some to blame a group that has led a 35-year armed campaign for the region's independence.
Date: Fri 19 Jan 2018
Source: WHO [edited]
<http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/259885/1/OEW03-1319012018.pdf>

On [3 Jan 2018], the Ministry of Health of Senegal notified WHO of a case of Rift Valley fever (RVF) reported from a hospital in Dakar. On [29 Dec 2017], a blood sample taken from a 52-year-old Korean man, resident in the Gambia, done at the Institute Pasteur Dakar, was positive for RVF on IgM testing. Previous PCR testing had been negative for RVF and other arboviruses.

The case patient worked for a fishing company in the Gambia and had no known history of handling raw meat. On [5 Dec 2017], the case patient travelled with his brother and 2 colleagues from Banjul, the Gambia, to Ziguinchor, Senegal. On [8 Dec 2017], the case patient continued travelling with his brother, a colleague, and a driver, from Ziguinchor to Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, and continued to Buba the following day. On [10 Dec 2017], the case patient returned from Buba to Bissau, and presented with a dry cough, fever, headache, and joint pain. His brother and the driver also developed a dry cough on [10 Dec 2017], which improved the following day. The group returned to the Gambia (via Ziguinchor) on [12 Dec 2017].

The case patient, however, continued to suffer a persistent cough during this time. On his return to Banjul, he additionally developed fever, headache, and vertigo. He was hospitalized on [20 Dec 2017] and diagnosed with severe malaria. On [23 Dec 2017], he became delirious and developed psychomotor agitation, profuse mucousy diarrhoea, bile-stained vomiting, and haemorrhage. On [25 Dec 2017], he became comatose and was evacuated by ambulance to Dakar. His symptoms improved, and blood samples were taken on 26, 28, and 30 Dec 2017. However, he experienced a recurrence of haemorrhagic symptoms on 31 Dec 2017 and died the same day.

Public health actions
A case investigation was conducted by a multidisciplinary team from the Centre of Health Emergency Operations of the Ministry of Health of Senegal. As part of this investigation, blood samples were collected from the brother of the case and the colleague and driver who accompanied him to Guinea-Bissau. These samples were all negative for RVFV by PCR. The results of the investigation and recommendations for action from the Ministry of Health of Senegal are pending. A case investigation was conducted by a multidisciplinary team from the Epidemic and Disease Control Unit of the Ministry Health of the Gambia. Enhanced RVF surveillance in the animal population and community RVF sensitization have been implemented in the country.

Situation interpretation
Outbreaks of RVF are uncommon in the Gambia and its neighbouring countries. The last documented human case of RVF in the Gambia was reported in 2002. There is currently no indication of risk of a major RVF outbreak in the Gambia, Senegal, or Guinea-Bissau. Heavy rainfall, causing flooding and mass emergence RVF vectors, _Aedes_ and _Culex spp._ mosquitoes, is closely associated with RVF outbreaks. Uncontrolled movement of livestock can increase the risk of spread of the disease to new areas. RVF can cause trade reductions and important economic losses due to high mortality and abortion rates among infected livestock. Integrated control measures that address both human and animal health are therefore necessary (e.g. preventive animal vaccination, vector control, control of animal movements, educational campaigns for populations at risk).
====================
[The case, who travelled in 3 different countries (The Gambia, Senegal, and Bissau) was diagnosed as being affected by malaria. Later, this person and people accompanying him exhibited symptoms that can be attributed to RVF. However, all of the other 3 tested negative, while the case was diagnosed RVF positive on IgM testing and negative on PCR. The situation needs some clarification, especially since it is not the flooding season in the region, which favors the multiplication of disease vector insects and thereby precipitates the appearance of RVF in animals with possible contamination of humans. - ProMED Mod.AB]

[Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus can persist for a long time in some areas, maintained in _Aedes_ vector mosquitoes that deposit eggs in seasonally-flooded areas, where those eggs are transovarially infected with the virus. Adult female mosquitoes coming from infected eggs can transmit the virus during their 1st blood meals. Eradicating the virus from these areas is not possible with current technology.

