Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2019 13:13:57 +0200 (METDST)

Hanoi, Oct 10, 2019 (AFP) - Selfie-snapping tourists railed against the closure of Hanoi's 'train street' on Thursday after police blocked off the Instragram-famous tracks for safety reasons.   The narrow railway corridor in central Hanoi has become a hotspot among visitors seeking the perfect holiday snap on the tracks -- often dodging trains that rumble through daily.    But Hanoi authorities said this week they would block people from the tracks to avoid accidents, and police on Thursday erected barricades to keep out disappointed visitors.    "I'm very frustrated because today I can't go in and take a picture," Malaysian tourist Mustaza bin Mustapha told AFP, vowing to come back later.

Dozens of other tourists were turned away, though some managed to get onto still-open sections of the railway, moving out of the way as an afternoon train chugged past.    Built by former colonial rulers, the railway once shipped goods and people across France's former Indochina colony and remains in use today by communist Vietnam's state-run railway company.    The stretch of the tracks was once known as a rough part of town, occupied by drug users and squatters until their recent discovery by camera-wielding holidaymakers who have splashed images of the area across social media.

Cafe owners complained that business would be hurt thanks to the new regulations, and that tourists always moved out of the way for oncoming trains.   "There has never been any regretful accidents here," said Le Tuan Anh, who runs a cafe from his home along the tracks.   "Compared to traffic density elsewhere in the city, this is much safer," he said, referring to Hanoi's chaotic, motorbike-clogged streets.   New signs were installed in the area Thursday, warning passersby not to take photos or videos in the "dangerous area", much to the chagrin of British tourist Harriet Hayes.   "People come from all over the world to Hanoi just to see the train go past," she told AFP.   "It's such a shame that we come and have been told that we have to leave."
Date: Wed 11 Sep 2019
Source: Saigon Giai Phong [edited]
<http://sggpnews.org.vn/health/four-people-die-of-rare-whitmores-disease-in-north-vietnam-83506.html>

The Hanoi-based Bach Mai Hospital yesterday [Tue 10 Sep 2019] warned of a high possibility of death from rare Whitmore's disease [melioidosis], as the disease re-occurred and killed 4 people in August [2019].

Moreover, the fatal disease infected 12 patients including a woman suffering from a severe abscess on her nose. The case was very rare, and the hospital treated such cases for the 1st time, said Director of the hospitals' Tropical Disease Center Dr. Do Duy Cuong. The patient was misdiagnosed as having sepsis caused by a staphylococcal infection at a local hospital. However, tests from her wound carried out at the center were positive for the Whitmore bacterium, _Burkholderia pseudomallei_.

The doctors had to change the treatment regimen; otherwise the patient could have died, as Dr. Cuong said. After 2 weeks of treatment, her wound had improved. However, she will still be undergoing treatment for at least 3 months under the close watch of doctors to avoid disease recurrence.

Dr. Cuong added that there have been around 20 cases of melioidosis in the past 5 to 10 years, but since the beginning of the year [2019], the center has admitted 20 cases, mostly from the northern and central provinces.

Melioidosis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium _Burkholderia pseudomallei_. that can affect humans or animals. It is predominately a disease of tropical climates, especially in Southeast Asia and northern Australia where it is widespread.

The bacteria causing melioidosis are found in contaminated water and soil. It is spread to humans and animals through direct contact with the contaminated source. Patients developing the disease may die without proper treatment.  [Byline: Minh Khang - Translated by Uyen Phuong]
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[Melioidosis is a disease of the rainy season in its endemic areas. It mainly affects people who have direct contact with soil and water. Many have an underlying predisposing condition such as diabetes (most common risk factor), renal disease, cirrhosis, thalassemia, alcohol dependence, immunosuppressive therapy, chronic obstructive lung disease, cystic fibrosis, and excess kava consumption (kava is an herbal member of the pepper family that can be associated with chronic liver disease).

Melioidosis may present at any age but peaks in the 4th and 5th decades of life, affecting men more than women. In addition, although severe fulminating infection can and does occur in healthy individuals, severe disease and fatalities are much less common in those without risk factors.

