Date: Fri 24 Jan 2020
Source: Uganda Ministry of Health Tweets [edited]
<https://twitter.com/MinofHealthUG>

[This series of tweets is drawn from a video interview that is also available at the above Twitter URL.]

The Ugandan Health Minister confirms an outbreak of yellow fever in Moyo District, West Nile region and Buliisa District in the Hoima region of Uganda.

Original public tweets
------------------------
Minister of Health, @JaneRuth_Aceng confirms the outbreak of Yellow Fever in Moyo District in West Nile region and Buliisa District in Hoima region in #Uganda.

@WHOUganda country representative, @tegegny speaks about the Yellow fever vaccine. "The Yellow Fever vaccine is one of those vaccines where you need to be vaccinated only once," he says.

@MinofHealthUG has also applied to @gavi and WHO for inclusion of the Yellow Fever vaccination into the routine immunisation schedule. Having faced 4 outbreaks, #Uganda now qualifies to introduce Yellow Fever vaccine as a long term measure to prevent Yellow Fever outbreaks.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: We anticipate that within the next 2 weeks, vaccines will be available and vaccination will commence in Moyo and Buliisa districts.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: @MinofHealthUG has requested for the Yellow Fever vaccines from the International Coordination Group that manages global stock piles of Yellow Fever and Meningitis vaccines.

@MinofHealthUG working with partners have dispatched Rapid Response Teams to Moyo and Buliisa Districts to support investigations, active search for cases, community mobilization and sensitization.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: At this time, there was little suspicion, however, his blood sample was withdrawn and sent to @UVRIug [Uganda Virus Research Institute] for testing and results showed positive for Yellow fever virus.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: In Buliisa, there are also 2 confirmed cases. A 37-year old male and his 38-year old wife. The husband was a cattle farmer trading in milk between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

They presented with symptoms of:
- fever
- vomiting
- diarrhea
- fatigue
- headache
- abdominal and joint pain
- confusion
- unexplained bleeding.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: Upon arrival, they got ill and on [3 Jan 2020] were admitted at Logobo Health Center III in Moyo District. They were later referred to Moyo General Hospital.

@JaneRuth_Aceng: In Moyo District, there are 2 confirmed cases, both are males who were dealing in cutting and trading timber between Uganda and South Sudan. On [2 Jan 2020], the 2 cases travelled from South Sudan to Moyo.
==========================
[These 2 small (2 infected individuals in each locality) yellow fever (YF) outbreaks are not interconnected, having occurred at 2 sites at far distances from each other. It is reassuring to learn that the Ministry of Health will be investigating these 2 sites and initiating vaccination in these areas in 2 weeks. There is no indication of the proportion of the residents in these areas who have been vaccinated for YF previously.

Yellow fever is no stranger in Uganda, and outbreaks occur sporadically. The most recent previous outbreak reported by the Ugandan Ministry of Health was in May 2019 after laboratory-confirmed cases were reported from Koboko in the Northern region and Masaka in the Central region districts -- regions 600 km (375 mi) apart. These cases are spillover from endemic sylvan (forest) maintenance of the virus. Maintaining 80%-90% vaccination coverage in these areas is important to prevent initiation of urban transmission of the virus that can quickly get out of hand.

A map showing the location of Buliisa District in the center-west part of Uganda can be accessed at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buliisa_District>, and another showing Moyo District in the far north of the country can be seen at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyo_District>. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Uganda: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/97>]
Date: Wed 22 Jan 2020 1:04 PM EAT
Source: Uganda Red Cross Twitter [edited]
<https://twitter.com/UgandaRedCross/status/1220059777637797889>

One confirmed case of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, 4 others suspected, in Kagadi [western Uganda]

A district Task Force has been formed to manage and coordinate the cases across the district @MinofHealthUG @robert_kwesiga @inakasiita1
========================
[Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) can cause serious disease in humans, with a case fatality rate of 10-40%. It can be responsible for severe outbreaks in humans, but it is not pathogenic for ruminants, their amplifying hosts. WHO states that the onset of symptoms in humans is sudden, with fever, myalgia, (muscle ache), dizziness, neck pain and stiffness, backache, headache, sore eyes and photophobia (sensitivity to light). There may be nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and sore throat early on, followed by sharp mood swings and confusion. After 2-4 days, the agitation may be replaced by sleepiness, depression, and lassitude, and the abdominal pain may localize to the upper right quadrant, with detectable hepatomegaly (liver enlargement). Other clinical signs include tachycardia (fast heart rate), lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), and a petechial rash (a rash caused by bleeding into the skin) on internal mucosal surfaces, such as in the mouth and throat, and on the skin.

