Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2019 11:16:53 +0200 (METDST)

Bangkok, Sept 14, 2019 (AFP) - Floods in northeastern Thailand have submerged homes, roads and bridges, leaving more than 23,000 people in evacuation shelters as anger grows over the government's "slow" emergency response.   Torrential rain has lashed the country for the last two weeks, causing flash floods and mudslides in almost half its provinces, with families evacuated from their homes in boats or makeshift rafts.   Since August 29, 32 people have been killed in the deluge, said a statement from the disaster department on Saturday that also gave the number of people staying in emergency shelters.   Two weather events are behind the widespread floods, the department said -- Storm Podul and a tropical depression that formed over the South China Sea called Kajiki.

Local media reports from the worst-hit province of Ubon Ratchathani showed people wading through chest-deep water and rescuers in boats trying to steer buffalo to higher ground.   Flooding in the province, which borders Laos and Cambodia, has been exacerbated by rising water levels in the Moon and Chi rivers.   "It will take three weeks to drain the floodwater" from up to 90 percent of inundated households, said provincial governor Sarit Witoon.   "The water has slightly receded about four centimetres today and I think it will keep going down," he added.

But the situation is already "unlivable" for families in one-storey homes, said Pongsak Saiwan, local director of opposition party Future Forward.   Access to an entire district is currently cut off due to flood waters, which are about two metres (6.5 foot) deep in the main town, while three major bridges are "impassable", he said.   "The government has been very slow in responding to the situation since the floods started in the beginning of September," Pongsak told AFP.   Ubon Ratchathani's plight started trending on Twitter this week with the hashtag #SaveUbon.   Aerial shots of the flood-hit plains blanketed with muddy river water were widely shared, as well as photos of stray dogs being rescued by passing boats.

One Twitter user compared the flood response to how quickly the government had mobilised and saved 12 young boys and their football coach from a waterlogged cave last year -- an incident that catapulted Thailand to international attention.   "Only 13 lives stuck in the cave and it was still very high-profile, but this is hundreds of thousands of lives," tweeted Yosita8051. "It's not okay."   Thailand's junta leader-turned-premier Prayut Chan O-Cha tweeted on Saturday that he has told agencies to "expedite assistance" to those in the affected areas.
15 Aug 2019

Thailand health officials reported an additional 4500 dengue fever cases during the past week, which has brought the total case tally to 49,174 cases with 64 deaths, according to a Chiang Rai Times report. This has prompted the health minister to order preventive measures against dengue fever to include requiring the healthcare sector to report the number of new infections to contain the outbreak. Local authorities and volunteers will spray chemicals to kill mosquitoes, and pubic members are advised to destroy mosquito breeding grounds around their houses.
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/thailand-dengue-case-count-nears-50000/>

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Thailand:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/151>
Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 06:14:38 +0200

Mae Sai, Thailand, June 18, 2019 (AFP) - Tourists snap selfies by a bronze statue of the diver who died trying to save the 'Wild Boars' football team from a flooded cave, while momentos from their rescue fly off the shelves -- scooped up by the 1.3 million people who have descended on a once serene mountainside in northern Thailand.   "It's amazing what happened here. I followed everything from Australia," tourist John McGowan told AFP after taking photos at the visitor centre around 100 metres from the Tham Luang cave entrance.   "I wanted to see it with my own eyes," the 60-year-old said, adding he was a little disappointed the cave is still off limits to visitors.

For a few dollars tourists can get framed photos at the site, pick up posters of the footballers and take home a souvenir t-shirt  -- some printed with the face of Saman Gunan the Thai diver who died in the bid to save the group.   There has been extraordinary global interest in the picturesque rural backwater of Mae Sai since 12 youngsters -- aged between 11 and 16 -- and their coach entered the Tham Luang cave on June 23, 2018.   They quickly became trapped by rising water levels and the daring, unprecedented mission to extract them through twisting flooded passageways captivated the world for 18 nail-biting days.   When they emerged -- after being heavily sedated and manoeuvered out by expert divers -- they did so into the centre of a global media frenzy.

The cave, which previously received around 5,000 visitors a year, has since been inundated by visitors both Thai and foreign.   "A miracle has happened here with these children," Singaporean tourist Cheong, giving one name, said but adding Tham Luang "must still have a spiritual side" despite the mass popularity.   - Tragedy and luck -   Mae Sai district, where the cave is located, was considered off the beaten track for foreign visitors.    But between October 2018 and April this year alone "1.3 million people visited," site manager Kawee Prasomphol told AFP.

