25th July 2012

- Trinidad. 25 Jul 2012. Mayor Orlando Nagessar has said that 260 cases of dengue have been reported in Central Trinidad recently. He was speaking with the media on Monday [23 Jul 2012] after the monthly statutory meeting of the Chaguanas Borough Corporation. The areas in which the mosquito-borne disease was reported include Longdenville, Edinburgh 500, Montrose, Lange Park and Cunupia.
<http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2012-07-25/mayor-warns-dengue-outbreak-central>
======================
[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map of Trinidad can be accessed at <http://healthmap.org/r/172E>. - ProMed Mod.TY]

Trinidad and Tobago

Flag of Trinidad and Tobago
Still current at: 08 December 2011
Updated: 08 December 2011


This advice has been reviewed and reissued with amendments to the Travel Summary and the Safety and Security - Crime section (state of emergency lifted; beware of opportunistic crime over festive period). There are no travel restrictions in place in this travel advice for Trinidad and Tobago.

(see travel advice legal disclaimer)


  • The State of Emergency, called into effect on 21 August 2011 to tackle a spike in crime, was lifted on 6 December 2011. All associated restrictions have been lifted.

  • You should be aware that there are high levels of violent crime, especially shootings and kidnappings. British nationals have been victims of violent attacks, particularly in Tobago where law enforcement is weak. See the Crime section of this Travel Advice.

  • Around the festive period, reports of opportunistic crime, such as muggings, robbery and car break-ins increase, even in well-populated areas. Take usual precautions when withdrawing money from ATMs and displaying perceived high-value items in public.

  • 38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period April 2010 - March 2011. See General - Consular Assistance Statistics.

  • The hurricane season in the Caribbean normally runs from June to November. See Natural Disasters - Hurricanes.

  • There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. See Safety and Security - Terrorism.

  • You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.

Safety and Security - Terrorism
There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. For more general information see our Terrorism Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Crime - Trinidad
There is an increasing level of gang related violence and crime in Trinidad. Incidents are concentrated in the inner city neighbourhoods east of Port of Spain's city centre, particularly Laventille, Morvant and Barataria, but can occur in other areas. Theft from vehicles and property can be a problem in parts of downtown Port of Spain and in other urban areas. All visitors, whether arriving by sea or air, should take particular care if walking around the port area or downtown, especially at night, and avoid straying into areas affected by gang violence. There has also been a worrying increase in violent crime, muggings, robberies and sexual assaults in 2009-2010. There have also been attacks, some involving firearms, at tourist sites, including Fort George, the Pitch Lake, Las Cuevas beach and also at car parks of supermarkets, shopping malls, nightclubs, restaurants and business premises, including hairdressers and vegetable stalls. There have been a number of incidents involving British nationals, including stabbings and violent attacks.

You should not carry large amounts of cash or wear eye-catching jewellery. Use hotel safety deposit boxes to store valuables, money and passports. Do not walk alone in deserted areas even in daylight.

During the festive period and carnival season, reports of opportunistic crime, such as muggings, robbery and car break-ins increase, even in well-populated areas. Take usual precautions when withdrawing money from ATMs and displaying perceived high-value items in public.

Safety and Security - Crime -Tobago
Although many visits to Tobago are trouble free, crime against tourists in Tobago and the inability of the Tobago authorities to apprehend and prosecute the perpetrators remains a concern. The authorities on the island are taking positive steps and the response times of the police have improved. There have been a number of serious robberies against tourists and residents. Some of these incidents have been accompanied by violence, including attempted rape. In August 2009 a British couple were attacked in their home in Bacolet. The couple suffered life threatening injuries that required medical evacuation to Port of Spain. In Bon Accord a British visitor was subject to a robbery and sexual assault at her villa in the Black Rock area. In July 2010 a British family were subjected to an armed robbery in their rented villa in the Courland area. The local police take such incidents seriously and respond quickly. But caution is still advised when renting villas in Tobago. All villas should have adequate security measures in place, including the provision of external security lighting, grills and 24-hour security guards. You should be aware of your surroundings at all times and preferably carry a mobile phone with roaming capability for use in emergency. Petty theft from cars has also increased.

