Date: Thu 25 Jul 2019
Source: Kampala Dispatch [edited]
<http://dispatch.ug/2019/07/25/kadaga-directs-health-ministry-respond-increased-cases-elephantiasis/>

The Speaker of Parliament Rebecca Kadaga has directed the Health Minister Jane Aceng to dispatch a team to Kamwenge and Kitagwenda districts to respond to increasing cases of elephantiasis in the area.

Elephantiasis, also known as lymphatic filariasis, is one of the neglected tropical diseases caused by parasitic worms such as _Wuchereria bancrofti_, _Brugia malayi_, and _Brugia timori_, all of which are transmitted by mosquitoes. It causes the affected area, mostly the limbs or parts of the head, to swell abnormally.

During the plenary session on Wednesday [24 Jul 2019], Kamwenge Woman MP Dorothy Azairwe Nshaija raised a matter of National Importance. She told Parliament that elephantiasis has affected the area since 2007.

She said that despite the matter being brought to the attention of the Ministry of Health, nothing has been done. Nshaija says that 12 people are reported to have died in the past few weeks.

Nshaija appealed for government's intervention in the affected areas of Busiriba Sub-County in Kamwenge District and Sub-Counties of Ntara and Buhanda in the new district of Kitagwenda. Kadaga directed Aceng to travel to Kamwenge and Kitagwenda districts to establish the causes of the disease and report back to Parliament on Wednesday [31 Jul 2019].

Reports indicate that several farmers in the affected areas have abandoned their gardens due to the disease. Contrary to reports that elephantiasis was being caused by mosquitoes and worms, a 2015 study by the Ministry of Health indicated that volcanic minerals in soils were causing elephantiasis in Kamwenge. The study described the disease as a result of chronic exposure of skin to irritant minerals in volcanic soils causing itching and pain.

The Health Ministry then reported that 52 cases of people with elephantiasis had been identified and that these had the disease since 1980 since it takes longer for someone to realize it due to lack of awareness and its risk increases with older age. The report said that women were 5 times more affected than men since they move barefooted and spend more time in the farms touching the volcanic soils with minerals that cause this disease.

Also noted was that a big number of farmers affected by elephantiasis were not wearing gumboots when tilling their land, yet the disease is associated with direct contact with the soils.
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[The news report suggests that the condition is filariasis caused by mosquito-borne nematodes _Wuchereria bancrofti_ and _Brugia malayi_. The discussion of the association with exposure to volcanic soil, however, makes it more probable that the condition is so-called "podoconiosis."

Podoconiosis is known as "mossy-foot" because the papillomata have a moss-like appearance. It is caused by long-term barefoot exposure to volcanic soils high in silica. These soils are found in the highlands of tropical Africa, Central America, and northwest India (1). Seasonally heavy rains in these regions lead to soil erosion. Chronic, recurrent barefoot exposure to exposed silica leads to lymphatic obstruction resulting in ascending lymphedema. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[Reference
1. Eid R, Sharma D, Smock W. Podoconiosis in rural Tanzania. Am J Trop
Med Hyg 2016;95(1):1. <https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0028>

HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Uganda: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/97>]
Date: Thu 11 Jul 2019
Source: Daily Monitor [edited]
<https://www.monitor.co.ug/SpecialReports/Bilharzia-infections-hit-12m-Ugandans-report/688342-5190618-x7tnh4/index.html>

Bilharzia infections in Uganda have hit 12 million cases and the threat continues, 14 years after the Health ministry launched a programme to wipe out the disease. The ministry launched the Bilharzia Control Programme in 2003, with mass treatment of affected communities once every year with a drug called Praziquantel. The drug was used in areas with bilharzia infection of 20% and above.

The government also launched mass treatment of school-age children once every 2 years in areas where the infection ranges were from 1% to 20%. However, despite its high prevalence, bilharzia is clustered among the tropical neglected diseases, with little funding allocated to combat it. This has made its control and elimination a difficult task for health experts. A 2018 research report released by Makerere University School of Public Health indicates that 29% of 40 million Ugandans are infected by bilharzia, which translates into about 12 million people suffering from the disease. The research findings say the burden is up to 42% among children aged between 2 and 4, posing a huge risk to their health.

