Date: Tue 1 Oct 2019
From: John Frean <johnf@nicd.ac.za> [edited[]

The patient is a 23-year-old male international student, who has been studying in South Africa since late July 2019. Between [6 and 16 Sep 2019] he was on vacation in Uganda.

Places visited in Uganda were:
Entebbe: Jinja music festival for 3 days
Sipi Falls: hiking/waterfalls/homestay
Moroto: visited tribes
Murchison Falls: 2 days
Masindi: 1 day
Entebbe, then back to South Africa.

He did not see any tsetse flies, nor was he aware of any insect bites.

On [Sun 22 Sep 2019] he felt unwell and noticed a lesion on his chin. He was admitted to hospital and on [26 Sep 2019] underwent surgery for a presumed submandibular abscess. No abscess was found but histological examination of tissue removed at surgery showed some areas of necrosis, and evidence of fibrin thrombi compatible with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. No organisms were seen.

The white cell count was about 3 x 109/L and platelets were 34 x 109/L, then 29 x 109/L, and postoperatively dropped to 4 x 109/L.

Blood films were examined and numerous trypanosomes were seen, estimated density of about 56,000/microlitre. On review of the blood sample from [26 Sep 2019], scanty trypanosomes were seen.

The patient was transferred to the care of an infectious diseases physician on [Sat 28 Sep 2019]. On admission he was very ill with unrelenting fever, tachycardia, periodically hypotensive, dyspnoeic, renal dysfunction (creatinine 300 micromol/L), jaundiced with raised transaminases, and slightly confused. Test dose and 1st dose of suramin were well tolerated, and the 2nd dose was given on [30 Sep 2019]. Clinically the patient is slightly improved today (1 Oct 2019), with a platelet count now 12 x 109/L and creatinine around 200 micromol/L.

According to WHO EAT [East African trypanosomiasis] experts, the infection was most likely acquired at Murchison Falls, where there have been sporadic cases; alternatively at Moroto [both in northern Uganda].

This is the 4th case of EAT evacuated to Johannesburg in 2019. The other cases acquired the infection in Zambia and Malawi.
----------------------------------------------
Lucille Blumberg
John Frean <johnf@nicd.ac.za>
National Institute for Communicable Diseases, GeoSentinel Site,
Johannesburg
Evan Shoul (infectious diseases specialist);
Pieter Ekermans (Ampath Laboratories)

[ProMED-mail thanks Lucille Blumberg, John Frean, Evan Shoul, and Pieter Ekermans for their submission. - Mod.ML]

[Sleeping sickness is endemic in 36 sub-Saharan Africa countries where there are tsetse flies that transmit the disease (WHO Trypanosomiasis fact sheet <https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/trypanosomiasis-human-african-(sleeping-sickness)>).

Trypanosomiasis is endemic in the national parks in southern Africa, where there are tsetse flies and a reservoir of the trypanosomes in the wildlife. It is important to consider trypanosomiasis in febrile travellers to these national parks with negative tests for malaria. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of South Africa:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/179>
Murchison Falls (Uganda):
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murchison_Falls>;
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/36260>]
Date: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 22:36:01 +0200 (METDST)

Kampala, Aug 29, 2019 (AFP) - A nine-year-old girl who had travelled from the Democratic Republic of Congo has been found to have Ebola, authorities in Uganda said on Thursday.   The child, who is of Congolese origin, was diagnosed after exhibiting symptoms at a border crossing in the southwestern Kasese district on Wednesday. She was subsequently isolated and transferred to an Ebola treatment unit.

A rapid response team had been dispatched to Kasese to support local teams, the Ugandan Health Ministry said in a statement.   Earlier this month, Uganda said it had started a trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine that may be used in neighbouring DR Congo where an outbreak of the disease has killed more than 1,900 people.   The trial of the MVA-BN vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson is expected to last two years.   At present there is no licenced drug to prevent or treat Ebola although a range of experimental drugs are in development.