Although ProMED-mail has not previously posted cases of RVF in the Gambia, there is a report from neighboring Senegal. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[Mauritania, a country in close proximity (neighboring with Senegal to its north) has also experience recurrent outbreaks of RVF (see prior ProMED-mail posts). - ProMED Mod.MPP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Gambia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/481>]
Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 17:03:27 +0100

Dakar, Dec 15, 2017 (AFP) - Flights to and from Dakar's brand-new airport were cancelled on Friday after air traffic controllers went on strike just eight days after it opened.   Controllers announced they would strike for 24 hours from 0001 GMT Friday, Blaise Diagne International Airport's operators, LAS, said in a statement.   The company "deplores the consequences of this movement, which strongly impacts the image of Senegal, as well as the service provided to passengers and airlines", it said.

The air traffic controllers' association, Asecna, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.   President Macky Sall had inaugurated the airport on December 7 in the presence of fellow heads of state from Gabon, Guinea-Bissau and The Gambia. He was due to return to the country on Friday evening after a trip abroad.

The Senegalese press say air traffic controllers are aggrieved over working conditions, especially the problem of getting to the airport which is much farther from the capital than the previous one.   The airport is located in Diass, 47 kilometres (29 miles) southeast of Dakar. Its predecessor,  Leopold Sedar Senghor international airport, now a military airport, is in Dakar's suburbs.
Date: Thu, 7 Dec 2017 17:56:52 +0100
By Malick ROKHY BA

Diass, Sénégal, Dec 7, 2017 (AFP) - Senegal's president opened a flagship new airport on Thursday seen as the central plank of government plans to boost the economy and create a west African regional hub.   President Macky Sall toured the brand-new Blaise Diagne International Airport in the town of Diass, 47 kilometres (29 miles) from the capital of Dakar, while the first international flight arrived from Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in the afternoon.   "Senegal is taking flight," Sall declared to an audience of dignitaries on the tarmac including the presidents of Gabon, The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau, while supporters gathered in their thousands to celebrate the opening, banging
drums and chanting slogans outside.

Work began in 2007 on the 645 million-euro ($767 million) airport under former president Abdoulaye Wade, but unforeseen problems and a change of construction company have repeatedly delayed the project and doubled anticipated costs.   Blaise Diagne -- named after the Senegalese MP who was the first African elected to France's parliament -- is at the heart of Sall's "Emerging Senegal" plan, which includes the construction of a new city, Diamniadio, close to the site in Diass.   The airport will be a key test of Senegal's economic fortunes as the president seeks re-election in 2019, and forms part of a suite of plans to relieve the congested capital with a recently constructed conference centre, housing and planned stadium.

As the country invests more heavily in tourism, Senegal is also betting on the facility's strategic position close to several beach resorts that are already heavily frequented by European holidaymakers.   The airport services at the site will contribute to the development of the special economic zone nearby, Sall said. "We need quality infrastructure which facilitates connectivity, creates jobs and contributes to economic transformation," the president explained.   With a capacity of three million passengers, Blaise Diagne will still rank far below the busiest African airports and a long way off challenging Nigeria in the west African region, though plans for up to 10 million travellers are in the pipeline, according to officials.

- Uncertainty for new airline -
Passenger numbers have increased in recent years at Dakar's current airport in the middle of the city, leading to long waits at security and contributing to chronic traffic jams.   The Leopold Sedar Senghor airport will become a military airfield from Friday.

The new airport boasts six footbridges direct to flight cabins, and will be able to service a range of aircraft including Airbus's massive A380s.   Work was completed on the 4,500-hectare site -- with 2,000 hectares unused in case of required expansion -- by Turkish consortium Summa-Limak after a disagreement with Saudi Arabia's Bin Laden construction derailed the final stage of preparations.    Summa-Limak will operate the airport for the next 25 years, furthering ever-closer economic ties between Ankara and Dakar.

A train linking the airport with the city is not expected to open until 2021, leaving taxi drivers in pocket but ordinary travellers nervous of arriving on time for flights in a city with unpredictable traffic.   Backed by loans from France's development agency the African Development Bank (ADB), the West African Development Bank (BOAD) and Islamic lender the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), officials are celebrating the airport's completion -- but the future of Senegal's new airline is less certain.   Air Senegal still does not have all the licences required to begin commercial flights and has a fleet of just two ATR 72-600s, but Aviation Minister Maimouna Ndoye Seck said international ambitions for the airport meant a well-performing national airline was "a necessity".
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