The most commonly recognized presentation of melioidosis is pneumonia, associated with high fever, significant muscle aches, and chest pain, and -- although the cough can be nonproductive -- respiratory secretions can be purulent, significant in quantity, and associated with on-and-off bright red blood. The lung infection can be rapidly fatal -- with bacteremia and shock -- or somewhat more indolent.

Acute melioidosis septicemia is the most severe complication of the infection. It presents as a typical sepsis syndrome with hypotension, high cardiac output, and low systemic vascular resistance. In many cases, a primary focus in the soft tissues or lung can be found. The syndrome, usually in patients with risk factor comorbidities, is characteristically associated with multiple abscesses involving the cutaneous tissues, lung, liver, and spleen, and a very high mortality rate of 80-95%. With prompt optimal therapy, the case fatality rate can be decreased to 40-50%.

The melioidosis bacillus is intrinsically insensitive to many antimicrobials, and in fact bioterrorism strains may be engineered to be even more resistant. _Burkholderia pseudomallei_ is usually inhibited by tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), antipseudomonal penicillins, carbapenems, ceftazidime, and amoxicillin/clavulanate or ampicillin/sulbactam. Ceftriaxone and cefotaxime have good in vitro activity but poor efficacy; and cefepime did not appear, as well, to be equivalent to ceftazidime in a mouse model. The unusual antimicrobial profile of resistance to colistin and polymyxin B and the aminoglycosides but sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanate is a useful tool to consider in treatment of infection with the organism.

The randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing melioidosis treatment have been reviewed, and it was found that the formerly standard therapy of chloramphenicol, doxycycline, and SXT combination had a higher mortality rate than therapy with ceftazidime, imipenem/cilastatin, or amoxicillin/clavulanate (or ampicillin/sulbactam). The betalactam-betalactamase inhibitor therapy, however, seemed to have a higher failure rate.

Source: Tolaney P, Lutwick LI: Melioidosis. In: Lutwick LI, Lutwick SM (eds). Bioterror: the Weaponization of Infectious Diseases. Totowa NJ: Humana Press, 2008 pp 145-58. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Vietnam: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/152>]
Date: Fri, 10 May 2019 11:12:19 +0200

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam, May 10, 2019 (AFP) - Most visitors to Vietnam's famed Ha Long Bay opt for cruise views of the UNESCO heritage site but from Friday tourists can hop on a helicopter to see the area's famous karst rock formations from the skies.    Nervous flyers beware.   A pair of five-seater helicopters soared up to 300 metres (1,000 feet) to offer passengers aerial views of the limestone towers, cruise ships and the odd houseboat dotting Ha Long's green waters for the maiden flights on Friday.

Helicopter manufacturer Bell said the trips, which start at $125 for 12 minutes, were aimed at tapping into a growing number of tourists to Vietnam -- many from the world's second biggest economy.    "With the Chinese economy growing, you're seeing more tourists come here," said David Sale, Bell's managing director for Asia-Pacific.

The number of visitors to Vietnam grew nearly 20 percent last year, with one-third of the total coming from its powerful communist neighbour to the north.    Domestic tourism is also booming among Vietnam's fast-growing middle class with expanding appetites -- and budgets -- for travel.   Ha Long Bay is one of the country's top draws, with as many as 500 cruise ships in the bay every day and a newly-opened airport helping to funnel visitors into the area.

But the tourist boom has also prompted environmental concerns in the once-pristine bay in Quang Ninh province, also home to home to rapid industrialisation.    "We're under pressure from the coal industry, the urbanisation process, the arrival of more tourists and the population increase," said Le Minh Tan, deputy director of Quang Ninh's tourism department.    He added that a waste-water management system is set to be rolled out soon to deal with sewage spewed out by cruise ships daily.   "We're launching many programs in the area to ensure the environment of Ha Long is green and clean."
Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 13:43:38 +0200

Hanoi, April 9, 2019 (AFP) - Three divers who helped rescue a Thai football team last year have made a fresh discovery in Vietnam where they explored a tunnel that could expand the footprint of the world's largest cave.   The team was invited to descend into a waterlogged pit in the Son Doong cave in central Vietnam that has never been explored and is believed to connect to nearby chambers.    They were forced back at 77 meters (252 feet) because they did not have enough oxygen to push further, but they think the tunnels could be 120 meters deep.   If the tunnel connects to another cave, it would make Son Doong "easily the largest cave in the world and it would never be overtaken," British cave expert Howard Limbert, who helped organise the dive, said Tuesday at a press conference announcing the find.