Public education, especially among individuals in contact with livestock or their products, is needed to prevent cases of CCHF infection. A One Health approach is needed for effective surveillance, with effective communication between animal health and human health professionals.

The information in the tweet above indicates that there is one confirmed and at least 4 suspected cases of CCHF in Kagadi district, in the western region of Uganda.  Any updates on the epidemiology of these cases, occupational exposure, and public health response measures to control the transmission will be highly appreciated. - ProMED Mod.UBA]

[Maps of Uganda:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Districts_of_Uganda> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/28757>]
Date: Tue 31 Dec 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/uganda-reports-2nd-fatal-rift-valley-fever-case-51670/>

A 2nd fatal human Rift Valley fever (RVF) case in recent weeks was reported in Uganda. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the 2nd confirmed case of RVF was reported from Ntoroko district, Uganda.

The individual was a 25-year-old male from the Democratic Republic of Congo who was living and working in Kimara Village, Butungama sub-county, in Ntoroko district, Uganda. The patient developed haemorrhagic symptoms on 5 Dec [2019] and despite treatment, the patient died the next day [6 Dec 2019]. A safe and dignified burial occurred later in the month [December 2019].

The 1st RVF case/death was reported from Obongi district (see Rift Valley fever - Eastern Africa (06): Uganda ex South Sudan http://promedmail.org/post/20191209.6829994).

According to WHO, RVF is caused by a virus transmitted by mosquitoes and blood-feeding flies that usually affects animals (commonly cattle and sheep) but can also involve humans. In humans, the disease ranges from a mild flu-like illness to severe haemorrhagic fever that can be lethal. When livestock are infected, the disease can cause significant economic losses due to a high mortality rate in young animals and waves of abortions in pregnant females.
========================
[The WHO report cited above leads one to conclude that although the man was from the DR Congo, he was living and working in Uganda and contracted the Rift Valley fever [RVF] there. There is no indication that RVF cases were occurring in livestock in Uganda at the time this case occurred, nor how the man became infected. There were RVF livestock cases in 2018. There were 3 reported RVF outbreaks located in 3 separate southwestern districts of Uganda (Mbarara, Isingiro, Lyantonde) (see Rift Valley fever - Eastern Africa (31): Uganda, bovine, OIE http://promedmail.org/post/20180907.6014484).

At that time, there also were 2 confirmed human cases (see Rift Valley fever - Eastern Africa (13): Uganda, WHO http://promedmail.org/post/20180711.5898523). However, in 2019, no livestock cases were reported. The occurrence of human cases in the absence of reported animal cases prompted Mod.AS to comment: "Unfortunately, during the recent South Sudan RVF event, as in most -- if not all -- previous RVF events in other African countries, humans served as sentinels. Improved surveillance in animals is desperately needed in Africa to allow timely measures applied, predominantly preventive vaccination, before the development of a full-blown epizootic involving secondary infection in humans."

It is likely that RVF virus has persisted in this Uganda and other countries in East Africa in transovarially infected eggs of _Aedes_ mosquito vectors. These eggs can remain viable for long periods of time and hatch when flooded during future rain events, with the subsequent emergence of infected females ready to transmit the virus. This risk provides justification for keeping livestock of the area well vaccinated into the future. This may have accounted for the reappearance of RVF in South Sudan in 2018, after nearly 2 years without additional reported cases in humans or livestock, and again with this human case in 2019. - Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Ntoroko district, Uganda: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/24929>]
Date: Tue 3 Dec 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/rift-valley-fever-uganda-reports-fatal-case-in-obongi-district-92864/>

In late November [2019], Uganda health authorities notified the World Health Organization of a fatal Rift Valley fever (RVF) case from Obongi district.  The case was a 35-year-old man from South Sudan who was living in the Palorinya Refugee camp in Obongi district, Uganda. The case had travel history to South Sudan between 12 and 19 Nov 2019 to harvest cassava. While in his home country, he developed fever and other symptoms and was treated for malaria; however, his condition got worse.  He later returned to the refugee camp in Uganda and his symptoms progressed and he was hospitalized. Viral hemorrhagic fever was suspected. Samples were collected and sent to the Uganda Virus Research Institute; however, the patient died. A safe and dignified burial was performed on 22 Nov 2019. As of 24 Nov 2019, a total of 19 contacts were recorded during the active case search including 10 healthcare workers.
===================
[The circumstances and specific location under which the man became infected with Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus in South Sudan is not mentioned. It is worth noting that there was an RVF outbreak in the Eastern Lakes region of South Sudan during the 1st 3 months of last year (2018). At the end of that outbreak, the OIE's follow-up report no. 3 reported: "The event cannot be considered resolved, but the situation is sufficiently stable. No more follow-up reports will be sent. Information about this disease will be included in the next 6-monthly reports."