Currently, there is no bilharzia treatment for children below 5 years. This means they are at more risk than those above 5 years and adults, yet they have a lot of contact with contaminated water. In an earlier interview with Daily Monitor, Mr. Moses Adriko, the programme officer for vector control at the Vector Control Division of Ministry of Health, said the bilharzia problem is huge yet the disease falls under the neglected tropical disease category. [Byline: Franklin Draku]
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[ProMED does not agree that children under 5 years of age with schistosomiasis cannot be treated. Please refer to a recent review (Osakunor, DNM, Woolhouse MEJ, Mutapi F et al. Paediatric schistosomiasis: What we know and what we need to know. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018 Feb; 12(2): e0006144. <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805162/>)

Followed by an endorsement from the WHO (Montresor A, Garba A. Treatment of preschool children for schistosomiasis.
Lancet Glob Health. 2017;5(7):e640-e1. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(17)30202-4; available at: <https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(17)30202-4/fulltext>), a recent randomised dose-ranging trial reports that a single 40 mg/kg dose of PZQ can be used for treatment in preschool-aged children (PSAC) (Coulibaly JT, Panic G, Silué KD, Kovac J, Hattendorf J,
and Keiser J. Efficacy and safety of praziquantel in preschool-aged and school-aged children infected with Schistosoma mansoni: a randomised controlled, parallel-group, dose-ranging, phase 2 trial. Lancet Glob Health. 2017;5(7):e688-e98; available at: <https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(17)30187-0/fulltext>).

PZQ is currently administered to PSAC as crushed tablets with juice or bread. In conclusion, paediatric schistosomiasis can and should be treated. - ProMED Mod. EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at: Uganda:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/97>]
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2019 14:55:44 +0200

Kinshasa, July 10, 2019 (AFP) - Uganda says there have been no further cases of Ebola on its territory resulting from the deaths of two Ugandans who had travelled to DR Congo, the Congolese authorities said Wednesday.   In an update on the epidemic in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, the health ministry said its Ugandan counterparts had confirmed there had been no further infections.   "The health ministry of the Republic of Uganda has announced that all contacts with the index case completed their obligatory 21-day monitoring period without developing signs of the disease," it said.   The "index case" was a five-year-old Ugandan boy who was the first of the two to die, followed by his grandmother.

His family had travelled to DRC where they had buried an Ebola-stricken relative.   They were then placed in an isolation ward in the DRC but fled and returned to Uganda across the porous border, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).   A total of 1,641 deaths have been recorded in DRC's North Kivu and neighbouring Ituri provinces since August 1, according to the latest toll.   The epidemic is the worst outbreak of Ebola on record after more than 11,300 were killed Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone between 2014-2016.
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 17:37:51 +0200
By Grace Matsiko

Mpondwe, Uganda, June 13, 2019 (AFP) - At the bustling Mpondwe border post, a woman crossing from the Democratic Republic of Congo into Uganda is whisked away to an isolation unit after a thermal scanner picks up her high temperature.   Health workers keep Mulefu Kyakimwa, a 32-year-old vegetable oil trader, under observation but later discharge her, once Ebola has been ruled out as the cause of her fever.

The border post is on high alert after a family with suspected Ebola escaped isolation on the Congolese side and entered Uganda, where two of them died this week.   The spread of the deadly virus to Uganda comes after months of efforts in a region of porous borders to contain an outbreak in Congo which has killed 1,400 people, according to the latest official data.    "Since the start of the outbreak, the total number of cases is 2,084, of which 1,990 have been confirmed and another 94 are probable," the Congolese health ministry said in its daily bulletin from Wednesday.   "In all, there have been 1,405 deaths -- 1,311 confirmed and 94 probable -- and 579 people have recovered," the bulletin said, adding that 132,679 people had been vaccinated.

- 'We expected it' -
Few people seem to be surprised that Ebola would eventually make its way to Uganda -- which has experienced outbreaks in the past.   "The outbreak is not a surprise. We expected it. People cross the borders all the time and interact a lot," said Dorcus Kambere, a 29-year-old Ugandan bar attendant who feels her job puts her at risk.

At Mpondwe -- where 25,000 people cross daily -- travellers undergo rigorous health checks to detect the lethal virus, which attacks the organs and leads to internal and external bleeding.   Soldiers carrying automatic rifles guide travellers through the screening process, making sure they wash their hands with disinfectant.   The travellers then pass through a shelter with a thermal scanner that feeds people's body temperatures into a computer.   "This is a situation we go through every day since the Ebola outbreak," said Ambrose Nyakitwe, 34, a Ugandan trader returning from the Congo side.   "It is good. I have a family. I have to see that they don't get affected," he added, after passing through the scan.   Outside the busy border post, business carries on as usual, with children swimming and playing in the muddy Lhubiriha river that draws a natural boundary between the two nations.