Uganda has suffered Ebola outbreaks in the past but nothing on the scale of the DR Congo epidemic, which began in August 2018.    It is the second-worst outbreak on record, eclipsed only by the 2013-2016 epidemic in West Africa, which killed more than 11,300 out of 29,000 documented cases.   Uganda has been declared Ebola-free but in June three people from one family died there from the haemorrhagic fever after crossing back from DR Congo.
Date: Tue, 27 Aug 2019 16:19:47 +0200 (METDST)

Kampala, Aug 27, 2019 (AFP) - Uganda on Tuesday re-launched its national airline after two decades with an inaugural flight to Nairobi, becoming the latest East African nation seeking to revive their aviation industry.   "The airline will first fly to seven destinations. Starting with Nairobi, Mogadishu, Juba and Dar es Saalam. And then to Mombasa, Kilimanjaro and Bujumbura," said Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda at Entebbe International Airport.

Uganda Airlines is launching into increasingly crowded East African skies, where both Rwanda and Tanzania have in recent years revived their national airlines in a bid to capture a slice of the booming market.   They are taking on regional giants Kenya Airways -- which continues to expand despite struggling with years of losses and management woes -- and Ethiopian Airlines, which largely dominates the skies.    Uganda Airlines is coming to compete in the market alongside other airlines", said Transport Minister Monica Azuba.
 
Uganda Airlines was founded by former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in 1976 but the carrier was liquidated in 2001 after a failed bid to privatise the floundering company, dogged by corruption and mismanagement.   The country has acquired two new Bombardier CRJ 900 jets, and will take delivery of another two in September, while the addition of two Airbus A330-800 planes in 2020 will allow it to carry out long-haul flights.   "Uganda Airlines will have direct flights from Uganda to China plus other countries, and it will be very important in hitting the four million tourist goal the government has set," said Tourism Minister Ephraim Kamuntu.   Uganda welcomed 1.8 million tourists in 2018, according to official statistics.

Meanwhile, neighbouring Tanzania has invested heavily in reviving its airline, with the purchase of six planes including Bombardiers, Airbus and one Boeing dreamliner since 2016. Air Tanzania launched its first route outside of the continent to Mumbai, India, in July.    Rwanda has massively invested in its national airline Rwandair, with a fleet of 12 jets which now fly 29 routes around the world, with the most recent flight launched to Israel in June.   According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Rwanda breached its debt ceiling of $500 million by $87 million due to the lease of new aircrafts in 2018, and is seeking further loans to expand routes and make a profit.   Numerous airlines in Africa have failed to stay afloat, or survive on government bailouts.
Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2019 18:34:26 +0200 (METDST)

Kampala, Aug 5, 2019 (AFP) - Uganda said Monday it had started a trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine that may be used in neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo, where an outbreak has killed more than 1,800 people.   The trial of the MVA-BN vaccine developed by Johnson&Johnson is expected to last two years, Uganda's Medical Research Council (MRC) said.

The vaccine will be administered to up to 800 health professionals and frontline workers such as cleaners, ambulance personnel and mortuary and burial teams, in the western district of Mbarara, the MRC said in a statement.   MRC spokeswoman Pamela Nabukenya Wairagala said vaccinations had already begun.   The MRC said the trial would be led by Ugandan researchers and supported by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.   At present there is no licenced drug to prevent or treat Ebola although a range of experimental drugs are in development.

The Congo outbreak is the first time that a vaccine has been used as a full-scale weapon against the virus.   Health authorities have been issuing the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine, developed by US pharma group Merck -- a product that has yet to be licenced but has been shown to be safe and effective.   The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for its deployment to be expanded and has recommended the Johnson&Johnson vaccine also be rolled out in order to meet needs.   However, the latter move has been resisted.

Critics have cautioned against introducing a new product in communities where mistrust of Ebola responders is already high.    Congo's former health minister, Oly Ilunga, who stepped down in July, was among the detractors.   The MRC said the Johnson&Johnson vaccine "is safe" and had been tested on more than 6,000 people in Europe, the US and African nations including Uganda.   However, its efficacy is unclear because it has never been assessed in an outbreak scenario.    By comparison, rVSV-ZEBOV was introduced in Guinea towards the end of a 2013-16 epidemic in West Africa, enabling scientists to conclude it was effective.