Visitors are advised to visit isolated beaches such as Englishman's Bay and King Peter's bay only as a member of an organised group. Consult your tour operator if in doubt.

See our Victims of Crime Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Road Travel
The standard of driving in Trinidad and Tobago is erratic. High speed road accidents on the main East/West and North/South highways in Trinidad that result in fatalities are a regular occurrence. Some of the roads are narrow and winding and the surface of a low standard. When hiring a car, you should drive with care. If you do not have a vehicle, you should use hotel taxis, particularly after dark.

See our Driving Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Sea Travel

In June 2007 an accident involving two bathers and a motorised boat resulted in serious injuries and an air evacuation. Bathers should be aware that no local maritime legislation in Trinidad and Tobago law exists under which boat drivers can be charged and prosecuted for reckless driving following an incident. See our River and Sea Safety page.

Safety and Security - Political Situation
Trinidad and Tobago Country Profile

Drug traffickers face severe penalties in Trinidad and Tobago. The authorities are alert to the carriage of illicit drugs of any kind and checks are thorough. You should pack all luggage yourself and do not carry items which do not belong to you.

Trinidad and Tobago has a number of laws, which make certain homosexual acts illegal.

You should be aware that it is an offence for anyone, including children, to dress in camouflage clothing.

For more general information for different types of travellers see our Your Trip page.

Entry Requirements - Visas
British visitors do not need visas to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Visitors are generally given 90 days to remain in the country but extensions can be obtained from the Passport and Immigration Department, 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain.

Entry Requirements - Passport validity
You must hold a valid passport to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Your passport must be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Trinidad and Tobago.

In some areas of Trinidad and Tobago medical facilities can be limited and may not be up to UK standards. Private clinics are able to treat most ordinary problems, but there may be a need for medical evacuation to Miami or elsewhere in cases of serious accident or illness. You should check that your insurance covers this.

Dengue Fever is common across the Caribbean and can occur throughout the year. Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection that can cause a feverish illness associated with headache, muscle aches and pains, and rash. Some cases of dengue are severe. Dengue can be prevented by avoiding being bitten by the disease-carrying mosquitoes that feed predominately during daylight hours. For more information on prevention, see the National Travel Health Network and Centre website: http://www.nathnac.org/pro/factsheets/dengue.htm.

In the 2010 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic the UNAIDS/WHO Working Group estimated that around 14,000 adults aged 15 or over in Trinidad & Tobago were living with HIV; the prevalence percentage was estimated at around 1.5% of the adult population compared to the prevalence percentage in adults in the UK of around 0.2%. Exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS. For more general information on how to do this see our HIV and AIDS page.

Seek medical advice before travelling to Trinidad & Tobago and ensure that all appropriate vaccinations are up-to-date. For further information on vaccination requirements, health outbreaks and general disease protection and prevention visit the websites of the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) and NHS Scotland's Fit For Travel or call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

See our Travel Health page.

Natural Disasters - Earthquakes
Earthquakes are a potential threat and tremors are felt occasionally. For advice on how to protect yourself in the event of being caught in an earthquake or tremor, please see: http://www.geologyuk.com/index.htm.

Natural Disasters - Hurricanes
The hurricane season in Trinidad and Tobago normally runs from June to November. Monitor local and international weather updates from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). You can also access the National Hurricane Centre for updates. Please also see our Tropical cyclones pages for more detailed information about what to do if you are caught up in a hurricane.

General - Insurance
You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling. Check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for all the activities you want to undertake.

See our Travel Insurance page.

If things do go wrong when you are oversees then see our When Things Go Wrong page.

General - Registering with the British High Commission
We recommend you register with our LOCATE service to tell us when and where you are travelling abroad or where you live abroad so our consular and crisis staff can provide better assistance to you in an emergency.

General - Honorary Consul, Tobago
The British High Commission has an honorary consul in Tobago, James Morshead, who can assist in cases of emergency and lost passports. His telephone number is (00) (1) (868) 639 8855, mobile number (00) (1) (868) 680 4609. In his absence, Jeremy Knott provides back-up cover. He can be contacted on (00) (1) (868) 639 2689 or mobile numbers (00) (1) (868) 631 8269 or (00) (1) (868) 374 9822. These telephone numbers are not for casual enquiries and should only be used in cases of genuine emergency.

