Date: Fri 17 Jan 2020
Source: The Herald [edited]
<https://www.herald.co.zw/anthrax-ravages-parts-of-the-country/>

At least 177 cattle have died from anthrax while 87 people were treated for the disease in various clinics and hospitals after eating meat from cattle that died from the infection during this season. Anthrax is a bacterial disease that affects a wide range of animals and human beings.

Livestock, particularly cattle, take up anthrax bacteria during grazing, while people get infected when they handle or eat anthrax-infected meat. Anthrax disease occurs throughout the year, but in Zimbabwe, most cases start from onset of rainy season. It is rare to see an animal showing signs of the disease; animals are often found dead. [Actually once it gets started, ranchers will start seeing sick animals; watching more carefully, longer incubation periods. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

Division of Veterinary Field Services, Acting Director, Dr. Wilmot Chikurunhe has told The Herald that anthrax outbreaks have been recorded in Gokwe, Nkayi, Gutu, Bikita, Marondera, Mazowe, Chegutu, Makonde and Sanyati. He said the disease is being detected in traditional outbreak areas and not affecting the whole district as it may seem from information circulating. "Even in the affected dip tanks, the disease is restricted to certain areas, although the vaccination coverage is then extended to a wider area to contain the outbreak.

"Cattle owners in anthrax areas need to ensure that their cattle are vaccinated against the disease once a year before the rainy season starts. The Department of Veterinary Services comes in to prevent massive outbreaks, but the primary responsibility for disease prevention lies with the owner," he said.

Dr. Chikurunhe said anthrax carcasses must be disposed of safely in a manner that does not leave the bacteria exposed to air. "The best method is to burn the carcasses in a pit, then bury the ashes. However, some parts of the country have firewood problems. In these areas it is recommended to dig a pit 6 feet [1.8 m] deep, bury the carcass, cover the carcass completely with soil and apply a layer of agricultural lime before filling the rest of the pit with soil. This is best done under supervision of veterinary personnel," said Dr. Chikurunhe.  [Byline: Elita Chikwati]
==================
[For maps clearly showing the locations of the individual provinces, go to <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Zimbabwe>. The districts mentioned are in the following provinces: Bikita (Masvingo), Chegutu (Masonaland West), Gotwe (Midlands), Gutu (Masvingo), Makonde (Masonaland West), Marondera (Masonaland East), Mazowe (Masonaland Central), Nkayi (Matabeleland North), and Sanyati (Masonaland West).

The survival of anthrax spores is location dependent, and this facilitates mapping where the disease might be found and where control should be centered. For some relevant maps, see:
1. Carlson CJ, Kracalik IT, Ross N, et al. The global distribution of _Bacillus anthracis_ and associated anthrax risk to humans, livestock, and wildlife. Nat Microbiol 2019;4:1337-43. doi:10.1038/s41564-019-0435-4
<https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333062961_The_global_distribution_of_Bacillus_anthracis_and_associated_anthrax_risk_to_humans_livestock_and_wildlife>
2. Blackburn JK, Odugbo MO, Van Ert M, et al. _Bacillus anthracis_ diversity and geographic potential across Nigeria, Cameroon and Chad: further support of a novel West African lineage. PLOS Negl Trop Dis
2015;9:e0003931. <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003931>;
<http://www.plosntds.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003931&representation=PDF>

As Dr. Wilmot Chikurunhe comments, while vaccination should center on these enzootic areas, one should extend the vaccination cover outwards because of the risk from female biting tabanid flies with contaminated mouthparts and non-reporting neighbours. Annual vaccination prior to the anthrax season protects the livestock at a minimal cost, as Sterne vaccine is extraordinarily cheap. And eradication follows from successful control. Country after country, province after province are realising the truth of this. I just wish the ranchers would be as enthusiastic. It is the procrastinators' livestock that come down, demonstrating a local persistence of risk. Experience shows that once you have gone 8-10 years without outbreaks, you can step back to just high awareness of unexpected deaths (for checking).

