Date: Tue, 3 Sep 2019 12:05:34 +0200 (METDST)

Harare, Sept 3, 2019 (AFP) - Hundreds of doctors in public hospitals across Zimbabwe went on strike on Tuesday demanding their salaries be pegged to the US dollar in the face of spiralling living costs.   "We are not in the wards, we are not at the hospitals. We simply do not have the means, we are incapacitated," Peter Magombeyi, president of the Zimbabwe Hospital Doctors Association, told AFP by phone.   Salaries are fast losing value as the southern African country battles a currency crisis and triple-digit inflation.

A junior doctor's monthly salary in the Zimbabwe currency is now equivalent to around $100, Magombeyi said.   "We don't have money for transport, we don't have money for food, we don't have money to pay our kids schools fees, we don't have rental and we can't keep on subsidising the employer anymore."   Talks with the government on Monday failed to yield any solution.   "We were called to a meeting yesterday and they don't have any solid answer, they didn't give a position which addresses our concerns," said Magombeyi.   The doctors want salaries to be pegged to the prevailing foreign exchange interbank rates.

This is the second time in less than a year that government doctors have embarked on a work stoppage.    They went on strike in December over salaries and conditions, and only called it off after 40 days on promises to resolve their grievances.   State hospitals cater for the majority of Zimbabweans who cannot afford private care while wealthier patients, including top politicians, fly out to neighbouring South Africa and even beyond to Asian countries for medical attention.

Zimbabwe's health system has collapsed in recent decades as the economy tanked, with  shortages of basics like cash, fuel, bread and medicines and surging prices when the goods are available.   President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who took over from long-time ruler Robert Mugabe and won a disputed election in July last year, pledged to revamp the already ailing economy.   But the country has seen growing strikes and protests as the economy continues to falter.
Date: Sat 27 Jul 2019
Source: Outbreak News Today [edited]
<http://outbreaknewstoday.com/zimbabwe-more-than-850-typhoid-cases-reported-in-harare-62367/>

Officials in the capital city of Zimbabwe, Harare, report seeing 858 new typhoid cases in the last 6 months, with the suburbs of Glen View and Budiriro hit the hardest according to a report in The Herald. No deaths have been recorded.

The reason for the outbreak is failure to constantly supply clean water and delays in attending to sewer bursts or leakages, local authorities state. Harare Town Clerk Engineer Hosiah Chisango said: "The drivers for water-borne diseases (cholera and typhoid) have been water cuts or availability of municipal water, contaminated water, sewer bursts or leakages, use of shallow wells, illegal vending of cooked food, attending gatherings during an outbreak, poor hygiene practices, and household contact to a case."

Typhoid fever is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the bacterium _Salmonella_ Typhi. _Salmonella_ Typhi lives only in humans. Persons with typhoid fever carry the bacteria in their bloodstream and intestinal tract. In addition, a small number of persons, called carriers, recover from typhoid fever but continue to carry the bacteria. Both ill persons and carriers shed _S._ Typhi in their faeces.

You can get typhoid fever if you eat food or drink beverages that have been handled by a person who is shedding _S._ Typhi or if sewage contaminated with _S._ Typhi bacteria get into the water you use for drinking or washing food. Therefore, typhoid fever is more common in areas of the world where handwashing is less frequent and where water is likely to be contaminated with sewage.

Typhoid fever can be successfully treated with appropriate antimicrobials, and persons given antimicrobials usually begin to feel better within 2 to 3 days.
====================
[Typhoid fever, so-called enteric fever caused by _Salmonella enterica_ serotype Typhi, has a totally different presentation from that of the more common kinds of salmonellosis. Epidemiologically, usually spread by contaminated food or water, typhoid is not a zoonosis like the more commonly seen types of salmonellosis. Clinically, vomiting and diarrhoea are typically absent; indeed, constipation is frequently reported. As it is a systemic illness, blood cultures are at least as likely to be positive as stool in enteric fever, particularly early in the course of the infection, and bone marrow cultures may be the most sensitive.