General - Consular Assistance Statistics
38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period of 01 April 2010 - 31 March 2011 for the following types of incident; four deaths; four assaults; and nine arrests, for a variety of offences.

Trinidad and Tobago

Flag of Trinidad and Tobago
Still current at: 24 November 2011
Updated: 23 November 2011


This advice has been reviewed and reissued with amendments to the Travel Summary (non-specific security threat). The overall level of the advice has not changed. There are no travel restrictions in place in this travel advice for Trinidad and Tobago.

(see travel advice legal disclaimer)


  • On 23 November, the Trinidad and Tobago authorities advised of a non-specific security threat, including the possibility of protests in Port of Spain. As a consequence, you are encouraged to exercise extra vigilance and avoid large gatherings until the threat level is reviewed.

  • On 21 August 2011, a Limited State of Emergency was called into effect by the Prime Minister. The curfew restrictions associated with the State of Emergency were lifted on 7 November. However, other restrictions remain in place. The police and military still possess special powers of search, arrest and detention. See Safety and Security - Local Travel.

  • You should be aware that there are high levels of violent crime, especially shootings and kidnappings. British nationals have been victims of violent attacks, particularly in Tobago where law enforcement is weak. See the Crime section of this Travel Advice.

  • 38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period April 2010 - March 2011. See General - Consular Assistance Statistics.

  • The hurricane season in the Caribbean normally runs from June to November. See Natural Disasters - Hurricanes.

  • There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. See Safety and Security - Terrorism.

  • You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.

Safety and Security - Terrorism
There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. For more general information see our Terrorism Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Crime - Trinidad
There is an increasing level of gang related violence and crime in Trinidad. Incidents are concentrated in the inner city neighbourhoods east of Port of Spain's city centre, particularly Laventille, Morvant and Barataria, but can occur in other areas. Theft from vehicles and property can be a problem in parts of downtown Port of Spain and in other urban areas. All visitors, whether arriving by sea or air, should take particular care if walking around the port area or downtown, especially at night, and avoid straying into areas affected by gang violence. There has also been a worrying increase in violent crime, muggings, robberies and sexual assaults in 2009-2010. There have also been attacks, some involving firearms, at tourist sites, including Fort George, the Pitch Lake, Las Cuevas beach and also at car parks of supermarkets, shopping malls, nightclubs, restaurants and business premises, including hairdressers and vegetable stalls. There have been a number of incidents involving British nationals, including stabbings and violent attacks.

You should not carry large amounts of cash or wear eye-catching jewellery. Use hotel safety deposit boxes to store valuables, money and passports. Do not walk alone in deserted areas even in daylight.

Safety and Security - Crime -Tobago
Although many visits to Tobago are trouble free, crime against tourists in Tobago and the inability of the Tobago authorities to apprehend and prosecute the perpetrators remains a concern. The authorities on the island are taking positive steps and the response times of the police have improved. There have been a number of serious robberies against tourists and residents. Some of these incidents have been accompanied by violence, including attempted rape. In August 2009 a British couple were attacked in their home in Bacolet. The couple suffered life threatening injuries that required medical evacuation to Port of Spain. In Bon Accord a British visitor was subject to a robbery and sexual assault at her villa in the Black Rock area. In July 2010 a British family were subjected to an armed robbery in their rented villa in the Courland area. The local police take such incidents seriously and respond quickly. But caution is still advised when renting villas in Tobago. All villas should have adequate security measures in place, including the provision of external security lighting, grills and 24-hour security guards. You should be aware of your surroundings at all times and preferably carry a mobile phone with roaming capability for use in emergency. Petty theft from cars has also increased.

Visitors are advised to visit isolated beaches such as Englishman's Bay and King Peter's bay only as a member of an organised group. Consult your tour operator if in doubt.