There were more human cases than animal ones in that outbreak, prompting Mod.AS to comment: "Unfortunately, during the recent South Sudan RVF event, as in most -- if not all -- previous RVF events in other African countries, humans served as sentinels. Improved surveillance in animals is desperately needed in Africa, to allow timely measures applied, predominantly preventive vaccination, before the development of a full-blown epizootic involving secondary infection in humans." Intensified surveillance is needed in South Sudan in those localities where the affected man had been prior to his return to Uganda.

It is likely that RVF virus has persisted in this area in transovarially infected eggs of _Aedes_ mosquito vectors. These eggs can remain viable for long periods of time and hatch when flooded during future rain events, with the subsequent emergence of infected females ready to transmit the virus. This risk provides justification for maintaining livestock of the area well vaccinated into the future. This may have accounted for the reappearance of RVF in South Sudan in 2018, after nearly 2 years without additional reported cases in humans or livestock and again with this human case in 2019. - ProMED Mod.TY]

Obongi district, Uganda is located approximately 50 km (30 mi) from the South Sudan border.
HealthMap/ProMED-mail maps:
Uganda: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/65264>
South Sudan: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/8402>

According to OIE's data, a total of 2 outbreaks of RVF affecting animals have been reported from Sudan during the event. The 1st outbreak started in the Arabaata dam area, Red Sea state, on 25 Sep 2019, affecting goats. The 2nd (and, so far, last) outbreak started 10 Oct 2019 in the River Nile state, affecting sheep and goats. Both outbreaks have been declared as 'resolved' on 14 Nov 2019.

Outbreak summary:
Total outbreaks = 2 (Submitted)
Species / Susceptible / Cases / Deaths / Killed and disposed of / Slaughtered
Goats / 1700 / 37 / 7 / 0 / 0
Sheep / 1550 / 37 / 5 / 0 / 0

According to the recent (5 Dec 2019) OCHA (UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs) update, the (human) RVF situation in Sudan, as of 26 Oct 2019, was the following: "a total of 345 suspected RVF cases -- including 11 related deaths -- reported in the states of Red Sea (128), River Nile (212), Khartoum (1), White Nile (1), Kassala (2), and Gedaref (1). The most affected age group is 15 to 45 years, which accounts for 83% of the total suspected cases. The male to female ratio is 2.6, with a high proportion of the cases being farmers (37.5 per cent). RVF is endemic in Sudan and 3 outbreaks affecting people have been documented in 1973, 1976, and 2008. During the outbreak in 2008, a total of 747 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported, including 230 deaths."

Egypt suffered its 1st RVF outbreak in 1977/78 with serious human disease and death as well as severe losses in livestock; several additional events have been recorded since. A recent historical review paper [1] concluded: "due to the availability and abundance of the potential vectors, the suitability of environmental conditions, continuous importation of livestock's from Sudan, and the close association of susceptible domestic animals with humans, the RVF virus could possibly occur and circulate in Egypt."   (https://tinyurl.com/whz3pz5)

Reference
---------
1. Kenawy MA, Abdel-Hamid YM, Beier JC. Rift Valley fever in Egypt and other African countries: Historical review, recent outbreaks, and possibility of disease occurrence in Egypt. Acta Trop. 2018; 181: 40-49; <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2018.01.015>  - ProMED Mods.AS/TY]
Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2019 15:58:56 +0100 (MET)

Kampala, Dec 7, 2019 (AFP) - Twelve people have been swept to their deaths by floods in western Uganda, the Red Cross said on Saturday, as the East African country is battered by torrential rain.   "We have recovered 12 bodies from the water and one person has been rushed to hospital with serious injuries," said Diana Tumuhimbise, Red Cross branch manager in the Bundibugyo district.   "The rain started last night and continued until 9:00 am (0600 GMT)," she told AFP on Saturday.   "Several houses have been swept away, roads have been blocked and some washed away completely."

The Red Cross has launched a search and rescue operation with the police, military and community members in 12 affected areas but it is not yet clear how many people are missing.    Rain is hampering communication in the remote location, on the border with DR Congo and separated from the rest of Uganda by the Rwenzori mountains.   At least 20 people have been killed as a result of floods and mudslides in the last week in Uganda.

The extreme weather has been blamed on the Indian Ocean Dipole -- a climate system defined by the difference in sea surface temperature between western and eastern areas of the ocean.   At the moment, the ocean around East Africa is far warmer than usual, resulting in higher evaporation and moist air flowing inwards over the continent as rain: the hallmarks of a "positive" dipole.   Scientists warn that as ocean temperatures rise because of climate change, Indian Ocean dipoles will become more frequent and severe.
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