The government now has big plans for the area around the storied cave, Kawee added, allocating a total of 50 million baht ($1.6 million) including a shopping complex, restaurants, hotels and several campsites outside the national park.   Vans disgorge streams of tourists who explore a visitor hub where the centrepiece is a mural entitled "The Heroes".   It depicts the young footballers, stars of the rescue, and junta chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha -- a reminder of the governmental fingerprints in aiding their cause.   At the heart of the mural is the beaming face of Saman Gunan, the Thai Navy SEAL diver who ran out off oxygen attempting to establish an air line to the children and their coach -- the only fatality across the near three-week rescue mission.

Laying white flowers at the foot of his bronze statue, Thai nurse Sumalee, who travelled four hours to the site, described him as "the hero of the whole country" in a sobering reminder of the risks involved in the rescue amid the blizzard of marketing opportunities now attached to the cave story.    Nearby lottery ticket vendors are capitalising on the perceived good fortune linked to the boys' survival and the folkloric appeal of a nearby shrine. The number of stalls has mushroomed from a few dozen to around 250.    Kraingkrai Kamsuwan, 60, who moved his stall to the site weeks after the rescue, sells 4,000 tickets a month ($2.5) but reckons more will visitors will arrive once the cave reopens.    He told AFP: "People want to gamble after wishing for luck from the shrine."
Date: Fri 24 May 2019
Source: CGTN [edited]
<https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d514f7967444f34457a6333566d54/index.html>

Syphilis has become a serious public health concern in Thailand. An alarming rise in syphilis cases in the country underscores the need for a public health education campaign. But it's a topic rarely discussed freely in Thailand, where sexual dialogue is received with embarrassment, mockery or laughter in sex education classes.

According to the Thai Health Ministry, the average age of the 1st sexual encounter of Thais has fallen to 13-15 years old. Fifty percent report to have not used a condom. Teens are becoming complacent about sexually transmitted infections. Syphilis in Thailand has now reached alarming rates, and about 37% of new infections recorded last year [2018] were found among those aged between 15 and 24 [years old].

We asked a group of 18-year-old students what they knew about syphilis and were met with shaking heads, faces of confusion and blank stares. They can be forgiven for not knowing much about syphilis. It is, after all, considered to be a practically ancient ailment. But its incidence has been rising almost every year for the past 10 years in Thailand from 2 to 3 cases to now 12 people out of 100,000 who have been infected. That's almost a 300% increase.

Unfortunately, this trend is also seen around the world. Cases in Japan have hit a 50-year high. Western Europe saw increases of over 50% in new cases, while the US saw a 73% increase of infection rates from 2013 to 2017.

Rossaphorn Kittiyaowamarn, a medical doctor at Bangrak STI [sexually transmitted infection] Clinic in Bangkok, believes that this is because "having sexual relationships now is a lot easier." In a conservative country like Thailand, she continues, "people used to go and pay for sexual services. Now, society has changed and encounters can happen everywhere and are becoming more casual."

The disease is curable with antibiotics, but it's a bit of a secret agent, transmissible through almost all sexual means and erupting as a tiny lesion about a month after exposure. At various stages of the infection, it might cause no symptoms or a puzzling array of them. If gone undiagnosed, it can cause everything from disfigurement to seizures.

Mond* happens to be one of the unlucky ones. He came to Bangrak STI Clinic in Bangkok as rashes started to appear. His tests came back positive for syphilis, a disease he knew nothing about. "I've never heard about this disease. I only just found out about this on the posters on the wall while I was waiting for the doctor."

But that is essentially the problem. Today, syphilis has somewhat been forgotten. And that is what makes it so dangerous. Because after all, it hasn't disappeared. London today, Tokyo or Bangkok tomorrow and a different bedmate at each stopover. And with that, the chance of getting infected with syphilis increases as containment becomes virtually impossible.

*Name has been changed to protect identity.  [Byline: Dusita Saokaew]
==========================
[The rising incidence of syphilis and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is an international issue. The reasons for the increase in incidence of STDs are varied and likely differ by locality and the patient population affected. Increased diagnostic testing for STDs could contribute to some extent to the increased incidence in some groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM). Some of the factors that could promote unprotected sex include lack of sex education and access to condoms for teenagers; the opioid epidemic and sale of sex for drugs; the popularity of cell phone geolocating dating apps that facilitate sexual activity with multiple anonymous partners; use of Internet chat rooms to meet sex partners; use of psychoactive "party drugs"; and use among MSM of pre-exposure HIV prophylaxis, or PrEP, which is a way to prevent HIV infection for people who do not have HIV but who are at substantial risk of getting it by engaging in risky condomless sexual activity (<https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/PrEP_fact_sheet_final.pdf>).