See our Victims of Crime Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel

On 21 August 2011, a Limited State of Emergency was called into effect by the Prime Minister. On 4 September, the Prime Minister announced an extension of the State of Emergency for up to 3 months. The curfew restrictions associated with the State of Emergency were lifted on 7 November. However, other restrictions remain in place. The police and military still possess special powers of search, arrest and detention.

The State of Emergency also extends to Tobago.

The State of Emergency grants special powers to the police and military:

  • Search and seizure powers will not require a search warrant;
  • Military to have power to arrest and detain before transfer to the police;
  • Police can arrest and detain for up to 24 hours after which a magistrate, or assistant superintendent (or higher), will be able to add an extra 7 days;
  • No bail for those arrested during the State of Emergency;
  • Courts no longer will have the power to grant bail.

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Road Travel
The standard of driving in Trinidad and Tobago is erratic. High speed road accidents on the main East/West and North/South highways in Trinidad that result in fatalities are a regular occurrence. Some of the roads are narrow and winding and the surface of a low standard. When hiring a car, you should drive with care. If you do not have a vehicle, you should use hotel taxis, particularly after dark.

See our Driving Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Sea Travel

In June 2007 an accident involving two bathers and a motorised boat resulted in serious injuries and an air evacuation. Bathers should be aware that no local maritime legislation in Trinidad and Tobago law exists under which boat drivers can be charged and prosecuted for reckless driving following an incident. See our River and Sea Safety page.

Safety and Security - Political Situation
Trinidad and Tobago Country Profile

Drug traffickers face severe penalties in Trinidad and Tobago. The authorities are alert to the carriage of illicit drugs of any kind and checks are thorough. You should pack all luggage yourself and do not carry items which do not belong to you.

Trinidad and Tobago has a number of laws, which make certain homosexual acts illegal.

You should be aware that it is an offence for anyone, including children, to dress in camouflage clothing.

For more general information for different types of travellers see our Your Trip page.

Entry Requirements - Visas
British visitors do not need visas to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Visitors are generally given 90 days to remain in the country but extensions can be obtained from the Passport and Immigration Department, 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain.

Entry Requirements - Passport validity
You must hold a valid passport to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Your passport must be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Trinidad and Tobago.

In some areas of Trinidad and Tobago medical facilities can be limited and may not be up to UK standards. Private clinics are able to treat most ordinary problems, but there may be a need for medical evacuation to Miami or elsewhere in cases of serious accident or illness. You should check that your insurance covers this.

Dengue Fever is common across the Caribbean and can occur throughout the year. Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection that can cause a feverish illness associated with headache, muscle aches and pains, and rash. Some cases of dengue are severe. Dengue can be prevented by avoiding being bitten by the disease-carrying mosquitoes that feed predominately during daylight hours. For more information on prevention, see the National Travel Health Network and Centre website: http://www.nathnac.org/pro/factsheets/dengue.htm.

In the 2010 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic the UNAIDS/WHO Working Group estimated that around 14,000 adults aged 15 or over in Trinidad & Tobago were living with HIV; the prevalence percentage was estimated at around 1.5% of the adult population compared to the prevalence percentage in adults in the UK of around 0.2%. Exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS. For more general information on how to do this see our HIV and AIDS page.

Seek medical advice before travelling to Trinidad & Tobago and ensure that all appropriate vaccinations are up-to-date. For further information on vaccination requirements, health outbreaks and general disease protection and prevention visit the websites of the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) and NHS Scotland's Fit For Travel or call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

See our Travel Health page.

Natural Disasters - Earthquakes
Earthquakes are a potential threat and tremors are felt occasionally. For advice on how to protect yourself in the event of being caught in an earthquake or tremor, please see: http://www.geologyuk.com/index.htm.

Natural Disasters - Hurricanes
The hurricane season in Trinidad and Tobago normally runs from June to November. Monitor local and international weather updates from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). You can also access the National Hurricane Centre for updates. Please also see our Tropical cyclones pages for more detailed information about what to do if you are caught up in a hurricane.

General - Insurance
You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling. Check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for all the activities you want to undertake.

See our Travel Insurance page.

If things do go wrong when you are oversees then see our When Things Go Wrong page.

