Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:36:32 +0200

Khokha, Yemen, April 19, 2019 (AFP) - Oxfam has warned that war-torn Yemen risks a "massive resurgence" of cholera, with around 195,000 suspected cases of the disease recorded so far this year.   "Fears that the world's worst cholera outbreak could be set for a massive resurgence are growing," the relief organisation said Thursday.   It said aid agencies were struggling to reach suspected cases.

In a statement, Oxfam pointed to "fighting and restraints on access, including checkpoints and permit requirements imposed by the warring parties", and warned the coming rainy season was likely to accelerate the spread of the disease.   The water-borne bacterial infection has claimed more than 3,000 lives in Yemen since the outbreak began in 2016, according to Oxfam.

At a medical centre for the displaced in the government-held western town of Khokha, Qassem Suleiman had brought his son Alaa for tests after a serious case of diarrhoea.   Doctor Wadah al-Tiri told AFP that several patients had been transferred to Aden while others had been treated at the Khokha centre.   He said a tent was to be set up for suspected cases.

The doctor said Yemen badly needed international aid to combat the epidemic.   The UN's humanitarian coordination office OCHA said last month that children under the age of five make up nearly a third of this year's cases.   The spike, which comes two years after Yemen suffered its worst cholera outbreak, was concentrated in six governorates including in the Red Sea port of Hodeida and Sanaa province, both combat zones, it said.

Yemen's conflict, which pits Iran-linked rebels against a regional pro-government alliance led by Saudi Arabia, has left some 10,000 people dead since 2015 and pushed millions to the brink of famine.   Aid groups say the actual death toll could be five times as high.    The war has created the perfect environment for cholera to thrive, as civilians across the country lack access to clean water and health care.
Date: Fri 5 Apr 2019
Source: Associated Press [edited]
<https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/cholera-is-surging-once-again-in-war-ravaged-yemen/2019/04/05/7f9ac268-57aa-11e9-aa83-504f086bf5d6_story.html?utm_term=.114291b18a97>

Cholera is surging once again in Yemen, with the UN reporting that the number of suspected cases has doubled in March 2019 over previous months and doctors in overwhelmed health facilities fearing it could rival a 2017 outbreak that spiraled into the world's worst flare-up. The surge underscores how Yemen, which has endured multiple outbreaks of cholera amid 4 years of civil war, still isn't able to stop its spread.

At al-Sabeen Hospital in the capital of Sanaa, beds are full and patients sleep in tents in a courtyard. Some of them wait for treatment by lying on cardboard under trees, with IVs dangling from the branches. "We receive cases around the clock. Sometimes 3 to 4 cases a minute," said Dr. Ismail al-Mansouri. "The hospital is under heavy pressure, as it receives patients from across the country." Even the doctors are not immune: al-Mansouri and several other staff have caught cholera. On 28 Mar 2019, one of their colleagues, a well-loved pediatrician, died of the disease.

Two other outbreaks since 2016 caused more than 1.4 million suspected cases and killed more than 3000 people. Most of those stemmed from an outbreak that began in April 2017 and grew into the world's biggest. The spread has slowed since late 2018, although it never stopped. Now, seasonal rains that began earlier than usual in 2019 have caused a spike in the disease.

There were 76,152 new suspected cases and 195 deaths in March 2019, compared with about 32,000 cases in February 2019 and 39 000 in January 2019. The March toll brought the number of those believed to have died from cholera this year [2019] to nearly 300. The rates in March 2019 are comparable with the 1st weeks of 2017, when cases jumped to 10 000 and 20 000 a week. It accelerated to 50 000 a week at its height and went on to infect more than 1 million people before waning in mid-2018. "The outbreak this year [2019] is much worse and the situation is very dangerous," said Adel al-Alamni, head of the cholera treatment center at al-Sabeen.

In a statement last week, the WHO said it was "doing everything possible to avoid the 2017 scenario." But it noted it faces restrictions on access and "bureaucratic hurdles" to bringing in supplies. Speaking to the Associated Press on Fri 5 Apr 2019, WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier said rates of cholera fatality overall this year are still lower than in 2017, but the situation is exacerbated because of the early rains and because "infrastructure is more destroyed than it used to be."

