Date: Sat 6 Jul 2019
From: Johannes Jochum <j.jochum@uke.de> [edited]

A 19-year-old German woman was diagnosed with East African trypanosomiasis (due to _Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense_) during a stay in Zambia.

The patient had been working since August 2018 in a school project close to Kabwe. From 29 May to 4 Jun [2019] she visited South Luangwa National Park. On 31 May [2019], she received a mildly painful insect bite on her calf during an afternoon game-viewing drive from Kafunta River Lodge.

She recalled seeing numerous tsetse flies during this drive but was told there had not been any cases of trypanosomiasis for years in this area. The bite initially healed well and she returned to Kabwe.

On the evening of 11 Jun [2019], she developed high fever, rigors, and severe headache. The site of the insect bite on her calf was swollen and showed livid discoloration. Several point-of-care tests for malaria were negative.

Antibiotic treatment at a local hospital led to no improvement of her symptoms. On 16 Jun [2019] she was admitted to Lusaka Coptic Hospital where African trypanosomiasis was diagnosed by blood microscopy. Central nervous system involvement was ruled out by spinal tap, and treatment with suramin was started on 17 Jun [2019]. The patient returned in stable condition to Germany on 2 Jul [2019] where she sought further treatment and follow-up at our institution.

South Luangwa National Park is known to be endemic for East African trypanosomiasis with several cases in recent years; the most recent report in ProMED-mail is in March 2019:  <http://www.promedmail.org/post/http://promedmail.org/post/20190320.6377064>.

Game animals and livestock are the main reservoir of this zoonotic disease in south-eastern Africa. Tourists acquire the disease occasionally during game safaris in Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Uganda, and Tanzania. West African trypanosomiasis (_Trypanosoma brucei gambiense_) accounts for substantially more cases in total, affecting local populations mostly in remote rural areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Central African Republic  (<https://www.who.int/trypanosomiasis_african/country/en/>).
---------------------------------------------
Communicated by:
Dr. Johannes Jochum
Department of Tropical Medicine
Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine
Department of Medicine
University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Hamburg, Germany
j.jochum@uke.de
==========================
[This is the website of the national park:
<https://www.southluangwa.com/>.

Trypanosomiasis is endemic in the national parks in southern Africa, where there are tsetse flies and a reservoir of the trypanosomes in the wildlife. It is important to consider trypanosomiasis in febrile travellers to these national parks with negative tests for malaria. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Zambia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/170>]
Date: Tue 14 May 2019
Source: Lusaka Times [edited]
<https://www.lusakatimes.com/2019/05/14/17-admitted-suspected-cholera-cases/>

Government has revealed that about 17 people are admitted to Mpulungu urban clinic for suspected cholera. Mpulungu District Commissioner Dennis Sikazwe has confirmed the development to ZANIS [Zambia News and Information Services] in Mpulungu today [14 May 2019].

Mr. Sikazwe said the Ministry of Health has since recommended that schools be closed for the period of one week to ensure that the situation is contained. He added that all operations of ferrying people from Mpulungu to Nsumbu in Nsama district by boats has been suspended for the period of one week. Mr. Sikazwe has also revealed that the ministry has put up measures to sensitize people on the need to maintain high levels of hygiene during this period.

The District Commissioner has also urged people to work with the medical staff at the health facility in order to control a further spread of the disease. He has also urged people to report all suspected cholera cases to the nearest health centres.

In Mbala, 5 people have been admitted at Tulemane clinic for suspected cholera. Sources from Tulemane clinic, who sought anonymity, confirmed the development to ZANIS in Mbala yesterday [13 May 2019]. Mbala District Commissioner Kedrick Sikombe, who could not confirm the matter, has promised to give a detailed report once he gets details from the Ministry of Health in the area.
==================
[The mortality from cholera and most diarrheal illnesses is related to non-replacement of fluid and electrolytes from the diarrheal illness.