General - Registering with the British High Commission
We recommend you register with our LOCATE service to tell us when and where you are travelling abroad or where you live abroad so our consular and crisis staff can provide better assistance to you in an emergency.

General - Honorary Consul, Tobago
The British High Commission has an honorary consul in Tobago, James Morshead, who can assist in cases of emergency and lost passports. His telephone number is (00) (1) (868) 639 8855, mobile number (00) (1) (868) 680 4609. In his absence, Jeremy Knott provides back-up cover. He can be contacted on (00) (1) (868) 639 2689 or mobile numbers (00) (1) (868) 631 8269 or (00) (1) (868) 374 9822. These telephone numbers are not for casual enquiries and should only be used in cases of genuine emergency.

General - Consular Assistance Statistics
38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period of 01 April 2010 - 31 March 2011 for the following types of incident; four deaths; four assaults; and nine arrests, for a variety of offences.

Trinidad and Tobago

Flag of Trinidad and Tobago
Still current at: 06 September 2011
Updated: 05 September 2011


This advice has been reviewed and reissued with amendments to the Travel Summary and Safety and Security - Local Travel section (State of Emergency extended; curfew) and the Entry Requirements - Passport Validity section (reworded). The overall level of the advice has not changed. There are no travel restrictions in place in this travel advice for Trinidad and Tobago.

(see travel advice legal disclaimer)

Travel Summary


  • On 21 August 2011, a Limited State of Emergency was called into effect by the Prime Minister. On 4 September, the Prime Minister announced an extension of the State of Emergency for up to three months. There is now a curfew in place for designated "hotspots" in Trinidad from 23:00 to 04:00 local time. Although the State of Emergency extends to Tobago, the island has no designated "hotspots" and is not affected by the curfew. We strongly advise you to respect the curfew in the affected areas and to comply with directives issued by the Government of the Republic of Trinidad & Tobago, military and police units. See Safety and Security - Local Travel.

  • You should be aware that there are high levels of violent crime, especially shootings and kidnappings. British nationals have been victims of violent attacks, particularly in Tobago where law enforcement is weak. See the Crime section of this Travel Advice.

  • 38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period April 2010 - March 2011. See General - Consular Assistance Statistics.

  • The hurricane season in the Caribbean normally runs from June to November. See Natural Disasters - Hurricanes.

  • There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. See Safety and Security - Terrorism.

  • You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.

Safety and Security - Terrorism
There is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. For more general information see our Terrorism Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Crime - Trinidad
There is an increasing level of gang related violence and crime in Trinidad. Incidents are concentrated in the inner city neighbourhoods east of Port of Spain's city centre, particularly Laventille, Morvant and Barataria, but can occur in other areas. Theft from vehicles and property can be a problem in parts of downtown Port of Spain and in other urban areas. All visitors, whether arriving by sea or air, should take particular care if walking around the port area or downtown, especially at night, and avoid straying into areas affected by gang violence. There has also been a worrying increase in violent crime, muggings, robberies and sexual assaults in 2009-2010. There have also been attacks, some involving firearms, at tourist sites, including Fort George, the Pitch Lake, Las Cuevas beach and also at car parks of supermarkets, shopping malls, nightclubs, restaurants and business premises, including hairdressers and vegetable stalls. There have been a number of incidents involving British nationals, including stabbings and violent attacks.

You should not carry large amounts of cash or wear eye-catching jewellery. Use hotel safety deposit boxes to store valuables, money and passports. Do not walk alone in deserted areas even in daylight.

Safety and Security - Crime -Tobago
Although many visits to Tobago are trouble free, crime against tourists in Tobago and the inability of the Tobago authorities to apprehend and prosecute the perpetrators remains a concern. The authorities on the island are taking positive steps and the response times of the police have improved. There have been a number of serious robberies against tourists and residents. Some of these incidents have been accompanied by violence, including attempted rape. In August 2009 a British couple were attacked in their home in Bacolet. The couple suffered life threatening injuries that required medical evacuation to Port of Spain. In Bon Accord a British visitor was subject to a robbery and sexual assault at her villa in the Black Rock area. In July 2010 a British family were subjected to an armed robbery in their rented villa in the Courland area. The local police take such incidents seriously and respond quickly. But caution is still advised when renting villas in Tobago. All villas should have adequate security measures in place, including the provision of external security lighting, grills and 24-hour security guards. You should be aware of your surroundings at all times and preferably carry a mobile phone with roaming capability for use in emergency. Petty theft from cars has also increased.