- 'Not safe' -
A woman serves pancakes with her bare hands from a bucket as pot-bellied money changers lounging next to her carry out their trade.   However, while some carry on seemingly oblivious to the dangers posed by the virus, others are increasingly suspicious.   "It is not safe. If they say people with Ebola crossed into Uganda, how sure are we there are not many who will infect us and are yet to be got?" asked Bernadette Bwiso, 41, a trader.    "Government must do a house-to-house search," she said.   Meanwhile, Nyakitwe is anxious about how the infected patients managed to cross into Uganda despite heightened surveillance.   A Congolese woman -- who is married to a Ugandan -- her mother, three children and their nanny had travelled to DRC to care for her ill father, who later died of Ebola.

The World Health Organization said 12 members of the family who attended the burial in Congo were placed in isolation in the DRC, but six "escaped and crossed over to Uganda" on June 9.   The next day, a five-year-old was checked into hospital in Bwera vomiting blood. Tests confirmed he had Ebola and the family was placed in an isolation ward.   His three-year-old brother was also confirmed to have Ebola, as was their grandmother who died late Wednesday.   Uganda and the RDC are discussing what can be done to intensify collaboration between the two countries to prevent the spread, the Congolese authorities said.

- No surveillance -
Uganda's health ministry said that the surviving travellers and the Ugandan father -- five people in total -- had agreed to be repatriated to DRC on Thursday for treatment and "family support and comfort" from relatives on the other side of the border.   However, three unrelated patients are still in a Ugandan hospital awaiting the result of Ebola tests.

Uganda's Health Minister Jane Ruth Aceng said challenges remained at "unofficial entry points" between Congo and Uganda, which share a porous 875-kilometre (545-mile) border.   These unauthorised border crossings, known as "panyas" in the local Lukonzo language, are often merely planks laid down across a point in the river, or through forests and mountains where there is no surveillance.   In a bid to contain the spread of the disease the Ugandan government has suspended market days and urged people to stop shaking hands and hugging.
11th June 2019
https://afro.who.int/news/confirmation-case-ebola-virus-disease-uganda

Kampala, 11 June 2019 - The Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) have confirmed a case of Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda. Although there have been numerous previous alerts, this is the first confirmed case in Uganda during the Ebola outbreak on-going in neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The confirmed case is a 5-year-old child from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who travelled with his family on 9th June 2019. The child and his family entered the country through Bwera Border post and sought medical care at Kagando hospital where health workers identified Ebola as a possible cause of illness. The child was transferred to Bwera Ebola Treatment Unit for management. The confirmation was made today by the Uganda Virus Institute (UVRI). The child is under care and receiving supportive treatment at Bwera ETU, and contacts are being monitored.

The Ministry of Health and WHO have dispatched a Rapid Response Team to Kasese to identify other people who may be at risk, and ensure they are monitored and provided with care if they also become ill. Uganda has previous experience managing Ebola outbreaks. In preparation for a possible imported case during the current outbreak in DRC, Uganda has vaccinated nearly 4700 health workers in 165 health facilities (including in the facility where the child is being cared for); disease monitoring has been intensified; and health workers trained on recognizing symptoms of the disease. Ebola Treatment Units are in place.

In response to this case, the Ministry is intensifying community education, psychosocial support and will undertake vaccination for those who have come into contact with the patient and at-risk health workers who were not previously vaccinated.  

Ebola virus disease is a severe illness that is spread through contact with the body fluids of a person sick with the disease (fluids such as vomit, faeces or blood). First symptoms are similar to other diseases and thus require vigilant health and community workers, especially in areas where there is Ebola transmission, to help make diagnosis. Symptoms can be sudden and include:
People who have been in contact with someone with the disease are offered vaccine and asked to monitor their health for 21 days to ensure they do not become ill as well.

The investigational vaccine being used in DRC and by health and frontline workers in Uganda has so far been effective in protecting people from developing the disease, and has helped those who do develop the disease to have a better chance of survival. The Ministry strongly urges those who are identified as contacts to take this protective measure.

Investigational therapeutics and advanced supportive care, along with patients seeking care early once they have symptoms, increase chances of survival.

The Ministry of Health has taken the following actions to contain spread of the disease in the country:

There are no confirmed cases in any other parts of the country.

The Ministry is working with international partners coordinated by the World Health Organization.

The Ministry of Health appeals to the general public and health workers to work together closely, to be vigilant and support each other in helping anyone with symptoms to receive care quickly. The Ministry will continue to update the general public on progress and new developments.
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