The spores have a reputation for "immortality", which is exaggerated. Archived spores have a 3% annual mortality. On my 1st field investigation of this disease, Max Sterne told me that in his experience the contaminated soil will present a risk for 3 months to 3 years; we repeatedly sampled the bloody soil site at that outbreak and found no live spores after 90 days, but we might have just run out of contaminated soil thanks to the repeated sampling. A study by one of my students showed the spore count decreasing by 30% per year. But in general this is an aspect of the epidemiology of this disease that is understudied. And another aspect is that over 5 to 6 years the spores in the soil lose their plasmids and become apathogenic.

The genetics of spore survival depend on a matching of the strain with the soil, Darwin again.

See: Mullins JC, Garofolo G, Van Ert M, et al. Ecological niche modeling of _Bacillus anthracis_ on three continents: evidence for genetic-ecological divergence? PLoS One 2013;8:e72451. <https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0072451>

Remember, graduate students need fresh air and mud on their boots. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Zimbabwe: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/171>]
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2020 03:28:20 +0100 (MET)
By Ish MAFUNDIKWA

Hwange, Zimbabwe, Jan 11, 2020 (AFP) - Zimbabwean villager Dumisani Khumalo appeared to be in pain as he walked gingerly towards a chair under the shade of a tree near his one-room brick shack.   The 45-year-old was attacked by a buffalo days earlier, and he was lucky to be on his feet.   Wild animals in Zimbabwe were responsible for the deaths of at least 36 people in 2019, up from 20 in the previous year.    "I thank God that I survived the attack," said Khumalo with a laugh, making light of the fact that the buffalo almost ripped off his genitals.   Authorities recorded 311 animal attacks on people last year, up from 195 in 2018.

The attacks have been blamed on a devastating drought in Zimbabwe which has seen hungry animals breaking out of game reserves, raiding human settlements in search of food and water.   "The cases include attacks on humans, their livestock and crops," said national parks spokesman Tinashe Farawo.   He said elephants caused most fatalities, while hippos, buffalos, lions, hyenas and crocodile also contributed to the toll.   Hwange National Park, which is half the size of Belgium, is Zimbabwe's largest game park and is situated next to the famed Victoria Falls. The park is not fenced off.   Animals breach the buffer and "cross over to look for water and food as there is little or none left in the forest area," Farawo said

- Starving animals -
Khumalo vividly remembers the attack. He was walking in a forest near his Ndlovu-Kachechete village to register for food aid, when he heard dogs barking.   Suddenly a buffalo emerged from the bush and charged, hitting him in the chest and tossing him to the ground.    It went for his groin and used its horn to rip off part of the skin around his penis.   Khumalo grabbed the buffalo's leg, kicked it in the eye and it scampered off.   Villagers in Zimbabwe's wildlife-rich but parched northwestern region are frequently fighting off desperately hungry game.   More than 200 elephants starved to death over three months last year.

Despite suspecting that Khumalo was hunting illegally when he was attacked, Phindile Ncube, CEO of Hwange Rural District Council admitted that wild animals are killing people and that the drought has worsened things.   "Wild animals cross into human-inhabited areas in search of water as … sources of drinking water dry up in the forest," said Ncube.   He described an incident that took place a few weeks earlier, during which elephants killed two cows at a domestic water well.   Armed scouts have been put on standby to respond to distress calls from villagers.   But it was while responding to one such call that the scouts inadvertently shot dead a 61-year-old woman in Mbizha village, close to Khumalo's.   "As they tried to chase them off one (elephant) charged at them and a scout shot at it. He missed, and the stray bullet hit and killed Irene Musaka, who was sitting by a fire outside her hut almost a mile away."

- Chilli cake repellant -
Locals are encouraged to play their part to scare off animals. One way is to beat drums.   But the impact is limited.   "Animals, such as elephants get used to the noise and know it... won't hurt them, so it does not deter them in the long term," said George Mapuvire, director of Bio-Hub Trust, a charity that trains people to respond to animal attacks.   Bio-Hub Trust advocates for a "soft approach" that encourages peaceful co-existence between humans and wildlife.