Visitors are advised to visit isolated beaches such as Englishman's Bay and King Peter's bay only as a member of an organised group. Consult your tour operator if in doubt.

See our Victims of Crime Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel

On 21 August 2011, a Limited State of Emergency was called into effect by the Prime Minister. On 4 September, the Prime Minister announced an extension of the State of Emergency for up to three months. There is now a curfew in place for designated "hotspots" in Trinidad from 23:00 to 04:00 local time.

Although the State of Emergency extends to Tobago, the island has no designated "hotspots" and is not affected by the curfew.

The affected areas in Trinidad are as follows: The City of Port of Spain (St. James East, St. James West, Woodbrook, Northern Port of Spain, Belmont East, Belmont North & West, Southern Port of Spain, East Dry River, St. Ann's River South, St. Ann's River Central, St. Ann's River North, Belmont South);

The City of San Fernando (Cocoyea/Tarouba, Les Efforts East/Cipero, Les Efforts West/La Romain, Marabella East, Marabella South/Vistabella, Marabella West, Mon Repos/Navet, Pleasantville, Spring Vale/Paradise);

The Borough of Arima (Calvary, Arima North East, Arima West, Arima Central, Malabar, Tumpuna, O'Meara);

The Borough of Chaguanas (Charlieville, Edinburgh/Longdonville, Enterprise North, Enterprise South, Cunupia, Montrose, Felicity/Endevour, Munroe Road/Caroni Savannah);

The San Juan/Laventille Regional Corporation (Maracus Bay/Santa Cruz/La Fillette, Febeau/Bourg Mulatresse, Morvant/Upper Malick, San Juan West/Caledonia, St. Ann's/ Cascade/ Mon Repos West, St. Barb's Chinapoo, Beetham/Picton, Success/Trou Macaque, Aranguez/Warner Village, Barataria, Petit Bourg/ Champ Fleurs/ Mt. Lambert, San Juan East); and The Diego Martin Regional Corporation (Chaguaramas/Glencoe, Goodwood/La Puerta, Covinge/Richplain, Diamond Vale, Morne, Coco/Alyce Glen, Petit Valley/ Cocorite, St. Lucien/ Cameron Hill, Belle Vue/Bossiere#1, Moka/Bossiere#2).

  • The State of Emergency grants special powers to the police and military:
  • Search and seizure powers will not require a search warrant;
  • Military to have power to arrest and detain before transfer to the police;
  • Police can arrest and detain for up to 24 hours after which a magistrate, or assistant superintendent (or higher), will be able to add an extra 7 days;
  • No bail for those arrested during the State of Emergency;
  • Courts no longer will have the power to grant bail.

We strongly advise you to respect the curfew in the affected areas and to comply with directives issued by the Government of the Republic of Trinidad & Tobago, military and police units.. Travel times might be affected by these measures, so ensure you have sufficient time to reach your destination before curfew

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Road Travel
The standard of driving in Trinidad and Tobago is erratic. High speed road accidents on the main East/West and North/South highways in Trinidad that result in fatalities are a regular occurrence. Some of the roads are narrow and winding and the surface of a low standard. When hiring a car, you should drive with care. If you do not have a vehicle, you should use hotel taxis, particularly after dark.

See our Driving Abroad page.

Safety and Security - Local Travel - Sea Travel

In June 2007 an accident involving two bathers and a motorised boat resulted in serious injuries and an air evacuation. Bathers should be aware that no local maritime legislation in Trinidad and Tobago law exists under which boat drivers can be charged and prosecuted for reckless driving following an incident. See our River and Sea Safety page.

Safety and Security - Political Situation
Trinidad and Tobago Country Profile

Drug traffickers face severe penalties in Trinidad and Tobago. The authorities are alert to the carriage of illicit drugs of any kind and checks are thorough. You should pack all luggage yourself and do not carry items which do not belong to you.