The symptoms of classical typhoid fever typically include fever; anorexia; lethargy; malaise; dull, continuous headache; non-productive cough; vague abdominal pain; and constipation. Despite the (often high) fever, the pulse is often only slightly elevated. During the 2nd week of the illness, there is protracted fever and mental dullness, classically called coma vigil. Diarrhoea may develop but usually does not. Many patients develop hepatosplenomegaly (both liver and spleen enlarged). After the 1st week or so, many cases develop a maculopapular rash on the upper abdomen. These lesions ("rose spots") are about 2 cm (0.78 inch) in diameter and blanch on pressure. They persist for 2-4 days and may come and go. Mild and atypical infections are common.

The word typhoid (as in typhus-like) reflects the similarity of the louse-borne rickettsial disease epidemic typhus and that of typhoid fever; in fact, in some areas, typhoid fever is still referred to as abdominal typhus. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map of Zimbabwe:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/46291>]
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2019 18:30:12 +0200

Harare, July 1, 2019 (AFP) - Zimbabwe's passport-issuing service has ground to a halt, officials said Monday, leaving many citizens trapped in the country as its economic crisis worsens.   Applicants for new or renewed passports face an indefinite wait as the government does not have the foreign currency to pay for special imported paper, ink and other raw materials.

Officials at the Registrar General Office told AFP that even if citizens want to pay for an urgent application for a passport, they face a minimum wait of 18 months before they can even submit their papers.   "Last month, the urgent applicants were being told to come back at the end of 2020," said one official who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.   She added that non-urgent applicants were told that no date was available for when they can apply.

Millions of Zimbabweans have fled abroad in the last 20 years seeking work as hyperinflation wiped out savings and the formal employment sector collapsed.   Many others are now seeking to leave as conditions worsen under President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who had promised an economic revival after he succeeding long-ruling Robert Mugabe in 2017.

Official inflation is at nearly 100 percent -- the highest since hyperinflation forced the government to abandon the Zimbabwe dollar in 2009 -- while supplies of essentials such as bread, medicine and petrol regularly run short.   Power cuts often last 19 hours a day.   Isheanesu Mpofu, a 23-year-old unemployed university graduate, applied for a passport last November but is still waiting.   "I went back early June to check on it, and was told to check again in August," Mpofu said, adding he wanted to visit his family abroad.   "Besides, it is my right to have a passport so I can travel whenever I want to," he said.

Mnangagwa addressed the problem last month, saying a dispute with the printers over unpaid bills meant that a state-owned company would take over the job.   "They said they will not print any more passports because of legacy debts," he said, claiming the money had now been paid.   A passport office official told AFP that only ten passports were being printed each day despite a reported backlog of 280,000.   "We have the capacity to clear the backlog in a very short time but all the machinery is lying idle right now," she said.   Registrar General Clement Masango told AFP that he had no comment to add to the president's remarks.
Date: Tue 21 May 2019
Source: ZBC (Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation) [edited]
<http://www.zbc.co.zw/anthrax-contained-in-the-zambezi-Valley/>

The Zambezi Parks & Wildlife Management Authority (Zimparks) says it has managed to contain the anthrax outbreak in the Zambezi Valley which claimed 6 elephants, 3 buffalo, a lion and an impala. Zimparks, which has been working together with other stakeholders following the outbreak of anthrax in Zambezi Valley, confirmed that the infectious disease has now been brought under control.

Zimparks Public Relations Manager, Mr. Tinashe Farawo said the authority is pleased to have contained the disease, adding that measures are being put in place to strengthen surveillance mechanisms. "We can confirm that we have managed to contain the anthrax diseases in the Zambezi Valley thanks to efforts by our officers and support from private stakeholders," said Mr. Tinashe Farawo.

The disease killed a number of hippos in Binga last year [2018]. Anthrax is usually transmitted by feed and water contaminated with spores, which can lie dormant in the soil for many years. The primary sign of anthrax in grazing animals is sudden death, often with bloody discharges.
=======================
[So far so good, but I must point out that nature is illiterate and does not read the announcements of senior bureaucrats. She does what she does. Hopefully Mr. Farawo is correct but we should wait a couple of weeks at full alert.