The three divers -- Rick Stanton, Jason Mallinson and Chris Jewell -- were part of the daring rescue to save 12 Thai footballers and their coach who were trapped in a cave for eighteen days last year.    Stanton -- who found the boys on a ledge -- said the painstaking task of safely leading the group out of the tunnel alive helped to prepare for the mission in Vietnam.    "Our planning and preparation is without parallel," he said.   The team plans to return to Vietnam next year to try to link the tunnel to another cave near Son Doong, which is so big that it has its own ecosystem and weather patterns.

The cave in central Quang Binh province was first found by a local forager in 1991, but was not re-discovered for another 19 years because its entrance was hidden by thick surrounding jungle.   Only 30 percent of Vietnam's Phong Nha national park -- where Son Doong and a network of adjacent caves are located -- has so far been explored.     Son Doong is the world's largest cave by volume, big enough to house a New York city block -- including 40-storey skyscrapers -- according to Oxalis, which runs tours into the caves. 

Proposed plans to build a cable car in the area have sparked anger among the Vietnamese public who fear it will harm the area's wildlife and pristine views.      An official said Tuesday there were no plans to move ahead with the project despite offers from several companies.   "That is only in theory, in truth, to build a cable car there is no such project yet," the vice chairman of Quang Binh province Tran Thien Dung said Tuesday.       Vietnam's tourism industry is booming among domestic and foreign travellers alike, but the communist country has come under fire for failing to preserve landscapes as it rapidly expands the sector.
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2019 12:21:09 +0100
By Jenny VAUGHAN

Vu Thu, Vietnam, Jan 25, 2019 (AFP) - Tran Huu Hoa was scared, desperate and on the verge of suicide after his leprosy diagnosis in 1958, fearing he'd never work or marry in an age when lepers were completely shunned from Vietnamese society.   He could not imagine he would find new life at the leprosy hospice where he has been living for 61 years, a walled off compound in northern Thai Binh province where he met his wife, worked as a union boss and took in needy children.    "There were about 2,000 people here then, mostly young people. It was fun because we started a teen union," the 80-year-old told AFP, sitting on his bed with his wife Teo of 54 years. 

Today there are only 190 patients at the hospital, all cured but living with disabilities caused by leprosy.    Many walk with prosthetic legs. Others like Hoa have lost fingers. Some are so severely disabled they spend the day bent over in bed, covered with thick blankets to keep the cold at bay.    Founded in 1900, Van Mon is the oldest leprosy hospital in northern Vietnam.    At its peak it treated 4,000 patients a year -- a number that has dwindled as leprosy cases have dropped across Vietnam thanks to improved healthcare, hygiene and greater awareness of the disease.   World Leprosy Day is January 27.

There were 248 people being treated for leprosy in 2017 in Vietnam, down by more than half from a decade earlier, according to data from the World Health Organization.    But as numbers have decreased so have the live-in patients at the Van Mon centre.   Meandering days are punctuated with a morning and midday meal. Some pass the time worshipping at the on-site chapel or pagoda, while most watch TV or listen to the radio during the day when they are not sleeping.    "I have no one to count on, I'm so lonely, so I just follow God. When I die I will follow God then too," said Pham Van Bac, 83, who has been at the centre since 1960. 

His daughter no longer visits and his grandchildren come only once a year, so he has little to look forward to most days, he says.    But many like Bac chose to stay, fearing they will be a burden on their families, or lose the care and small stipend provided at the government-run hospital.   Some, like Hoa, have found companions in the centre.   "It's a source of encouragement and motivation and they can have a happier and better life," said Nguyen Thi Thai, deputy director of the hospital where both her parents were once treated for leprosy.    And even though stigma against leprosy sufferers has largely faded outside the walls of the hospice, many prefer to remain at Van Mon.    Hoa said: "This is my second home, I will live here until my death."
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