As stated by Lutwick and colleagues (Lutwick LI, Preis J, Choi P. Cholera. In Chronic illness and disability: the paediatric gastrointestinal tract. Greydanus DE, Atay O, Merrick J, editors. New York: Nova Bioscience; 2018:113-127), oral rehydration therapy can be life-saving in outbreaks of cholera and other forms of diarrhoea: "As reviewed by Richard Guerrant et al. (1), it was in 1831 that cholera treatment could be accomplished by intravenous replacement, and, although this therapy could produce dramatic improvements, not until 1960 was it 1st recognized that there was no true destruction of the intestinal mucosa, and gastrointestinal rehydration therapy could be effective, and the therapy could dramatically reduce the intravenous needs for rehydration. Indeed, that this rehydration could be just as effective given orally as through an orogastric tube (for example, refs 2 and 3) made it possible for oral rehydration therapy (ORT) to be used in rural remote areas and truly impact the morbidity and mortality of cholera. Indeed, Guerrant et al. (1) highlight the use of oral glucose-salt packets in war-torn Bangladeshi refugees, which reduced the mortality rate from 30% to 3.6% (4) and quotes sources referring to ORT as "potentially the most important medical advance" of the 20th century. A variety of formulations of ORT exist, generally glucose or rice powder-based, which contain a variety of micronutrients, especially zinc (5).

"The assessment of the degree of volume loss in those with diarrhoea to approximate volume and fluid losses can be found in ref 6 below. Those with severe hypovolemia should be initially rehydrated intravenously with a fluid bolus of normal saline or Ringer's lactate solution of 20-30 mL/kg followed by 100 mL/kg in the 1st 4 hours and 100 mL/kg over the next 18 hours with regular reassessment. Those with lesser degrees of hypovolemia can be rehydrated orally with a glucose or rice-derived formula with up to 4 L [4.2 qt] in the 1st 4 hours, and those with no hypovolemia can be given ORT after each liquid stool with frequent reevaluation."

References
1. Guerrant RL, Carneiro-Filho BA, Dillingham RA: Cholera, diarrhoea, and oral rehydration therapy: triumph and indictment. Clin Infect Dis 2003;37(3):398-405; available at <http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/3/398.long>.
2. Gregorio GV, Gonzales ML, Dans LF, Martinez EG: Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009;(2):CD006519; available at <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD006519.pub3/full>.
3. Gore SM, Fontaine O, Pierce NF: Impact of rice based oral rehydration solution on stool output and duration of diarrhoea: meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials. BMJ 1992;304(6822):287-291; available at <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1881081/>.
4. Mahalanabis D, Choudhuri AB, Bagchi NG, et al: Oral fluid therapy of cholera among Bangladesh refugees. Johns Hopkins Med 1973;132(4):197-205; available at <http://www.searo.who.int/publications/journals/seajph/media/2012/seajph_v1n1/whoseajphv1i1p105.pdf>.
5. Atia AN, Buchman AL: Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review. Am J Gastroenterol 2009;104(10):2596-2604; abstract available at <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19550407>.
6. WHO. The treatment of diarrhea, a manual for physicians and other senior health workers. 4th ed. 2005; available at <http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2005/9241593180.pdf>. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Zambia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/170>]
Date: Wed 20 Mar 2019
From: Lucille Blumberg, John Frean, Evan Shoul <lucilleb@nicd.ac.za>,
<johnf@nicd.ac.za>, <evan.shoul@gmail.com> [edited]

A game hunter working in an area close to the South Luangwa National Park, Zambia has been admitted to a Johannesburg hospital with laboratory confirmed East African trypanosomiasis (EAT) [_Trypanosoma rhodesiense_] following an acute febrile illness.

He has a typical trypanosomal chancre on the dorsum of his hand, and a scanty parasitaemia was noted on a Giemsa- stained blood smear in Lusaka and Johannesburg laboratories.