Trinidad and Tobago has a number of laws, which make certain homosexual acts illegal.

You should be aware that it is an offence for anyone, including children, to dress in camouflage clothing.

For more general information for different types of travellers see our Your Trip page.

Entry Requirements - Visas
British visitors do not need visas to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Visitors are generally given 90 days to remain in the country but extensions can be obtained from the Passport and Immigration Department, 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain.

Entry Requirements - Passport validity
You must hold a valid passport to enter Trinidad and Tobago. Your passport must be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Trinidad and Tobago.

In some areas of Trinidad and Tobago medical facilities can be limited and may not be up to UK standards. Private clinics are able to treat most ordinary problems, but there may be a need for medical evacuation to Miami or elsewhere in cases of serious accident or illness. You should check that your insurance covers this.

Dengue Fever is common across the Caribbean and can occur throughout the year. Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection that can cause a feverish illness associated with headache, muscle aches and pains, and rash. Some cases of dengue are severe. Dengue can be prevented by avoiding being bitten by the disease-carrying mosquitoes that feed predominately during daylight hours. For more information on prevention, see the National Travel Health Network and Centre website: http://www.nathnac.org/pro/factsheets/dengue.htm.

In the 2010 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic the UNAIDS/WHO Working Group estimated that around 14,000 adults aged 15 or over in Trinidad & Tobago were living with HIV; the prevalence percentage was estimated at around 1.5% of the adult population compared to the prevalence percentage in adults in the UK of around 0.2%. Exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS. For more general information on how to do this see our HIV and AIDS page.

Seek medical advice before travelling to Trinidad & Tobago and ensure that all appropriate vaccinations are up-to-date. For further information on vaccination requirements, health outbreaks and general disease protection and prevention visit the websites of the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) and NHS Scotland's Fit For Travel or call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

See our Travel Health page.

Natural Disasters - Earthquakes
Earthquakes are a potential threat and tremors are felt occasionally. For advice on how to protect yourself in the event of being caught in an earthquake or tremor, please see: http://www.geologyuk.com/index.htm.

Natural Disasters - Hurricanes
The hurricane season in Trinidad and Tobago normally runs from June to November. Monitor local and international weather updates from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). You can also access the National Hurricane Centre for updates. Please also see our Tropical cyclones pages for more detailed information about what to do if you are caught up in a hurricane.

General - Insurance
You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling. Check any exclusions, and that your policy covers you for all the activities you want to undertake.

See our Travel Insurance page.

If things do go wrong when you are oversees then see our When Things Go Wrong page.

General - Registering with the British High Commission
We recommend you register with our LOCATE service to tell us when and where you are travelling abroad or where you live abroad so our consular and crisis staff can provide better assistance to you in an emergency.

General - Honorary Consul, Tobago
The British High Commission has an honorary consul in Tobago, James Morshead, who can assist in cases of emergency and lost passports. His telephone number is (00) (1) (868) 639 8855, mobile number (00) (1) (868) 680 4609. In his absence, Jeremy Knott provides back-up cover. He can be contacted on (00) (1) (868) 639 2689 or mobile numbers (00) (1) (868) 631 8269 or (00) (1) (868) 374 9822. These telephone numbers are not for casual enquiries and should only be used in cases of genuine emergency.

General - Consular Assistance Statistics
38 British nationals required consular assistance in Trinidad and Tobago in the period of 01 April 2010 - 31 March 2011 for the following types of incident; four deaths; four assaults; and nine arrests, for a variety of offences.

Thursday 18th August 2011

A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org>

- Trinidad & Tobago. 12 Aug 2011. The number of reported dengue cases, as of 30 Jul [2011], is 1639, with the highest number reported in Tobago. The statistics were provided yesterday [11 Aug 2011] by Health Minister Dr Fuad Khan at yesterday's launch of the national campaign.
<http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2011/08/12/1639-cases-dengue-so-far>
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[A HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map of Trinidad & Tobago can be accessed at
<http://healthmap.org/r/18BD>. - ProMed Mod.TY]
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