Mapuvire suggested burning home-made hot chilli cakes to repel wildlife.   "You mix chilli powder with cow or elephant dung and shape it into bricks, once the bricks dry, you can burn them when elephants are approaching. They can't stand the smell!"   Villagers have created an elephant alarm system by tying strings of empty tin cans to trees and poles.   When the cans click, they know an elephant is approaching and they light chilli cakes to keep it away.   Another way of keeping elephants at bay is the chilli gun, a plastic contraption loaded with ping-pong balls injected with chilli oil.    "When it hits an elephant, it disintegrates, splashing the animal with the chilli oil," Mapuvire explained.
Date: Fri 10 Jan 2020
Source: The Herald [edited]
<https://www.herald.co.zw/three-hospitalised-after-eating-meat-with-anthrax/>

Three people are battling for their lives after consuming meat from animals that died of anthrax in Mahusekwa, Marondera district. The 3 cases were picked at Chimbwanda Clinic last week and were confirmed at Mahusekwa Hospital on Monday [6 Jan 2020].

Marondera District Veterinary Officer Dr. Kramer Manyetu said, on investigation, it was established that the affected 3 people consumed meat from 2 cattle that died on [30 Dec 2019]. "No meat was still available when the affected property was visited. The 2 cattle deaths were reported at Chimbwanda West Dip Tank, which has a census of 800 cattle. The combined census for a 10-kilometre (6.2 mi) radius is 4500 cattle covering a total of 3 dip tanks, namely, Chimbwanda West (800), Chimbwanda communal area (2276) and Nyandoro (1458)," he said. Dr. Manyetu said they had secured 5000 doses required to cover the 3 dip tanks.

"Our staff and the Ministry of Health and Child care are in the area and, so far, we can confirm that it is only one homestead affected. The community has secured poles to build races on 3 dip tanks and vaccinations will start Friday [10 Jan 2020]," he said.

The Department of Veterinary Services has received 811,000 doses of anthrax vaccine from Botswana's Vaccine Institute to deal with outbreaks during the rainy season.

Anthrax is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by bacteria that normally affects animals, especially ruminants. The disease affects all warm-blooded animals, including humans. Signs of anthrax include sudden death of livestock, rapid decomposition of the bloated carcasses and tarry blood coming out of all natural openings. The blood of the carcass is brownish and does not clot. During the rainy season, the country usually experiences more anthrax outbreaks because of the rains that wash away the top soil and expose spores. [If this were the case, the spores would be washed away. The rain, following the dry season, encourages the forage to grow, and, in grazing, cattle consume significant amounts of soil, some of which might be contaminated. Also the rain floats the hydrophobic spores to the soil surface. Tabanid hatch will occur, and these blood-feeding flies will spread the infection to more cattle, increasing the risk. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

There have been cases of farmers who get infected after eating meat from cattle that would have died of anthrax. People may also get infected thorough contact with the infected animals. "Opening an anthrax carcass will lead to formation of anthrax spores that are resistant to environmental changes, heat, cold and will contaminate the soil or area for [a significant period].

"The public should not handle, buy or eat meat that has not been inspected. Anthrax carcasses should never be opened, skinned or eaten. Instead, they should be buried deep into the ground," said Dr. Manyetu. [Preferably, they should be burnt. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

"It is also an offense to sell to the public, meat that has not been processed in an abattoir and inspected and certified as unconditionally fit for human consumption."

Farmers were advised to report all cattle deaths to their nearest veterinary officers.  [Byline: Elita Chikwati]
========================
[Marondera is in the center of Mashonaland East
(<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marondera>).

This is an update on the previous report of 2 Jan 2020 (Anthrax - Zimbabwe: (ME) cattle, human cases
http://promedmail.org/post/20200102.6867615).