On admission, he was moderately hypotensive with a tachycardia, had a mild acidosis, but no definite myocarditis, no ARDS, or clinical CNS pathology. He had a profound leucopaenia (WBC: 1.5) and thrombocytopenia (but no bleeding), moderately deranged hepatic transaminases (chronic hepatitis B infection) but normal renal function.

Suramin treatment was commenced promptly after admission. A CSF examination will be carried out later this week once the peripheral parasitaemia has cleared and the thrombocytopaenia has improved.

This is the 3rd case of EAT admitted to the unit in the past 4 months, one person working in game park, Malawi reserve (fatal case) and one person working in a game management area close to the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia.
-----------------------------------------------
Prof Lucille Blumberg
John Frean
Centre for Emerging Zoonotic and Parasitic Diseases
GeoSentinal Site
National Institute for Communicable Diseases
Johannesburg, South Africa
<lucilleb@nicd.ac.za>
<johnf@nicd.ac.za>
and
Dr Evan Shoul
Infectious Diseases Specialist
Johannesburg, South Africa
evan.shoul@gmail.com
===========================
[ProMED thanks Lucille Blumberg, John Frean, and Evan Shoul for this report.

The South Luangwa National Park is in eastern Zambia, the southernmost of 3 national parks in the valley of the Luangwa River (see map at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Luangwa_National_Park>).  African trypanosomiasis is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in wild game animals and is a risk throughout game parks in Africa including Zambia. More information can be found on the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) website on African trypanosomiasis: <http://www.fao.org/paat/en/>.
The case story presented here shows that trypanosomiasis is a differential diagnosis to malaria and indeed haemorrhagic fever in endemic areas. Thus, such patients with a negative malaria blood film should be suspected and investigated for trypanosomiasis, also called African sleeping sickness. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
South Africa: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/179>
Zambia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/170>]
Date: Sat 29 Dec 2018
Source: Zambia Daily Mail Limited [edited]
<http://www.daily-mail.co.zm/fake-health-certificates-scam-exposed/>

Fake World Health Organisation (WHO) yellow fever certificates of vaccination are being openly sold at Inter-City Bus Terminus in Lusaka to travellers who cannot afford to pay K450 [about USD 38] to get vaccinated.

Because of the high cost of the vaccine, some travellers prefer acquiring the certificate from the bus terminus, where one can easily get the medical document for K50 [about USD 4].

Yellow fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The "yellow" in the name of the ailment refers to the jaundice (yellowing of skin) that affects some patients.

Under the guise of a traveller, this reporter managed to easily buy the document at Inter-City Bus Terminus by simply asking where one can buy the yellow fever certificate.  [Byline: Caroline Kalombe]
=====================
[The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared Zambia a yellow fever (YF) free zone. The WHO found from scientific research that Zambia had reduced cases of yellow fever. The Tourism Council of Zambia (TCZ) indicated that the long-awaited WHO decision would significantly increase international tourist arrivals. The South Africa requirements for proof of vaccination status had led to the sale of fake YF vaccination cards in Zambia and Zimbabwe. The change in South African requirements should end this illegal and unfortunate practice, but apparently it has not. In the absence of internal risk of YF within Zambia, the motive for sale of YF vaccination cards presumably is economic on the part of travelers that may be going to countries where there is a risk of infection and evidence of vaccination may be required for entry.  Fake yellow fever (YF) vaccination cards have been a recurring problem in several African countries in the recent past. The sale of fake yellow fever vaccination cards to individuals who did not receive the vaccine presents a serious public health problem inside and outside of Zambia. An unvaccinated, viremic individual with a fake card who becomes infected outside Zambia could carry YF virus to localities in the country where vector mosquitoes are present and initiate an outbreak of this serious disease.
One wonders, if the practice of issuance of fake YF cards continues, whether countries that are currently YF-free but are most at risk of ongoing transmission should the virus be introduced, in Central and North America, South and South East Asia, will deny visas to or admittance of individuals coming from Zambia unless they can prove that their cards are legitimate. The Zambian government authorities should put a stop to these practices immediately. - ProMED Mod.TY]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Zambia:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/3090>]
Date: Mon 24 Dec 2018
From: Lucille Blumberg <lucilleb@nicd.ac.za> [edited]

East African trypanosomiasis [EAT] has been confirmed in 2 patients admitted to a Johannesburg Hospital over the past week. Both presented with acute febrile illness, and progression of illness to multi-system involvement prompted medical evacuation. Both patients required admission to a critical care unit for supportive care and suramin therapy.

