Date: Tue 7 May 2019
Source: Pindula [edited]
<https://news.pindula.co.zw/2019/05/07/cholera-kills-sixty-nine-people/>

The Ministry of Health has issued a statement suggesting that 69 people have died nationwide due to cholera in 2019. On a positive note, Bulawayo is reported to have recorded zero casualties. The statement further notes that more than 10 400 cases of the disease were reported during the period January to April 2019. Resultantly, the Ministry of Health embarked on a nationwide cholera vaccine program targeting over one million people. The ministry said "No suspected cases of cholera and deaths were reported during the week ending 14 Apr 2019.This brings the total number of deaths to 69 out of 10,421 cases reported so far in 2019.

In a telephone interview last week[week of 29 Apr 2019], the Director of Epidemiology & Disease Control, Dr Portia Manangazira said that the Ministry was working to curb the cholera epidemic. She revealed that the vaccination program in Manicaland has just been completed while the mass vaccination program for cholera in Harare, Epworth, and Chitungwiza was already yielding results.
=======================
[Maps of Zimbabwe:
<http://www.un.org/Depts/Cartographic/map/profile/zimbabwe.pdf> and <
http://healthmap.org/promed/p/171>]
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 12:17:21 +0100

Geneva, March 21, 2019 (AFP) - The number of people in Zimbabwe affected by a devastating cyclone and flooding has jumped to 200,000, with most of the damage occurring near the Mozambique border, the UN said Thursday.    The initial estimate of those hit in Zimbabwe was 15,000 but World Food Programme (WFP) spokesman Herve Verhoosel told reporters in Geneva that the numbers had surged following an overnight assessment.
Date: Thu 17 Jan 2019
Source: MMWR 2019;68(2):44-45 [edited]
<https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6802a5.htm?s_cid=mm6802a5_w>

Citation: N'cho HS, Masunda KP, Mukeredzi I, et al. Notes from the field: typhoid fever outbreak -- Harare, Zimbabwe, October 2017-February 2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2019;68:44-45. DOI: <http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6802a5>.
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On 16 Oct 2017, the Harare City Health Department (HCHD) in Zimbabwe identified a suspected typhoid fever (typhoid) case in a resident of Harare's Mbare suburb. Typhoid is a potentially fatal illness caused by _Salmonella enterica_ serovar Typhi (Typhi). HCHD initiated an investigation and identified a cluster of 17 suspected typhoid cases, defined as the occurrence of fever and at least one of the following symptoms: headache, malaise, abdominal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhoea, cough, or constipation. A confirmed case had Typhi isolated from blood, stool, or rectal swab culture [1].

As of 24 Feb 2018 (the most recent publicly available data), 3187 suspected and 191 confirmed cases were identified [see figure in source URL above. - Mod.LL], with no reported deaths among confirmed cases. Among suspected cases, 1696 (53%) patients were male, and the median age was 17 years (range, 1 month to 90 years). In addition to clusters in Mbare, clusters were detected in Harare's western suburbs, including Kuwadzana, where high rates of ciprofloxacin-resistant Typhi were identified.

Previous typhoid outbreaks in Harare have been associated with municipal water shortages and increased use of contaminated boreholes and shallow wells [2-5]. In January 2018, the CDC collaborated with HCHD to standardize the collection, analysis, and interpretation of water quality data from wells, boreholes, and municipal taps. HCHD and partners paired this approach with efforts to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) through assessing and repairing boreholes (particularly those with in-line chlorinators in affected areas); attending to burst sewers; conducting water sampling of municipal and borehole water; and educating local residents about typhoid. At the request of HCHD, a CDC team also conducted a review of case management and clinical outcomes among suspected typhoid patients admitted to Harare's designated typhoid treatment center from 1 Oct 2017 through 31 Dec 2017. Among 583 patients admitted with a diagnosis of suspected typhoid, complications occurred in 79 (14%), the most common being acute kidney injury (26), anemia (10), peritonitis (9), and electrolyte abnormalities (9). One patient experienced intestinal perforation, and 5 patients with suspected typhoid died; however, because these cases were not culture-confirmed, they were not reported as typhoid-related deaths. Cultures were processed for 286 (49%) inpatients; 74 (26%) yielded Typhi. In addition, 15 (33%) of 46 isolates from hospitalized patients were ciprofloxacin-resistant. Complication rates were higher (19%) and median illness duration was longer (9 days) among patients with ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates than among those with nonresistant isolates (9%; 7 days), but the differences were not statistically significant.

CDC laboratorians collaborated with Zimbabwe laboratory staff members to design a reporting protocol for laboratory results and ensure that accurate results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing were included in all reports. The standardized collection and analysis of clinical and laboratory information during an outbreak in which an unusual regional antibiotic resistance pattern featured prominently prompted public health officials to recommend 3rd-generation cephalosporins as 1st-line treatment for patients residing in areas with high rates of ciprofloxacin resistance [1].