"Dip tanks" take us back to Southern Rhodesia, when a major veterinary disease control activity was tick control. Community cattle were swum through the deep pesticide at regular intervals throughout the year. This was tightly supervised. This provided a good opportunity for individual animals to be checked, pregnancy status confirmed, and generally one-on-one contact with the veterinary assistants. Thus, the census centered on these collecting points. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED-mail map:
Mashonaland East, Zimbabwe: <http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6141>]
Date: Tue 7 Jan 2020
Source: News Day [edited]
<https://www.newsday.co.zw/2020/01/deadly-anthrax-hits-gokwe/>

A deadly anthrax outbreak has hit Gokwe North district in the Midlands province, with farmers losing large herds of cattle while several people were reportedly hospitalised after eating infected meat.

Midlands veterinary officer Munyaradzi Chigiji confirmed the development and said his department had since moved in to put the outbreak under control. "We have had great losses of livestock to date, and our tests confirmed that it was anthrax. Farmers have lost huge numbers of cattle due to the outbreak so far. We have also recorded cases of human beings who have been treated of the disease in the affected areas. Although we cannot confirm the number of deaths of the livestock, what we can say is that farmers have lost out," Chigiji said.

"During my visit to the area, I arrived at a homestead which had lost 15 cattle. I also visited another one which had lost 4. We also have several other farmers who have lost their livestock due to anthrax." The hardest hit areas are Nembudziya, Simchembo and Chireya.

Southern Eye yesterday [6 Jan 2020] spoke to farmers at Nembudziya Growth Point who confirmed that the outbreak was wreaking havoc in the area. "I lost a herd of 11 cattle due to the outbreak. In my village alone, over 80 cattle have perished in the recent past due to the outbreak. Here, our main economic activity has been cotton growing, but lately we had shifted to cattle ranching because the cotton has become less profitable due to falling prices," said Nomore Machivenyika, a farmer in Maserukwe village. "This outbreak has, therefore, come as a big blow for us."

Another farmer told this paper that several people in Nembudziya had been hospitalised after eating infected meat. "There are people who have been selling cheap meat around this area, and little did people know that it was from cattle that died of anthrax. Several of them have been going to Nembudziya Hospital for treatment," Nomore Musundire said.

Chigiji said measures to control the outbreak had since been put in place. "As we speak, we have dispatched 10 400 (vials of) vaccines to Gokwe North so that cattle can be vaccinated. We have also been carrying out awareness campaigns in conjunction with the Ministry of Health. In terms of humans, no one has died from anthrax," he said.

Chigiji also revealed that another livestock disease, heartwater, had been wiping out cattle in the same district. "We had shortages of dipping chemicals, so heartwater also caught up with the livestock. However, we are working to normalise the situation," he said.
======================
[For a brief description of Gokwe North & South in Midlands Province west of Harare, go to: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gokwe_region>. For a map of Zimbabwe showing the various provinces, click on "Subdivision of Zimbabwe" in the Wikileaks link.

It would appear that this disease has got away from any control efforts by the Midlands veterinary officer and his people. The actual extent and intensity of those efforts is not obvious from the quoted statements. And being the holiday season, a number of owners of sick and dead cattle did not miss the opportunity to sell contaminated meat from their butchered sick stock. To control and stop an anthrax epizootic in livestock, one must be aggressive and have your feet on the ground. - ProMED Mod.MHJ]

[HealthMap/ProMED map available at:
Midlands Province, Midlands, Zimbabwe:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/8884>]
Date: Wed 1 Jan 2020
Source: Pindula News [edited]
<https://news.pindula.co.zw/2020/01/01/3-anthrax-cases-reported-in-mashonaland-east/>

Three people were diagnosed and treated for Anthrax in Mashonaland East's Bosha Clinic in Chikwaka after they had consumed the meat of a dead cattle the Herald reports. DVS chief director, Dr. Josphat Nyika revealed the incident and said they couldn't find a carcass for sample collection because people consumed all the meat.

Suspicion of anthrax was consolidated by human contacts. There were 3 patients who were diagnosed of anthrax after they had consumed the meat of dead cattle. They were admitted and treated at Bosha Clinic.

Meanwhile, the government has received 800 000 doses of anthrax vaccines from Botswana and vaccinations are currently underway according to Dr. Nyika.
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