Cholera is spread primarily by water and food tainted with faeces. It usually can be treated if caught early, but it can kill swiftly by dehydrating its victims through vomiting and severe diarrhea. The destruction wreaked by Yemen's civil war has created prime conditions for cholera's spread. The conflict is between Shiite rebels known as Houthis who control the northern part of the country and a Saudi-led coalition backing the internationally recognized government, based in the south.

Fighting and airstrikes have damaged sewage systems and water stations. Most people don't have access to clean water, particularly the more than 3 million driven from their homes by the war. The main water treatment facility outside Sanaa has broken down. Sewage water is often used to irrigate fields, potentially infecting food supplies, and it leaks into wells, the main source of water. Health services and trash collection have further broken down because about 1 million government employees have largely gone unpaid since the Central Bank was moved in 2016 from Houthi-controlled Sanaa to the southern city of Aden. Nearly half the prewar health facilities are no longer working, often because they were damaged by airstrikes.

The cholera adds to what is already the world's worst humanitarian crisis. Nearly two-thirds of Yemen's 23 million people are in need of some sort of aid and possibly tens of thousands have died of malnutrition, preventable diseases and epidemics. The surge in cholera has been centered in districts around Sanaa and other parts of the north. The relief agencies Doctors Without Borders and Save the Children warned last week of an "alarming spike" with 1000 children infected with suspected cholera every day.

Most of the patients at al-Sabeen Hospital are children under 10 years of age, al-Mansouri said. Among the most recent deaths were 2 pregnant women, along with their unborn babies. Among the dead was al-Mansouri's colleague who had treated children during the recent waves of cholera. His colleagues and family believe he was infected as he did his morning rounds, checking the dozens of patients in his care, before having breakfast at the hospital cafe. He died of kidney failure, a common complication from cholera.

Health workers dealing with cholera patients have not received vaccinations, al-Mansouri said, noting doctors are left without protection. Infection control in health facilities is almost nonexistent because of the lack of resources, making staff vulnerable, he said. Hardly anyone in Yemen has been vaccinated against cholera. UN officials have said agencies largely have been unable to bring in vaccines because of the difficulty in delivering them amid the conflict. The only vaccination campaign so far took place in a few districts in 2018 and covered 400,000 people.  [Byline: Ahmed Al-Haj]
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[The numbers reported in this continuing catastrophe are difficult to wrap one's head around. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Yemen: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/126>]
Wednesday 27th March 2019
http://www.emro.who.int/yem/yemen-news/two-years-since-world-largest-outbreak-of-acute-watery-diarrhoea-and-cholera-yemen-witnessing-another-sharp-increase-in-reported-cases-with-number-of-deaths-continuing-to-increase.html

Two years since world-largest outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea and cholera, Yemen witnessing another sharp increase in reported cases with number of deaths continuing to increase
From Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF Regional Director in the Middle East and North Africa and Dr Ahmed Al Mandhari, WHO Regional Director for the Eastern Mediterranean

MUSCAT / AMMAN / CAIRO, 26 March 2019 – “In Yemen, since the beginning of the year until 17 March, nearly 109 000 cases of severe acute watery diarrhoea and suspected cholera were reported with 190 total associated deaths since January. Nearly one third of the reported cases are children under the age of 5. This comes 2 years since Yemen witnessed the world-largest outbreak when more than 1 million cases were reported.

“We fear that the number of suspected cholera cases will continue to increase with the early arrival of the rainy season and as basic services, including lifesaving water systems and networks have collapsed. The situation is exacerbated by the poor status of sewage disposal systems, the use of contaminated water for agriculture, unreliable electricity to store food and families’ displacement as they flee escalating violence especially in Hudaydah and Tai’z.

“Our teams in Yemen are working day and night with a wide network of local partners to respond and stop the further spread and transmission of the diseases. Focusing on 147 priority districts, additional health, water, hygiene and sanitation supplies are being mobilized. Rapid response teams have been deployed. A total of 413 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration centres are operational in all 147 priority districts. Partners are repairing water and sanitation systems. In the past weeks, we scaled up chlorination activities to disinfect water in 95 priority districts and provided fuel and spare parts to keep going water supply and sanitation networks. A round of oral cholera vaccine campaign reached over 400 000 people in several districts. Meanwhile, community-based awareness raising reached 600 000 people in house-to-house campaigns since early 2019 to provide families with hygiene practices and improve reporting symptoms and seeking treatment.