The combination of poor water quality and sanitation and urban overcrowding continues to be a persistent driver of seasonal outbreaks of waterborne diseases in Harare. Although localized WASH interventions, such as those described here, serve to disrupt local transmission, comprehensive measures will be needed to improve the water treatment and delivery system in Harare. One such measure that was informed by the epidemiologic data is a Gavi-funded vaccination campaign using typhoid conjugate vaccine scheduled for January-February 2019, targeting 350 000 persons; this is the 1st use of typhoid conjugate vaccine and the 1st outbreak response vaccination campaign in Africa. The goal of this effort will be to disrupt transmission, thereby providing time for implementation of sustainable and widespread WASH interventions.

References
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1. World Health Organization. Guidelines for the management of typhoid fever. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2011. <http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/documents/s20994en/s20994en.pdf>
2. Davis WW, Chonzi P, Masunda KPE, et al. Notes from the field: typhoid fever outbreak -- Harare, Zimbabwe, October 2016-March 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018;67:342-343.
3. CDC. Notes from the field: _Salmonella_ Typhi infections associated with contaminated water -- Zimbabwe, October 2011-May 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2012;61:435.
4. Polonsky JA, Martinez-Pino I, Nackers F, et al. Descriptive epidemiology of typhoid fever during an epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2012. PLoS One 2014;9.
5. Muti M, Gombe N, Tshimanga M, et al. Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2011. Pan Afr Med J 2014;18:309.
====================
[Vaccine intervention is an important step, as increasing antimicrobial resistance in the typhoid bacillus has made treatment more difficult.

Typhoid fever, so-called enteric fever caused by _Salmonella enterica_ serotype Typhi, has a totally different presentation from that of the more common kinds of salmonellosis. Epidemiologically, usually spread by contaminated food or water, typhoid is not a zoonosis like the more commonly seen types of salmonellosis. Clinically, vomiting and diarrhea are typically absent; indeed, constipation is frequently reported. As it is a systemic illness, blood cultures are at least as likely to be positive as stool in enteric fever, particularly early in the course of the infection, and bone marrow cultures may be the most sensitive.

The symptoms of classical typhoid fever typically include fever, anorexia, lethargy, malaise, dull continuous headache, non-productive cough, vague abdominal pain, and constipation. Despite the (often high) fever, the pulse is often only slightly elevated. During the 2nd week of the illness, there is protracted fever and mental dullness, classically called coma vigil. Diarrhea may develop but usually does not. Many patients develop hepatosplenomegaly (both liver and spleen enlarged). After the 1st week or so, many cases develop a maculopapular rash on the upper abdomen. These lesions ("rose spots") are about 2 cm (0.78 inch) in diameter and blanch on pressure. They persist for 2 to 4 days and may come and go. Mild and atypical infections are common.

The word typhoid (as in typhus-like) reflects the similarity of the louse-borne rickettsial disease epidemic typhus and that of typhoid fever; in fact, in some areas, typhoid fever is still referred to as abdominal typhus. - ProMED Mod.LL]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Zimbabwe: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/171>]
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2019 18:24:24 +0100
By Fanuel JONGWE

Harare, Jan 15, 2019 (AFP) - Three people have been shot dead and many injured, Zimbabwe's main opposition party said Tuesday, as security forces crack down on protests triggered by a sharp, sudden rise in fuel prices.   The streets of the capital Harare were deserted a day after widespread demonstrations when public anger erupted over the country's worsening economic crisis.   Zimbabwe's mobile phone networks and internet were partially shut down, with one industry source saying the systems had been jammed and many users were complaining of severely limited access.

The government more than doubled petrol prices at the weekend after months of shortages that saw drivers queueing for hours to fill up. Essentials such as bread and medicine have also been scarce.   "The information we have received is that two people were shot dead in Chitungwiza (on the outskirts of Harare) and one person in Kadoma (town)," MDC opposition party spokesman Jacob Mafume told AFP.   "This is needless loss of lives. Many have been injured, some of them seriously." He gave no further details.

Amnesty reported that eight people had died, without giving a source, and criticised "repressive measures" taken by the government to quash the protests.   On Tuesday morning, police fired tear gas in Zimbabwe's second city Bulawayo after protesters chanted for the removal of President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who was on an official visit to Moscow.   An AFP reporter witnessed looting in the city, a stronghold of opposition to the ruling ZANU-PF party.

- 'Police beat me' -
Most shops remained closed in Harare, and minibus taxis that usually transport workers from the suburbs to the city centre were not running.   In the suburb of Kuwadzana, police were on patrol and forcing people off the streets.   One resident, Tawanda Mataya, said police had beaten him and slapped his 17-year-old son.   "It's so painful," Mataya told AFP showing swellings on his back.   "I was standing at my gate to assess whether I could go to work then this group of police who were passing by started beating me.   "My son who heard me screaming and opened the window to see what was happening was slapped several times."