The trial taking place in Uganda, where there is no Ebola, will look at the response of the immune system to the vaccine -- a key pointer of effectiveness.   It will also look at safety and the attitudes of participants towards the vaccine, the MRC said.   Professor Pontiano Kaleebu, the lead Ugandan researcher in the trial, said developing a reliable vaccine was a key component to controlling Ebola epidemics.   "In this trial we hope to avail more information that will help us work towards having a licenced Ebola vaccine," Kaleebu said in a statement.

Uganda has suffered Ebola outbreaks in the past but nothing on the scale of the Congo epidemic, which began in August 2018.    It is the second-worst outbreak on record, eclipsed only by 2013-2016 epidemic in West Africa, which killed more than 11,300 out of 29,000 documented cases.   Uganda has been declared Ebola-free though in June three people from one family died there from the haemorrhagic fever after crossing back from Congo.
Date: Sat 3 Aug 2019
Source: Daily Monitor [edited]
<https://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/49-people-isolated-Crimean-Congo-Fever-hits-Lyantonde-/688334-5221502-o5k1cgz/index.html>

One person has been confirmed dead and 49 others currently are isolated following an outbreak of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Lyantonde District.

According to the Lyantonde District Health Officer, Dr Moses Nkanika, [VB], 42, who was a businessman dealing in cattle, succumbed to the deadly disease on [Wed 31 Jul 2019].

"The blood samples we got from the deceased in Kasagama Sub County have tested positive for CCHF, not Ebola as earlier suspected," Dr Nkanika told Daily Monitor in an interview on Saturday morning [3 Aug 2019].

He said 49 residents who got in close contact with the deceased are currently isolated to avoid contacts with other people as health workers continue to monitor their health conditions.

"These people are expected to remain in isolation for 40 days until they are cleared by ministry of health," he said. He advised residents to be on alert and report any emergencies to the nearby health centres.

Mr Emmanuel Ainebyoona, the Ministry of Health spokesperson said he was not aware of the outbreak, but promised to crosscheck with other responsible authorities to confirm.  [Byline: Paul Ssekandi]
==========================
[CCHF has occurred sporadically in Uganda over recent years and is endemic there. It causes a viral hemorrhagic fever and the virus is transmitted by ticks. ProMED Mod.UBA has indicated that, "Uganda lies between countries that have frequent outbreaks of RVF [Rift Valley fever] and in which CCHF is endemic: Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, and Sudan. A recent Food and Agriculture Organization risk analysis identified Uganda as at very high risk of amplification in some districts of the cattle corridor, which covers 52 districts cutting across the central part of the country from the southwest in Ankole-Kigezi to the northeastern region in Karamoja.

The RVF virus has been isolated frequently in domestic animals in all affected areas. In addition, the practice of eating "sanga meat" (meat harvested from sick animals) in some districts heightens the risk of zoonotic transmission of both VHFs [viral haemorrhagic fevers, CCHF and Rift Valley fever]. At present, there is inadequate community engagement and social mobilization around the risks posed by these practices. Most of the 52 districts in the cattle corridor lack such engagement  (<http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/273497/OEW30-2127072018.pdf>)."

CCHF can cause serious disease in humans, with a case fatality rate of 10-40%. It can be responsible for severe outbreaks in humans, but it is not pathogenic for ruminants, their amplifying hosts. WHO states that the onset of symptoms in humans is sudden, with fever, myalgia, (muscle ache), dizziness, neck pain and stiffness, backache, headache, sore eyes and photophobia (sensitivity to light). There may be nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and sore throat early on, followed by sharp mood swings and confusion.

After 2-4 days, the agitation may be replaced by sleepiness, depression, and lassitude, and the abdominal pain may localize to the upper right quadrant, with detectable hepatomegaly (liver enlargement). Other clinical signs include tachycardia (fast heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the skin) on internal mucosal surfaces, such as in the mouth and throat, and on the skin.

Public education, especially among individuals in contact with livestock or their products, is needed to prevent cases of CCHF infection. A One Health approach is needed for effective surveillance, with effective communication between animal health and human health professionals. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Uganda:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/24897>]
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