“UNICEF and WHO are committed to continue scaling up the response to assist immediately the people affected and to prevent the disease from spreading further. We are doing everything possible to avoid the 2017 scenario including the timely use of proven effective measures, including oral cholera vaccination. However, we face several challenges, including the intensification of fighting, access restrictions and bureaucratic hurdles to bring lifesaving supplies and personnel to Yemen.

“UNICEF and WHO are calling to lift all restrictions on our humanitarian operations to respond to the spread of the disease and other areas. Our humanitarian teams must have full access to reach every child, every woman, every man in need of medical and other humanitarian assistance.

“Above all, we jointly reiterate the calls for the fighting to end. It is time for the 4-year long war to come to an end. If not, Yemen will continue to be trapped in a web of diseases, malice and sink deeper in endless humanitarian disasters, with the most vulnerable paying the highest price.

For further information, please contact:

Inas Hamam
Mobile: +2 01000 157 385
E-mail: hamami@who.int

Tarik Jašarević
Mobile: +41 793 676 214
E-mail:  jasarevict@who.int
Date: Mon 25 Mar 2019
Source: AFP [edited]
<http://www.france24.com/en/20190325-suspected-cholera-cases-spikes-yemen-2019-un>

Cholera is a waterborne disease which is endemic to Yemen, and the war-torn country witnessed its worst outbreak in its modern history in 2017. Nearly 110,000 suspected cases of cholera have been reported in war-hit Yemen since the beginning of January 2019, including 190 related deaths, the UN said on Mon 25 Mar 2019.

The UN office for humanitarian affairs (OCHA) said children under the age of 5 make up nearly 1/3rd of 108 889 cases which were reported between 1 Jan 2019 and 17 Mar 2019. OCHA said the spike, which comes 2 years after Yemen suffered its worst cholera outbreak, was concentrated in 6 governorates including in the Red Sea port of Hodeida and the Sanaa province home to the capital.  Early rains could be blamed for the recent increase in suspected cholera cases, it said. "The situation is exacerbated by poor maintenance of sewage disposal systems in many of the affected districts, the use of contaminated water for irrigation, and population movements," OCHA added.

Yemen's brutal conflict, which pits Iran-linked rebels against a regional pro-government alliance led by Saudi Arabia, has left some 10 000 people dead since 2015 and pushed millions to the brink of famine. The war has created the perfect environment for cholera to thrive, as civilians across the country lack access to clean water and health care.
=====================
[This horrific outbreak of cholera has persisted since 2017, but usually the early months of the year have been relatively spared.  Reporting almost 110 000 cases in about 11 weeks suggests that as time goes on, many more cases will occur.  The low case fatality rate overall suggests that although cholera has been documented, the outbreak may be caused by a variety of gastrointestinal pathogens. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Yemen: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/126>]
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2019 11:52:43 +0100

Sanaa, March 25, 2019 (AFP) - Nearly 110,000 suspected cases of cholera have been reported in war-hit Yemen since the beginning of January, including 190 related deaths, the UN said on Monday.   The UN office for humanitarian affairs (OCHA) said children under the age of five make up nearly a third of 108,889 cases which were reported between January 1 and March 17.

OCHA said the spike, which comes two years after Yemen suffered its worst cholera outbreak, was concentrated in six governorates including in the Red Sea port of Hodeida and the Sanaa province home to the capital.   Early rains could be blamed for the recent increase in suspected cholera cases, it said.   "The situation is exacerbated by poor maintenance of sewage disposal systems in many of the affected districts, the use of contaminated water for irrigation, and population movements," OCHA added.   The waterborne disease is endemic to Yemen, which witnessed the worst cholera outbreak in its modern history in 2017.

More than one million suspected cases were reported within an eight-month period that year. More than 2,500 people died of the infection between April and December 2017.    Yemen's brutal conflict, which pits Iran-linked rebels against a regional pro-government alliance led by Saudi Arabia, has left some 10,000 people dead since 2015 and pushed millions to the brink of famine.    The war has created the perfect environment for cholera to thrive, as civilians across the country lack access to clean water and health care.
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