Mnangagwa announced the fuel price hike in a televised address late Saturday, saying it was needed to tackle severe shortages and illegal trading.   He replaced longtime ruler and autocrat Robert Mugabe following a military takeover in 2017, before winning a disputed election in July.   Speaking during his visit to Russia, Mnangagwa said the fuel price increase "was necessary and still is".   On Monday, police dispersed hundreds of protesters who burnt tyres, erected barricades and looted businesses on the first day of a three-day general strike.   Security Minister Owen Ncube said the security action caused "loss of life" without giving figures on the number of dead and wounded.

- Economy in ruins -
The Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said 13 people had sustained gunshot wounds in and around Harare on Monday. At least 200 people were arrested.   Zimbabwe's economy has been in dire straits since hyperinflation wiped out savings between 2007 and 2009, when the Zimbabwean dollar was abandoned in favour of the US currency.   Zimbabweans mainly rely on electronic payments as US dollar notes are in short supply. The local "bond note" currency, introduced in 2016, is little trusted and falling in value.

Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa blamed the protests on "terrorism".   "Threats to overthrow a constitutionally elected government by force and install an unelected person as president of Zimbabwe will be thwarted," she vowed.   The Zimbabwe Trade Union Confederation (ZCTU) reiterated its call to continue the strike.   "Today it's day two of the Shutdown. We urge workers and citizens everywhere to stay at home," ZCTU tweeted. "There must be economic reforms for the poor to survive."   Mnangagwa -- Mugabe's former deputy -- has claimed that he represents a fresh start for the country and has vowed to revive the economy by attracting foreign investment.   Two days after July's election in July, soldiers opened fire using live bullets on protesters in Harare, leaving six dead.
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2019 11:17:26 +0100

Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Jan 15, 2019 (AFP) - Zimbabwe police fired tear gas to disperse protesters in the second city of Bulawayo on Tuesday, a day after the countr was rocked by violent demonstrations against a sharp hike in fuel prices.   Police moved in after protesters chanted for the removal of President Emmerson Mnangagwa and as looting broke out in Bulawayo, a stronghold of opposition to the ruling ZANU-PF party, an AFP reporter witnessed.   The streets of the capital, Harare, were deserted after Monday's demonstrations when public anger over Zimbabwe's worsening economic crisis erupted.

The government more than doubled petrol prices at the weekend after months of shortages when drivers have been forced to queue for hours to fill up, while essentials such as bread and medicines have also been scarce.   In the capital Harare, most shops remained closed after Monday's protests and minibus taxis that usually transport workers from the suburbs to the city centre were not running.   In Kuwadzana suburb, police were on patrol and forcing people off the streets.   One resident, Tawanda Mataya, said he and his 17-year-old son had been beaten up by police.   "It's so painful," Mataya told AFP showing swellings on his back.   "I was standing at my gate to assess whether I could go to work then this group of police who were passing by started beating me.   "My son who heard me screaming and opened the window to see what was happening was slapped several times."

- Pressure on president -
In a televised address late Saturday, President Emmerson Mnangagwa announced the fuel price hike, saying it was needed to tackle severe shortages and "rampant" illegal trading.   Mnangagwa took over from long-time ruler and autocrat Robert Mugabe following a military takeover in 2017, before winning a disputed election in July.

Currently on a tour of European countries, Mnangagwa will attend the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland, next week.   Speaking in Russia on Monday, Mnangagwa said the fuel price increase "was necessary and still is".   On Monday, the police had dispersed hundreds of protesters who burnt tyres, erected barricades and looted businesses on the first day of a three-day general strike.   Security Minister Owen Ncube said the security action caused "loss of life" without giving figures on the number of dead and wounded.

The Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said 13 people had sustained gunshot wounds in and around Harare on Monday. At least 200 people were arrested during the disturbances.   Zimbabwe's mobile phone networks and internet were partially shut down, with one industry source saying the systems had been jammed and many users complaining of limited access.   On Tuesday morning the Twitter account of the Ministry of Information said that "public order has been restored".   The Zimbabwe Trade Union Confederation (ZCTU), for its part, reiterated its call to strike.   "Today it's day two of the Shutdown. We urge workers and citizens everywhere to stay at home," ZCTU tweeted.   "Our struggle is genuine and there must be economic reforms for the poor to survive."

- An economy in ruins -
Zimbabwe's economy has been in dire straits since hyperinflation wiped out savings between 2007 and 2009, when the Zimbabwean dollar was abandoned in favour the US dollar.   Zimbabweans rely on electronic payments as US dollar notes are in short supply. The local "bond note" currency, introduced in 2016, is little trusted and falling in value.   Mnangagwa -- Mugabe's former deputy -- has claimed that he represented a fresh start for the country and vowed to revive the economy by attracting foreign investment.   In Bulawayo, one night guard on duty outside a closed shop told AFP that his colleagues had not turned up to work on Tuesday.   "Things are hard, and the protest and the protests should continue as long as they are peaceful," said Nicholas Banda.
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