Maps of Zimbabwe can be seen at
<http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/zimbabwe.pdf> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/59888>.

For a description of Hwange national park, go to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park>.

Hwange is in the western part of the country bordering Botswana and Zambia
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange>). - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Matabeleland North Province, Zimbabwe:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/833>]
Date: Sun 19 May 2019 00:05 CAT
Source: The Sunday News [edited]
<https://www.sundaynews.co.zw/outbreak-of-anthrax-claims-elephants-buffaloes/>

A suspected outbreak of anthrax has been reported in the Zambezi Valley following the death of 8 elephants, 2 buffaloes, and other animals last week.

The latest outbreak comes barely a year after 20 hippos were found dead in the Zambezi River in Mlibizi, Binga district [Matabeleland North province] after being infected by anthrax.

In an interview on the sidelines of a District Civil Protection Committee meeting in Hwange last week, Hwange District Veterinary Officer Dr Lovemore Dube said several animal carcasses such as elephant, buffalo, impala, hyena were found last week in Matetsi Unit 6 and 7 which lies along the Zambezi Valley.

"Control and prevention are difficult because it's endemic. It's in the soil and we should expect it during the drought season. But on the livestock side we don't have cattle near those areas otherwise we would have vaccinated them. We have an anthrax vaccine but for wildlife it's difficult to vaccinate them, all that we can do is have proper sanitary measures in the disposal of those carcasses. For example by deep burying or burning so that they are not eaten by predators who can spread it. We have received information that eight elephants, two buffaloes, jackal, impala, hyena have died," he said.

He said the drought that the country is experiencing was also worsening the situation.

"We had outbreaks of anthrax 1.5 years ago that resulted in several hippos being affected and died. This anthrax is endemic along the whole Zambezi Valley and because of this drought, the spores are now being exposed to the surface. For example, we had some heavy downpours which lasted 2 days after a prolonged drought which washed away the topsoil and exposed the lower part of the soils where the spores are. The wildlife will be drinking from those pools of water that will be infected with anthrax. We could have lost several wild animals," said Dr Dube He said there were still finding more elephant and other wild animal carcasses in the heavily affected areas of Matetsi Units 6 and 7 in Hwange.

Dr Dube warned members of the public against buying biltong [dried, cured meat] from unknown sources. "The danger of it spreading to humans is there especially if it is consumed, there are bound to be death even in humans taking into account that anthrax affects all warm blooded. We have been carrying out awareness campaigns against buying biltong from unknown sources as some unscrupulous people can harvest meat from some wild animals killed by anthrax."

ZimParks spokesperson Mr Tinashe Farawo said he was still getting details of the latest outbreak.

Anthrax is an infection caused by the bacterium _Bacillus anthracis_. It can occur in 4 forms: skin, lungs, intestinal, and injection. Anthrax is spread by contact with the bacterium's spores, which often appear in infectious animal products.

Anthrax can be found naturally in soil and commonly affects domestic and wild animals around the world. The meeting was meant to give an update on the state of preparedness in response to emergency situations following the killing of a 24-year-old man while fishing at one of the disused mine dams in Hwange.  [Byline: Fairness Moyana]
======================
[Though labelled "suspected" in this report, the frequency of anthrax in the Zambezi valley significantly increases the probability of it being "anthrax" on laboratory confirmation. And the appearance of outbreaks following a rain shower is typical of what we have seen in Texas whitetail deer and other stock. The availability of new grazing after a drought in areas with contaminated soils results in infections, with predictable accuracy by my experienced colleagues in that state.

Maps of Zimbabwe can be seen at
<http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/zimbabwe.pdf> and
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/59888>.

For a description of Hwange national park, go to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange_National_Park>.

Hwange is in the western part of the country bordering Botswana and Zambia
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hwange>). - ProMED Mod.MHJ]
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