The news report above says that about 37% of new infections recorded last year [2018] were found among those aged 15 to 24 years old. Syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections in this age-group in Thailand are being attributed to a lack of education about STDs and the necessity of safer sexual practices to prevent these diseases. STDs in teenagers and young adults has been similarly attributed to lack of education in the US (see ProMED-mail post Syphilis, gonococcal disease, chlamydia: USA, Argentina http://promedmail.org/post/20170507.5019549), where the CDC reports that in the years 2013 and 2017 -- the latest year for which data are available -- about 23% to 25% of new primary and secondary syphilis infections occurred in those aged 15 to 24 years old (Table 34, <https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats17/tables/34.htm>). - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Thailand: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/151>]
Date: Sun 19 May 2019
Source: Nation Multimedia [edited]
<http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30369655>

As many as 249 babies were born with syphilis in Thailand this year [2019], according to the Public Health Ministry. "The babies were affected because their mothers were infected," the ministry's permanent secretary, Dr Sukhum Karnchanapimai, said yesterday [18 May 2019].

Sukhum said that between 1 Jan and 13 May 2019, 3080 people of all ages were diagnosed with syphilis. Of them, 40.42 per cent are between 15 and 24 years old. Some 24.48 per cent of others are between 25 and 34 years old. "The number of syphilis patients is rising. The increase reflects that many teenagers and people in the reproductive age group have engaged in unsafe sex," he said.

Sukhum said he has instructed provincial public-health chiefs to closely monitor the situation and to prevent the disease from spreading. He urged people to protect themselves by using condoms, refraining from having several sex partners, and regularly undergoing blood tests. "Pregnant women, along with their husbands, should take blood tests too," he said.
=====================
[Thailand was said to have eliminated congenital syphilis by the WHO just a few years ago (2016) (See Sidibe M, Singh PK below.) Thailand thus joins the countries that now report a rise in incidence of congenital syphilis. In the U.S., for example, after syphilis reached historic lows in 2000, with less than 6000 reported cases and an incidence rate of only 2.1 cases per 100 000 people, the United States has since experienced a rising incidence of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis (<https://www.cdc.gov/std/sam/2017syphilis.htm>). Initially, during 2000-2015, the rise in the rate of reported P&S syphilis in the US was primarily attributable to increased cases among men, specifically among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). More recently, syphilis also increased among women. For example, during 2014-2015, the rate increased 18.1 percent among men, but increased 27.3 percent among women  (<http://www.loopcayman.com/content/syphilis-cases-increase-1>).

These increases among women are of particular concern because congenital syphilis cases tend to increase as the rates of primary and secondary syphilis increase among women  (<https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats16/figures/44.htm>).

Transmission of _Treponema pallidum_, the organism that causes of syphilis, to the fetus occurs via the bloodstream when the foetus is exposed in utero to a mother with untreated early syphilis. Transmission may also occur during delivery if maternal genital lesions are present. Late abortion, stillbirth, and neonatal death may result from congenital infection in untreated pregnancies. Among survivors, manifestations that develop in the 1st 2 years of life are called "early" and are similar to adult secondary syphilis; manifestations that develop after age 2 years are called "late" and include tooth abnormalities (Hutchinson teeth), bone changes (saber shins), "Clutton's joints" (bilateral painless swelling of the knee joints), neurological involvement, blindness, and deafness.

We are not told in the news report above about the factors responsible for the changing epidemiology of syphilis in Thailand, which could account for their increasing incidence of congenital syphilis. In the U.S. and Canada, the recent increasing incidence of syphilis in heterosexual men and women has been linked to illicit drug use, which is reminiscent of the increase in syphilis among heterosexuals during the crack cocaine epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s, when the practice of trading sex with multiple partners for drugs, especially crack cocaine, played a major role in the transmission of syphilis. Under these circumstances, the identities of sex partners are often unknown, which weakens the traditional syphilis-control strategy of partner notification.

Control of congenital syphilis is achieved by antenatal screening and treatment of mothers who are infected. Routine serologic screening should be done at the 1st prenatal visit in all pregnant women and in communities and populations in which the risk for congenital syphilis is high; serologic testing and a sexual history also should be obtained at 28 weeks gestation and at delivery. Groups at high risk include uninsured women, women living in poverty, sex workers, illicit drug users, women diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases, and those living in communities with high syphilis morbidity (<http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/uspstf09/syphilis/syphpgsum.htm>). No mother or neonate should leave the hospital without maternal serologic status having been documented at least once during pregnancy and, if the mother is considered high risk, also at delivery.

Reference:
Sidibe M, Singh PK. Thailand eliminates mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis. The Lancet 2016: 387(10037);2488-2489, June 9, 2016 DOI: <https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30787-5>. - ProMED Mod.ML]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Thailand: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/151>]
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