Patient 1 is a 24-year-old working in the Luauno Game Management Area, adjoining the northern boundary of the Lower Zambezi Game Park, Zambia. He self-tested for malaria (negative RDT) after developing a fever, and travelled to Lusaka, the capital, after no response to empiric malaria treatment. He had a typical trypanosomal chancre.

The diagnosis of EAT was promptly confirmed on a peripheral smear; suramin was commenced, and medical evacuation to South Africa was arranged for management of complications of EAT. These included profound thrombocytopaenia but no bleeding, raised transaminases 3 times normal, ARDS requiring nasal oxygen, and some initial confusion. This patient has responded very well to treatment, including diureses, platelet transfusion, and suramin. An examination of the cerebrospinal fluid will be performed to exclude CNS involvement.

Patient 2 is a 24-year-old from the United Kingdom working as a volunteer on an elephant census project in the Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. He developed an acute febrile illness and was seen at a number of clinics over several days; malaria tests were reported as negative. He was treated with antibiotics but deteriorated and was transferred in a critical condition with liver failure (transaminases 100 times normal value), shock (but no myocarditis), encephalopathy, severe lactic acidosis, lower lobe pneumonia and ARDS, DIC with bleeding, and renal failure. He had a typical trypanosomal chancre. The diagnosis was confirmed on a peripheral blood smear.

The intense parasitaemia initially seen on admission reduced significantly in response to initial suramin therapy. Despite ventilatory and inotropic support, dialysis, platelet and clotting factor replacement, the patient's condition has continued to deteriorate. Liver failure, possibly as a result of a period of severe hypotension prior to admission, would seem to be the major problem.

While malaria is still the most important infection to consider, trypanosomiasis must be considered urgently in the differential diagnosis of persons presenting with progressive, acute febrile illness in persons living, working or travelling to trypanosomiasis-endemic areas.

A history of tsetse bites, the presence of a skin lesion -- the trypanasomal chancre (often misdiagnosed as an eschar of African tick bite fever, a spider bite, or cellulitis) -- and negative malaria RDTs should strongly suggest a diagnosis of EAT.

The diagnosis can be confirmed on a peripheral blood smear, but this may not always be performed in the setting where the patient is 1st seen, and repeat smears may be required. While the disease is uncommon, early consideration for its diagnosis is critical, as rapid progression to complicated disease is typical, and patients require urgent treatment with suramin and supportive care. WHO-supplied stocks of suramin are available in Johannesburg, South Africa; Harare, Zimbabwe; and Lusaka, Zambia.
--------------------------------------------
Lucille Blumberg, John Frean and Evan Shoul
National Institute for Communicable Diseases
GeoSentinal Site
Johannesburg, South Africa
lucilleb@nicd.ac.za
=========================
[ProMED thanks Dr Lucille Blumberg, John Frean and Evan Shoul for informing us about these cases.

African trypanosomiasis is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in wild game animals and is a risk throughout game parks in Africa. More information can be found on the FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) website on African trypanosomiasis: <http://www.fao.org/paat/en/>.

The cases presented here show how urgent the development of the clinical disease can be and emphasize that persons with an exposure in a trypanosomiasis-endemic area with a negative malaria test should be considered to have trypanosomiasis. - ProMED Mod.EP]

[HealthMap/ProMED maps available at:
South Africa: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/179>
Zambia: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/170>
Malawi: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/176>]
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